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New side impact protection for 2014


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#1 encircled

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 19:48

from formula1.com

Marussia, McLaren, Mercedes and Red Bull all engaged with the FIA Institute to help find an improved solution and the result - based on a Marussia design optimised by Red Bull - was an evolution of the current tube system, but using high-performance carbon fibre with a bespoke external and internal geometry and precise layup configuration.

The tubes do not shatter on impact but progressively crush and decelerate the car in a highly controlled manner. During testing, the structures were able to absorb nearly 40kJ of energy in both normal and oblique impact directions - a major improvement over current designs.

With the design of the structures and how they are attached to the chassis to be standardised in the F1 regulations, the new system will also save teams money by reducing impact test costs.



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#2 Shiroo

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 19:54

Marussia design. Wow, they amazed me a bit tbh.

#3 pingu666

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 19:59

thats good
actually my main concern safety wise is downward load, and the lack of crumple/soft structure for a drivers back, and thats across all catagories. we have had alot of spinal injuries the last 2-3 years.


#4 KnucklesAgain

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 21:43

I suppose FIA knows where to turn to for knowledge and skills regarding precisely layered carbon fiber which deforms progressively in a controlled manner. :p

Edited by KnucklesAgain, 25 June 2013 - 21:46.


#5 One

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 21:46

While it sounds well thought, me, IMHO, think that when Carbon crashed under 40G, there are millions of sharp carbon fibers flying around the drivers and forcing him to breathe it in, and it might cause internal damage to the driver... Perhaps I am bit paranoia....

#6 Rubens Hakkamacher

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 22:37

While it sounds well thought, me, IMHO, think that when Carbon crashed under 40G, there are millions of sharp carbon fibers flying around the drivers and forcing him to breathe it in, and it might cause internal damage to the driver... Perhaps I am bit paranoia....


So, what happens to the driver when there isn't that carbon splintering under the 40G crash.......?




#7 Anja

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 22:41

I suppose FIA knows where to turn to for knowledge and skills regarding precisely layered carbon fiber which deforms progressively in a controlled manner. :p

:rotfl:

#8 Rubens Hakkamacher

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 22:44

thats good
actually my main concern safety wise is downward load, and the lack of crumple/soft structure for a drivers back, and thats across all catagories. we have had alot of spinal injuries the last 2-3 years.


It strikes me as odd that they haven't done anything about putting something under their seats. When you look at the cutaways and how very little they have between their butt and the track, it makes me cringe to see, what otherwise wouldn't be that much of an incident, "bouncing" situations like Sutil jumping the sleeping policeman at Montreal.

If the car lands flat on the underside of the chassis, on top of a chicane or one of the aforementioned sleeping policemen, that's got to be kinda like falling a few feet flat on your butt. There has been a number of situations in recent memory where cars have been landing flat on top of something, with or without wheels - 4 feet off the ground doesn't sound like much, but try sliding off your desk onto your tailbone with nothing but a piece of memory foam under you....



#9 mattferg

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 23:01

Marussia design. Wow, they amazed me a bit tbh.


Remember who Marussia's designer is...

#10 pingu666

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 23:05

yep
justin wilson broke his back with a fairly small bounce at mid ohio, probably the easiest solution for that is a seat/back piece made of different pieces of foam, drivers seat on top of that. maybe you need some stiff mount thatll break/buckle easily, like a crumple zone in a modern road car


#11 Shiroo

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:33

Remember who Marussia's designer is...

I still expect Marussia to overleap Caterham in next season by quite a margin

#12 HaydenFan

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:49

yep
justin wilson broke his back with a fairly small bounce at mid ohio, probably the easiest solution for that is a seat/back piece made of different pieces of foam, drivers seat on top of that. maybe you need some stiff mount thatll break/buckle easily, like a crumple zone in a modern road car


IndyCar claim the DW-12 was designed with the knowledge that taller drivers would be in the car at some point. That was one of the major beliefs around the Wilson accident. There is a small level of padding, but the bigger drivers, in order to sit lower in the car, have to remove that small amount.

Maybe make the cars taller so a driver doesn't have to sit on the floor of the car. An inch would not affect too much in terms of aero, and would not necessarily punish the taller drivers (and by tall, I mean even the guys around 6 foot) from being looked at just because of design and aero conflicts.

#13 Craven Morehead

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:58

I suppose FIA knows where to turn to for knowledge and skills regarding precisely layered carbon fiber which deforms progressively in a controlled manner. :p


Nicely done :lol:

#14 Jackmancer

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 06:15

It must be coincidence that this comes instantly after Simonsen's death..

#15 Jackmancer

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 06:21

Maybe Marussia can use this, as their invention, for the Concorde Agreement?

#16 SenorSjon

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 06:52

yep
justin wilson broke his back with a fairly small bounce at mid ohio, probably the easiest solution for that is a seat/back piece made of different pieces of foam, drivers seat on top of that. maybe you need some stiff mount thatll break/buckle easily, like a crumple zone in a modern road car

The IndyCar is notorious as being a back breaker due to the sitting angle if I've read correctly. Especially the previous CART car was hopeless in desgin in that aera.

#17 Peter Perfect

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 12:30

It strikes me as odd that they haven't done anything about putting something under their seats. When you look at the cutaways and how very little they have between their butt and the track, it makes me cringe to see, what otherwise wouldn't be that much of an incident, "bouncing" situations like Sutil jumping the sleeping policeman at Montreal.

If the car lands flat on the underside of the chassis, on top of a chicane or one of the aforementioned sleeping policemen, that's got to be kinda like falling a few feet flat on your butt. There has been a number of situations in recent memory where cars have been landing flat on top of something, with or without wheels - 4 feet off the ground doesn't sound like much, but try sliding off your desk onto your tailbone with nothing but a piece of memory foam under you....

Too true. Didn't Mansell have an F1 accident where his car bounced on the kerb right where he sat?

#18 Boxerevo

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 13:03

Too true. Didn't Mansell have an F1 accident where his car bounced on the kerb right where he sat?

Well,i know about that crash on suzuka... he spun and crashed on the tyres but his car got some height coming back to the circuit and the fall was kinda hard.

#19 Rubens Hakkamacher

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 13:05

Too true. Didn't Mansell have an F1 accident where his car bounced on the kerb right where he sat?


Yeah. They should raise the chassis height an inch and have a crumple zone under their butt.

Mandate it pass a 1.5 meter drop test with a certain amount of energy reduction.

Mandate an FIA sensor in there to show if a "squatting" incident could have damaged the driver.

And while we are on the subject....

I was STARTLED at seeing the positioning of sleeping policemen at Montreal. They should instead be using some sort of flexible bollards/flags to stop drivers from cutting the corner. If a car has a loss of brakes before the turn in, and gets bumped by another car so that it's sliding into that thing sideways at 180 mph - the car is going to roll.

Good for racing, very dumb placement and idea IMO. A low profile line of flexible bollards - or even a "field" of them so that you might get front wing damage flying through them - would be better than an obstacle that could flip the car. It completely obviates having running off area if you're going to make the car get airborne and possible flip/roll.




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#20 pingu666

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 18:53

that was a stupid curb tbh

#21 One

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 23:17

So, what happens to the driver when there isn't that carbon splintering under the 40G crash.......?


End of.

Obviously.

HANS is great, I mean.