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Silverstone Classic this weekend


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#1 garyfrogeye

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:52

Perhaps I've missed the thread but is anyone going from here attending? I will be camping Friday night (but not arriving till about 9pm) and Saturday night. I'll be in the rusty red frogeye, which needs a wash. Is anyone camping there too.



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#2 Alan Cox

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:44

Entry list

http://www.hscc.org....one_Classic.pdf

Timetable

http://www.hscc.org....imetable_v9.pdf



#3 Macca

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 13:56

I see Andy Middlehurst's Lotus 25 is still being listed as R4, when recent research shows that his is R3 and the one at Donington is R4/R13. 

 

Paul M



#4 chunder27

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 15:13

Would love to go, but it will be extremely hot for one, on an airfuield in the middle of nowhere with no shade.

 

And extremely expensive for what it is for another.

 

I was planning on Friday until I saw it was 39 quid.

 

I guess some folk dont mind, but fo me thats daylight robbery for a practice day, never mind 50 plsu quid on racedays



#5 Nick Planas

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 18:33

I have a ticket for Saturday; paddock entry, the lot. Can't wait - I intend to be there from dawn to dusk! Don't mind the sun, don't care if it rains. It's back to my childhood days, except I shouldn't need to queue for four hours to get in...



#6 Automobiliart

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:33

Hi
I'll be at the Silverstone Classic, set up at the History Car Art gallery stand in the art kiosque, doing a painting of Sir Stirling in his Maserati 250F at the Grand Prix de Monaco 1956.
Drop by and say "Hello"!
Cheers!
Paul
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#7 john ruston

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:02

Not sure about two paddock idea but my cars are in the morning fleet based around old paddock.

More my type of cars in old paddock so we go this morning for practise and Sunday morning for race.

Problem with the event now rather than ten,fifteen years ago is that the racing is organised by individual organisations on behalf of meeting promotor so everyone wants to make a margin and it is crazily expensive.

Pity BRDC has now't to do with racing anymore.Bring back Fitz!

Goodwood is in a different class and whilst Silverstone persues the same course will always be second best.

#8 oldtransamdriver

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:30

So where did all those Mustangs in the entry list come from?  Raced  back in the day, or just imported recently and cloned into sedan racers?  I was at the Oulton Park F2 wknd. in

72 and there may have been 1 or 2 at the most in the touring car race.

 

Robert Barg


Edited by oldtransamdriver, 25 July 2014 - 05:55.


#9 Alan Cox

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:07

So where did all those Mustangs in the entry list come from?  Raced  back in the day, or just imported recently and cloned into sedan racers?  I was at the Oulton Park F2 wknd. in

72 and there may have been 1 or 2 at the most in the touring car race.

I'm sure you are right, Robert.  I suspect you would struggle to find (m)any of the Mustangs in the entry with a period racing history



#10 Tim Murray

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:14

I haven't checked the entry list but I assume there are also the usual multitudinous hordes of Lotus Cortinas, all ex-Jim Clark, no doubt.  ;)

#11 David Wright

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 09:57

And more appropriate than the Falcons which didn't appear in the BSCC until the regulations changed to Group 5.



#12 elansprint72

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 10:30

A hot-rod meeting, on a disused airfield- what are they thinking of?  :eek:

 

I'll give it a miss.



#13 garyfrogeye

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 11:02

Blimy! I only asked if anyone was going :eek:

I for one will enjoy the weekend watching the cars on track, which in my case I was uable to watch when (and if) they raced in period.

So to answer my question of the people who replied, It's Paul, Nick, John and myself.


Edited by garyfrogeye, 25 July 2014 - 11:04.


#14 Odseybod

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 17:07

I'm there tomorrow, Gary - but not precisely sure yet of the wheres and whens. Hope to bump into you, anyway.



#15 Roy C

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 06:07

I haven't checked the entry list but I assume there are also the usual multitudinous hordes of Lotus Cortinas, all ex-Jim Clark, no doubt.  ;)

14740799384_69c0d1cde5_b.jpg



#16 LotusElise

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 09:05

Dad and I were there yesterday Yes, there were hordes of Cortinas, not sure about their claimed history.

The Mustang/Fords and Friends race may not have been absolutely period-correct, but it was a good race, one of the highlights for me. The best race was the Historic Sports Car Trophy, ably won by Leo Voyazides in a Lola T70. It was competitive and sounded beautiful.

 

The entry price looked a bit steep, but you got 12 races, with grandstand access if you wanted it, which you would pay £120+ for at Goodwood. The grandstand access was very welcome in the baking heat



#17 Nick Planas

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 10:37

Well it was a fun day out; admittedly it was easy for me to cruise along from Brackley in 15 minutes. The ticket gets you everywhere, paddocks included, so I had a good nose around some of the more memorable cars from my childhood. At the risk of being shot down in flames I would say that I'm not terribly worried about whether the car I'm seeing fleetingly on track is the exact chassis that Joe Pedaller raced in 1963/4 or whatever, but I can truly understand why to some this is important.

 

A few general observations - I'd forgotten how truly colourful the FJuniors were; uncluttered as they were with the absence of sponsorship, but it brought back a strong childhood memory. It's nice to see all these old cars aired in public, and understandable that some people were not pushing them to their limits.

 

A highlight for me was a quick word with Jackie Oliver who pulled up where I was standing in the paddock having just failed to move up to second after a good battle in the under-2.0l Touring Cars. He told me the clutch went (BMW 1.8 TiSa) - he did well to bring it home at all.

 

I tried several different vantage points through the day, but I preferred to station myself at the braking point for Copse, so I can see the cars close to their fastest while checking out the cornering pace too. From there the most impressive racers were the pre-'61 GP cars; almost to a car they were all "on it". I was particularly impressed with the Curtis Indycar driven by Fred Harper (according to my programme) who must have the most enormous cojones. I had a look inside the cockpit and blanched when I saw how close to the driver's left thigh the propshaft went. I think he hauled it up to 5th; not bad for a car designed to go mainly left!

 

I can understand LotusElise's comment about the Historic Sports Cars, though I had the privilege of watching that from the timekeepers' box in the Wing so was more interested in the behind the scenes stuff than that particular race, but we all agreed the Lolas were just fabulous.

 

Thanks to the organisers for making it a thoroughly pleasant experience; at no point was I told I couldn't go here or there, and even though there were loads of spectators in the pits & paddock they all gave the people working on the cars enough respect and room to work without officialdom feeling the need to step in.



#18 maplestone71

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 19:55

Overall enjoyed yesterday and today and think I may have started proper motor sport training with the kids (daughter shows definite lap chart keeping capabilities).

On a more serious note, however, I fear Denis Welch needs some thoughts and prayers from us based on the time spent extricating him from his overturned car today. Has anyone heard any news?

Jon

#19 Bloggsworth

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 20:53

I haven't checked the entry list but I assume there are also the usual multitudinous hordes of Lotus Cortinas, all ex-Jim Clark, no doubt.  ;)

 

And all cornering without lifting the inside front wheel...



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#20 Bloggsworth

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 20:56

14740799384_69c0d1cde5_b.jpg

 

I remember the Moto Baldet Cortinas used to turn up at the service department to be serviced like ordinary road-going cars, they used to have an offset black & orange stripe down the bonnet.



#21 Nick Planas

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 21:02

From my then vantage point on the inside of Copse, I can verify that some of those Cortinas were indeed lifting the inside front wheels in their pursuit of the Mustangs (while scrabbling consistently over and beyond the exit kerbs!) though perhaps not to the extent seen in the "good old days" :)



#22 john aston

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 07:09

God there's some miserable old sods about.... Price- I get two 3 day tickets for £95 and with 1000 plus entries, access all areas and terrific racing it's a bloody bargain where I'm concerned. Add in an  early morning blat in the Seven from my B and B at Priors Hardwick in company with a Tiger one day and a C Type the next , add in chats with lots of drivers and spectators , add in a briliant dice between Meaden and Sheddon in Cortinas, and standing on the pit wall as a Mercedes C111 Gp C car thundered by feet away and I had a bloody great time . Yes it was hot and yes it was on an old airfield . Best of all- it wasn't full of hoorays , unlike a certain venue  in Sussex.    :|



#23 garyfrogeye

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 08:21

I will leave comments regarding the terribly sad news regarding Dennis Welch on another thread, but here are my thoughts on the weekend.

I usually only go on the Sunday due to having a non motorsport participating wife. While she probably wouldn't mind if I went for the whole weekend, it's always good to save up brownie points for the four days I spend at Le Mans, as well as various sprints and Autosolos etc. On this occasion she was away with her mother, so I got to play all weekend. I'm lucky enough not to have to pay to get in, so I can't really comment on value for money. However, the Frogeye and I arrived around 20:30 on Friday, after a lovely drive up from London. Checked into the camp site (costing £50 for the whole weekend). The campsite was excellent, both in atmosphere, entertainment and facilities. The location, being 250 meters from the track obviously meant that for me, there were no traffic jams or queueing to get in. The weather obviously played an enormous part in the enjoyment of the weekend, not having to get muddy, wet or cold. The access to the cars, drivers, pits and prime viewing spots was excellent as was the variety of vehicles (original cars which raced in period or not). seeing 100+ Grand Prix cars parading on circuit was possibly a once in a lifetime experience, though my main interest is in much more humble vehicles. Having said that, the sound of the Group C cars always stirs the blood. The classic car club stands were very well attended and from the Midget & Sprite Club's point of view it was a very successful event in terms visitors, positive feedback and taking on new members, especially as we didn't go there for that purpose.

The variety of vehicles both on and off track was superb. The food and drink, while not as cheap as the high street, was still relatively good value compared to other event that I've been to (and a bargain compared to Le Mans). The whole event seemed devoid of any kind of snobbery or oneupmanship (or perhaps I just don't move in those circles).

What else can I say, except unless the weather forecast  predicts monsoons or snowdrifts, I will be back again next year, hopefully for the whole weekend.



#24 chunder27

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 08:48

I guess folks it is about what as a fan you consider value.

 

I can watch just about any motorsport, and will only pay more than 30 quid to get in if I consider it worth it's weight.

 

There are very few events I would pay that for in all honesty.

 

But, plenty of fans are happy to pay what I consider to be over the odds to watch historic racing, maybe it's to see the cars, maybe its to drive their car there and see some racing?  I did all that years ago and found it a great day out. Then they started putting on music and trying to get newer cars and sadly I was priced out.

 

It is the growth area for motorsport right now in terms of rally and race.

 

And that is reflected in the over inflated ticket prices and people watching and competing.

 

As with most things, it will continue to rise until it hits a peak, then stabilise.

 

it is interesting that I have found plenty of people tlaking about taking their wives? So they are obviously doing osmehting right, and obvisouly plenty of people see this is a value day out.



#25 john aston

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:26

Honestly - it isn't expensive. Unless you regard everything else as overpriced-  BTCC is £30 (for spec formula bumper cars); Santa Pod is similar; theatre or a rock band usually is £30 -50 and last time I went to Covent Garden (or fly fished the Test come to that ) I got pennies change out of £200 . It costs £70 to fill up my diesel for God's sake! I

 

The Classic  is a terrific event and the highlight of the racing year for me .

 

But I was so very sad to hear about the fatality- only the second to have happened whilst I was present in 45 years of race meetings thank God. 



#26 chunder27

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:34

John

 

BTCC is better family entertainment as is BSB, which is why they are able to continually get decent crowds decade after decade. They offer big grids, great racing and because of their success can somehow keep prices lower. PLus being a series they can tour the country. This is a one off hence the profit margin.

 

I guess I am priced out of most sport. I have got used to watching clubmans motorsport and short oval racing for so long where the most you will ever pay is 30 quid for the biggest race of the year. Also supporting smaller footie teams and occasional rugby union club sides means it is cheaper to watch top level sport. 

 

So 59 quid for a bunch of amateurs racing old cars seems a lot I guess, and 39 quid for practice frankly I find embarassing. But maybe there was racing Friday so they coudl get away with it I dont know.

 

As I said before i used to go before Etcell got involved and back than it was trying to be Coys but nowhere near, Very club like, lots of cars, lots of mixed grids, was great fun, my Dad and I loved it.

 

But sadly, as time went on the prices went up and for me and Dad we were disappointed once or twice with no shows and going to see great cars being driven very slowly, as is often the case at Goodwood, so decided to do other things.

 

You mention drag racing, there are very few events with ticket prices that high, only the FIA events. The rest of events there are often 20 quid range, which is great value, for facilities on a par with Silverstone I might add.

 

For me 200 quid is a horrendous amount for amateur historic racing, just shows wher ethe money is in modern motorsport, I could go to a round of world rallycross abroad for that including ferry, hotel, tickets and fuel!

Each to their own clearly.



#27 john aston

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:54

I wouldn't term Stretton, Hadfield , Neal or Sheddon(and many others- check out the drivers in the paddock for some shockingly young ones )   old and  while  Whizzo et al are no  spring chickens they can bloody drive. Don't know if you have actually attended any BTCC live recently ? I have and although the feature race  pantomime gets some people going the cars  are hideous and sound ghastly , the driving is often  cynical and the support races are thin gridded spec fomulae with little decent racing  . As for the crowd , or ..er,, BTCC barmy army it's chav heaven ...



#28 chunder27

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:54

I am usually doing other things to be honest, but from what I gather they still get healthy crowds, even though the meetings are televised.

 

I have been watching Stretton, Hadfield, and many others for years, and sadly they are the cream of the crop. Very often in the past my Dad and I would plan on going, see a 917 or something cool on the entry list and then get there to see if cruising round or not turn up.

 

Then you watch a historic F1 race and there are people on that grid who would be lapped in 2 laps round a dodgem track racing, I found this a little uncomfortable and dangerous. Though some guys up front were super quick.

 

Historic motorsport is massive right now. the money is coming from a lot of folk who are now very well off and couldn't race back then when they were young putting money in to teams, buying cars, and the promoters realise this and ahve moved with it. And as I say you cant blame them, if folk are prepared to fork out 200 quid for a weekends spectating why would they make it cheaper? 

 

Nostalgia is immense in the UK, I went to Santa Pod recently for a meeting called Dragstalgia, the crowd was huge, BTCC level.

 

So, it seems people will go to this kind of thing, Goodwood has been popular for years. But the Classic has managed to get itself on a similar plane. Admittance fees are now much closer, they never used to be. Drivers are wanting to compete, they never used to, it was your usual deal of paying a Sytner, Hadfield, Stretton to help you sort it if he has a go in the race with you etc.

 

So, the scene has changed a lot. Classic car prices are huge and increasing, my Dads 911 was worth 10k now mayb doubled, people are coming in as investors in these things. That happened rarely int he past away from marquee cars.

 

As a fan, I just don't see it as good value.  But as I say tens of thousands do so it will not change until or if this nostalgia bubble bursts, then it wll do it was doing before, passing from promoter to promoter until someone like the people now get lucky in an era when nostalgia is huge.

 

For me this weekend I was horrified at the cost of a practice day, that's all. When in the past I have got in free to watch WEC practice within 5 years!  Maybe you can understand the point.



#29 geordiecraig101

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 14:33

After going to the classic last year for 2 days, this year i thought about doing all three as well as taking my dad for his late Xmas present and we both agreed it's a great event and will be going back next year.

 

There is sum thing for everyone, whether its race cars/ road cars/ entertainment or memorabilia stalls, u cant help but be impressed.  For me, its the race cars as prity much of these had stopped racing first time round by the time i was born, for my dad it was all the road cars as it took him back to when he was young plus as being a big Eagles fan, having the Ultimate Eagles playing on the Friday night just topped it off for him.

 

The way the event is organised with the buses going around the perimeter grandstands then the buses running from both pits was a god send as it let you travel around the whole circuit in little time meaning more time to enjoy the action, so all in all just perfect.

 

Any way here's the vid of the action i managed to get from the weekend.

 



#30 MODE

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 15:15

Great video, thanks  :wave:  M.Stretton showing again that all F1 cars can win with the right driver  :up:



#31 LotusElise

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 16:02

Most of the races I saw were very competitive. There was the usual cohort of trundlers, but the drivers at the front, who did include some current BTCC/WTCC big-names, were going for it. Even pro racing series have to have their share of back-markers

 

There were some disappointing drop-outs from the Group C grids, but the race I saw was no demo run - Martin Stretton, Katsu Kubota and further back, Michael Lyons were all going for it.

 

It would be interesting to see some younger drivers taking part, but young drivers are not usually known for having the wealth of a Leo Voyazides or the connections (and wealth) of a Martin Stretton.



#32 chunder27

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 19:22

Well there you go

 

Apparently 90,000 of you went this weekend

 

Just think about that for a minute.

 

I gather entry fees for some races were over 800 quid.

 

the cheapest ticket was 39 quid.

 

So even if you all went on Friday to watch practice thats 3.5 million in gate receipts alone!

 

Fair play to Silverstone, I don't get it, but they are onto a winner with that meeting clearly, and clearly attracting folk that will happily shell out fairly serious money too.



#33 geoffd

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 19:36

I had a great time at Silverstone.  £95 for two for three days, that's about £16 each per day.  There were lots of fine cars, some good racing, and the social scene with the car clubs adds another dimension.  It seemed like good value to me.

 

Geoff



#34 Nick Planas

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 19:38

I get that you don't get it. I don't do pop concerts / festivals but I accept that some folks will fork out loads to camp in muddy fields to "hear" their favourite and not so favourite bands. I'm happy that they're happy.

Serious money maybe, but it's what you get for it.

 

Silverstone needs to make serious money to be able to afford the fees for the GP, and I've always been a believer that if you don't con people to pay a lot more than they expected to, and they're happy, then you've done good business.

 

I applaud them for making it a good value day out, with food that wasn't overpriced and access to pretty much everywhere. Oh, and the complete absence of people with airhorns every time their favourite driver goes past. Yep, compared to the Grand Prix the value was priceless. Or how about the F1 testing. Half the price of the entry to the Classic, but restricted to a small part of the circuit and not the most spectacular parts either, to watch 11 cars maybe go round if they felt like it.

 

People are free to complain by all means but let's not knock it.



#35 chunder27

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 22:10

Interesting.

 

I know Silverstone need to make money, and this must be their biggest moneyspinner now.

What I can't understand is the sudden vast swathes of people watching historic racing. I knoew it was popular but this is from where exactly? Would you seriously call it a family day out?  It seems so.

 

I could understand a gradual increase, but for what is pretty much an amateur sport, all of a sudden the punters are quite happy to fork out fairly high prices to watch it, when they weren't before? What's changed? Are these folk that used to go F1 and been replaced by other folk that are wanting to go F1?  Or what.

 

Silverstone doesn't seem to be struggling with F1 crowds, no matter what the cost.

 

So where on earth has this huge chunk of people happy to spend this much on watching a posh club meeting come from?  A ticket for any day for me on my own would have been more expensive for example than the World Motocross championship, an event that gets a decent crowd every year, and for me was a little pricey!

 

Maybe I am just not with these crazy kids and what is considered reasonable? Lol



#36 arttidesco

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 23:59

I must admit I was happy to go to the practice day a couple of years ago, then I had the opportunity of sharing the petrol expenses for 'Super Saturday' the following year and the last couple of years I have been on the guest list so 'Super Saturday' has become a regular fixture.

 

I quite understand everyone has to draw a line in the sand, I crossed my own line in the sand to see practice for the British GP last year for the first time since 1984 and if it had continued raining in the afternoon as it did in the morning I would have been extremely disappointed, the one off Silverstone F1 Test Day was an absolute bargain and thanks to unexpectedly meeting another TNFer I met at the track I saw a whole load of the action from vantage points I would not normally have had access to.

 

To date the best value for money events I have ever attended have been the Le Mans 24 hour races, I have not been for over 20 years, but the ticket prices always appeared to be aimed at any old Jacques who could make it to the track and I doubt it has changed much since then.

 

The rise in interest in historic racing seems to be a result of a number of factors, disaffection with stock blocks, spec chassis and one make racing which has seen an ever increasing nostalgic malaise take over the sport in place of a continually growing interest in the talents of the drivers and engineers that are coming through the sport.

 

But all of this ignores the real elephant in the cupboard which is that over the last ten to twenty years while the rich have, as always never stopped getting richer, the pyramid is getting ever narrower meaning that the base of potential drivers and engineers is getting ever smaller, because for 20 years or so the overall standard of living has without question fallen, not just in this country, but globally. This means that for most teenagers the prospect of owning a car on the road let alone on the race track is getting postponed into ever later life as most now have to take on substantial debts just to complete a half way decent education and postpone home ownership into their mid thirties.

 

That's my tuppence worth anyway, I hope it's not all too much doom and gloom and that as Gerhard Richter observed there is always hope, even in a disaster zone.

 

I notice tickets for the Gold Cup at Oulton Park are a fraction of the price of those at Silverstone Classic and Goodwood, I hope if historic/classic racing floats your boat I will meet some of you there.


Edited by arttidesco, 30 July 2014 - 06:52.


#37 john aston

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:48

MY final words-if you are too broke or tight to pay for your day out then go for Thursday testing; free of charge, access anywhere and lots of cars to watch and drivers to talk to(I enjoyed chatting to F5000 hero and now Bond FJ racer Mike Walker) . Doubtless somebody will moan and chelp about the downside of that too...

 

Crowd demographic- in the main they are informed and enthusiastic and unfailingly polite , as were the circuit staff. As a chippy Yorkshireman I found a very low hooray count compared to the sainted and absurdly priced Goodwood    

 

Car club stands were superb - seeing a couple of 7litre Iso Grifos. a stunning and very noisy Miura and the one off Ghia Cobra as well as some very rare and beautiful Lancias was a joy. I won't dwell on the Cobra replica stand though- a couple of gems in a sea of crassness.

 

I certainly wouldn't describe the upsurge in historic racing as a malaise-  for Christ's sake if it means I get to see and hear a horde of T70s or 50 plus Formula Juniors or  a howling Ferrari 246 or 512 I'm happy and I don't mind admitting it :wave:

 

I shall be at Croft Nostalgia meeting this weekend and expect thoroughly to enjoy it- it's cheap too....


Edited by john aston, 30 July 2014 - 06:49.


#38 Tim Murray

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:03

MY final words-if you are too broke or tight to pay for your day out then go for Thursday testing; free of charge, access anywhere and lots of cars ...


Is this still possible, John? We used to do this and, as you say, it was great. Last year, however, they wouldn't let us in as we didn't have the correct pass. :well:

#39 Supertourer

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:24

Interesting.

 

I know Silverstone need to make money, and this must be their biggest moneyspinner now.

What I can't understand is the sudden vast swathes of people watching historic racing. I knoew it was popular but this is from where exactly? Would you seriously call it a family day out?  It seems so.

 

I could understand a gradual increase, but for what is pretty much an amateur sport, all of a sudden the punters are quite happy to fork out fairly high prices to watch it, when they weren't before? What's changed? Are these folk that used to go F1 and been replaced by other folk that are wanting to go F1?  Or what.

 

Silverstone doesn't seem to be struggling with F1 crowds, no matter what the cost.

 

So where on earth has this huge chunk of people happy to spend this much on watching a posh club meeting come from?  A ticket for any day for me on my own would have been more expensive for example than the World Motocross championship, an event that gets a decent crowd every year, and for me was a little pricey!

 

Maybe I am just not with these crazy kids and what is considered reasonable? Lol

 

 

Silverstone as in Silverstone Circuits Ltd, don't run the Silverstone Classic, the event is run under license by a seperate promoter. SCL simply gain a licence fee and circuit hire.



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#40 Supertourer

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:26

Well there you go

 

Apparently 90,000 of you went this weekend

 

Just think about that for a minute.

 

I gather entry fees for some races were over 800 quid.

 

the cheapest ticket was 39 quid.

 

So even if you all went on Friday to watch practice thats 3.5 million in gate receipts alone!

 

Fair play to Silverstone, I don't get it, but they are onto a winner with that meeting clearly, and clearly attracting folk that will happily shell out fairly serious money too.

 

This won't be 90,000 ticket sales - events promoters count attendance as people on site per day - so for example if 15,000 people bought 3 day tickets and went each day that would equate to 45,000 people over 3 days.



#41 john aston

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:47

Is this still possible, John? We used to do this and, as you say, it was great. Last year, however, they wouldn't let us in as we didn't have the correct pass. :well:

Yes- have done so for last 3 years- I just drive up to main entrance, say I am going to the old pits and that's it. I park up where I can and enjoy myself.Nobody has ever asked for a pass (but if they did I would just say I'm picking it up from my mate Jackie Oliver  in the Historic saloons paddock (or whatever fairy tale you spin)) 



#42 Tim Murray

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:12

OK - perhaps we were just unlucky with the person we encountered on the main gate, who flatly refused to let us in without a pass, which we did manage to scrounge.  ;)

Edited by Tim Murray, 30 July 2014 - 08:15.


#43 Alan Cox

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:31

 

I notice tickets for the Gold Cup at Oulton Park are a fraction of the price of those at Silverstone Classic and Goodwood, I hope if historic/classic racing floats your boat I will meet some of you there.

Admittedly the Gold Cup doesn't get the quality and breadth of entries that the Classic and Revival get, nor the spread of quality sideshows and, also, it's 'oop north', but I am intrigued as to where the vast numbers of 'old' car fans, who attend the high-profile events, go for the rest of the year if they are so interested in historic racing cars. They certainly don't go to the average HSCC or VSCC meeting which cost relative peanuts for admission.


Edited by Alan Cox, 30 July 2014 - 08:32.


#44 yasushi888

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 09:26

What I can't understand is the sudden vast swathes of people watching historic racing. I knoew it was popular but this is from where exactly? Would you seriously call it a family day out?  It seems so.

I could understand a gradual increase, but for what is pretty much an amateur sport, all of a sudden the punters are quite happy to fork out fairly high prices to watch it, when they weren't before? What's changed? Are these folk that used to go F1 and been replaced by other folk that are wanting to go F1?  Or what.

Well for me I've started looking more at historic race meetings, partly because there is the nostalgia of seeing the cars racing again when I first started watching. I'm 27 so the cars I saw at 12/13 years old have only just really started being classed as 'historics' its making me feel very old seeing the Super Tourers in a historic championship! The other reason's being that I think the cars in general were far more exciting in looks and sounds in previous years than what Motorsport is offering today and also to see cars which I have never seen before in person but heard/seen all about in images/videos.

One thing I don't understand is the Silverstone thing, I can't stand the place! For me the worst circuit in England, poor viewing and has the atmosphere of an Industrial estate! It just seems wrong for historic cars to be on such a circuit. So out of place. But thats just me. The Silverstone Classic organisers must be doing something right because the reviews are good and the event seems to be getting stronger each year which is nice to hear at a time when all other motorsport events seem to be struggling to get decent attendances.  :up:



#45 chunder27

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 09:53

Yas

 

This is exactly my point

 

My kind of exasperation at this event stems from going a few times about 5 or 6 years ago. Grids were decent then too, OK nowhere near as big as now but still very good. And it was a fair bit cheaper to get in.

 

Surely folk who wanted to watch this sort of stuff were around then too?  I know this kind of racing is experiencing a boom, but the rapid inflation of crowds and ticket prices is staggering.

 

My interest is in where these people come from. What their interest is, do they go anywhere else? Is F1 and Goodwood too expensive or far away?

 

You are right though Silverstone is a truly hideous place, Brands, Donington (who are cashing in on thier own theme here early on in the year thankfully) Oulton ahve their own mini Classics with Masters events and the Gold cup,.

 

I guess I am just fascinated in the sheer numbers invovled, or are the figured being manipulated?

 

Coys was big, Goodwood has always been big for years both events. but this seesm to have come from nowhere!



#46 Supertourer

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 09:58

Admittedly the Gold Cup doesn't get the quality and breadth of entries that the Classic and Revival get, nor the spread of quality sideshows and, also, it's 'oop north', but I am intrigued as to where the vast numbers of 'old' car fans, who attend the high-profile events, go for the rest of the year if they are so interested in historic racing cars. They certainly don't go to the average HSCC or VSCC meeting which cost relative peanuts for admission.

 

I don't think they go anywhere and I don't think they are particularly old car fans per se - they may well be big car event fans. The promoters of the 'big' events have packaged them into an easily buyable product that satisfys the true enthusiast to the vaugely interested, be that someone who wants the scale and variety of the classic or the period atmosphere and theatre of the Revival -  both of which have something for everyone. And invested substantial sums in building the customer base.

 

You pays your money and takes your choice, indeed you could have seen the Masters F1 and Super Tourers at Brands Hatch just before the Silverstone Classic, but how many went to that? Equally how many visitors to the SC or the Revival even know when other HSCC or VSCC meetings are, or that there are smaller events to go to?

 

Promotion all costs money and equals risk and VSCC/HSCC meetings are really for the drivers and funded by them, to take them to a level where they could attract outside of the historic circle takes big investment and risk although you would imagine they could use their involvement in the large scale events to reach out to a new audience.


Edited by Supertourer, 30 July 2014 - 10:01.


#47 arttidesco

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 13:59

Back in the day, well all the way back to '78 when i first went to Silverstone, I thought it was a bit 'sketchy', but the place has undeniable history and the latest form of the circuit is IMHO a huge improvement on the days of my youth particularly in terms of spectating, the new complex being a particular favourite if I'm paying and the end of the new pit wall if I am a guest.

 

But for sheer character Cadwell, Oulton Brands and Donington will always top Silverstone which if course has the misfortune of being situated on top of an old airfield.

 

BTW if 90,000 went I would suggest some were three day ticket holders who did not attend the whole three days, going on the size of the crowd I saw on Saturday.



#48 chunder27

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 14:04

Interestng again art

 

From the galleries I ahve seen there dont seem to be 40 or 50 thousands people there either day, which would tend to hint you are right!



#49 john aston

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 14:53

Sorry but the sneering tone on the theme of 'who are these people who dare to go to Silverstone Classic  and enjoy themselves, can't be a real fan like me ' is just risible.They go to have a good day out but not all of them know the compression ratio on an ERA ...So what? Is it meant to be an exclusive club of anoraks who can look down at mere mortals unblessed by the  encyclopaedic knowledge of the cognoscenti ?

 

Me , I  go to HSCC, some VSCC and a lot of modern meetings and I enjoy them all , but I gave up Goodwood because it's a long way from home and I'm buggered if I'm paying for GRRC membership so I can get into the paddock. Silverstone has immense heritage but absolutely is terrible for spectating but if I can stand next to a T70 being warmed up in a pit garage I'm happy . And I don't have to contend with people poncing around in fancy dress there either(yup, I can be elitist too)  .



#50 garyfrogeye

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 19:02

"My interest is in where these people come from. What their interest is, do they go anywhere else? Is F1 and Goodwood too expensive or far away?"


I describe myself as an enthusiastic motor racing fan with almost no knowledge. I wasn't weaned on motorsports, in fact my parents couldn't really care less about cars other than to get them from A to B. I on the other hand have always loved cars and could name the road cars of my childhood (I was born in 1961) pretty much at the same as I learnt to speak.

I came to motor racing other than watching F1 and Autocross on TV, rather late. And the only motorsport (if you can call it that) that I ever attended before adulthood was at Harringey Stadium being taken by my dad, on possibly only two occasions, to see the banger racing.


I did a bit of Go Karting but only the slow stuff in disused bus depots, generally around London. Plus a couple of Formula Ford driving experience days. One at Goodwood with Mithrill racing (James Hunts Brother) and another at Brands Hatch.

In 2000 I bought a Frogeye Sprite and then things changed. I later became the editor of the Midget & Sprite Clubs monthly magazine Mascot, which I've edited on a voluntary basis since August 2008. Because of that, I've come into contact with a few ex Spridget racers like John Sprinzel and Jack Wheeler (who I saw again only today). While doing research for the magazine, I have stumbled on various websites and buleting boards such as this, which is increasing my knowledge expidentially. It's also brought me into contact with many more people involved with motorsports. Especially through the TFN Herts Film show organised by Richard Hinton, and more recently guest speakers through the 750 motor Club.

My Frogeye has evolved from a Sprite with a later engine, to become a fast road car and relatively competent track day/Sprint car, though it's still quite happy transporting me to Sainsbury on a Saturday morning. That's the background.


In terms of the events I visit, I'm lucky to be able to get media accreditation to some venues but would probably pay the entrance fees even if I didn't.

These events are the Le Mans 24 Hour every June. This is a non negotiable outing which neither my boss or my wife (yes they are different people) would try to or desire to stop me attending. The Classic Le Mans, if I feel that I've deserved to take a long weekend off so soon after the 24 hours. The Silverstone Classic, The Donington Historic. The Classic Car show at the NEC, Race Retro and a few others. I participate in various track days and the aforementioned Sprints and Autosolos. I would attend other events if I had more time, but in all honesty, as my wife really wouldn't want to attend any motorsport events, and given the choice, I would rather spend time with her over doing anything else. I'm restricted to perhaps 20 events per year. I also don't want to stand in the freezing cold or the driving rain watching motorsports. So I can hardly be described as hard core. 


Why do I think that events like Silverstone are successful? 

I believe that the wide array of older vehicles (be they historic racing cars or plain old basic classic vehicles) attracts a very wide demographic. Think how many classic vehicles attended Silverstone last weekend, and each of them has at least one occupant, sometimes four or five. Coupled with family entertainment, relatively cheap prices, A safe child friendly environment, And possibly overlooked so far, a geographically central location which is also very well organised, means that you are always going to get far more people attending than a cold rainy day at Knockhill, watching Caterham Sevens (or similar) in the middle of February.

You can argue about whether 90,000, 75,000 or only 50,000 people attended over the weekend. Either way, it's tens of thousands of people. No, the viewing position may not be as good as some other circuits (though Donington is fantastic) or unrestricted by catch fencing as it was in previous decades. But you can still get right up close to the cars in the pits, still hear the glorious sounds and still smell the oil and rubber. For someone like me, who's not particularly interested in the number of rivets on the underside of a 1950's Grand Prix car, but who likes to see them being driven. These events are wonderful. 

Sorry, I only intended to write a couple of lines!