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Who do you think is the most misunderstood driver?


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Poll: Who is the most misunderstood F1 driver? (174 member(s) have cast votes)

Current Drivers

  1. Sebastian Vettel (32 votes [18.39%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.39%

  2. Mark Webber (10 votes [5.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.75%

  3. Fernando Alonso (19 votes [10.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.92%

  4. Felipe Massa (5 votes [2.87%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.87%

  5. Jenson Button (5 votes [2.87%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.87%

  6. Sergio Perez (4 votes [2.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.30%

  7. Kimi Raikkonen (29 votes [16.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.67%

  8. Romain Grosjean (9 votes [5.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.17%

  9. Nico Rosberg (3 votes [1.72%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.72%

  10. Lewis Hamilton (32 votes [18.39%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.39%

  11. Nico Hulkenberg (1 votes [0.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.57%

  12. Paul di Resta (1 votes [0.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.57%

  13. Adrian Sutil (8 votes [4.60%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.60%

  14. Pastor Maldonado (9 votes [5.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.17%

  15. Jean-Eric Vergne (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  16. Daniel Riccardo (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  17. Charles Pic (7 votes [4.02%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.02%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#51 lustigson

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 07:09

I answered Maldonado.

He has the 'pay-driver' label sticking to him, and, sure, he does indeed bring a very decent check from PDVSA. But he has also won races in all categories he has competed in, bar one — i.e. the International GT Open in which he did a handful of races.

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#52 Sakae

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 08:05

Well, either you're right, or you're a case in [my] point. :D

Doesn't matter if you say you support him, or just that you 'like' him. The thing is, people mainly regard other people they like as 'misunderstood', it's rarely a term that springs to mind about people one despises.

So in the end this is just another popularity poll like most of them, IMO.

You might correct in your assessment, but then one can take your premise and develop it into a nice journalistic study how much share have media on influencing masses. Most fans obtain their information after race from video clips, and internet articles they read. Incendiary headlines, and bias content are certainly not supportive of calm and rational discourse that follows, are they? Defensive tone appears, and then we end up with polls like this one. Yes, we usually address issues which are closer to a subject of our interest, but that doesn't always means that we have to agree with all critique thrown at him. On topic I would cite a case of Vettel after Malaysia 2013 incident and how it was (and remains until this very weekend) treated by media, and compare it to relatively muted treatment of Webber by media from the past for the same behavior. Once you lay those cases side-by-side, then perhaps you can ask whether Vettel's behavior of 2013 is abhorrent, or, placed into proper content, understood, and could be forgiven due to extenuating circumstances. In conclusion, it is not always only about fanboism, favoritism, or any other label you want to plaster on it. It is also perhaps about little displeasure that someone is throwing mud into your sand-pale. That’s who we are, human.

______________
For the record, I think Vettel should probably follow direction issued by his manager, but then, I also admit that driver's state of mind behind cockpit and state of mind of someone sitting at the desk might be two different worlds, totally exclusive, thus who are we to judge? Status quo.

Edited by Sakae, 05 June 2013 - 08:07.


#53 MarileneRiddle

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:37

Hamilton. I still can recall few his things he said, done, that looked/sounded silly, but maybe he wanted to show/say something else.

Hmm, yes. Actually, Hamilton would be my personal second pick precisely because, despite the fact he is British, he doesn't seem to be able to express himself well to the British media. I suspect it may have something to do with the fact that he gravitates a little more to American culture which causes some of his comments (most famously the Ali-G one) to be blown out of proportion by the British media. It wasn't very well thought out, but still remains forgivable.

Grosjean. Unfortunate to become fans pet hate object when there was a vacant spot following some unlucky and poor starts which then no doubt spiraled into a self-fulfilling paralysis. We've seen worse repeat crash offenders in F1 who never got this much of a reputation. I bet just slightly different starts to his first races of 2012, or Maldonado not winning and Spain and thus becoming the inevitable fans and medias bully victim, and Grosjean would be free to develop some of his in my opinion considerable talent.

Oh, yes. I am definitely one of the people who is pro-Grosjean. He isn't WDC-quality (mainly due to a lack of composure) but some of the criticisms levelled at him seems surely too harsh. It doesn't help that he has only ever had the best drivers (Alonso, Raikkonen) alongside him, which just allows the team mate comparison to make things look even worse.

I voted for Sutil because a little pat on the cheek is always misunderstood when the hand has a champagne glass in it.

I do not believe violence, in any situation, should be condoned. But then again, I also believe that everyone should be given a second chance (especially since he had a season off to cool his head). So any continuing harping on that subject would be rather exaggerated.

I answered Maldonado.

He has the 'pay-driver' label sticking to him, and, sure, he does indeed bring a very decent check from PDVSA. But he has also won races in all categories he has competed in, bar one — i.e. the International GT Open in which he did a handful of races.

Maldonado is my vote as well. I am not sure why, but for some reason he has always comes across as remarkably earnest and passionate in his interviews. Hot-headed, perhaps, but also capable of great drives.

When I watched the Humphrey's interview, I thought that for all the criticism Vettel gets, at least there is still some respect that his talent brought him into F1. But Maldonado doesn't even get that. He is derided as a crash driver who paid his way into F1, when his talent (perhaps not WDC quality but still win-worthy) was what gave him the chance. So I personally feel Maldonado is the most misunderstood driver on the current grid.

#54 MarileneRiddle

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 11:50

I also met these two in a one on one situation, and I can verify that they are both indeed, human. :D

Please share your experience! What did you ask them? And how did they reply?

Ayrton Senna of all time.

Current? Pastor perhaps?

Okay, so currently we have Ralf Schumacher, Michael Schumacher and Ayrton Senna for the ex-drivers vote. Once I get 2 more suggestions, I'll start up a poll.  ;) Please do also tell why you think these drivers are misunderstood.

So I promised a few anecdotes on the drivers if I can find them. And since it is his interview which started this topic, I'm going to quote some from Humphrey's 'The Inside Track' (by the way it's a really entertaining read, though not F1 heavy).

Jenson Button
(with regards to an interview Humphrey had with Button during the Italy GP 2009 weekend) "Jenson has never been a difficult interviewee, but on this occasion he looked like a haunted man. He arrived in the room with barely a word for any of us, didn't cut me a second glance as he sat down and, try as I might to get him to open up, his responses were pretty guarded and defensive. (...) Usually, he will chat after an interview, but not on this occasion - his mic was off and he was gone."

Stirling Moss
(with regards to Humphrey visiting Moss at his London home) "I asked (Moss) what kind of safety devices he'd had in his day, and he scoffed at me before suddenly hauling himself out of his chair. His ever-loving and loyal wife Suzie heard him and shouted down to him, 'The doctor says you're not to walk on those ankles yet!', at which point he flashed me a wicked grin and asked me to follow him."

David Coulthard
(with regards to Coulthard becoming a TV presenter) "David certainly disarms the drivers, as they still see him predominantly as a mate rather than a journalist - and I think they always will. (...) Having said that, I do remember seeing David get angry when one of the people he used to work with refused to tell him something because he was 'now a journalist', which really got DC's back up. (...) Few drivers will ever actually enjoy doing the media side, even though they know it's important. David's approach was clever - he always said that in his mind he was paid to do the media stuff; the driving was what he did for free."

Anthony Davidson
(with regards to jetlag) "As (Davidson) was struggling to adjust to the time zone the news came through from the team that the Japanese drive Takuma Sato had gone down with a fever. (...) Suddenly, a sleepy Anthony Davidson is told he's in the car, and the next thing he knows he's fighting a 200mph racing car as well as jetlag! (...) He tells me he certainly decided from that day that he'd never arrive late at a track again, even if he was only the reserve driver."

Lewis Hamilton
(with regards to a test drive of the McLaren SLR Humphrey shared with Hamilton in Silverstone in 2009) "I remember Lewis driving first, and he set off along the start-finish straight with the doors open! However, they were the gullwing doors that open towards the sky and as he floored it on the slippery track, the doors slammed shut and whooped with joy. A couple of corners later he decided to see where the grip was, and as the back end twitched and he grappled with the wheel, he declared, 'There isn't any!' "
(when Humphrey took over driving) "As I was panicking about my off-roading experience, we were slewing across the grass (...) Amazingly, Lewis just giggled, 'I turned off the traction control, man!!' (...) We finished with him teaching me doughnuts by the pit wall, and when I asked if it was wise he replied: 'It's not my car, I don't mind.' "

Fernando Alonso
"One of my favourite personal F1 moments ever relates to Fernando: he was driving me around a track in a road car and I grabbed hold of the seat. I must have looked a little scared as I recall him giving me a wry grin and confidently saying, 'You are quite safe with me', before shutting his eyes around one of the corners and still driving it perfectly."

Sebastian Vettel
"I was filming with (Vettel) in China a few years ago, and we decided to do an interview while playing table tennis. There were a few questions being asked at the time about the legality of Red Bull's car, and rather than avoid the subject entirely he'd reference it after winning points off me by blaming his 'illegal aids'. (...) Whereas usually a driver would just hit a few shots and then leave as soon as the filming was over, Seb and I carried on playing for a while afterwards. I think he was keen not simply to beat me, but to pummel me."
(with regards to Humphrey showing the two times WDC winners VT to Vettel in Japan GP 2011) "However, as the music started to play, Sebastian's reaction was completely honest and human. (...) He stared at it, tears filling his eyes, and as it finished a huge smile spread across his face. He turned to me, his eyes glistening under the lights in the paddock, and said, 'What are you trying to do to me?' "

Mark Webber
"After we went cycling once for a piece we were putting together about Mark's recovery from injury, we were chilling out back at his house and I noticed that he had lots of military pictures and memorabilia. I asked him why he enjoyed the two things, F1 and military memorabilia, and his answer was: 'Sport and war, mate, both the same... Just gotta keep fighting, keep going forwards.' "

I am going to update with anecdotes from other sources as well to show different points of view of the drivers. So if any forumers have things to share on a different side of the drivers, do reply! :wave:

#55 Sin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 12:35

thank you Marilene, that are a few intresting quotes I never read

#56 Sakae

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 13:06

Please share your experience! What did you ask them? And how did they reply?


Okay, so currently we have Ralf Schumacher, Michael Schumacher and Ayrton Senna for the ex-drivers vote. Once I get 2 more suggestions, I'll start up a poll.;) Please do also tell why you think these drivers are misunderstood.

I have attempted to give you my explanation with Schumacher (language) earlier on. Later in Michael's career, I think, a new phenomenon emerged, almost stigma, one can say - tiredness of him winning everything (in F1) in sight, all the time. Predictability of Schumacher disappearing on first lap, etc. He took his job seriously, yet very few actually understood what drives this man. Very private, family oriented, gave a lot of his fortunes away to children, Africa, etc., but not appreciated for what he was and is, but judged for how (some) media portrayed him.

Edited by Sakae, 05 June 2013 - 13:07.


#57 Zippel

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 13:32

Nick Heidfeld. The guy was highly rated when he first joined the F1 ranks but after his year at Prost the perception was nothing he did was good enough, despite beating many highly rated teammates many who eventually got their opportunity at a top 2 team.

#58 SophieB

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 14:02

I’m always fascinated by the question of what the drivers are ‘really’ like and so I always read their interviews. However, I do it also thinking it ultimately an exercise in enjoyable futility for similar reasons that Buttoneer gave. I always go ahead and form distinct ideas about the personalities of the drivers anyway - I just know they’re unlikely to match the reality that closely. However, so as to contribute more, Fernando Alonso spoke about this sort of thing at Silverstone to Top Gear Magazine last year, apparently reflecting on how being misunderstood in this way can have its advantages.

Top Gear: Does [press/fan criticism] ever hurt?

Fernando Alonso: No, it’s fine. It’s always about Alonso the driver. Never Fernando the person. Because they don’t know me. I know that Fernando the driver exists in a kind of fake world. Alonso the driver will be there for 12 or 14 or whatever years. Fernando the person is for the rest of my life.

TG: You refer to yourself in the third person…

FA: Yes. I separate the characters. I know that this is an unreal world. You live for X number of years, you enjoy, you do your job, they pay you. And the rest of your life will be your normal life.

TG: In other words you have a policy of deliberately withholding elements of yourself?

FA: No. it’s part of my educations, part of my character, part of my family’s character. I try to put limits on the information, so there are things that might be useful for my fans, or for those who follow my career. And then there is information that is not useful for those people.


Interesting. Driver personality as media construct.

#59 lustigson

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 14:23

I’m always fascinated by the question of what the drivers are ‘really’ like and so I always read their interviews. However, I do it also thinking it ultimately an exercise in enjoyable futility for similar reasons that Buttoneer gave. I always go ahead and form distinct ideas about the personalities of the drivers anyway - I just know they’re unlikely to match the reality that closely. However, so as to contribute more, Fernando Alonso spoke about this sort of thing at Silverstone to Top Gear Magazine last year, apparently reflecting on how being misunderstood in this way can have its advantages.

Interesting. Driver personality as media construct.

Posted Image

Now if we could only fix the outcome of races. :cool:

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#60 Sakae

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 15:04

I’m always fascinated by the question of what the drivers are ‘really’ like and so I always read their interviews. However, I do it also thinking it ultimately an exercise in enjoyable futility for similar reasons that Buttoneer gave. I always go ahead and form distinct ideas about the personalities of the drivers anyway - I just know they’re unlikely to match the reality that closely. However, so as to contribute more, Fernando Alonso spoke about this sort of thing at Silverstone to Top Gear Magazine last year, apparently reflecting on how being misunderstood in this way can have its advantages.



Interesting. Driver personality as media construct.

So, sounds like what we see now is Alonso, The Big Fake [TBF]. I wonder when Alonso TBF says "I am fighting Newey", what real Alonso thinks?

#61 SophieB

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 15:32

So, sounds like what we see now is Alonso, The Big Fake [TBF]. I wonder when Alonso TBF says "I am fighting Newey", what real Alonso thinks?


I don't think he's saying anything so simplistic. From this and a few other interviews he's given on this subject, he isn't saying he is constructing the artificial persona, he's saying that between the artificial nature of F1 itself, the nature of the press and his own opting to keep stuff back, such a persona emerges and that his words and actions get read in that context.

#62 Buttoneer

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 17:02

SophieB :up:

We see different media persona's depending upon what we choose to read and will filter the information depending upon how much they support our view of them. How many times do we see comments and articles from a journalist derided because they are critical of a driver only for them to be hailed as an insightful and important commentator when the next item is positive? Just looking at the thread for Autosport scores after every race weekend reveals a microcosm of this. We add weight to opinions we agree with.

So it's not just 'real v media construct', but 'real v media construct v filtered opinion.'

Final point is that some journalists will get closer to a driver than others and this increasing intimacy may result in more positive opinions as a method of getting closer still or a result of being that close. Who can tell the difference? Not me.

#63 Sakae

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 18:07

I don't think he's saying anything so simplistic. From this and a few other interviews he's given on this subject, he isn't saying he is constructing the artificial persona, he's saying that between the artificial nature of F1 itself, the nature of the press and his own opting to keep stuff back, such a persona emerges and that his words and actions get read in that context.

I don't want to appear contrarian for sake of an argument, but it seems that we have come from different environments. I believe that a man has to be truthful to himself, and stand up for what he believes, every time, everywhere, if circumstances permit. Analogy you would see a war in which a soldier behave abhorrently, committing war crimes, and then in the front of a tribunal claim as self-defense, that his private life see him as a nice and different person. I do not see difference what Alonso was saying. There is no separation of soul and body, and we are what we are, fully accountable for our behavior all the time. Criminal psychology actually is full of examples how destructive such state of mind, duality of persona, really can be; but that's too far of topic.

I made the same mistake long time ago, thinking that at work I am someone else than at home. It took me many years to realize how foolish that notion was. Anyway, I was joking in me initial post, and of course he will conduct himself as he see fit. I would not be so presumptions attempting to give him any advise, nor that he expects one.

#64 undersquare

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 20:27

How many people, fans or media, would have expected that when an F1 driver talked about punching another driver in the face, it would be Kimi?

It makes me think we all misunderstand how aggressive he is.

#65 Sin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 20:44

How many people, fans or media, would have expected that when an F1 driver talked about punching another driver in the face, it would be Kimi?

It makes me think we all misunderstand how aggressive he is.


saying and doing are two different things tho....

#66 undersquare

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 21:31

saying and doing are two different things tho....

Oh sure, but even saying it quite aggressive, isn't it? Whereas Kimi's reputation is someone who's not aggressive, I'd say.

#67 Sin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 22:05

Oh sure, but even saying it quite aggressive, isn't it? Whereas Kimi's reputation is someone who's not aggressive, I'd say.


aggressive is usual something you act and not something you think.... if you think it its just being angry

#68 undersquare

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 23:00

aggressive is usual something you act and not something you think.... if you think it its just being angry

You can be aggressive verbally, feel aggressive and have aggressive thoughts. What are you arguing anyway? Did you expect it? I was quite surprised.

I was quite surprised he put Perez in the barrier too, if you need action.

#69 Sin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 23:09

I wasn't surprised at all, before Kimi did what he did, Danner said that good drivers won't let Perez do those passes constantly all the time (forcing them off the track) Kimi defended.... it was exactly what I expected

#70 undersquare

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 23:29

I wasn't surprised at all, before Kimi did what he did, Danner said that good drivers won't let Perez do those passes constantly all the time (forcing them off the track) Kimi defended.... it was exactly what I expected

Oh well I guess we have to disagree. Normally Kimi is smarter than that, that's how he has the long run of points finishes that he so nearly ended with the squeeze in to the barrier. Danner was talking nonsense, obviously, as we saw with Jenson scoring 8 points while Kimi was lucky to score 1 and lost a lot of ground in the wdc. But if you don't think talking about punching someone in the face is 'aggressive' then language isn't going to serve us I guess.

#71 michaelmyers

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:03

I would say that Kimi is misunderstood, but I wouldn't go as far as saying he's the most misunderstood or to judge who is. Nevertheless on the subject of Kimi, I think a lot this discussion we've had over the years about Kimi being unmotivated is just all down to the way he treats the media and vice versa. If you watched him on Top Gear or you saw the clip a fan had recorded earlier this year him discussing with his bosses on the paddock, you could easily tell that when he was more relaxed and at ease he seemed like a completely other guy all laughy and cheerful. Couldn't know for sure could I but that's what I think.

#72 LB

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:42

Ayrton Senna of all time.

Current? Pastor perhaps?


Senna is probably the least misunderstood driver ever. I'm fairly sure everyone here could describe his personality fairly accurately. Even if he was a walking contrast at times. Ruthless and generous at the same time. Schumacher funnily enough is fairly similar.

To find out who is actually misunderstood you have to think what is the general consensus on each and which do you think is wrong.

The three obvious ones for debate are actually Sutil, Maldonado and Grosjean. by reading here you would think we have a glass wealding psycho killer, a ruthless crashing machine, and one who seems to drive with a blindfold on the first few laps at least. I don't actually think any of the three are totally accurate but I certainly think that Sutil isn't as portrayed.

I actually think Kimis drive is a bit misunderstood at times too

#73 noikeee

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:23

How many people, fans or media, would have expected that when an F1 driver talked about punching another driver in the face, it would be Kimi?

It makes me think we all misunderstand how aggressive he is.


Oh the irony. This is the perfect example of why drivers put up a media personna and refrain from making tongue-in-cheek, coloured comments: any such comments and folks will spin it onto painting the driver as negative as possible.

#74 Skinnyguy

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 10:49

Not sure what you mean by that since we currently have the four most popular drivers in the lead and only then with a few votes. 22 for Vettel isn't a lot is it?


What I mean is that in a straight "favourite driver" thread Vettel is nowhere near the other 3 top guys, while he´s leading this.

What I mean is that in a straight "favourite driver" thread I would vote Räikkönen... but here I voted Vettel, and Hamilton would be my second option. Why? Because Räikkönen IS usually understood (people like and understand the things he does, sport fans are generally lenient on stuff he does that maybe other less like drivers would unfairly get stick for), while Vettel or Hamilton can get stick for stuff that doesn´t deserve so.

And I think other people, considering the current results, have done with I did and given an answer to the actual topic instead of voting the guy they like the most, because we´ve seen plenty of polls like these and the results don´t match.

#75 aditya-now

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 11:56

Grosjean. 90% of the time none of the other drivers understands what he's doing on track.


:lol:

:up:

#76 Buttoneer

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:01

What I mean is that in a straight "favourite driver" thread Vettel is nowhere near the other 3 top guys, while he´s leading this.

What I mean is that in a straight "favourite driver" thread I would vote Räikkönen... but here I voted Vettel, and Hamilton would be my second option. Why? Because Räikkönen IS usually understood (people like and understand the things he does, sport fans are generally lenient on stuff he does that maybe other less like drivers would unfairly get stick for), while Vettel or Hamilton can get stick for stuff that doesn´t deserve so.

And I think other people, considering the current results, have done with I did and given an answer to the actual topic instead of voting the guy they like the most, because we´ve seen plenty of polls like these and the results don´t match.

Vettel third in latest poll so his position is improving over previous seasons in terms of support here. http://forums.autosp...w...=185416&hl=

Obviously his position in the support or favourite threads would be higher if only he wasn't so misunderstood...

#77 undersquare

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:23

Oh the irony. This is the perfect example of why drivers put up a media personna and refrain from making tongue-in-cheek, coloured comments: any such comments and folks will spin it onto painting the driver as negative as possible.

Tongue in cheek? I didn't see it, but it doesn't sound that way:

"Asked if the drivers would talk to Perez, Raikkonen said: "That won't help. Maybe someone should punch him in the face."

Got a link to a clip?

#78 undersquare

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:33

In the course of looking for a kimi clip I came across this one, seems Sebi is all misunderstood as well...

It's a bit old but I lolled anyway :D .

#79 MarileneRiddle

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 14:20

Update on ex-drivers poll: Ralf Schumacher, Michael Schumacher, Ayrton Senna, Nick Heidfeld. One more and I'll get it rolling! :up:

Now, the following are taken from larger posts on my personal website, so it is going to be only on Sebastian Vettel. I promise to get the my other sources (and therefore other drivers) when I next post!  ;)

"One year, the team was flying to Bahrain. By the time we got off the plane, Sebastian had taken all our bags off the carousel and lined them up for us. That’s how you bring a team together." - Ole Shack, Vettel's front wheel mechanic.

Taken from an interesting anecdote at the F1 Fanatic forums (credit to @raymondu999). During the recent Singapore Grand Prix, Sebastian was spotted preparing sandwiches and lemonade for his mechanics in between free practice sessions. He then ate with them while they took a quick break, chatting amiably.

"But I tell you: the kid’s gotta change his attitude with the media. He’s happy, he’s friendly, he answers your questions, he shakes hands with the sound man, he shakes hands with the camera man and the interviewer and thanks you for the interview." - Martin Brundle, Sky Sports commentator. This is especially obvious in the Abu Dhabi GP 2011 BBC post-race forum.

At a Casio sponsored quiz session, Sebastian and Martin Brundle competed against boss Christian and Johnny Herbert. After some remarkably easy questions, Christian stumbled at the quick fire round. His reply of “Nigel Mansell” to the question “Which Italian racing legend was known as ‘Ciccio’?” prompted immediate laughter from Sebastian. So it was not surprising that the world champion demonstrated considerable immaturity by displaying the loser sign at his boss when the quiz came to an end (Sebastian’s side winning of course).

"He is a perfectionist and extremely ambitious – if he goes from the paddock to the parking lot and there is someone in front of him, he has to pass them." - Christian Horner, Infiniti Red Bull Racing team principal.

And a Raikkonen special:

"We tested several new parts in tests Kimi drove. When some new part worked, Kimi described it as good and never used another word for it. The car became better and better every time some new part was good according to Kimi. In the end of the season while Kimi was already going to McLaren we asked why he never classified any new parts as brilliant as they proved to be brilliant steps forward. Kimi just answered that if he had revealed exactly how good the new part would be, it would have been put into Heidfeld’s car, not his." - unnamed Sauber mechanic

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#80 Skinnyguy

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 16:48

Vettel third in latest poll so his position is improving over previous seasons in terms of support here. http://forums.autosp...w...=185416&hl=

Obviously his position in the support or favourite threads would be higher if only he wasn't so misunderstood...


That´s what I think, that seing the disparity in results (even if it´s smaller than I said) people are being sensible and trying to vote on the actual question, not just in the like/dislike way.

And it´s really a different topic. I´d never vote Lewis in a popularity contest but I do think he´s vastly misunderstood, close to Vettel level. He really takes heat when he screws up (tweeting telemetry data to show why he was defeated) but he also gets heat for silly stuff (like people not agreeing with his life-style).

#81 Sin

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 17:18

In the course of looking for a kimi clip I came across this one, seems Sebi is all misunderstood as well...

It's a bit old but I lolled anyway :D .


the problem with all those Untergang clips is... they are never funny for anyone who speaks german and actually understands what he is saying....

most misunderstood driver of the past... mhhhhhh Eddie Irvine? :o....

Edited by Sin, 06 June 2013 - 17:18.


#82 Schumacher7

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 19:31

Michael Schumacher, I feel his desire for privacy and focus are misinterpreted as coldness and arrogance.

#83 Iremos

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 22:25

In many ways,Vettel is a victim of Schumacher's success,and I believe any German driver that dominates will always suffer the same disrespect Seb gets.For example,if Nico Rosberg has a dominant season next year,especialy if he dominates Lewis,you will see the hate and vitrol thrown at him.I can already see it now.


You are wrong! Your attempt at white-washing Vettels behaviour is weak. Vettel brought all this hate over himself by his antics: arrogant finger-waving, childish post-race cheering, deprecatory comments about other drivers and even about his own team-mate. Sorry, Vettel deserves his image as much as Schumacher does. In comparison, Rosberg is very likeable: almost always cool, focused and a gentleman. Of course he has his moments, but who doesn't? Not Vettels nationality is the reason, but his poor character and his bad manners.

#84 Sin

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 23:01

You are wrong! Your attempt at white-washing Vettels behaviour is weak. Vettel brought all this hate over himself by his antics: arrogant finger-waving, childish post-race cheering, deprecatory comments about other drivers and even about his own team-mate. Sorry, Vettel deserves his image as much as Schumacher does. In comparison, Rosberg is very likeable: almost always cool, focused and a gentleman. Of course he has his moments, but who doesn't? Not Vettels nationality is the reason, but his poor character and his bad manners.


that is solely your opinion tho... I personally think Rosberg is okay, but a little bit boring... I dont think I would get on well with him in real as much as with Seb... not that I wouldnt get on with him at all, but he reminds me of the always perfect guys at university... who I got along with but never became good friends with... just a little bit too nice

Edited by Sin, 06 June 2013 - 23:50.


#85 Jimisgod

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 01:45

People didn't like Schumacher because he was often a dirty driver on track.

People don't like Vettel because he acts like a spoiled petulant child - his teammate is frequently impeded, he has never had to deal with anything but the joint fastest car since 2009, he behaves in an arrogant manner, he whines over the radio.

Neither of them are disliked because of anything to do with nationality.

#86 Sin

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 01:54

People didn't like Schumacher because he was often a dirty driver on track.

People don't like Vettel because he acts like a spoiled petulant child - his teammate is frequently impeded, he has never had to deal with anything but the joint fastest car since 2009, he behaves in an arrogant manner, he whines over the radio.

Neither of them are disliked because of anything to do with nationality.


you are stating it as if it are facts when it is simply your opinion....

I don't think he does.... Seb acts like an easy going, nice guy, who doesn't take everything so serious... and thats what I like about him... maybe that is where you misunderstand him

#87 Buttoneer

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 13:41

Seb acts like an easy going, nice guy, who doesn't take everything so serious...

you are stating it as if it are facts when it is simply your opinion....

#88 Sin

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 13:44

you are stating it as if it are facts when it is simply your opinion....


I said I think it and the reason I said it is because I'm tired of a constant war between those different fangroups... you can have your opinion without being disrespectful...
but yeah.... we can also constantly argue continue hating each other and not be a real complete community....


#89 eronrules

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 13:53

it's a wonder that kimi holds the lead ... i thought we all knew what he was, leave him alone, he knows what he's doing

i expected JB to be the leader, it seems apart from predictable brits, everybody has different opinion about him. from 'no grip' to 'smooth assasin', he has them all.

#90 gm914

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 13:59

Poll needs Kurt Busch.

#91 muramasa

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 14:09


Alonso may be interesting case, coz misconceptions about him is actually "visible" here as this board has quite a few Spanish forumers who can explain his "questionable" remarks and behaviors in context and clear things up. On the other hand it seems not so many french/german/etc posters, so I wonder how much I still misunderstand some other drivers. Always helps to take anything with pinch of salt..

#92 Kingshark

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 14:52

Seb acts like an easy going, nice guy, who doesn't take everything so serious in front of the media

I have that fixed for you. :wave:

#93 Sin

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 15:11

I have that fixed for you. :wave:


you didn't fix it for me, you did fix it for you... its your opinion not mine

#94 MarileneRiddle

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 15:25

You are wrong! Your attempt at white-washing Vettels behaviour is weak. Vettel brought all this hate over himself by his antics: arrogant finger-waving, childish post-race cheering, deprecatory comments about other drivers and even about his own team-mate. Sorry, Vettel deserves his image as much as Schumacher does. In comparison, Rosberg is very likeable: almost always cool, focused and a gentleman. Of course he has his moments, but who doesn't? Not Vettels nationality is the reason, but his poor character and his bad manners.

I do think this is a rather exaggerated view of Vettel though, don't you think? Just in the recent Monaco GP Rosberg did a similar finger-waving celebration (with both hands!) and just as much post-race cheering. Like Sin mentioned however, it is your opinion.

But I am assuming you voted for Vettel as being the most misunderstood seems the media likes to portray him as a nice person instead? Any specific examples you like to share to show Sebastian is far more intense that the friendly image the media portrays?

that is solely your opinion tho... I personally think Rosberg is okay, but a little bit boring... I dont think I would get on well with him in real as much as with Seb... not that I wouldnt get on with him at all, but he reminds me of the always perfect guys at university... who I got along with but never became good friends with... just a little bit too nice

:lol: Still, it would be nice if you cited specific things that Rosberg does which gives you this opinion? Or maybe you can say how Rosberg is understood/misunderstood? Just trying to keep it on topic here.

People didn't like Schumacher because he was often a dirty driver on track.

People don't like Vettel because he acts like a spoiled petulant child - his teammate is frequently impeded, he has never had to deal with anything but the joint fastest car since 2009, he behaves in an arrogant manner, he whines over the radio.

Neither of them are disliked because of anything to do with nationality.

An specific examples of either opinion?

I am not here to refute any opinion, just trying to get more examples or anecdotes. It would be lovely if I wasn't the only one who does large block quote posts.  ;)

#95 Sin

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 15:36

:lol: Still, it would be nice if you cited specific things that Rosberg does which gives you this opinion? Or maybe you can say how Rosberg is understood/misunderstood? Just trying to keep it on topic here.


it's nothing in particular he does he just gives me that impression cause his whole character as it seems reminds me of some guys at university, that I liked, but never really was friend with, cause we were not broadcasting on the same frequence, so to say...

its mostly language I guess... bodylanguage and spoken language

thats also why I for example like the drivers I do, cause I feel like they are broadcasting on a very similar frequence to mine

Edited by Sin, 07 June 2013 - 15:41.