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#1 Boniver

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 05:00

DO YOU KNOW THE FATE, WHEREABOUTS OR HISTORY OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING MARQUES?


Fry
Gordano
Tojeira




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#2 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 11:39

Are you sure about all these spellings Boniver?

1 The Fry-Climax was a peculiar-looking one-off F2 car built in 1959 and raced by Mike Parkes. I don't think it still exists, but there are some basic details about it in David Hodges A-Z of Formula Racing Cars.

2 Gordini?? If so, which Gordinis?

3 Tojeiro?? If so, which Tojeiro? If it's a single seater you're after (most Tojeiros were sports cars), it could be John Tojeiro's first single-seater design, which was a Formula Junior for Britannia Cars.

Most of the production was sold to the USA, but they were not very successful on either side of the Atlantic.

When Britannia cars went broke, JohnTojeiro bought the parts for six cars which he made up and sold as Tojeiros. Yet more proof that changing the name doesn't improve the performance.

#3 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 21:07

Oops! The Fry was actually built in 1958, not 1959, as I discovered when I tried looking its race history up. It raced through both years in the hands of Mike Parkes.

I've also just encountered another Tojeiro (sort of). Apparently someone called Richard Utley entered a "Tojeiro-Climax" in the F2 class of the 1958 German GP. The note in Sheldon Volume 6 says: "did not arrive, no such car". This ties in with my previous post, as the Britannia was JohnTojeiro's first single-seater and didn't appear until 1960. I suppose it could have been an FPF-engined sports car: one ran at Le Mans in 1958 with an 1100cc Climax engine.

#4 Roger Clark

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 21:24

Richard Uttley was entered in the 1.5 litre sports car race which supported the 1958 German GP, driving a works tojeiro.

#5 David McKinney

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 22:41

Richard Utley (one 't') was later associated with Bob Hicks in the design and construction of the FJ Caravelle. Utley's still racing, in historic events with a 500cc JBS

#6 Criceto

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Posted 11 May 2001 - 23:07

The Gordano - I may be totally wrong (can't find my copy of Iota at short notice) but wasn't the Gordano a Formula 3/500cc special built by Dick Caesar around 1950?

Caesar was something of an eclectic enthusiast, involved with Formula 3, hillclimbs and the Bentley Drivers Club (!) The name would have come from the part of North Somerset he was based in, just down the road from Avonmouth.


And while we're on really obscure 500cc specials, has anyone any clue what became of the three Trevithicks, built in Cornwall? I've a friend whose dad ran one of these - once - before the JAP engine decided to pop. The look on his face when I showed him the Paul Sheldon reference to his one and only race meeting at Rufforth was a sight to behold!

#7 Pete Stowe

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Posted 08 May 2002 - 19:05

The Fry-Climax was constructed by David Fry at Frenchay, Bristol. Back in the 1930s, with input from Dick Caesar Fry built the Freikaiserwagen hillclimb & sprint car, which he shared with cousin Joe Fry. This had various incarnations (see John Bolsters 'Specials' book) & in 1949 Joe set a new hii record at Shelsely Walsh. In the late 1940s Davids younger brother Jeremy built a 500cc Iota based F3 named the Parsenn.

The Gordano was to be a road going sports car (late 1940s), with concept & chassis design by Dick caesar, Rodney Gordon Jones was to design a new engine, intended to be a 4cyl 1.5 litre with Cross rotary valves. It was to be financed by Joe Fry, and the workshop was in Clifton, Bristol. 2 prototypes were built, an open sports version with 1548cc MG engine, & a saloon with 1767cc Lea Francis engine. However Gordon-Jones died in 1950, then Joe Fry was killed racing at Blandford, and the project folded.

Articles on the Gordano appeared in Autocar 3 August 1962 and the Automobile July 1993.

#8 dmj

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Posted 09 May 2002 - 15:58

Originally posted by Criceto
And while we're on really obscure 500cc specials, has anyone any clue what became of the three Trevithicks, built in Cornwall? I've a friend whose dad ran one of these - once - before the JAP engine decided to pop. The look on his face when I showed him the Paul Sheldon reference to his one and only race meeting at Rufforth was a sight to behold!

Amazing! I knew about only one car named Trevithick, and certainly not a race one (although undoubtly the fastest car on Earth in its time)... http://www.trevithic...g.uk/index.html will give more info - Cornwall origin of these race cars means that someone in that Trust should know about fate of these cars, as descendandts of Richard Trevithick were probably involved in building them.
BTW, was there any racing car named Cugnot?;)

#9 Doug Nye

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Posted 09 May 2002 - 16:16

Warm welcome to Pete Stowe - great contribution. As a relatively newboy myself I have never welcomed anyone before - always have the sneaking feeling they pre-date me.

#10 bobbo

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Posted 09 May 2002 - 21:07

Doug:

Don't feel too bad, I once welcomed someone who was a member 6 months before I joined :blush: :blush: :blush: .

Besides, while you've only been at TNF for a short while, you have certainly been "in the know" a LONG time.

Keep on posting!

(and welcoming!)

Bobbo

#11 Barry Boor

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Posted 10 May 2002 - 21:05

May one make a very small request for information regarding the colour of the Fry Climax?

#12 Doug Nye

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Posted 10 May 2002 - 21:58

Well - it's on very fine colour movie featured in a recently released video/DVD entitled 'Motorfilms Quarterly Volume 1' - David Weguelin Productions - e-mail ....ooommmph!!!

#13 Rainer Nyberg

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Posted 10 May 2002 - 22:13

Definetely OT, when seeing Bobbo's place of residence, do you ever visit the Dover Downs One-mile Speedway?

Do you listen to George Thorogood ???

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#14 bobbo

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Posted 10 May 2002 - 23:20

Rainer:

Would you believe that I have lived less than 5 miles fron Dover Downs for 18 years, drive right past it almost every day and have NEVER :blush: :blush: :blush: been to the track? Shoot me now or later? I can at least hear the cars during practice and the races, I can usually tell when the Busch cars or Winston Cup cars are running, they do sound different.

Uh . . . Who is George Thorogood?

Bobbo

#15 Rainer Nyberg

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Posted 11 May 2002 - 10:14

I understand, NASCAR is more an entertainment than real racing after all.
But I guess that they run local events, for everyday Joe, there as well?

Thorogood is a blues/rock guitar player, and one of my favorite acts. Been a fan of him since the early 1980s. He is from Delaware, and his group is called the Delaware Destroyers.

#16 bobbo

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Posted 11 May 2002 - 11:26

Actually, Rainer, having been to a few other tracks on the NSCAR Winston Cup series over the years, I have found that there IS a LOT of racing going on. If you have access, you might want to check out videos of the road races at Sears Point and Watkins Glen. Real passing, a few spins, "trading paint", etc. Really impressive through the Esses at The Glen.

Oh, well, back on thread, there are a few pics of the Fry-Climax somewhere in this Forum, I've just not been able to locate them. Does Barry Boor have any pics of it? Sorry, too much cood Port (and good cigars) last night . . . :drunk: :blush:

Bobbo

#17 Rainer Nyberg

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Posted 11 May 2002 - 11:45

Yes, those races on Sears Point and Watkins Glen are usually very entertaining and good racing.

I have taped quite a few of those over the years.

#18 Rainer Nyberg

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Posted 11 May 2002 - 11:49

A small one here of the Fry, but it has appeared larger here before...


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#19 Joe Fan

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Posted 11 May 2002 - 15:00

Originally posted by bobbo
Rainer:

Would you believe that I have lived less than 5 miles fron Dover Downs for 18 years..


Doesn't everybody in Delaware live about 5 miles from Dover Downs? :cool: :D

Back to the topic, Graham Gauld is working on a biography of John Tojeiro. It is one that I am looking forward to purchasing when it comes out.

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#20 Ian McKean

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Posted 14 May 2002 - 00:04

British readers will recall the advertising jingle,

"Fry's Turkish Delight..."

Yes, the Fry's were from the Chocolate family!

The Iota was also designed by Dick Caesar, and was originally a plan drawn up for the 500 Club.

The Fry-Climax looks pretty weird (thanks Rainer), but then so did the Freikaiserwagen.

#21 Barry Boor

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Posted 14 May 2002 - 06:12

Yes, the Fry's were from the Chocolate family!



So the car was two-tone brown then? :lol:

#22 Vitesse2

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Posted 02 June 2002 - 21:27

Yesterday BBC Radio Bristol ran their annual History Fest. I caught part of an interview with a charming chap from Frenchay Museum Society whose name I didn't catch - apparently the museum have an exhibit devoted to the Fry family, who were prominent Quakers in the community for many years, and they are developing the theme of the Fry racing cars as a major part of it!

At the moment it sounds pretty basic - photocopies from Motor Sport were mentioned, but not much else - but he did mention that he had heard that the Fry-Climax was supposed to be still in existence: rumoured to be somewhere in Bath! As he said in an appeal to listeners "So, if you've got an old racing car in your garage with a Coventry Climax engine in the back ...." :)

#23 ensign14

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Posted 02 June 2002 - 21:48

OT, but the Cadbury and Rowntree families were Quakers as well - they made their money by promoting a non-alcoholic drink (and trying to sell it to the masses as a replacement for that Ruinous Liquid) and ploughed it straight back into improving their workforce's lives. In Joseph Cadbury's case this resulted in a whole suburb of Birmingham being created, called Bournville.

#24 Pete Stowe

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Posted 04 June 2002 - 20:43

I caught part of an interview with a charming chap from Frenchay Museum Society whose name I didn't catch
Vitesse2


That might have been Alan Freke, or possibly Martin Longbottom, who had a letter in this months Motor Sport asking for memorabilia relating to the Freikaiserwagen. The exhibit should eventually be quite interesting as the Bristol MC&LCC have offered them film of the Frys with the Freikaiserwagen at Backwell pre-war & Shelsley (or maybe it was Prescott) post war (which reminds me that I must tell them about the Fry-Climax on the 'Motorfilms Quarterly' video). There is also a rumour that the Freikaiserwagen chassis is somewhere in Bath. The Bristol MC&LCC still have the Joe Fry Memorial Trophy which was awarded to the Formula 1 race winners at Castle Combe in the 1950s - this was a perfect scale model of the Freikaiserwagen, created at significant expense after Joe’s death.

#25 mickj

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Posted 15 July 2002 - 00:53

Was Ron Fry who raced Ferrari's in England in the 60's a member of the Fry family ??

#26 Pete Stowe

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Posted 15 July 2002 - 20:58

I understand he wasn't one of the "chocolate" Frys (see also thread "Need your help" http://www.atlasf1.c...&threadid=43356).

Ron Fry was a garage owner from Bath. Early sprints & races were with an Aston Martin DB2/4 , then he had 250GT, GTO & LM Ferraris in succession, followed by a couple of Ford GT 40's for sports & GT races, and also ran a Downton Mini, Broadspeed Escort, and then a Mustang in saloon races.

#27 David Beard

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Posted 11 August 2002 - 09:59

Originally posted by David McKinney
Richard Utley (one 't') was later associated with Bob Hicks in the design and construction of the FJ Caravelle. Utley's still racing, in historic events with a 500cc JBS


And Bob Hicks's son is now racing the Caravelle in Historic FJ races.

#28 Pete Stowe

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Posted 06 November 2002 - 19:45

Originally posted by Pete Stowe

There is also a rumour that the Freikaiserwagen chassis is somewhere in Bath.


It turns out that the rumoured car is not the Freikaiserwagen, which was written off in Joe Fry’s fatal accident at Blandford and never rebuilt, but is in fact Jeremy Fry’s 500cc Formula 3 Parsenn. Although now lacking engine and bodywork it is otherwise a complete rolling chassis in good condition. I now understand that the Parsenn was not based on the Iota chassis, but was a unique design, with three 24 gauge steel tube frame subsections which were quickly detachable. When it first appeared in 1949 the Parsenn was noted as technically interesting, with all round independent rubber suspension, swing-axle rear with rubber in compression, front having rubber in torsion with Armstrong dampers, apparently known as the Spencer Moulton Roto-tube.

Rubber suspension would seem to be something that the Formula 2 Fry-Climax of 1958-59 had in common with the Parsenn. The F2 Fry-Climax actually raced more often than is evident from Sheldon, as Mike Parkes also drove it in a number of UK Formula Libre races (a practice in common with other F2 racers of the time) best result being a win at Silverstone in September 1958. The car was modified somewhat for the 1959 season, the original low rear-engine cowling being replaced by a high tailfinned version, giving it a toothpaste-tube appearance, and, to quote Autosport, "a Porsche gearbox replacing the original VW, & wishbone rear suspension in place of the rubber bands." The car doesn't seem to have been raced in 1960, and was offered for sale - as a potential F1 car- by Mike Parkes in the Autosport classifieds in early 1961.

#29 Ian McKean

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Posted 06 November 2002 - 20:07

Does anyone know what the origin of the name Parsenn was?

Reading this thread again and the name Richard Utley, I have an idea that he had a Frazer-Nash Le Mans Replica once? Did I imagine this?

And Tojeiro; perhaps his main significance was when AC adopted his Tojiero Bristol as the basis for the Ace. So his later involvement in the Dax Cobra replica provides an even older link than Shelby's.

#30 Vitesse2

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Posted 25 December 2002 - 16:18

This seems an appropriate place to mention a new video on Bristol Motor Sport. Produced by First Take, a local firm, with help from Bristol MC & LCC. The commentary leaves a little to be desired, but there's some wonderful film from the 30s, 40s and 50s of races, hillclimbs and sprints - quite a few shots of what must be some of the 500cc specials of the time - my knowledge of those is rudimentary, to say the least, but there's some (shall we say) eccentric creations. Also some early shots of Castle Combe and the Backwell, Naish and Dyrham hillclimbs.

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https://www.1st-take...ge_Complete.htm

#31 Pete Stowe

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Posted 26 January 2003 - 09:44

Another early 500 F3 has just been unearthed - literally- here in the West Country, the Iota chassied Milliunion built and raced by Gerry Millington. Although without engine or bodywork, the rest of the car has survived - just, although the chassis has been badly attacked by rust, so a re-creation using any serviceable original parts rather than a restoration is on the cards.

This is one of the original batch of 12 Iota chassis made in 1947. These were not produced as complete cars, but comprised a number of new parts: tube frame chassis, rear swing-axle assembly, rear wheel hubs, frame to carry the front suspension, & coil springs for the front suspension. Individual builders could then complete the cars with engine, second hand Morgan front suspension & hubs, brakes, transverse rear leaf spring, etc, and also construct their own bodywork. These cars tended to be given unique names, such as ‘Stromboli,’ the first car completed by Adrian Butler and Bruce Mardon, Jim Bosisto’s Buzzie, and the Milliunion. One of these chassis was also used for the 1948 version of the Freikaiserwagen hillclimb car.

The Milliunion in 1950.

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#32 Alan Lewis

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Posted 02 February 2003 - 21:39

Also off thread, but Joe Fry's death at Blandford in the summer of 1950 meant that he was the first casualty of that exclusive group formed eleven or so weeks before; drivers in the first World Championship race, the Grand Prix of Europe at Silverstone on May 13th 1950.

I believe that today, more than half a century later, there are, following Geoffrey Crossley's death about a year ago, just three survivors; Baron Emmanuel "Toulo" de Graffenreid, Eugene Martin and Tony Rolt, but I stand to be corrected. In particular I'm not at all sure about Martin and I'm uncertain if Joe Kelly is dead.

APL

#33 Vitesse2

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Posted 02 February 2003 - 22:16

According to Richie Jenkins' information, Martin is still with us. Joe Kelly passed away in 1993.

http://www.oldracing...driver/watn.asp

#34 Alan Lewis

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Posted 03 February 2003 - 21:25

Many thanks, I have now learned the "something new" for today!

APL

#35 Ted Walker

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 19:51

The fry Climax certainly survived into the mid 60s , I photographed at Prescot Hill Climb,it was painted light metallic blue,at least one Gordano survives in the family of its original owner in Bristol, a second Gordano was being used for autocrossing in the 60s and might still survive.Rumour has it that the wreckage of Joe Frys car survives minus its special blown Blackburn engine.

#36 Pete Stowe

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Posted 05 February 2003 - 21:04

Hi Ted.
Could this be the same rumour that turned out to be Jeremy Fry’s Parsenn? One of Joe Fry’s cousins apparently said recently that the Freikaiserwagen was destroyed in 1950.

I’d come across an entry for the1964 Weston Speed Trials by a JD Turnball from Malmesbury in a 1500cc Fry Special - is this the same chap who ran at Prescott? In any case I think you might soon hear from someone wanting a copy of that photo :)

#37 Pete Stowe

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Posted 30 June 2003 - 18:18

Originally posted by Ian McKean
Does anyone know what the origin of the name Parsenn was?

It's taken a few months to find out, but it’s named after Jeremy Fry's favourite ski resort in Switzerland (somewhere around Davos).

Completely OT, but it was meeting, and then working for and being encouraged by, Jeremy Fry that started James Dyson of Cylone Vacuum cleaner fame on his inventor/designer career.
Dyson on Fry "As a novice designer you are like a sponge looking to soak up mentors and models, and in Fry I had an ocean of experience to absorb. Like Brunel, he operated empirically. He had no regard for experts from other fields (always teaching himself whatever he needed to know as he went along) and he was an engineer interested in building things that derived not only excellence from their design, but elegance as well."
Later, it was Jeremy Fry who helped fund the initial development of Dyson’s cyclone cleaner concept.

#38 Vitesse2

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 13:40

Today's Bath Chronicle carries an obituary for Jeremy Fry, whose death was announced yesterday.

http://www.thisisbat...e=sidebarsearch

Warm tributes have been paid to one of Bath's most famous businessmen, Jeremy Fry. The death was announced last night of Mr Fry, who founded international engineering firm Rotork. The entrepreneur was the saviour of the city's Theatre Royal and the man who inspired billionaire designer James Dyson.
The charismatic businessman was also a close friend of the late Princess Margaret, who was a regular visitor to his onetime home at Widcombe Manor.
In recent years, Mr Fry had lived in India on a tea plantation in the south of the country.
Mr Dyson, who developed his bagless cleaner in his shed while living at Bathford, was among the first to pay tribute to his "mentor".
Mr Dyson worked for Brassmill Lane-based Rotork for seven years, from 1970, after being invited to join the company by Mr Fry.
The billionaire said: "Jeremy was the most charismatic and inventive of engineering designers. "Yet his real brilliance was to nurture and help young engineers, to whom he showed huge generosity.
"To myself and many others, he was the most inspirational mentor imaginable."
Mr Fry founded Rotork in 1957 from his home after seeing the potential of the technology behind the actuator - a device which controls flows through valves in pipelines.
The company is now a market leader in its field, producing equipment which is exported around the world for use in oil and gas pipelines, refineries, power stations and waste water plants, and employing 1,000 people.
A former head of engineering at Gordonstoun School in Scotland, Mr Fry had cosmopolitan interests.
He was also president of the Theatre Royal Bath, which is celebrating its bicentenary this year. He saved the theatre with then director of the National Theatre, Sir Peter Hall, so that it could reopen after extensive refurbishment in 1982.
Sir Peter is now at the theatre, directing a summer season of plays.
Anna O'Callaghan, the theatre's marketing manager, described Mr Fry's death as "the end of an era". She said: "Staff at the Theatre Royal Bath were deeply saddened to hear that our president, Jeremy Fry, had died. "It was Jeremy who bought the Theatre Royal in 1979 when it was in a dilapidated state, and was the powerhouse behind the renovation.
"It was Jeremy who was the inspiration behind the tremendously successful and beautiful building we have today. We have much to be grateful to him for."
Leslie Towers, who ran city shop Leslie Menswear, worked on the fundraising for the Theatre Royal's refurbishment with Mr Fry.
He said: "He has done such a lot for the city and the theatre.
"He worked for a lot of charities and things, and really was the instigator behind the Theatre Royal."
Mr Fry, who was divorced from his late wife Camilla, was godfather to Princess Margaret's son Viscount Linley.
On one visit in the '60s, the Chronicle reported that the princess and her husband Lord Snowdon had met the city's chief constable and watched a wedding at the nearby St Thomas Church, which they also attended for an 8am service.
The weekend also featured a visit by photographer Cecil Beaton and Mr Fry's sister, Barbara Robertson, who lived at Combe Hay Manor.
Mr Fry, who had three children, hotel developer Cosmo, Francis and Polly, was part of the Fry chocolate-making family, whose factory at Keynsham is now run by Cadbury.
His father Cecil Fry was the last of the family to head the firm of J S Fry and Sons.
Mr Fry, who later moved from Widcombe to the Royal Crescent, was also instrumental in the development of Green Park Station


Another racing connection? Louis Klemantaski lived in Combe Hay ...

#39 Graham Gauld

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 17:15

Reference a reply regarding my book TOJ -JOHN TOJEIRO AND HIS CARS the books are being delivered on Friday and my son Lance Gauld who is publishing it is planning to bring them down to Silverstone next week.

Graham Gauld

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#40 chrisbailey

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 13:25

The Gordano project (named after the river Gordano near Bristol) might yet see the light of day. A Cross engine exists, the drawings exist and a chassis is also still around. Watch this space!

#41 Barry Boor

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 08:12

Picture #5 on the recently introduced Mike Parkes website shows Mike in the Fry Climax. It is clearly painted in a two-tone colour scheme and neither of those colours looks like the blue it wore at Aintree in the sequence mention earlier in this thread by Dong Yen.

So another colour mystery arises. :rolleyes:

#42 Dutchy

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 13:07

The Gordano project (named after the river Gordano near Bristol) might yet see the light of day. A Cross engine exists, the drawings exist and a chassis is also still around. Watch this space!


I've just found this thread and the second chassis belongs to a friend of mine. It is presently without an engine and the owner is thinking of fitting a small block Chevrolet.
Strangely my father as a very young man placed an order for a Gordano. As it never went into production he was disappointed.

#43 Dutchy

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 13:12

.Rumour has it that the wreckage of Joe Frys car survives minus its special blown Blackburn engine.


With the publication of the Dunsterville book, this rumour unfortunately turned out not to be true. However I do believe the blown Blackburne engine survives.

#44 Dutchy

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 13:33

And while we're on really obscure 500cc specials, has anyone any clue what became of the three Trevithicks, built in Cornwall? I've a friend whose dad ran one of these - once - before the JAP engine decided to pop. The look on his face when I showed him the Paul Sheldon reference to his one and only race meeting at Rufforth was a sight to behold!


They were Trevellicks named after the builder Rudolph Trevellick. More here http://www.500race.o...2rOv4CN6YyBD/M=

#45 David Beard

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 16:14

I recently went to a conference where the boss of an industrial design company called Smallfry did an excellent presentation. He started by saying that one of the founders was Tim Fry, who had been responsible for the design of the Hillman Imp.

I had a chat a lunch time and mentioned that I had heard that Mike Parkes was also involved with the Hillman Imp and raced and F2 car called the Fry which I assumed must have been connected to same bloke.

Yet if you Google the Fry racing car it would seem it was designed by David Fry.

Are these two Frys related ?

Tim Fry
http://www.imps4ever...gemeen/fry.html

David Fry
http://www.petestowe....net/Fry_F2.htm

Smallfry
http://www.smallfry.com/


#46 Barry Boor

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 16:34

I'm sure there's a joke in there somewhere but I'm blowed if I can think of it.

I built a Fry:

Posted Image

Edited by Barry Boor, 26 September 2012 - 16:38.


#47 alansart

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 17:12

I'm sure there's a joke in there somewhere but I'm blowed if I can think of it.

I built a Fry:

Posted Image


A Hotrod?

#48 Pete Stowe

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 17:41

I recently went to a conference where the boss of an industrial design company called Smallfry did an excellent presentation. He started by saying that one of the founders was Tim Fry, who had been responsible for the design of the Hillman Imp.

I had a chat a lunch time and mentioned that I had heard that Mike Parkes was also involved with the Hillman Imp and raced and F2 car called the Fry which I assumed must have been connected to same bloke.

Yet if you Google the Fry racing car it would seem it was designed by David Fry.

Are these two Frys related ?

Tim Fry
http://www.imps4ever...gemeen/fry.html

David Fry
http://www.petestowe....net/Fry_F2.htm

Smallfry
http://www.smallfry.com/


They were distantly related, as explained in this old post.


#49 Bloggsworth

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 22:13

May one make a very small request for information regarding the colour of the Fry Climax?


My addled memory tells me it was dark green....... Well, it was dark something!

#50 Tim Murray

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 22:58

It's listed as blue in the programme for the 1959 Silver City Trophy at Snetterton, posted here by Andrew Kitson.