Jump to content


Photo

Doughnuts


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 03011969

03011969
  • Member

  • 435 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 27 October 2013 - 16:15

It's "doughnuts" in the UK, not "donuts".

Is Autosport not a UK publication?

Advertisement

#2 jimjimjeroo

jimjimjeroo
  • Member

  • 1,399 posts
  • Joined: December 08

Posted 27 October 2013 - 16:48

Sometimes known as Gravy rings in Ireland and doughnoughts in Scotland...

#3 milestone 11

milestone 11
  • Member

  • 2,942 posts
  • Joined: April 09

Posted 27 October 2013 - 17:13

We get enough of this, please desist. Doughnut not donut.



#4 Amphicar

Amphicar
  • Member

  • 1,855 posts
  • Joined: December 10

Posted 27 October 2013 - 22:09

Dough not do donut: do do doughnut 



#5 03011969

03011969
  • Member

  • 435 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 29 October 2013 - 10:06

BBc show how it should be done: http://www.bbc.co.uk...rmula1/24692355



#6 Option1

Option1
  • Member

  • 12,966 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 29 October 2013 - 13:47

As a filthy foreigner, I must ask if when the posters are composing their diatribes are they:

a.  Wearing the appropriate Union Jack vest?

b.  Listening to "Land of Hope and Glory" playing at a volume guaranteed to only mildly annoy the neighbours?

c.  Posting only after first having written your letter to The Times noting the falling standards of internet journalism?

d.  Listening to "Jerusalem" playing at a volume guaranteed to only mildly annoy the neighbours, who could damn well do with a spot of patriotism, forcibly injected if need be, especially her at number 97 who I'm fairly sure is an immigrant, you can tell you know, and besides they could do with a dose of cold steel, they don't like it up 'em you know, don't like it up 'em at all!!

e.  All of the above.

 

Neil



#7 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 56,888 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 29 October 2013 - 15:19

I thought it was doughnut in American English too. Donut being like 'Lite' salad dressing.



#8 Eli

Eli
  • autosport.com news editor

  • 2,690 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 29 October 2013 - 15:38

AUTOSPORT style is to use the US spelling for the celebration type.

 

The column does actually refer to the cake-esque type with the spelling you like. 



#9 SenorSjon

SenorSjon
  • Member

  • 1,365 posts
  • Joined: March 12

Posted 29 October 2013 - 15:48

In AutoCAD the command is Donut to draw one. :p



#10 Ross Stonefeld

Ross Stonefeld
  • Member

  • 56,888 posts
  • Joined: August 99

Posted 29 October 2013 - 15:53

AUTOSPORT style is to use the US spelling for the celebration type.

 

 

Shouldn't it be across the board either American or British English? Or whatever International English is these days. Because you guys use 'tyres'.



#11 condor

condor
  • Member

  • 11,239 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 29 October 2013 - 19:46

Just to add my two pennorth worth :)

Donut could be construed as being the correct spelling as it gives the impression of exuberance and frivolity which is more akin to the American way than the suppressed stiff upper lip English  ;)

Doughnut is a UK cake/pastry confection that the Americans do so much better than us too :D

#12 BRG

BRG
  • Member

  • 11,444 posts
  • Joined: September 99

Posted 29 October 2013 - 20:23

Doughnut is a UK cake/pastry confection that the Americans do so much better than us too :D

The Americans do ring doughnuts, not proper doughnuts which are balls of deep fried dough containing a delicious jam filling.  They are nut shaped; that's why they are called doughNUTS.  That's the nut from nature, of course, not the thing with a threaded hole in the middle that screws onto a bolt.  Which is more like a ring doughnut, so maybe that is where the American confusion arose.  Everyone clear now?  :wave:

 

And don't get me started on muffins... :stoned:


Edited by BRG, 29 October 2013 - 20:24.


#13 Rob

Rob
  • Member

  • 8,133 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 29 October 2013 - 21:18

AUTOSPORT style is to use the US spelling for the celebration type.

 

The column does actually refer to the cake-esque type with the spelling you like. 

 

It's a British magazine! Why use the US spelling in your style guide? Are we going to see winningest appearing in articles next? Checkered flag instead of chequered flag? Those black round things being called tires?



#14 Option1

Option1
  • Member

  • 12,966 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 30 October 2013 - 13:47

The Americans do ring doughnuts, not proper doughnuts which are balls of deep fried dough containing a delicious jam filling.  They are nut shaped; that's why they are called doughNUTS.  That's the nut from nature, of course, not the thing with a threaded hole in the middle that screws onto a bolt.  Which is more like a ring doughnut, so maybe that is where the American confusion arose.  Everyone clear now?  :wave:

 

And don't get me started on muffins... :stoned:

I'll just mark you down as an "e" then shall I?

 

Neil



#15 03011969

03011969
  • Member

  • 435 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 01 November 2013 - 13:01

I'll just mark you down as an "e" then shall I?

 

Neil

It is the website feedback section with a question about journalistic consistency.  If you believe that suggests any kind of jingoism you could not be more wrong. 



#16 Option1

Option1
  • Member

  • 12,966 posts
  • Joined: February 01

Posted 01 November 2013 - 13:26

Good to see that some still have a sense of humour.  Not sure I'd put 03lotsofsillynumbers in that category though.  :lol:

Neil



#17 03011969

03011969
  • Member

  • 435 posts
  • Joined: September 12

Posted 04 November 2013 - 13:53

Good to see that some still have a sense of humour.  Not sure I'd put 03lotsofsillynumbers in that category though.  :lol:

Neil

How you wish to categorise people you do not know, if that is what you choose to do with your time, is up to you.

#18 Buttoneer

Buttoneer
  • RC Forum Admin

  • 16,248 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 04 November 2013 - 17:02

Interestingly, the very American Krispy Kreme company who can't even spell their own name properly, calls them 'doughnuts' on their UK packaging.  They don't smell of burned rubber though, for which my waistline suffers.