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Georges Richard, did he have a brother in the US?


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#1 Michael Ferner

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 14:02

I was amazed to read in a 1916 Arizona newspaper, that Francis Richard, the head of the Richard (or, RIChard) Motor Manufacturing Co. in Cleveland/OH, was supposed to be "the brother of George S. Richard (sic!), designer and engineer of the famous French car Richard-Brassiere (sic - no giggles, please) (...) Francis Richard is also the builder and designer of the Richard carburetor"!

 

Now, I am used to reading all kinds of BS in US newspapers, especially when it comes to Europe and racing, but this article didn't strike me as particularly sensational, and furthermore the name (Richard-)Brasier was hardly any longer a househeld one (in 1916). So, is it true? Who knows more about that?

 

 

 

P.S. For those who wonder about the Arizona bit: Bob Delno, the driver of the RIChard at the 1916 Indy 500, was originally from Tucson/AZ.


Edited by Michael Ferner, 18 April 2014 - 14:03.


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#2 robert dick

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:53

Certainly pure promotion.

Georges Richard (born in Paris in 1863) had two brothers:

- Félix-Max = involved in the "Société des Cycles Georges Richard" and president of the "Chambre Syndicale de l'Automobile",

- and Jules = producer of optical equipment.



#3 Michael Ferner

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 16:24

Many thanks, Robert! Do you know anything about the Richard carburettor?


Edited by Michael Ferner, 19 April 2014 - 16:26.


#4 robert dick

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 05:59

The Francis Richard in question was François Richard, who - with Paul Sartori - assembled the 2x4-cylinder Fiat engined special for Alfred Vanderbilt during the autumn of 1905.

 

Contemporary description of the carburetor: "The Richard carburetor, Mr. Richard's patent, is practically three carburetors in one, with the complications eliminated, and gives double power and flexibility at one-half expense for gasoline obtained by any other make."



#5 Michael Ferner

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 16:10

Thanks, again. So, the Richard in question was at least French, it seems.



#6 robert dick

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 06:42

François Richard was born in Nîmes, Southern France, on 12 February 1875 (father = Auguste Richard, mother = Antoinette née Vertu, brothers = Ferdinand and Louis);

graduated at the École Centrale/Paris in 1894;

exhibited a two-cycle engine at the Exposition Universelle/Paris in 1900;

came to New York in 1905;

designed the Only in 1909 (had "Only" one cylinder 5 inch bore x 10 inch stroke, built in Port Jefferson, NY - "with a wheelbase of 104 inches, ability to negotiate 60 miles an hour on 30 miles to the gallon of gasoline, this little beauty must call for your attention");

moved to Cleveland in 1914:
"Mr. Richard, who is unmarried, is a man of extremely versatile abilities. and charming personality. He is one of the best linguists in Cleveland, and has a knowledge of the classic Latin and Greek, and also the modern languages Spanish, Italian, French, Flemish and English. As an American citizen he votes as a democrat. His home is at 1972 East Seventieth Street."
 



#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 08:23

According to the 1920 census, which confirms the Cleveland address, he arrived in the United States in 1904. I can't trace his original arrival, but there is a subsequent one in 1906, which shows his status as a 'non-immigrant resident alien' and his address as 277 York St, Jersey City NY. At that time he was married, since he was travelling with his wife Marguerite. The 1920 census shows him sharing his home with a housekeeper and a male lodger.

 

However, his draft record (same address) gives a birth date of January 14th 1875: he probably didn't serve in the army though, since he is described as being tall, stout and slightly balding and having a 'dislocated leg'.

 

The draft record also confirms the 'Franklin Auto Manufacturing Co', but the address is only partly legible: 7800 [something starting with either F or T], Cleveland.

 

I can't find him on the 1930 census though.