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François Cevert


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#201 Twin Window

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Posted 29 September 2007 - 21:05

Originally posted by f1steveuk

I was unaware that he was using what appears to be (compared with other pictures) a newish Bell helmet.

Bell-using F1 drivers often appeared in Canada & the US with new lids, presumably on account of them being made there - and thus delivered to them at the circuits.

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#202 f1steveuk

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 19:25

Makes sense Stuart, but I'm sure I saw a picture showing Francois with his usual "chipped and weathered" helmet in Canada, in 006.

#203 Bloggsworth

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 19:55

Originally posted by cheesy poofs
The third picture is the 1968 crash of french driver Jo Schlesser at Rouen.
He crashed on the fast sweeps on the way down to Nouveau-Monde.
He was at the wheel of a Honda and it was also his first GP.
He stood no chance...


IIRC Surtees wouldn't drive the weird Honda, so it was given to Schlesser. It was raining and the tub was made of magnesium, which when the car caught fire, went into overdrive, as water acts as an accelerant on burning magnesium.

#204 Lec CRP1

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 20:04

Originally posted by Bloggsworth


IIRC Surtees wouldn't drive the weird Honda, so it was given to Schlesser. It was raining and the tub was made of magnesium, which when the car caught fire, went into overdrive, as water acts as an accelerant on burning magnesium.


Not, I believe, helped by the fire crew trying to extinguish it with water. Not their fault, of course, they weren't told.

#205 Bloggsworth

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 20:28

Originally posted by Lec CRP1


Not, I believe, helped by the fire crew trying to extinguish it with water. Not their fault, of course, they weren't told.


They should have known - Sounds like North Street all over again.................

#206 vashlin

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 16:27

I had one more picture of Francois taken at Mosport in 1973. This is, of course, the drivers parade lap. I am sure there are many similar pics out there but I thought I would post this today.

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#207 Twin Window

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 22:48

Originally posted by f1steveuk

Makes sense Stuart, but I'm sure I saw a picture showing Francois with his usual "chipped and weathered" helmet in Canada, in 006.

I wasn't disagreeing with you, Steve - on the contrary! So, given that you've seen him in an old lid in Canada, it's likely that he was therefore handed the new one at the Glen.

So I agree; from the pics I've seen from the 1973 USGP, he is wearing a freshly-painted helmet.

#208 rdefabri

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 15:05

Originally posted by delaner
Indeed... 32 years.

Last I drove the car (006, he primary for latter '72/'73), I saw Jo Ramirez and he stopped in the pit lane, almost stunned: "Ah... this brings back memories.... this brings back memories!"


Mr. Delane, I've seen your cars - they are a wonderful testament to a bygone era. Kudos to you and Mr. Dimmer in keeping them pristine and doing what you can to keep that memory alive.

Perhaps, one day, I might drive a Historic F1 car in anger next to you and 006 - it would be my honor...

#209 Hieronymus

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 15:12

Ah, the great Francois...his memory lives on, even in my own family. My son having his name, although he actually was named after my grandfather.

#210 Broke bloke

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 11:05

As a very lucky 13 - 14 year old, I was friendly with a Tyrrell mechanic. I went with the team to Silverstone for the first outing of 005 where Francois was at the wheel. It was the first time I met him and he immediately put me at ease and treated me like a friend. Later in 1972 I went with the team to the Austrian GP and spent some time in the company of Francois. He was truly a gentleman, very passionate about his motor racing, those piercing blue eyes and one thing that always makes me smile, the almost constant "Gauloise" on the go - even in the paddock!
October the 6th 1973 I was packing my suitcase ready to go on holiday the following day when my mum shouted to come and see the news on TV. I was devastated, I was just numb the whole holiday. Such a waste. I often wonder what might have been.
Somewhere, I have pictures of the Silverstone test and the trip to Austria. If I can find them and one of you kindly souls can talk me through how to post them on this thread, I will share them with you.
Francois, gone but NEVER forgotten.

#211 cev 73

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 16:05

Hi Gary

Just reading through forum,and found your write up.
I might have A few bits for your Web page,
My Parent's Are Racing nuts? Just before i was born F.cevert was killed and parents being parents they named me Cevert, so for nearly all my life tried to find out who i was named after, was a little hard, when we went to races i would go around the stalls and shops asking if they had info on cevert,With not much luck. until i learnt to use the internet.
I have found out there are lots of people,who like me wanted to know more about this great man?
Thanx Cevert

#212 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 21:10

A friend send me this link with a picture of the aftermath of Cevert's accident. Maybe it has been posted on TNF before, couldnt find it on this thread. It looks like a newspaper picture.

Please note: Warning: photo of aftermath of fatal accident!
http://afw.fc2web.co...coisCevert2.jpg

#213 Coral

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 22:38

I have seen some disturbing photos of François' crash before, but that one is horrific. Poor François. :cry:

#214 David M. Kane

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 17:14

That photo unfortunately reflects what the ambulance driver told me several years ago. I believe he was going to be a WC if not the next year, very soon after that Jackie said he was ready.

#215 Neuz

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 18:37

So sad that such a great talent died the way he did.

I must say, I don't see anything in the photo except a very damaged car. Am I missing something?

Rob Neuzel
www.yesterdaysneuz.com

#216 manmower

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 20:30

I think we could be seeing a bit of his badly broken legs near the front of the car actually. His upper body is obviously still strapped in where the marshal is checking for a pulse.

#217 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 07:15

Originally posted by Neuz
I must say, I don't see anything in the photo except a very damaged car. Am I missing something?

Rob Neuzel
www.yesterdaysneuz.com


I just wanted to warn anyone beforehand.

#218 philippe7

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 07:43

I thought I had posted the info already but it must have been in another thread about François....anybody genuinely interested in his career should check out the chapter devoted to him in the "Mémoire des Stands" Blog....of course all the written contributions are in french , but still there are some stunning early photos from the private archives of family and friends of François....and if you do read french, and bother to read through all the posts, you'll find some very moving contributions from some of his youth friends , and even his sister Jacqueline . The main page is here, and all of the chapter titles in blue underneath the Montlhery Matra 660 photo and introduction text are clickable links to various themes stories.....

http://memoiresdesta...-exclusifs.html

#219 Hieronymus

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 08:00

Here is also a very nice tribute:

http://www.francoisc...ncoiscevert.htm

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#220 Paul Rochdale

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 08:34

I have attended dozens and dozens of fatal road traffic crashes during the past twenty five years and I fail to see how a grainy old picture of a badly crumpled car could be described as 'horrific'. Of course it's terribly sad when a racing driver ends his life in such a way but it is a terribly fast and risky sport to engage in, and certainly was in those days. When I think of the post mortems I've witnessed, of sudden death messages I've delivered to young widows and parents, and cot deaths, it puts such events into perspective (for me).

#221 Coral

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 11:54

Well I think the photo is pretty horrible. That was the first motor racing fatality that I can actually remember. And just because many people die in road accidents, it doesn't mean that I should not be sad when a popular young racing driver is killed. Oh well, maybe it's just me. :(

#222 repcobrabham

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 07:17

Originally posted by Lotus11Register
...the report from Scheckter and Hulme was that Cevert had entered the esses off-line and then had tried to "power through the turn."


i read somewhere that he insisted on going through the esses in a higher gear than stewart chose or recommended.

#223 David M. Kane

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 12:47

That is correct, then the car got traction and shot into the armco with such force that it rode up on it and roll over dragging his body across the metal with dire results. I was fifty yards away when it happened taking photos; however I was looking the oposite way. The info I have was provided by the ambulance driver. I don't care to say anymore, it's still hurts and it still freaks me out.

#224 f1steveuk

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 13:36

I had a soft spot for Francois, although I never met him. I was keen on motor racing as a thirteen year old, having been karting since the age of nine. The German GP of 73 was the turning point. Ray Baxter commentating, and superb camera shots into the cockpit around the Karasel of both Tyrrells. Even though I knew that Stewart was the "lead man", there was something about Cevert, dutifully following the team leader, even though you could see he could have gone past and dissapeared.

I visited Tyrrell's yard, unannounced, after they had returned from the US', just to see what it looked like, and was invited in by Nora! Tea, biscuits, a cursory tour of the famous "shed", and the newer factory, and the chance to sit in 006/2, weeks after it had clinched the championship. But I do recall the wreck in the corner, semi covered and compared to the complete car, there was a lot missing. Jo Ramirez took the time to talk to me, and seeing that the loss of Cevert had affected this mere schoolboy, he spoke quite openly about the driver, and the accident, quite a shock. As has been said, the teams thoughts were that he was trying a little too hard, and his gearing was, for the first time, different to Stewart's. His injuries sounded horrific, and thankfully quick. I walked out of the building taking a good hard stare at the blue covered wreck and haven't had "that" feeling until many years later, about six years ago when I was shown the remains of De Angelis' BT55. Cevert was the first driver I had followed to die in a racing car, and it's something I still remember, hearing of the crash, then seeing the pictures. How Stewart, having seen the aftermath, did any laps at all, is beyond belief, and a tribute to Francois.

#225 Lotus11Register

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 13:49

Jody Scheckter's involvement as a would-be rescuer was ironic in that (IIRC) he and Cevert had an incident at the Canadian GP, where the Frenchman later accused him of "driving as if there was a war on." Then the realization that the two would be teammates in '74. Then Cevert's apparent determination to out-qualify everyone at the Glen, especially Scheckter, leading up to the accident.

When he passed the crash scene, Scheckter stopped and ran back to do what he could. Upon seeing that the driver was obviously dead he raised his hands in grief and frustration. Then he got sick. It must have been a pivotal moment in his life.

There is another thread around about whether safer racing is better racing. When I think of losing my heroes like this, I can better deal with the drawbacks of safety.

#226 David M. Kane

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 14:33

Lotus11Register

That is exactly what happened. I was standing directly opposite to Jody on the inside of the track. He was extremely frustrated. When Denny Hulme started to slow down to see if he could help Jody, his body slightly slumped in disbelief and frustration, waved him on. That's when I knew it was really, really bad.

And yes Francois was driving like a man possessed all weekend. I saw him get the car at some aggressive angles several times. I had him drive several times at the Glen in F1 and in Matra 3.0 Sports Prototypes; and this was clearly he most aggressive outing. He was clearly out to prove something IMO.

#227 jonnyspa27

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 05:25

Originally posted by f1steveuk
I had a soft spot for Francois, although I never met him. I was keen on motor racing as a thirteen year old, having been karting since the age of nine. The German GP of 73 was the turning point. Ray Baxter commentating, and superb camera shots into the cockpit around the Karasel of both Tyrrells. Even though I knew that Stewart was the "lead man", there was something about Cevert, dutifully following the team leader, even though you could see he could have gone past and dissapeared.

I visited Tyrrell's yard, unannounced, after they had returned from the US', just to see what it looked like, and was invited in by Nora! Tea, biscuits, a cursory tour of the famous "shed", and the newer factory, and the chance to sit in 006/2, weeks after it had clinched the championship. But I do recall the wreck in the corner, semi covered and compared to the complete car, there was a lot missing. Jo Ramirez took the time to talk to me, and seeing that the loss of Cevert had affected this mere schoolboy, he spoke quite openly about the driver, and the accident, quite a shock. As has been said, the teams thoughts were that he was trying a little too hard, and his gearing was, for the first time, different to Stewart's. His injuries sounded horrific, and thankfully quick. I walked out of the building taking a good hard stare at the blue covered wreck and haven't had "that" feeling until many years later, about six years ago when I was shown the remains of De Angelis' BT55. Cevert was the first driver I had followed to die in a racing car, and it's something I still remember, hearing of the crash, then seeing the pictures. How Stewart, having seen the aftermath, did any laps at all, is beyond belief, and a tribute to Francois.


Now THAT is pretty special, not much more to say about it than that honestly.

#228 Bobby Deerfield

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 07:16

Cevert was one of the bravest racers of his era. I don't remember if someone already mentioned it, but Pescarolo in an interview said he was horrified to see Cevert negotiating the old Curvone of Monza, the old Monza before chicanes and all, flat-out in top gear. He was the only one to do so, and in Pesca's eyes that was equivalent to certain death. Now, it was tragically written in the stars he had to die doing a similar move, going thru the esses faster than anyone.

#229 jonnyspa27

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 17:16

Bobby, are you talking about the old Vialone? Where the Variante Ascari is at now?

#230 bschenker

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 17:51

I think hi spoke about the "Curva Grande" in that's time the first corner.

#231 lil'chris

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 21:26

Originally posted by bschenker
I think hi spoke about the "Curva Grande" in that's time the first corner.


That's what I thought too

#232 jonnyspa27

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 21:31

I remember Derek Bell saying that it used to be "the most exciting corner in motorsport". Pesca's comments give more credence to this.

#233 Bobby Deerfield

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 22:35

Sorry, I did a little translation italian-to-italian, I was talking about the Curva Grande, yes it was the first corner at the old Monza without chicanes, and I suppose one of the most terrifying.

#234 philippe7

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 17:39

http://forums.autosp...nde#post1620396

;)

#235 Bobby Deerfield

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 11:15

Great post Philippe, I read recently another, really similar, version of that story in a Pescarolo interview on italian Autosprint. Now I don't have it at hand, but I remember he said something like , after Cevert did Curva Grnade flat out in the Matra first, his fastest team mates after some frights were able to imitate him. But Cevert was able to do the same also in his F1 car, and there he was the only one to do so. Pesca said he felt that going thru Curva Grnde flat out in F1 was really, really inches away from death.

#236 Jean L

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 12:23

And this come from Pescarolo who was not a slow driver at Monza,best lap in race at the Gran Premio d'Italia 1971,with the March 711 ! :eek:

#237 drivers71

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:04

A great driver, who typified the 'laisser-faire' attitude of those by-gone days. That's not to say he took his racing any less seriously, for he was a determined and talented driver. Definitely a world champion in the making, had he not been so cruelly denied.

British GP 1973 Silverstone:

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#238 DOHC

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:22

Wasn't there a story (probably tongue in cheek) that Stewart once got his throttle stuck before the Curva Grande and explained to Jim Clark that it had been a spine-chilling moment. To which Clark replied, "What?, you mean you lift there?"

#239 FrankB

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:51

Originally posted by DOHC
Wasn't there a story (probably tongue in cheek) that Stewart once got his throttle stuck before the Curva Grande and explained to Jim Clark that it had been a spine-chilling moment. To which Clark replied, "What?, you mean you lift there?"


I heard a similar story which had JYS telling JC that as he braked for a particular corner the pedal went straight to the floor. In spite of this, he still managed to get the car round the corner with no damage done, the implication being that his skills saved the day. Clark's supposed response was "If you could get round the bend without any brakes, why did you need to be braking in the first place?"

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#240 fines

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 14:47

I can't quite imagine Clark saying something like that, unless it was a joke! I'm sure he of all people knew best that you're much faster if you use the brakes.;)

Just like the signature of one poster, where Jackie Stewart is asking David Purley where he brakes at a particular corner, whereupon Purley replies "What do you mean, brake?" Guess he bettered his lap times by quite a few tenths with that tip from a three-time World Champion... :smoking:

#241 Twin Window

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 16:18

Has anyone else heard the story of Cevert, Hulme, Amon, a Porsche 911 and a roundabout near Brands in 1970? ;)

#242 philippe charuest

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 16:48

we have to remember that it was the very early days of downforce and some curve impossible to pass flat out in 68 was a piece of cake in 70-71, still i thinq they were talking of the ascari/vialone curve not the curva grande it wasnt flat out then

#243 sterling49

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 17:55

Originally posted by Twin Window
Has anyone else heard the story of Cevert, Hulme, Amon, a Porsche 911 and a roundabout near Brands in 1970? ;)


No, I haven't Twinny, tell us more, I use these roundabouts daily and am intrigued to know! I would guess that it is the one at the bottom of Death Hill (Farningham Roundabout) if they were London bound, or Wrotham roundabout, if coastal bound........I have a few tales also, many a night spent rallying in the lanes of Kent :eek:

#244 Jerome

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 19:15

Hmm, these kinds of stories always seem urban legends. I do know, however, a story about 'not lifting' that seems genuine. When John Surtees switched from two wheels to four, he asked Stirling Moss how he should take a certain sector at Silverstone. Moss replied: 'Oh flat out, easy, mate. Just flat out.'

That evening a very angry Surtees called Moss. 'You idiot. I went flat out and I spun for about two miles!'
Then Moss started laughing so hard he fell down with the receiver in his hand: 'So you really did it? You really did it?'

#245 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 14:22

35 years have passed today since the tragic accident of François and 34 years since the tragic death of Helmuth... :cry: :cry: :cry:

RIP

Posted ImagePosted Image
© David Phipps

#246 Psall

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 20:20

R.I.P. Helmuth and Francois. You´re still remembered. R.I.P.

#247 jonnyspa27

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 20:32

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
35 years have passed today since the tragic accident of François and 34 years since the tragic death of Helmuth... :cry: :cry: :cry:

RIP

Posted ImagePosted Image
© David Phipps


Those are great pics to remember them by! :)

#248 sterling49

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 20:36

Such a talent, still remember him driving his glorious Tyrrell at the '73 GP.

Twinny still has not shared the 911 Farningham roundabout episode yet...........

#249 AMICALEMANS

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 11:31

just to commemorate... http://www.francoisc...ncoiscevert.htm

#250 Longtimefan

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 12:56

35 Years ago today...

October 7th 1973.. a tragic day in the memory of F1
The day we lost a star.. a future world champion..

Francois Cevert, then Jackie Stewarts young teammate who
had the speed, passion and talent to win and win big.. but
who stayed behind JS as he knew it would soon be his turn to win
1974 would be his year... he would be world champion

but alas that dreadful day at Watkins Glen denied him and we
lost a star.. and in my opinion a future world champion.

RIP Francois, we will never forget you