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Crazy Indy-500 stories: Quiz


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#151 Michael Ferner

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:40

Great interview, many thanks! HH was always one of the more entertaining guys in racing, and even if he doesn't get all the facts straight, it's a great pleasure to "chat with him" that way. I mean, "oh, we're guys, what are feelings?", or "I used to be 6 foot six" :rotfl: the guy's just hilarious! But the thing that sticks in my mind is his mention of testing a March Indycar (probably the Orbiter) at Winchester Speedway :eek: :eek: :eek: Oh boy, that must've been some experience...



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#152 Michael Ferner

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 18:21

Er, I don't really feel like I have answered the last question, so if anyone wants to pose a new one, please go ahead!

 

 

EDIT: And congratulations to Michael with his 2000th post!

 

Oh, I'm well past that...  ;)



#153 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 19:22

Er, I don't really feel like I have answered the last question, so if anyone wants to pose a new one, please go ahead!

 

I think E.B. should ask his question.

 

Oh, I'm well past that...   ;)

 

Yes, I know what you mean.  But I prefer not to be too complicated here making the conjunction.  :)



#154 E.B.

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 21:24

Thank you, but can't think of any decent questions at the mo, and am just as happy trying to guess answers as setting a question myself, so as Michael proposed, let's throw it open to anyone who wants to set a new question.

#155 Richard Jenkins

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 22:06

Can I ask one please, which is a more open one to other people?

 

The average age of ALL competitors (including non-qualifiers, excluding racing mechanics) saw its three lowest, or youngest, average age in three successive years. Which three?

 

If it helps at all, the averages are

 

? = 23.97

? = 25.94

? = 28.03

 

 

Special bonus point if you can name what year the oldest average all of all competitors, aged 42.02 was...



#156 Richard Jenkins

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 22:55

Sorry, maybe I've made this too large a window? A clue for both, they were pre-WW2.



#157 Michael Ferner

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 17:54

I'll start the guessing: the three youngest years were 1911, '12 & '13, and the oldest 1941.



#158 Richard Jenkins

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 19:26

Spot on! 1913, 1912 and 1911 is the order. 1911 surprises me a lot as a lot of people had already been racing for some time, but then I guess there weren't that many 40 or 50 year olds.

You are only one digit out of the oldest too...

#159 Magoo

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 19:45

Don't have anything to contribute except thanks for the interesting info! 



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#160 Michael Ferner

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 21:23

You are only one digit out of the oldest too...

 

Well, that's not too difficult, then! :D

 

Richard, out of interest, and only if it's easy to do (I suppose you can copy from your data base), but can you post the entire list, maybe even split into starters and complete entry?

 

 

 

NEW QUESTION: In the days before tits were banned from the pits, there was one year when two female car owners and one female "pit manager" watched over three cars in the field, and their combined average finishing position was more than twice better than that of their male colleagues. Which year?



#161 Richard Jenkins

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 22:58

Well, that's not too difficult, then! :D

 

Richard, out of interest, and only if it's easy to do (I suppose you can copy from your data base), but can you post the entire list, maybe even split into starters and complete entry?

 

 

Not quite, as it was 1931!

 

Well, I was going to give you a whole load of data, but having gone into the file only today, it's said;

 

Damage to the file was so extensive that repairs were not possible. Excel attempted to recover your formulas and values, but some data may have been lost or corrupted.

 

So it looks like all the data I had in there has either gone or is just gobblydegook. I only updated it the other day for Gary Bettenhausen's death and it seems to have thrown a wobbly afterwards. Real shame, 8 years work lost.....

 

Here's what I posted about 7 years ago though  on Trackforum- http://www.trackforu...ht=#post1441025 - obviously a lot of the data is not quite accurate, but you get the general drift - Frank Burany is creeping up the oldest ever drivers, 99 this year. Obviously I've learnt Jack Reynolds was the oldest ever Indy 500 racer.

 

Indy 500 Driver Ages Stats

I have no idea if this is of any use to anybody, but it might solve a few arguments. Corrections welcome, of course. I've been spending almost half a year on this on & off & wish I'd never started, but some of the results are quite interesting...

(it includes non-qualifiers of course)

Longest Lived Drivers
Dutton Reeves 1887-1988 (1919) 101 yrs, 150 days
Gerard Louis 1899-2000 (1946) 101 yrs, 25 days
Marr Buddy 1896-1996 (1927-1928) 99 yrs, 251 days
Snell Overton 1907-2004 (1933-1936) 97 yrs, 102 days
Oakes Danny 1911-2007 (1953-1954) 95 yrs, 186 days
Connor George 1906-2001 (1934-1953) 94 yrs, 225 days

Shortest Lived Drivers:
Spence Bill 1907-1929 (1928-1929) 22 yrs, 355 days
Mackey Bill 1928-1951 (1951) 23 yrs, 227 days
McElreath James 1954-1977 (1977) 23 yrs, 265 days
Knight Harry 1890-1913 (1911-1912) 23 yrs, 332 days
Jones Herbert 1903-1926 (1925) 23 yrs ?? days


Oldest Debutants:
Ensley Jack b. 1906 51 yrs of age (1958)
Farina Giuseppe b. 1906 49 yrs, 7 months (1956)
Fairman Jack b. 1913 49yrs, 2 months (1962)
(Starters of a racesmile.gif
Hewitt Jack b. 1951 46 years, 10 months (1998)
Lautenschlager Christian b. 1877 46 years, 1 month (1923)

(clearly being called Jack helps in this particular category) :lol:


Youngest Debutants/Racers:
Foyt (IV) AJ b. 1984 (2003) 19 yrs, 0 months
Garza Josele b. 1962 (1981) 19 yrs, 2 months, 9 days
Andretti Marco b. 1987 (2006) 19 yrs, 2 months, 16 days
Ruttman Troy b. 1930 (1949) 19 yrs, 2 months, 18 days
Fisher Sarah b. 1980 (2000) 19 yrs, 7 months
Jourdain(jr)Michel b. 1976 (1996) 19 yrs, 8 months

Oldest Racers:
Unser Al b. 1939 (1994) 55yrs old
Johncock Gordon b. 1936 (1992) 55yrs, 9 months old
Ongais Danny b. 1942 (1998) 55yrs, 11 months old
Foyt AJ b. 1935 (1993) 58 yrs, 4 months old

Born Longest Time Ago:
(1873)
Bigelow Charles (1911), Devigne, Jules (1916), Bablot, Paul (1919)
Born Most Recently
Patrick Danica b. 1982
Foyt (IV) AJ b. 1984
Andretti Marco b. 1987
Worst year for Death
1966 (16 deaths) (average age 54.2)

Best year for Death
1917 - 0 1 - in order of average ageicon13.gif 1950 (64), 1912 (27), 1914 (24)

2 deaths - 1911, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1927, 1937, 1945, 2007**
3 deaths - 1913, 1918, 1926, 1929, 1938, 1943, 1947, 1987, 1991
4 deaths - 1919, 1930, 1936, 1941, 1944, 1957, 1978
5 deaths - 1915, 1916, 1942, 1948. 1953, 1990, 2004, 2005
6 deaths - 1969, 1983, 1988, 1989, 2001
7 deaths - 1924, 1928, 1931, 1933, 1964, 1979, 1980, 1997, 2002
8 deaths - 1934, 1939, 1951, 1956, 1959, 1961, 1975, 1976, 1985, 1986, 1993, 1999, 2006
9 deaths - 1932, 1935, 1940, 1949, 1954, 1971, 1973, 1977, 1982, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2003
10 deaths - 1952
11 deaths - 1946, 1955, 1960, 1992, 1995
12 deaths - 1963, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1981, 1984
13 deaths - 1958, 1967
14 deaths - 1962
15 deaths - 1970, 1974, 2000

Most born in Year
1890 - 21 drivers

First born in New Century
1923 - 3 drivers - F H Wells b. 1900, Martin de Alzaga b. 1901, Harlan Fenger b. 1903
Last Born in Old Century
Louis Gerard in 1946, b. 1899

Most Participants
1982 - 68
1953 - 67
1967 - 65

Least Participants
1916 - 26
1921- 30
1924 & 2006 - 33

(I don't think 1916's total can be any surprise, considering the political situation at the time)

Youngest Average Age
1913 - 23.17
1912 - 25.31
1911-26.91

Oldest Average Age
1931 - 42.39
1964 - 39.78
1990 - 39.14

Youngest Average Age of Death
(apart from 0) :

2003 - 26,
2005 - 32
1988 & 1989 - 40.50

(of a full/virtually full field)
1949 - 49.78
1914 - 55.47

Oldest Average Age of Death
1921 68.54
1948 66.24
1946 66.06
1919 65.47

Total Av Participants Each Year
48

Total Average Age
33.57

Total Average Death
49.85
(sadly, rather low frown.gif )


#162 D-Type

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 23:13

 

~

 

Damage to the file was so extensive that repairs were not possible. Excel attempted to recover your formulas and values, but some data may have been lost or corrupted.

 

~

 

With the 100% wisdom of hindsight - yet another tale making the case for keeping a backup.

 

Having said that, you do genuinely have my sympathies



#163 E.B.

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 08:47

NEW QUESTION: In the days before tits were banned from the pits, there was one year when two female car owners and one female "pit manager" watched over three cars in the field, and their combined average finishing position was more than twice better than that of their male colleagues. Which year?


Does it involve a future Mrs Caracciola and a past Mrs Batten? 1929 if so.

Richard, how do 1930 and 1932 compare to 1931 for average age? For some reason I had it in my head that the late '20s saw a large influx of new young blood - apparently not. Before any clues, I would have guessed 1992 as the oldest year.

#164 Henri Greuter

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 12:01

Can the year be 1952? I remember having read a certain miss Bessie Paoli entering cars in the 50's
Vagueliy remember her being associated with the `pots and pans spcl` and chuck Stevens.

Henri

#165 Michael Ferner

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 13:49



Does it involve a future Mrs Caracciola and a past Mrs Batten? 1929 if so.

 

Correctamundo.

 

Alice Hoffmann-Trobeck accompanied Louis Chiron to Indy as an interpreter and "pit manager". She was reportedly present throughout the month to time Chiron's practice laps, and direct operations at the pits. It was speculated before Memorial Day whether she would be allowed to perform her tasks during the actual race, as the (in)famous ban on women was apparently only enforced on race days at the time, and the outcome isn't entirely clear: some have speculated that she actually sat on a small platform atop of the famous diner behind the pits! Chiron drove an uncharacteristically uninspired race, and was running twenty laps in arrears and in 9th position when he stopped ten laps from the finish, but actually several minutes after the winner had already been flagged in. Thus, very few observers realized that the famous Grand Prix star stepped from the racer, to make way for his countryman Jules Moriceau, who drove the last fifteen minutes of the race in the Delage which was finally flagged off in 7th position after a couple of dramas involving higher placed cars.

 

Marion Batten was the widow of Norm Batten, relief driver on the winning Duesenberg in 1925, and victim of a maritime accident the past November. Contrary to modern rumours, Norm's car was not aboard the sinking ship, and Marion entered it in 1929 for a number of prospective buyers, until selling it in the fall. At Indy, several drivers tried it in practice, before journeyman Wes Crawford qualified and started the race near the back of the field, giving way to a succession of relief drivers. Veteran Zeke Meyer, who had finished 5th in 1928 after relieving Batten, then still healing from the spectacular fire accident the year before, drove about 50 laps in mid-race, charging from way back into 5th place at half distance, and actually running the fastest laps of the entire field during that period, but the engine soon developed a misfire, and after a few more stops and driver changes it retired soon after from 9th position.

 

Maude A. Yagle was the wife of Edward C. Yagle, who made his money in real estate and spent it on racing! Perhaps to keep from spending even more money courtesy of the IRS, Ed entered his cars under Maude's initials "M. A. Yagle", but by 1929 the press had gotten wind of the fact that there was a woman owner behind one of the strongest teams in the nation! Ed remained the de facto head of operations, but Maude used to show up for the races, and seemingly revelled in her role. During the mid-twenties, the Yagles had run a multi-car operation in independent dirt track racing in the East, and when the opportunity arose to buy a second-hand Speedway Miller in late 1925, Ed couldn't resist. After Frank Lockhart's death in early 1928, the speed king's spare car was added to the stable, and with Ray Keech at the controls the team finished runner-up to National Champion Louie Meyer in the other ex-Lockhart car, then duelled with Meyer for the 1929 Indy bonanza. Fifty laps from the finish, Keech was running second and closing in on the leading Meyer, whose oil pressure began to sag. In a desperate attempt to stave off the challenge, the champion chose to stop at the pits to top up the oil, but the engine refused to start up again - for nearly seven minutes!

 

Still, Keech wasn't yet home and dry, for there was another challenger, a Californian rookie by the unlikely name of Barney Kloepfer, who'd taken over Lou Moore's front-running Miller at half distance, and was now closing in mercilessly: twenty laps from home, he was less than half a minute behind, and that at a time when races were usually won by several minutes - it was the closest finale that two cars had ever staged during a 500 mile race at the Speedway, even more exciting than the 1925 finish! Alas, all was not well with the green (wouldn't you know!) challenger, and with but five miles to go, it headed for the pits, smoke pouring from the engine. Moore replaced Kloepfer once again, but the car didn't last another lap - out! And thus, Maude Yagle became the first ever female car owner in history to win the fabulous Indy 500 :clap: :clap:


Edited by Michael Ferner, 20 March 2014 - 16:28.


#166 E.B.

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 14:02

What connects these drivers?

Ralph Mulford
Hughie Hughes
Earl Cooper
Harry Hartz
Rex Mays

#167 Michael Ferner

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 14:40

All finished second - if that's what you mean?



#168 E.B.

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 14:55

Sorry Michael - Hughes didn't, and anyway it's an exhaustive list.

PS Thanks for the full story re 1929, interesting stuff.

#169 Michael Ferner

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 15:07

You're right, I'd already realized that Hughie was "only" third; it was Wishart who was second in the same car.



#170 E.B.

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 23:56

I should probably have chipped in with a clue by now, but forgot all about the thread.

Michael was actually on the right lines, but the answer isn't so much about their exact finishing positions as about how many people beat them.

#171 Michael Ferner

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 15:45

Ah, they were all the first driver home without relief, yet not winners!


Edited by Michael Ferner, 25 March 2014 - 15:45.


#172 E.B.

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 15:47

Correct!

Happened to Hartz twice actually, in 1923 and 1925 (when he was only 4th, but that was the year that only 7 drivers DIDN'T get relieved at some point).

Your go again........

#173 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:15

Like father, like son - the history of the Indy 500 abounds with family tradition! In his long career, A. J. Foyt junior raced against most fathers and sons of former or future Indy 500 drivers who ever competed in the great race themselves. In fact, there was never a single race in all of Indy's rich history, in which more than one driver (including relief drivers) competed, whose father or son also started or drove relief in any other 500, and with neither of them ever competing against Foyt - actually, there was only one race in which more than one member of these father/son combinations started or drove relief, and where at least one of them never competed against Foyt! Which year?



#174 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:44

Had to read it about 12 times to even grasp the question!

1948? (Thinking Billy DeVore in the 6 wheeler versus Johnnie Parsons)

#175 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 11:43

Well, it took me at least half an hour to formulate! :lol:

 

And I'm still not sure if I've worded it right :(, as Johnnie Parsons wouldn't qualify since Foyt competed against both him and his son!

 

Anyway, 1948 is wrong since Parsons did not compete :) but Bettenhausen did! :( Rats, I need to word it differently :mad:... Bear with me!



#176 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 11:52

Okay, let's try it this way: ignore every driver who never had a son or a father compete in the 500! Now, ignore everyone who competed against Foyt! Lastly, ignore every race in which only one of those not yet ignored competed! Which one's left? :cat:

 

 

STOP! WRONG!!! [That's the question where the answer is "none"...] :mad:


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 11:54.


#177 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 11:57

Next try: ignore every driver who never had a son or a father compete in the 500! Now, ignore all those where either father or son competed against Foyt! Lastly, ignore every race in which only one of those not yet ignored competed! Which one's left? :timid smiley:

 

 

 

EDIT: I'm sorry, I think I managed to work my brain into a knot! Nurse, NURSE!!!  :drunk:


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 12:05.


#178 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:01

And I'm still not sure if I've worded it right :(, as Johnnie Parsons wouldn't qualify since Foyt competed against both him and his son!


You said at least one, so I took the DeVores as the ones who didn't compete with Foyt, and the Parsons for whom one (or in this case both) did.

I was just hoping Johnnie did a few laps relief in 1948 for someone - apparently not in that case!

#179 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:13

I'm sorry, I just messed this one up. Please ignore, just keep on walking, nothing to see here... :blush: :blush:


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 12:13.


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#180 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:13

EDIT: I'm sorry, I think I managed to work my brain into a knot! Nurse, NURSE!!!  :drunk:


It's rather more serious than that. You can't refer to Foyt as a point of reference immediately after telling us to ignore him. The question is trying to divide by zero. The world is now going to implode.

#181 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:14

I'm sorry, I just messed this one up. Please ignore, just keep on walking, nothing to see here... :blush:  :blush:


In all seriousness I actually think the original question is valid, but I had to cheat to establish that. So I guess I'm now a DQ.

#182 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:15

... the world is now going to implode.

 

Thank god! :relief:



#183 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:54



It's rather more serious than that. You can't refer to Foyt as a point of reference immediately after telling us to ignore him.

 

I now see what you were getting at, but Larry is legally his son, even if AJ is biologically his grandfather! Unless you can prove biological fatherhood for all the individuals involved, I think we should stick with the legal definition, no?  ;)

 

 

By the way, the nurse says I should be better any minute now, so that I can give it another try.



#184 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 13:08

Nurse?

 

...

 

 

Okay, let's have another go: ignore every driver who never had a legal son or a legal father compete in the 500! Now, ignore everyone whose father competed against Foyt, and ignore the fathers too! Lastly, ignore every race in which only one of those not yet ignored competed! Which one's left? :cat:


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 13:12.


#185 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 13:47

Ah well, that's a completely different question so I am reinstating myself.

1955?

#186 ensign14

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 15:04

42.



#187 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 16:17

Ensign is disqualified for giving an answer before posing the question*, but E. B. is rightfully reinstated, and declared the winner yet again! :clap: :clap:

 

 

Difficult to word the question, because I hit upon the idea in steps: watching a video of the '86 race last night, the commentator remarked how there were seven (?) second-generation drivers in the field, and that Foyt had raced against all of their fathers! Digging a bit, I found that Foyt had raced against all fathers in toto, except for Vukovich, Russo, Devore and Houser; he also never raced against the sons of Devore and Houser. The Vukies and Russos were more than a full generation apart, so finding a common race was almost accidental, but the Housers and Devores dodged each other rather artfully, I thought, despite both fathers and sons being born within just a few years: Houser senior started only one race (1926), but was a relief driver in 1923, 1924 and 1929, with Devore senior starting every race in between!! Devore junior, on the other hand, was a regular until his last start in 1948, the year before Houser junior qualified for his first start!

 

 

* Your penalty will be to head a commitee that will commence design & construction of a computer to find a suitable question to your answer!


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 16:20.


#188 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 16:57

Cool. Forgot all about the Housers, just as well or they would have been a red herring that led to lots of 1920s or 1940s guesses.

OK. After all that, how about a simple question about the lap record?

In 1923, Tommy Milton broke the one lap qualification record by more than 3 seconds.

Nobody since then has broken the existing one lap qualification record by that much – however, 3 drivers have broken it by more than 2 seconds.

Name them.

The winner is the poster who gives all 3 correct answers in one post, so please have a go at naming all 3 in every post you make. I will tell you how many of your answers are correct, but not which ones. Anyone attempting to circumvent this rule by naming drivers such as Phil Caliva or Dr Jack Miller in their answer will be made to stand in the silly corner.

#189 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 17:07

Hm. René Thomas bettered the David Bruce-Brown record by more than 6 and a half seconds on May 28 in 1914! But, oh, you said since 1923...

 

I hope you realize that Pete de Paolo didn't break Milton's record, because it was broken twice before on the same day!?!? Saves a bit of "red herring" work, you know...



#190 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 17:14

I hope you realize that Pete de Paolo didn't break Milton's record, because it was broken twice before on the same day!?!? Saves a bit of "red herring" work, you know...


Have I wasted anyone's time yet? (innocent whistling smiley)

#191 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 17:17

Jimmy Snyder May 22 1937: 1'08.97" (was 1'11.92" Bill Cummings May 15 1937)

Rodger Ward 57.12" May 16 1964 (was 59.27" Parnelli Jones May 18 1963)

 

I don't see nobody else coming close... :confused:



#192 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 17:33

Ha! But de Paolo broke Hartz's record two years later!!

 

Pete de Paolo May 26 1927: 1'14.66" (was 1'16.73" Harry Hartz May 26 1927)

Jimmy Snyder May 22 1937: 1'08.97" (was 1'11.92" Bill Cummings May 15 1937)

Rodger Ward May 16 1964: 57.12" (was 59.27" Parnelli Jones May 18 1963)

 

:cool:



#193 E.B.

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 17:39

Too good, Michael!

I was hoping someone would get the ball rolling with Duray, Hurtubise and B Unser and then be more than a bit surprised when I scored them zero!

On Trackforum they'd probably dispute it with me!

#194 Michael Ferner

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 18:14

Yeah, the official* list of track records makes for interesting study! One likes to think of 1972 as the year of the speed explosion, and while it is true that the record was lowered by a massive 4.42" (or 8.8 %) in one single day, it took five different drivers to accomplish this, so both Bobby U. and Billy V. are left in midfield with an identical improvement of 1.74", or roughly 3.5 %. It was also the last time that the record was bettered by (more than) a full second. But the REALLY BIG improvements happened all before WW2, both in absolute terms and in percentage:

 

1) René Thomas (Delage), 1914: 6.55" (6.4 %)

2) David Bruce-Brown (National), 1912: 5.08" (4.7 %)

3) René Thomas (Ballot), 1919: 4.24" (4.7 %)

4) Tommy Milton (Miller), 1923: 3.69" (4.3 %)

5) Jimmy Snyder (Sparks), 1937: 2.95" (4.1 %)

 

Next in the percentage list is Bobby Unser with the 1972 Eagle, and next in absolute terms Rodger Ward in the first rear-engined car to take the record. Duray only just makes the top ten (abs.) and 11th (perc.), while Hurtubise is nowhere at 20th (abs.) and 21st (perc.); Hepburn and the Novi are 8th (abs.) and 9th (perc.). Low man in both lists is Gary Bettenhausen in the Lola/Menard of 1992, because Luyendijk had taken most of Emmo's old record just 48 minutes earlier.

 

 

 

* "official", because there were a few unofficial records, when a run was disallowed, or the Barney Odfield record in an exposition run with the front-drive Christie

 

 

On Trackforum they'd probably dispute it with me!

 

On Trackforum they dispute everything outside of their tiny worlds!



#195 Michael Ferner

Michael Ferner
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Posted 26 March 2014 - 18:26

A quick new question in the same vein: in 1950, Walt Faulkner broke the official track record on May 13, the first day of qualifying - it was the 22nd official record in the books, and the first to have been established on the 13th of the month. How many other days of the month of May had seen the record broken so far? Guesses are welcomed!

 

 

TIE BREAKER: Teddy Tezlaff was the first driver to hold the official track record for a second "term", in 1914. Who was the first to hold it for a third?


Edited by Michael Ferner, 26 March 2014 - 18:51.