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Ford engineer 3d prints haptic gear shift using open-source electronics


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#1 Magoo

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 17:53

here's a fun gadget...

 

 

 

http://www.gizmag.co...ift-knob/28505/

 



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#2 MatsNorway

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 19:17

I like the idea. On its own it might not do much, unless its in a expensive lux car with heavy sound dampening. But again.. those are paddle shift or full auto. But combine it with gearbox speed for signals on when revs match and it could expand its use.



#3 gruntguru

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 23:01

The underlying programming would be a useful addition to all manual transmission vehicles, helping the driver to achieve better fuel economy, lower emissions and improved drivetrain longevity.



#4 Canuck

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 02:00

Nah. There's been many a factory shift-light ignored on the dash. It is exactly as Magoo described - an interesting gadget. I think it'd be a fun exercise to build from scratch.

#5 munks

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 14:02

As pointed out in the article, it could also be used in driving simulations. But in my opinion, it's still not useful for signalling when to shift - it would be more useful if it represented gear grinding or resistance on mistimed shifts.



#6 Magoo

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 19:34

I thought the tools, approach, and methodology were as interesting as the gadget. 



#7 gruntguru

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 23:02

Nah. There's been many a factory shift-light ignored on the dash. It is exactly as Magoo described - an interesting gadget. I think it'd be a fun exercise to build from scratch.

Oh well, it doesn't have to be a shift light or a vibrating knob. Cattle prod in the seat perhaps?



#8 desmo

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 00:17

Or you could just have a signal sent to the transmission to shift up...



#9 Canuck

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 00:50

I wonder if a driver's reaction time is any quicker reacting to a signal through the palm than through the optic nerve. Could replace a shift light.

Greg?

#10 bigleagueslider

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 02:53

Haptic devices are useful when the feedback from other sensory inputs (visual, auditory, equilibrium, etc.) is limited.  But most experienced drivers already are capable of performing precise manual shifts using input from eyes and ears. So while this haptic shift knob project shows some creativity and initiative on the part of the inventor, I don't really see that it provides much value to auto OEMs.

 

The type of haptic application for automobiles that I would suggest this guy should pursue is any type of system that provides touch feedback when the driver's other senses (such as vision or equilibrium) might be confused.  For example, what about a haptic steering wheel that vibrates on the left or right side to prompt steering corrections when the front wheels lose traction?  During these events most drivers fail to apply the proper steering inputs to get the vehicle headed in the right direction when the front wheels regain traction.  This is due to the disconnect between what the driver is sensing visually and in their equilibrium/balance versus the result they have becomed conditioned to expect from turning the steering wheel one direction or the other.

 

Haptics ("shakers") have long been used on the hand controls of aircraft to warn of impending stall.  It is very difficult for human pilots to detect oncoming stall.



#11 Magoo

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 16:39

Again, I don't think the gadget itself is the noteworthy aspect of the exercise. 



#12 Greg Locock

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 00:14

I think the idea of flashing lights or arrows on the speedo or tacho is ludicrous. Every time the driver looks down at the instruments he isn't looking at the road. mazda used to use a buzzer, this isn't a whole lot different. As magoo says, the important thing isn't this particular implementation, the idea is that you can interact with the operating system of the car and build new apps. The 3d printing thing is just jumping on this week's buzzword..



#13 DrProzac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 09:49

You don't need to look away from the road to see a proper shift indicator. Vibrating gearstick, interesting idea.



#14 indigoid

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 16:38

You don't need to look away from the road to see a proper shift indicator. Vibrating gearstick, interesting idea.

 

But as one of the comments on the article mentioned - you probably shouldn't be driving around with your hand on the gearstick waiting for it to buzz at you

 

 

(yes, I know people already do this, myself included if I'm not as attentive as I should be... old habits etc)

 

Also, +1 Greg's comment. I remember when I test-drove an early production Mazda RX-8 I could barely hear the engine even at WOT and 8500rpm, and with it being a Wankel I certainly couldn't feel it vibrating. To this day it remains the only car I've driven where I've felt a shift warning (of any sort) was warranted



#15 DrProzac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 18:33

I though about it as something that would only be used when you really need/want to accelerate fast on a straight :) 

Fortunately I have a habit of holding the steering wheel with both of my hands between gear changes.

 

A shift indicator light can be  places in such a way that you will see it flash when looking at the road..



#16 gruntguru

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 22:22

A shift indicator light can be  places in such a way that you will see it flash when looking at the road..

Yes, bounce it off the windscreen.



#17 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 22:33

Yes, bounce it off the windscreen.

That's no good, remember you have to have both eyes on the speedo so you do not get pinged for speeding!!

#18 GreenMachine

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 03:13

That's no good, remember you have to have both eyes on the speedo so you do not get pinged for speeding!!

 

 

 You forgot the eye on the mirror, looking for Plod behind, and the other one scanning for speed cameras ahead ... :rotfl:


Edited by GreenMachine, 24 September 2013 - 03:14.


#19 indigoid

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 05:35

 You forgot the eye on the mirror, looking for Plod behind, and the other one scanning for speed cameras ahead ... :rotfl:

 

Unfortunately this crap really contributes to fatigue, as do overly frequent changes of posted speed limit. Finland, I'm glaring at you, here.

 

Somewhat related old article: http://www.spiegel.d...s-a-448747.html



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#20 Kelpiecross

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 12:52

Yes, bounce it off the windscreen.


Most fighter 'planes have "heads-up" displays on the windscreen - and they have a lot of information and different displays - not just basic displays. I thought some car makers had "heads-up"?

#21 MatsNorway

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 19:14

BMW has i believe.



#22 Magoo

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 11:49

Okay, not terribly impressed. Tough room. 

 

So here's another clever fellow I thought of the other day as I drove past the site of his former workplace, the Gear Grinding Machine Company, on Christopher Street in Detroit (or Hamtramck I suppose). If you have a day or two to spare sometime, do a patent search on this guy:

 

 

Alfred H. Rzeppa 



#23 Greg Locock

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 23:36

The new mazda 323 has a flip up perspex screen that gives a head up display effect. You'll see a lot more of these haptic devices if my Inbox is any guide.



#24 indigoid

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 03:45

BMW has i believe.

 

Nissan had HUD (sans missiles, sadly) in their U13 Bluebird SSS in Australia. Wikipedia says the U13 model run was from 1993, but I don't know which exact years of production had the feature.

 

I recall hearing about it via Nissan's advertising at the time, though I also recall a distinct lack of interest in the feature in motoring media.

 

https://en.wikipedia..._Bluebird_(U13)



#25 Kelpiecross

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 04:04

Alfred H. Rzeppa


I think you could say that Alfred H. made the Morris Mini possible (and practical) and every FWD car from then on - so he was kind of important.

#26 Greg Locock

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:26

I don't know if anybody is actively interested in the programming side but here's the website, also gives links to the hardware so that you can program your own car. http://openxcplatform.com/ well, probably not program it but at least interface with it. I've got a day's course on this soon, I'm primarily interested in stealing CANBUS data.


Edited by Greg Locock, 22 October 2013 - 02:32.


#27 Rasputin

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 18:48

What's this, you're supposed to keep your hand on the knob while driving to know when to shift, as if that would be simpler than split-vision?

 

Stupidity, genetic or environmental?