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#1 tonyed

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:43

Aren't you just glad that our sport is on top on the latest doping scandel. Ant West banned for 18 months (retrospectively) for swigging a commercially available energy drink with a WADA banned substance in it (methylexaneamine).

 

It appears in the 2014 'Prohibitive Substances' under 'Specified Stimulents (examples). How can you have 'Specified Stimulents (examples)? Surely if it is specified you have to list ALL not just examples, or is it the lazy mans' way out or it leaves it open to ban whatever they want, tea, coffee, Castrol R?

 

If Ant got 18 months for this, 200 lifetimes wouldn't be enough for Lance Armstrong.

 

Just as well WADA and CAS weren't around in the 70s as I think that some Yanks and their bongs (allegedly) might have fallen foul of the protectors of all sport.

 

I notice that 'Gene Doping is also banned which explains why 'Little' John Kocinski retired.


Edited by tonyed, 29 November 2013 - 12:58.


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#2 greg1953

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 20:24

Aren't you just glad that our sport is on top on the latest doping scandel. Ant West banned for 18 months (retrospectively) for swigging a commercially available energy drink with a WADA banned substance in it (methylexaneamine).

 

It appears in the 2014 'Prohibitive Substances' under 'Specified Stimulents (examples). How can you have 'Specified Stimulents (examples)? Surely if it is specified you have to list ALL not just examples, or is it the lazy mans' way out or it leaves it open to ban whatever they want, tea, coffee, Castrol R?

 

If Ant got 18 months for this, 200 lifetimes wouldn't be enough for Lance Armstrong.

 

Just as well WADA and CAS weren't around in the 70s as I think that some Yanks and their bongs (allegedly) might have fallen foul of the protectors of all sport.

 

I notice that 'Gene Doping is also banned which explains why 'Little' John Kocinski retired.

What I found astonishing was the amount of people who found the whole Lance Armstrong business " no big deal " and claimed he shouldn't be hammered for cheating as "they all do it ".

So where does it stop ? is it ok for a boxer the put metal in his gloves ? how about a Moto GP bike in Moto 2 ? what about fielding a fifteen man football team against eleven ? an F1 car in BTCC ?

Cheating is cheating and should not be tolerated under any circumstances but surely it would be easier if the governing bodies of sport listed products that contain banned substances rather than the substances themselves making the whole thing simple to understand.

Greg



#3 tonyed

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 07:39

Yes the crux of the matter with these 'energy' drinks is that the list of ingredients on the can has little resemblance to the chemical derivation of the ingredient, in consequence a commercially available energy drink would not list the derivative by the chemical name methylexaneamine as it appears on the WADA Prohibited List.

 

I agree with Greg that if perhaps if the bodies that create these lists could also list known products that contain prohibited substances under the derived name then you might not need to be a Nobel Chemistry prizewinner to go motorcycle racing.

 

In the case of Moto2 there I would hazard a guess that there is much more abuse of the class intention, same engine for all, that gives wealthy teams the edge than one rider consuming an energy drink that contains a substance that is not much more potent than caffeine which is not a listed substance.

 

It was widely reported that last season at least one Moto2 team was probably abusing the control tyre by running low tyre pressures but the offender, instead of being banned, was rewarded with a MotoGP contract. Gaining advantage or trying to gain advantage by foul means is a greater abuse of the ethics of the sport than a rider consuming a commercially available energy drink.

 

When personal performance enhancement is systematically used for reasons of gaining unfair advantage then this is what the regulatory bodies should be punishing, but as we all know in most countries it is so widespread (along with event fixing) that when one poor sod unknowingly consumes a prohibited substance the whole book is thrown which is out of proportion to the crime.   



#4 GD66

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 09:01

It is a farce considering the lineup of GP riders in the 500cc era who used to queue up outside Costa's Clinic pre-race... :eek:



#5 Robin127

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 17:05

.......It was widely reported that last season at least one Moto2 team was probably abusing the control tyre by running low tyre pressures but the offender, instead of being banned, was rewarded with a MotoGP contract.............. 

 

Asparagus or Redding?



#6 tonyed

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 06:52

Guess -it's just not cricket old boy!



#7 Robin127

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 15:22

Well, going by who his team manager was I'm going to say Redding.  Bartholemy has some history of untoward behaviour.



#8 tonyed

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 17:22

Not casting 'nasturtiums' but 'Bartelby' might have fallen from heaven but is NOT a member of the 'Spanish Inquisition' however 'Dogmatic' that may seem.



#9 Paul Collins

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 00:17



Not casting 'nasturtiums' but 'Bartelby' might have fallen from heaven but is NOT a member of the 'Spanish Inquisition' however 'Dogmatic' that may seem.

Sorry but it had to be done :drunk:

 

monty_python_spanish_inquistion.jpg