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Don't you just love America


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#1 mariner

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 12:14

I saw this resto shop. mentioned in a UK magazine.

 

http://online.wsj.co...0533388508.html

 

 

http://jalopnik.com/...ng-classic-cars

 

The whole concept is so bizarre to English eyes.

 

At a serious level they were found guilty of a crime so should serve a punishment but more light-heartedly what life - fed every day while you rebuild muscle cars.

 

I just hope the building trades shop isn't constructing any launch ramp like structures or the escape plan is obvious - fit nitrous injection in the V-8, fill the tank and launch it over the fence

 

 



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#2 WhiteSGPlayer

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 12:26

Commenting on Americas penal system aside, those are some pretty kickass restorations.



#3 Magoo

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 18:03

Our penal system here is very complicated and serves multiple roles, including moral drama. 



#4 BRG

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 18:31

This seems more sensible than the British prison system where inmates sit around watching TV, taking drugs and calling their mates on the outside on their mobile phones, whilst demanding that the guards call them 'Mr' in a suitably respectful manner that doesn't demean their human rights.



#5 Magoo

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 22:43

This seems more sensible than the British prison system where inmates sit around watching TV, taking drugs and calling their mates on the outside on their mobile phones, whilst demanding that the guards call them 'Mr' in a suitably respectful manner that doesn't demean their human rights.

 

It never hurts to be polite to people. 



#6 Bloggsworth

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 21:51

Sounds a good idea on many levels - Give them an interest, a skill, a trade, an enthusiasm "Please Mr., can I have a job, I've just done this, and this, and this..."


Edited by Bloggsworth, 01 September 2013 - 21:52.


#7 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 21:58

I like that at least the money is going to the prison, rather than outsourcing the prisoners are stupidly-cheap labor for someone else to profit on. As is often the case.


Edited by Ross Stonefeld, 02 September 2013 - 01:22.


#8 Magoo

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 22:52

Wouldn't want anyone to think this is the norm in the American penal system. We still have work gangs and prison farms, fyi. For the most part, we still adhere to the theory that the sure way to produce solid, productive citizens is to lock people in confined spaces and then abuse and dehumanize them for some period of years. 



#9 NeilR

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 00:58

Your country is far from alone in that regard, Australia is much the same.



#10 tlc356

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 02:00

What this says is to really look closely the next time you get a bill from the shop. Many have complained that they thought they were dealing with a bunch of crooks, In this case, the suspicion is justified. Some of these guys are, or hopefully were, real crooks!



#11 bigleagueslider

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 02:08

The whole concept is so bizarre to English eyes.

 

At a serious level they were found guilty of a crime so should serve a punishment but more light-heartedly what life - fed every day while you rebuild muscle cars.

 

 

mariner-

 

If you study US history just after the Revolutionary War, one thing of note would be the significant changes made in the legal system versus that of the British.  These changes included jury trials, presumption of innocence, and prohibition against cruel forms of punishment.  A great effort was also made within the US justice system to rehabilitate criminals rather than simply punishing them.  In his classic 1835 work, "Democracy in America", Alexis de Tocqueville writes quite a bit about this.

 

Giving prisoners something to do that makes them feel productive is the best way to keep them from becoming disruptive. And working as an auto paint/body man is one of the few jobs available to someone with a felony record that pays enough money to survive on.



#12 NeilR

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 07:36

Yes but you need to make a distinction between the law as written, the practice and the implementation of the law. America made great strides in the early years for the white population and not the black population and then had spurts of real reform in parts of the country, which were often rolled back.



#13 BRG

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 18:07

If you study US history just after the Revolutionary War, one thing of note would be the significant changes made in the legal system versus that of the British.  These changes included jury trials, presumption of innocence

Well, you learn something everyday on the internet.  I always thought that here in Britain we had jury trials and a presumption of innocence since at least 1215 AD, from the signing of the Magna Carta.  For the rich and male part of the populace at any rate.