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3D Printing and Modelling


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#1 Cirrus

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 18:46

I know next to nothing about modelling and this is my first visit to this forum. I've got a background (in the distant past) of 3D surface design, both manually and using CAD - together with rapid prototyping. It occurred to me that, with the sudden interest in affordable 3D printing (witness BBC Breakfast earlier this week) there could be a whole new field of modelling out there where obscure cars could be modelled in 3D and printed by enthusiasts. For those interested in extreme detail, individual components could be replicated and assembled to make a very detailed model at relatively low cost.

I can't believe I'm the first to have had this idea... Any thoughts?

Edited by Cirrus, 31 July 2013 - 18:47.


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#2 Hamish Robson

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 20:06

Yes the technology is now becoming more accessible to us mortals, and the material technology is becoming much more usable - Toyota WEC for example (and I'm sure many others) make rapid prototype parts to use on their racing cars.

For small scale it's a little tricky as the resolution needs to be very fine so as not to look like everything is made of plywood, but there are companies out there that will take files and make parts for the adventurous modeller.

See here for some of the results: http://www.f1m.com/f...=...26&start=20


#3 EDWARD FITZGERALD

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 20:07

[quote name='Cirrus' date='Jul 31 2013, 19:46' post='6377673']
I know next to nothing about modelling and this is my first visit to this forum. I've got a background (in the distant past) of 3D surface design, both manually and using CAD - together with rapid prototyping. It occurred to me that, with the sudden interest in affordable 3D printing (witness BBC Breakfast earlier this week) there could be a whole new field of modelling out there where obscure cars could be modelled in 3D and printed by enthusiasts. For those interested in extreme detail, individual components could be replicated and assembled to make a very detailed model at relatively low cost.

I can't believe I'm the first to have had this idea... Any thoughts?

I herd a similar piece on an Irish radio station , cost of the 3D copier was quoted at euro 800 , so maybe outside the range of most modellers, there is also a size limitatoion which I didnt get as I was Driving , worth a google search , I am sure modellers in the US have already gone down this road .

#4 D-Type

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 21:13

At work we have models of the complex layout of tunnels that make up an extension to an underground station. The degree of detail is incredible. They are based on a 3-D CAD (Microstation) virtual model. The only limitations on maling a model car would be the accuracy achievable with laser scanning and the strength limits of the polyester powder, but I'm sure it would be practicable to give it a steel skeleton. I don't know the costs of the printer. The other hardware is simply a PC and the software exists.

#5 RCH

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 23:15

I thought about the possibilities for models as soon as I heard about 3D printing, trouble is I'm too old to even think about understanding the technology...

#6 tbolt

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:59

I have been watching the progress of 3D printers for about 18 months, software is available for making models, but is quite expensive.
Baker Torpedo

#7 David Lawson

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 15:33

I know next to nothing about modelling and this is my first visit to this forum. I've got a background (in the distant past) of 3D surface design, both manually and using CAD - together with rapid prototyping. It occurred to me that, with the sudden interest in affordable 3D printing (witness BBC Breakfast earlier this week) there could be a whole new field of modelling out there where obscure cars could be modelled in 3D and printed by enthusiasts. For those interested in extreme detail, individual components could be replicated and assembled to make a very detailed model at relatively low cost.

I can't believe I'm the first to have had this idea... Any thoughts?


There are a lot of model-makers thinking about using this technology but I'm not one of them, I am a traditionalist and prefer carving a block of wood and I'm way too old and set in my ways to bother with learning these new skills.

Here is a link to a thread on SlotForum about this subject.

3D Printing

David

#8 Vitesse2

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:41

Not exactly modelling, but there's a chap in New Zealand using a 3D printer to build the buck for a full-size replica Aston Martin DB4 fibreglass body which he eventually hopes to mount on a Nissan chassis ...

#9 Bloggsworth

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 22:34

I thought about the possibilities for models as soon as I heard about 3D printing, trouble is I'm too old to even think about understanding the technology...


No you're not.

#10 Bloggsworth

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 22:41

I know next to nothing about modelling and this is my first visit to this forum. I've got a background (in the distant past) of 3D surface design, both manually and using CAD - together with rapid prototyping. It occurred to me that, with the sudden interest in affordable 3D printing (witness BBC Breakfast earlier this week) there could be a whole new field of modelling out there where obscure cars could be modelled in 3D and printed by enthusiasts. For those interested in extreme detail, individual components could be replicated and assembled to make a very detailed model at relatively low cost.

I can't believe I'm the first to have had this idea... Any thoughts?


If you can draw it, you can make it. I used/use Rhino3D and all I have to do is save my project as an STL (Stereolithographic) file, which is the equivalent of saving my model as 0.1mm thick sheets of paper stacked up and glued together; in fact, one of the very first 3D modelling engines did exactly that, cut out sheets of paper with 2 alignment holes, and you sprayed the layers with adhesive and stacked them up in order until you had your model.

I had an acquaintance who was very early into stereolithography, when it was a lot more expensive and priced by time taken and total volume; he once managed to stack about 3 different jobs within the largest part of another. The problem came when the job was finished and he found that he couldn't get some of the larger bits out through the holes in the enveloping part!

Edited by Bloggsworth, 07 August 2013 - 22:44.


#11 Cirrus

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 21:26

Rhino 3D is an excellent package. I think most 3D printer software accepts STL files and the ability to design something in 3D on a screen and then print it is quite exciting (much more so than the current trend of simply downloading a pre-prepared model and printing it). I thought of a suitable application today. One of our Historic FF2000 drivers needs a special thermostat housing for his engine - with a 3D printer it would be possible to make a pattern to get a new one cast (or possibly create the finished article if the material is up to the job).

#12 ray b

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 16:38

do any 3D printers use a wax to print with

 

you can then use a lostwax mold [plaster]

heat the mold to lose the wax

and pour in plastic or metal in the lost wax cavity

and get a strong part after removing the one time mold



#13 Alfie

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 15:28

Stereolithography is but one method of additive manufacturing.

 

Dependant upon who you talk to there are four or five different methodologies, really separated by the outcomes (and therefore costs) that one requires -

Multi jet modelling

Stereo lithography

Selective Laser Sintering

Selective Laser Melting

 

There are also a number of materials which can be utilised in such systems, much of the advantage of the system comes from the speed of producing one piece very quickly - but at quite steep cost.

ABS

PLA

UV curable resins

And arguably any metal

 

Printers range from £750 - £850K and capacities too. Today's typical envelope is up to 1500x650x500mm

 

There are also supporting technologies emerging that can strengthen what can be initially a quite weak and open structure by infusing the crystallised structure with resin.

 

At one of the Disney sties you can now have your head scanned and go back in I don't know how long to get your doll princess model complete with your head on it! I bet it's not cheap!!

 

Alan



#14 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 18:00