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1926 German GP help


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#1 quintin cloud

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Posted 14 August 2001 - 07:35

Can anybody help me with any addition data on the 1st GROSSER PREIS VON DEUTSCHLAND
which was run on 11th July 1926 at Avus-Berlin :confused:

FP # SP Driver Car Time-laps / Reason of Retirement
1 Rudolf Caracciola Mercedes 2:54'12"8 (2.0)
2 5 Christian Riecken NAG 2:57'33"2 (+2.0 litre)
3 Willy Cleer Alfa Romeo 3:00'16"8 (+2.0 litre)
4 Pierre Clause Bignan 3:02'07"4 (2.0)
5 32 Georg Klöble NSU 3:07'27" (1.5)
6 Max zu Schaumburg Lippe OM 3:10'57"4 (2.0)
7 Jakob Scholl NSU 3:11'54"2 (1.5)
8 Franz Islinger NSU 3:13'58"8 (1.5)
9 Hans Santner OM 3:16'54"2 (2.0)
10 Josef Mueller NSU 3:18'25"4 (1.5)
11 Hans Bakatsch Brennabor 20 (2.0)
12 Reichstein Brennabor 20 (2.0)
13 Fritz Feldmann Hansa 20 (+2.0 litre)
14 Orska NAG 20 (+2.0 litre)
15 Fritz Mitzlaff Brennabor 20 (2.0)
16 Hugo Urban Emmerich Talbot 20 (1.5)
17 Max Wälti Bugatti 20 (1.5)

Did Not Finish:

Hans Berthold NAG (+2.0 litre)
Carl Deimann Austro Daimler (+2.0 litre)
4 Carl/Paul von Guillaume? Austro Daimler (+2.0 litre)
Ernst Hofer Steiger (+2.0 litre)
Lohmann Komnick (+2.0 litre)
Adolf Rosenberger Mercedes 14 Crash (2.0)
Komnick Komnick (2.0)
Hans Kolb Bugatti (2.0)
Josef Ludewig Bugatti (2.0)
Rudolf Breier Bugatti (2.0)
Ferdinando Minoia OM (1.5)
Jean Chassagne Talbot Crash (1.5)
August Momberger NSU (1.5)
Georg Kimpel Bugatti (1.5)
Willy Loge AGA (1.5)
Hans Friedrich Pluto Amilcar (1.1)
Adolf Mederer Pluto Amilcar Crash (1.1)
Georg Fiedler BF (1.1)
Erblich Alfi (1.1)
Van Horn GM (1.1)
Withdrawn
Reinhard Dürkopp Dürkopp (2.0)
Von Mosch Dürkopp (2.0)
Luigi Plate Chiribiri Practice crash
Wilhelm Heine NAG Practice crash

Thanks :up: :)

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#2 Vitesse2

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Posted 14 August 2001 - 11:58

From Cyril Posthumus "German Grand Prix" & Georgano Encyclopaedia:

Minoia's OM was a 1.5 litre Type 856.
Type number for the NAGs: C4b - capacity 2.6 litres
Cleer's Alfa: 22/90 RL6
Caracciola & Rosenberger: 1924 GP Mercedes
Type number for the NSUs: 5/30PS
Type number for the Durkopps: P8B
2.0 litre OMs - 'Superba' sports cars

The Bob, the Aga, the BF and the Durkopps all retired on lap 4.
Berthold retired lap 5
Rosenberger crash, lap 7, not lap 14: skidded and hit timekeeper's box at North Curve - three officials killed.
Kimpel retired lap 17 - connecting rod.

Fastest lap: Minoia 100.16mph/161.2km/h

I have a discrepancy on finishing time: CP says 2h54m17.8 - winning speed 135.1 km/h

Race distance was 20 laps, so cars for which you have no time were probably lapped at least once, but result I have does not show this detail.

Cars started in three groups, at two-minute intervals, biggest first.

#3 quintin cloud

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Posted 15 August 2001 - 05:54

Thanks Vitesse :up: :smoking:

#4 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 August 2001 - 23:18

There is one odd feature to this race - according to Posthumus and others, this was technically a sports car race, yet at least three of the entries (the two Mercedes and Minoia's OM) were Grand Prix cars and the NSUs and Talbots were Voiturettes. The Bugattis were probably GP or Voiturette too.

However, there are several pictures of the race, all of which show that even the pure sports cars ran stripped of lights and mudguards: so it must actually have been Formule Libre, in fact if not in name. Strange!

#5 John Cross

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Posted 18 August 2001 - 21:18

Quintin,

I was feeling kind today so have OCRed the complete report from the Posthumus book. Do you want the photos as well?

Out of interest, the 1927 report begins "The disasters at Avus in 1926 ended motor racing there for five years, ..."


1926 July 11

Stormy Overture

There had been motor racing on Berlin's Avus track since 1921, but nothing on a par with the first Grosser Preis von Deutschland, held there on July 11 1926. The earlier meetings were national, but this was a major International affair, with drivers coming from France, Italy, Switzerland and Czechoslovakia to contest the 243.75-mile race. Spectators came in staggering numbers-the estimated attendance exceeded 230,000 and this mass of people gathered thickly around the corners and spread along the long straights of the 12.25-mile circuit.

The entry was remarkable for its diversity. Instead of adopting the 1926-27 1.5-litre Grand Prix Formula, the A.v.D. wisely chose a rather free and easy 'sports car' formula which admitted several thinly disguised racing machines but had the advantage of producing 46 entries, compared with just three Bugattis in that year's French G.P. at Miramas, run a fortnight before. German sporting makes such as Brennabor, Alfi, Pluto, Steiger and Aga were there, most of them looking uncomfortably naked, stripped of their mudguards and headlamps.

More professional in turn-out were five 1.5-litre works-entered supercharged NSUs, four factory 2.6-litre NAGs, and two 1925 four-cylinder 1.5-litre Talbots of the kind which had dominated voiturette racing for so long, one driven by French veteran Jean Chassagne, the other by the Czech Hugo Urban-Emmerich. The German amateur Willy Cleer had a 22/90 Type RL6 Alfa Romeo, Frenchman Pierre Clause had a 2-litre Bignan, and Prinz zu Schaumburg-Lippe and H. Santner had a pair of 2-litre 'Superba' sports O.M.s.

Still more formidable, Minoia, the Italian racing veteran, came with a 1.5-litre Type 856 Grand Prix O.M. straight from the Brescia works. And there were two eight-cylinder supercharged 2-litre Mercedes, ostensibly private entries but works-backed, with designer Dr. Porsche and team manager Sailer accompanying them. These cars were of the kind that ran in the 1924 Italian G.P. at Monza, having fine engines but a bad reputation for roadholding ever since Count Louis Zborowski was killed in one. Their drivers at Avus were to be Adolf Rosenberger, a much-experienced amateur, and Rudolf Caracciola, a promising newcomer with a good record in local hill-climbs.

Practice showed the two Mercedes to be very fast, while Minoia's O.M., the two Talbots and Riecken's NAG all made good times. At the close of the last session, Gigi Plate's 'Monza' Chiribiri collided with W. Heine's 2.6-litre NAG in the South Curve. The Chiribiri's mechanic, Piroli, was killed, while Plate suffered broken ribs and internal injuries. This was the prelude of worse to come. On race day the weather was at first dry, but the skies were heavy when the cars were sent off, group by group at two-minute intervals, big cars first, then the 2 litres, then the 1,500s.

At flag fall, Caracciola stalled his Mercedes, losing at least a minute before getting going, while Rosenberger in the other Mercedes had taken the lead from Riecken and Berthold in the big NAGs and the Austro-Daimlers. The latter were soon assailed by trouble and dropped back and Cleer's Alfa moved up. By the fourth lap it began to rain, first in heavy drops, then in a downpour which rendered the asphalt-surfaced track as slippery as soap, sent spectators scurrying for cover, and quite a few cars to the pits. The Bob, the Aga, the two-stroke BFA and the Dürkopps retired with diverse troubles, Berthold's NAG went out on lap 5, and on the seventh round came disaster.

Adolf Rosenberger's Mercedes, leading the race, went out of control at the North Curve when passing an NSU at over 90 m.p.h., and by appalling luck skidded sideways into a timekeeper's hut and demolished it. Inside were two young students and the board painter, jointly in charge of the scoreboard; the students were both killed, the painter had both legs crushed and died 12 hours later after amputation, and Rosenberger's mechanic was seriously hurt. One report has it that a small ether tank on the Mercedes, used to aid starting, had sprung a leak and that Rosenberger, by moving slightly to get fresh air, precipitated the skid on the glass-like surface; whatever the true cause, it added further to the unfortunate reputation of the 2-litre eight-cylinder Mercedes as a 'killer'.

The Italian Ferdinando Minoia, who had made the fastest lap at 100.16 m.p.h. in his Grand Prix O.M. just before the rains came, retired shortly after the accident-whether because he witnessed it, or because of mechanical trouble, is not known.

The rain continued and under the appalling conditions there were numerous retirements. Race order at 8 laps was Urban-Emmerich (Talbot), Cleer (Alfa Romeo), Clause (Bignan) and Riecken, whose NAG was having considerable tyre trouble. Then Chassagne's Talbot left the road at the South Turn, allegedly because of broken steering, and overturned; the mechanic was injured, being unconscious for 12 hours. Next Mederer's Pluto (an Amilcar built under German licence) charged off the glassy road, over the grass verge, and into a parked petrol lorry, the driver receiving severe facial injuries.

Then Urban-Emmerich, who had been driving splendidly, had his Talbot skate wildly across one leg of the straight when braking for the North Curve; the car shot over the centre strip and across the opposite leg, across the nose of Caracciola's Mercedes, and into a post, from which it bounced into a packed enclosure. Three spectators were injured, one seriously. Urban-Emmerich and his mechanic somehow got the car back on to the road and resumed the race after checking it.

Meantime, young Caracciola, to whom this incident was but a frightening blur in the teeming rain, was driving like one possessed to make up time, revealing that remarkable surefootedness on wet roads which was to earn him the sobriquet the regenmeister (the rainmaster). His pace was interrupted, first by a refuel stop on lap 8, then three rounds later with misfiring; the offending plug proved to be the last of the eight he extracted and cost him thirty seconds. He tore back into the race, and with the rain now easing off lapped at over 98 m.p.h., caught Riecken again and won by over three minutes at 83.95 m.p.h.

Cleer's RL6 Alfa Romeo was third, and Clause's Bignan fourth. In the 1.5-litre class Kimpel's Bugatti inherited the lead from Urban-Emmerich's Talbot, only to break a connecting rod on lap 17. After that the kompressor NSUs came through to a fine team finish led by Georg Klöble, who finished fifth overall. Third to the NAG and the Alfa in the 2-3-litre class was Fritz Feldmann s Hansa, slow but reliable, and interesting for its full-width streamlined bodywork, destined to be popular wear at Avus in later years. In all 17 cars finished this unfortunate Grosser Preis, which precipitated a considerable crisis in German motor racing.

RESULTS:
1. Caracciola (Mercedes), 20 laps, 243.7 miles (392.2 km) in 2 hours 54 min 17.8 sec, 83.95 m.p.h. (135.1 k.p.h.)
2. Riecken (NAG), 2:57:33.2;
3. Cleer (Alfa Romeo), 3:0:16.8;
4. Clause (Bignan), 3:2:7.4;
5. Klöble (NSU), 3:7:27.0;
6. Schaumburg-Lippe (O.M.), 3:10:57.2;
7. Scholl (NSU), 3:11:54.2;
8. Islinger (NSU), 3:13:58.8;
9. Santner (O.M.), 3:16:54.2;
10. Muller (NSU), 3:18:25.4;
11. Backasch (Brennabor);
12. Reichstein (Brennabor);
13. Feldmann (Hansa);
14. Orska (NAG);
15. Mitzlaff (Brennabor);
16. Urban-Emmerich (Talbot);
17. Wälti (Bugatti).

Fastest lap: Minoia (O.M.), 100.16 mph. (161.2 k.p.h.).

Class D (2,000-3,000 cc.):1. Riecken (NAG), 82.33 mph. (132.5 k.p.h.); 2. Cleer (Alfa Romeo); 3. Feldmann (Hansa).

Class E (1,500-2,000): 1, Caracciola (Mercedes), 83.95 mph. (135.1 k.p.h.); 2. Clause (Bignan); 3. Schaumburg-Lippe (O.M.).

Class F (1,100 - 1,500): 1. Klöble (NSU), 78.17 mph. (125.8 k.p.h.); 2. Scholl (NSU) ; 3. Islinger (NSU). 4. Muller (NSU).

Retired:
Class D: von Guillaume (Austro-Daimler); Deilmann (Austro-Daimler); Berthold (NAG); Lohmann (Komnick); Hofer (Steiger).

Class E: Rosenberger (Mercedes); Kolb (Bugatti); Breier (Bugatti); Durkopp (Durkopp); von Mosch (Durkopp); Komnick (Komnick); Ludewig (Bugatti).

Class F: Chassagne (Talbot); Momberger (NSU); Minoia (O.M.); Loge (Aga); Fiedler (BFA); Mederer (Pluto); Friedrich (Pluto); Kimpel (Bugatti); Erblich (Alfi); Fettkenheuer (Bob); van Horn (GM).

#6 karlcars

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Posted 20 August 2001 - 20:51

Great stuff!

The rules did evidently require a sports-touring type of body because the two Mercedes had tonneaus grafted onto the back of the body to carry two additional seats! This was made easier by the fact that these cars had their fuel tanks mounted low in the chassis, under the driver and passenger, rather than at the rear.

#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 20 August 2001 - 21:56

John: in view of Karl's post above, could you perhaps post the two pictures of Mercedes on pages 17 & 19 of the Posthumus book? Maybe it's just me, but I can't see any sign of a tonneau on either of them ...:)

#8 quintin cloud

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Posted 22 August 2001 - 06:09

John Cross Excellent write up :up: , Vitesse2 I have updated the result that I have published on the net to include your data aswell I have also included Your class details John aswell :up: :smoking:

#9 John Cross

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Posted 22 August 2001 - 16:05

Guys,

I've been a bit busy (and had to sign up with a new host) but here are the photos from Posthumus:

Posted Image

Posted Image

while here is one from Hodges' latest book which I'm sure is from the same event:

Posted Image

Karl - the Hodges book says that in original (Monza 1924) form the fuel tank was under the seats (to concentrate weight within the wheelbase and to "reduce the possibility that an end would break away" :rolleyes: ). Then Werner was allowed to develop one car, which he did by moving the fuel to the tail (shades of the Lancia D50 here!) and introducing a 4-speed gearbox.

Then two of the cars were converted into sports cars for the 1926 German GP. Now the tanks were obviously still under the seats, but do you know why they did not move them to the tail like Werner did (given its reputation)? Was there not enough room with having to make room for the (very low) 'seats'?

#10 Vitesse2

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Posted 22 August 2001 - 21:40

Thanks John - I've got the Hodges book myself. Serves me right for not checking it. The third picture makes the tonneau clear and I can now make it out on the others. Rosenberger's crash must have been spectacular!

#11 Dennis David

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Posted 23 August 2001 - 04:23

From what I understand Caracciola driving under the most appalling conditions was not aware that he had actually won the race.

Neubauer believed that a driver on the racetrack was the "world's loneliest human being." He thought that if a driver could be informed, during the race, of his position, speed, race distance and other particulars he would have a better chance of achieving his ultimate potential.

#12 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 23 August 2001 - 08:16

Extract from RENNEN - SIEG - REKORDE by Rudolf Caracciola and Oskar Weller, Berlin, 1935

1926...
The first Grosse Preis von Deutschland.....
.....In this race we drove the Mercedes-eight-cylinder, which had raced for the first time 1924 in Monza. This car was known as 'krummer Hund' (‘crooked dog’) amongst us racing drivers. Everybody went carefully around, avoiding it, because until now the car had no sufficient staying power to last a long-distance race. The reason for this was not in the design. Doctor Porsche, who at that time was Technical Director at Daimler-Benz, had designed magic power into that engine. But at that time one was not as far advanced with materials as nowadays (1935), and when one extracted from the engine really all what it was able to deliver, it quickly became hot. Once it was really warm, it then began to 'eat' spark plugs by the dozen.....

In 1925 this car started only in short mountain climbs. But 1926 we had better plugs and with that we risked the Grand Prix of Germany.

This race was definitely not a docile affair, but compared with today (1935) one had then still a lot of time. First I stopped at the depot to inform myself about Rosenberger. Two or three laps later one cylinder started to misfire – nice present: to find from eight cylinders the one, which ‘pukes’. Nowadays, in a case like that, one throws out all eight plugs and installs a new set even when they are special plugs, where a set costs 200 Marks. 1926 we were not yet that smart.

I stopped at the depot, yanked the hood open and unscrewed every single plug, because at that time outside help of any kind was prohibited, and I threw the hot ‘chestnuts’ towards our dear Doctor Porsche who was standing in the pit and inspected with the magnifying glass every one of the plugs and threw them back to me. I think not till the seventh or even the eighth was the ‘Karnickel (‘rabbit’) found – a stop of several minutes, a criminal, unpardonable luxery.

Rain, rain, rain. The most depressing race, I have ever driven. No opponents were there against one had to fight, the foreign competition had collapsed long time ago, now it was just to drive the race home in proper posture and with sporting speed, where every kilometer appeared to me as senseless, unnecessary risk.

The last lap. Wet, dirty and tired, I climb out of the car. Finished! There flares up the Deutschlandlied, the German flag rises up the mast – I am not any more the private person Rudolf Caracciola, I had secured the victory for Germany! The victory in the first Grand Prix of Germany. 1926 had become my great lucky year. I had already won several races but only since the victory in the Grand Prix of Germany had I truly become top rank - Rudolf Caracciola on Mercedes-Benz became an image in the international sport…..

#13 Nanni Dietrich

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 14:00

Quintin,

I was feeling kind today so have OCRed the complete report from the Posthumus book. Do you want the photos as well?

Out of interest, the 1927 report begins "The disasters at Avus in 1926 ended motor racing there for five years, ..."


1926 July 11

...


Practice showed the two Mercedes to be very fast, while Minoia's O.M., the two Talbots and Riecken's NAG all made good times. At the close of the last session, Gigi Plate's 'Monza' Chiribiri collided with W. Heine's 2.6-litre NAG in the South Curve. The Chiribiri's mechanic, Piroli, was killed, while Plate suffered broken ribs and internal injuries. This was the prelude of worse to come.


...



According to the Italian newspaper "La Stampa" of Turin, issues of 11, 12, 15 and 21 July 1926, the real name of the unfortunate man who died in the Chiribiri at the AVUS in 1926 was Carlo Cattaneo. Possibly "Piroli" was a nickname (or a pseudonym) of Gigi Platé's riding-mechanic. In his book "A racing driver's world", Rudi Caracciola indicated the surname (or nickname?) as Pinoli = "pine nuts" in Italian language.
Carlo Cattaneo was an expert mechanic from Milan. His funeral was held in the following days at Zehlendorf cemetery, near Berlin, Germany, then he was buried at the Cimitero Monumentale in his hometown Milan, Italy. It is uncertain whether he was related to Pietro Cattaneo, a successful Italian driver, who raced a Ceirano in the 1920s.


#14 Cstonerfan

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 23:24

I would like to ask if anybody has any information on my wife's grandfather Louis Plattner.
He was according to an article, Austrian motor sportsman of the year 1926? took part in Motorcycle racing and car racing, inclusing being associated with Hans Stuck (Sen), Ferdinandt Porsche. and many other of that ILK.
Over time all info has dissapeared and we know very little other than what the aunties and my wife's mother can remember, they were the daughters of Loui Plattner.
Hand Stuck was a buisness partner of Mr. Plattner after his divorce of his first tennisplayer wife and he wrote his first book in the house above the garage in Voralberg (Aus)
Any help would be very welcome.

I will make a separate post, ONe of Louis Plattners daughters will be picked up tonite by me fronm the airport as the lady in Question has flown over from Switserland to Australia and with the added knowledge I will make a better post.
My appologies for this rude post.

Edited by Cstonerfan, 02 December 2010 - 11:58.


#15 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 08:42

Will write later when I have some spare time, push this thread up to find it back easier.


#16 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 16:10

Oops, just realized that this is a "stoneage" thread, and the last posting is off-topic.
Nothing to Mr. Plattner, only about the German GP 1926. Is there still some interest, or is the pre-war fraction at TNF dead...?


#17 Tim Murray

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 16:18

I'm interested, Michael, and I'm sure I'm not alone.

I suggest that Cstonerfan starts a new thread for his question - it'll be read by more people that way. :)

#18 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:33

Some time ago I did some research on this race. The car specifications had been indeed strange, officially for sports cars, but without lamps and fenders, thus more or less Formula Libre, but the cars from class E (< 2.0 litre) upwards needed 4 seats.

Class D (< 3.0 litre):
#1 – Hans Lohmann – Komnick (retired Lap 7)
#2 – Hans Berthold (owner Kurt Neugebauer) – NAG C4 (retired lap 6)
#3 – Franz Hofer – Steiger (retired lap 2, radiator)
#4 – Carl Deilmann – Austro-Daimler (retired lap 13)
#5 – Christian Riecken (works entry) – NAG C4b – 2nd
#6 – Paul von Guillaume – Austro-Daimler (retired lap 15)
#7 – Willy Cleer – Alfa Romeo RLSS (3rd)
#8 – R.C. Krüger – Alfa Romeo (retired lap 4)
#9 – Edwin Orska – NAG C4 (14th)
#10 – Fritz Feldmann – Hansa (13th)
#11 – Wilhelm Heine – NAG C4 (DNS, accident Friday training)

Class E (< 2.0 litre):
#12 (?) – Arno Hänsel – Bugatti (DNS, engine damage Friday training)
#13 – Robert Breier – Bugatti (retired lap 10)
#14 – Rudolf Caracciola (works car) – Mercedes GP 2 litre (1st)
#15 – Josef Ludewig - Bugatti T30 (retired lap 16)
#16 – Max zu Schaumburg-Lippe – OM 665 (6th)
#17 (?) – Reinhold Dürkopp (works entry) – Dürkopp P8B (DNA/DNS, withdrawn)
#18 – Otto Komnick (works entry) – Komnick (retired lap 14)
#19 – Adolf Rosenberger (works car) – Mercedes GP 2 litre (retired lap 7, crash)
#20 – Pierre Clause – Bignan – 4th
#21 (?) – von Mosch (works entry) – Dürkopp P8B - (DNA/DNS, withdrawn)
#22 (?) – Hans Kolb – Bugatti (DNS, engine failure before start)
#23 – Hans Santner (entrant “Brauda Motoren”) – OM 665 (9th)

Class F (< 1.5 litre):
#24 – Hans Hanft – Bugatti T13/T22 (retired lap 18)
#25 – Albert Mitzlaff (works entry) – Brennabor type S (15th)
#26 – Alfred Mederer (works entry) – Pluto (retired lap 9, crash)
#27 – Ferdinando Minoia (works entry) – OM 865 (retired lap 7)
#28 – Jakob Scholl (works entry) – NSU 6/60 (7th)
#29 – Josef Müller (works entry) – NSU 6/60 (10th)
#30 – M. Georg Fiedler (works entry) – Bolle-Fiedler (retired end of lap 1)
#31 – Hermann Friedrich (works entry) – Pluto (retired lap 17)
#32 – Georg Klöble (works entry) – NSU 6/60 (5th)
#33 – Max Wälti – Bugatti T13 (17th)
#34 – Otto Fettkenhauer (owner Otto Groninger) – Bob (retired lap 1)
#35 – Luigi Platé – Chiribiri Monza (DNS, accident Friday training)
#36 – Jean Chassagne (entrant “Inga Vertrieb”) – Talbot 70 (retired lap 9, crash)
#37 – Franz Islinger (works entry) – NSU 6/60 (8th)
#38 – Georg Kimpel – Bugatti T37 (retired lap 17)
#39 – August Momberger – NSU 6/60 (DNS, engine problems before start)
#40 – van Horn – GM Gendron & Co. (retired lap 9)
#41 – Eduard Reichstein (works entry) – Brennabor type S (12th)
#42 – Hugo Urban-Emmerich – Talbot 70 (16th)
#43 – von Einem (works entry) – Pluto (DNS, engine failure Friday training)
#44 – Fritz Backasch (works entry) – Brennabor type S (11th)
#45 – Willy Loge (owner Dr. Kurt Eimer) – AGA (retired lap 3)
#46 – Heinz Erblich – Alfi (retired lap 1)

Unclear is whether there had been classes also above 3 litres (A-B-C?), but if so, there had been no entries. Strange, because there was some interesting machinery around, and even more strange if the organizers did not allow them.

Racing enthusiasm was rather low with Germany’s automotive industry, the heavy economic crisis of 1922/23 was still felt. The AVUS at that time was Germany’s only real race track, and even not a permanent one, as it was part of Berlin’s road system. A toll motorway as fast connection between north and south. An important race was held there in 1921, and a more minor one the next year. A Grand Prix was scheduled for 1923, but cancelled after Mercedes and Benz both withdraw. A 1924 edition was planned but never realized, the same for 1925 when as substitute a sports car race was held on a public road circuit in the Taunus mountains near Frankfurt. It is worth to mention that only in May 1925 the AIACR re-admitted the German Automobile Clubs into the International Association. But the times had been still very bad, numerous small size manufacturers had disappeared already, more will follow, even large ones like Brennabor and NAG. Much factories considered motorsport as money-destroying nonsens, others considered it as last chance to promote their cars. Pure gambling, as the long straights of the AVUS had been engine killers. The major foreign Grand Prix contenders stayed away, only OM sought their chance.

Class D was a mix of various stripped sports cars.

The NAGs seem to be the same type as raced already at the AVUS in 1921 and 1922, but these had been race car bodied, so no idea how they managed the back seats. For sure Riecken’s C4b was a works entry (he was NAG’s chief engineer), unclear the others (C4 or C4b?). Berthold’s car seem the be owned by Kurt Neugebauer, thus private entry.

Both Austro-Daimlers had been private entries, no idea about the model, must have been ADM I or II.

Feldmann’s Hansa (2.1 litre only) had a streamlined race body similar to the 1922 GP Bugattis, so probably a works car. Also here no idea about the rear seats, the photos I have show the car only from front left.

Nothing known about Krüger and his Alfa, probably a RL. Willy Cleer reportedly was an Alfa Romeo dealer at Frankfurt, the car was a RLSS (which is still existing today). The relation of Cleer to the factory must have been a special one, as for the Schauinsland race at Freiburg the same year he entered privately a P2, which then was driven by Campari.

Lohmann’s Komnick was a stripped tourer, type C2 8/45 HP with 2.1 litre. Komnick was a truck and tractor manufacturer who tried to campaign his only passenger model, too heavy and underpowered for going racing.

No details about the Steiger, must have been a private entry as the company was closed down already. Most probably a type 11/55 (2.8 litre) or 12/70 (2.9 litre), both models had been rather successful in motorsport from 1922-25.

The main contenders in class E (< 2.0 litre) had been the 2 Mercedes GP racers from 1924, which carried some kind of ugly duck tail hosting 2 seats in order to fulfill the regulations. However, the seats were either for max. 6 year old children, or for some poor chaps who lost both legs in the Great War. The Mercedes works team with Neubauer and the top drivers had been in Spain participating in the Grand Prix de Guipuzcoa, a 12 hour handicap race at San Sebastian held on July 22. This was “only” a reliability run, and it shows how little attention they give to their home “Grand Prix”. Unclear whether whether the Berlin entries had been official works ones, but for sure the cars were factory owned, and also the mechanics were DB employees.

There had been 4 Bugattis, of which I only identified that of Ludewig as a T30. The others are still a mystery, Hans Kolb of Munich owned #4330, a standard T35 GP, no idea how he solved the 4-seat problem. Nothing known about Breier and Hänsel, must have been T30s. In 1926 also in Germany a lot of T35s had been raced, and it is really a pity that the organizers closed the door for them.

The 2 private OM of Santner and Schaumburg-Lippe had been stripped tipo 665 “Superba”.

Both Dürkopps had been works entries, based on the supercharged sports model P8B (8/60 HP). The engine, which had slightly more than 2 litres, was reduced to 1999 cc in order to start in the 2 litre class, and power was increased to 80 HP. No idea why the entries had been withdrawn.

Another Komnick in this class, driven by the junior chief Otto Komnick (“Red Devil”). It seems that Otto downsized the engine of his red painted car to below 2 litres, and most probably also the engine was tuned.

Last entry in this class was Swiss Pierre Clause with his Bignan, who between 1924 and 1927 toured through Europe. Not much known about the Bignan, but it seems it had a 4 cylinder 16 valve engine.

Class F (< 1.5 litre) had – besides the GP Mercedes – the most competitive cars. On top of them the works OM of Minoia, which in the period press is described as 8 cylinder supercharged. This is indeed a miracle, as the only OM car fitting to that would have been the tipo 865, which – strange enough - was "not ready" for Monza 2 months later??

Interesting also the 2 Talbots which must have been older type 70, pictures show a 2-seater race car with Bugatti-like tail, and a 4 cylinder s/c engine. Urban-Emmerich, who was a wealthy industrialist from Prague, for sure was a private entry, the status of veteran Jean Chassagne is unclear, as the entrant was “Inga Vertrieb”, which possibly was the German Talbot importer.

NSU entered 4 works cars for Klöble, Scholl, Islinger and Müller, all of the type 6/60 with a supercharged 6-cylinder engine. Although they had only 60 hp they were nice and solid little race cars. A 5th 6/60 was privately entered by 21 year old August Momberger.

Another works entry came from Brennabor for the drivers Mitzlaff, Reichstein, and Backasch. Although today nearly unknown, Brennabor at that time was Germany’s largest automobile manufacturer, and market leader also in bicycles and baby carriages. Although supercharged the type S 4-cylinder was not very powerful, but it had an underslung frame with the driver positioned very low in the car, when others were still sitting “on” it.

3 Bugattis had been in this class, among them the T13 Brescia of the Berlin residing Swiss journalist Max Wälti. Georg Kimpel, in normal life head of the fire brigade of chemical company BASF (IG Farben) reportedly entered a T37, but without a photo confirming this I do not exclude a T13 Brescia. Nothing known about Hans Hanft, must have been a T13 or T22.

The last but not least contender in the 1500 cc class was the Chiribiri Monza of Gigi Platé, a supercharged DOHC 4-cylinder with reported 95 hp. Tragically he had an accident in the Friday training session which injured the driver and even killed the riding mechanic.

Class F also included the 1100 cc cycle cars, of which the 3 works Plutos (German Amilcar licence) of Mederer, Friedrich, and von Einem surely had been the most competitive ones. The others – BF, Bob, GM Gendron, Aga, and Alfi – were driven by the olympic idea, participitation only counts. 3 of them died already in the first lap, and also the other 2 didn’t see the finishing line.



#19 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:38

Based on the original lap charts, and the period press reports, I tried to reconstruct the race.

Start & lap 1:

14h00 start of class D, 14h02 class E, and 14h04 class F.

Caracciola stalled his engine, codriver Sailer had to pushstart the car, and Caracciola followed his class with distance.

Rosenberger who started from 3rd row of class E was leading this group at the end of lap 1, and with lap time 7:58.1 he was also leading the race, as the cars in front of him had been started 2 minutes earlier. To get an impression of the individual performance here the times of lap 1:

E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 7:58.1
F - Minoia (OM) - 8:14.3
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 8:22.4
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:38.4
D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:43.2
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:45.4
D - Berthold (NAG) - 8:50.2
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 9:05.4
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 9:09.3
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:15.2
F - Scholl (NSU) - 9:15.4
F - Klöble (NSU) - 9:21.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:27.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:27.2
D - Orska (NAG) - 9:29.1
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:31.1
D - Krüger (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:57.4
E - Ludewig (Bugatti) - 10:00.0
E - Breier (Bugatti) - 10:04.4
D - Feldmann (Hansa) - 10:26.2
E - Santner (OM) - 10:31.2
F - Islinger (NSU) - 10:40.1
F - Wälti (Bugatti) - 11:04.4
F - Reichstein (Brennabor) - 11:15.1
F - Mitzlaff (Brennabor) - 11:15.3
E - Komnick (Komnick) - 11:27.3
F - Friedrich (Pluto) - 11:31.3
D - Lohmann (Komnick) - 11:36.3
F - Backasch (Brennabor) - 11:39.1
F - Hanft (Bugatti) - 11:44.1
F - Mederer (Pluto) - 11:45.4
D - Hofer (Steiger) - 11:53.2
F - van Horn (GM) - 13:11.4
F - Loge (Aga) - 15:56.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 16:18.4
F - Fiedler (BFA) - 26:05.2 (retired)
F - Erblich (Alfi) - retired
F - Fettkenheuer (Bob) - retired

As E. Schumann wrote in the contemporary article in "Der Motorwagen", already after the first lap it could be seen who seriously was competing, and who only participated "honoris causa".

The only serious contenders to the Mercedes came from class F, as expected, Minoia with the O.M. and the Talbots of Chassagne and Urban-Emmerich. The big NAGs and Austro-Daimler had been roughly one minute slower. Disappointing also the Bugattis of Ludewig and Breier, obviously they drove careful after the two Bugatti engine failures in training. Kimpel with the T37 however was even faster than the NSU's.
Considering the Brennabors in fact had a DOHC engine, and also considering their low sleek line, their performance was indeed disappointing.

Edited by Michael Müller, 01 December 2010 - 22:38.


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#20 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:40

Lap 2:

The 10 fastest times:

F - Minoia (OM) - 7:17.3
E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 7:19.0
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 7:29.2
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 7:33.2
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 7:45.0
D - Riecken (NAG) - 7:48.2
D - Berthold (NAG) - 8:11.4
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:20.0
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 8:23.2
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:29.1

Classification after 2nd lap:

1 - E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 15:17.1
2 - F - Minoia (OM) - 15:32.1
3 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 15:52.1
4 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 16:12.1
5 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 16:30.4
6 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 16:31.4
7 - D - Berthold (NAG) - 17:02.1
8 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 17:29.3
9 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 17:39.4
10 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 17:48.4

Rosenberger was leading, physically in front of him only 2 NAGs of Riecken and Berthold. Fastest lap went to Minoia, who was only 15 seconds behind Rosenberger. Caracciola had a slow lap and was only 5th behind the 2 Talbots.

Retirements in lap 2:
Hofer (Steiger), radiator
van Horn (G.M.), valve spring, rejoined the race after 1 ½ hours.



#21 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:42

Lap 3:

The 10 fastest times:

F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 7:26.1
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 7:34.4
E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 7:35.1
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 7:35.2
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 8:08.3
D - Berthold (NAG) - 8:11.1
D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:16.4
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:23.3
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 8:27.4
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:30.3

Classification after 3rd lap:

1 - E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 22:52.2
2 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 23:27.0
3 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 23:38.2
4 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 24:08.1
5 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 24:48.3
6 - D - Berthold (NAG) - 25.13.2
7 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 25:48.2
8 - F - Minoia (OM) - 25:50.2
9 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 25:53.1
10 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 26:28.3

Rosenberger slowed down, but was still nearly half a minute in the lead. Riecken was physically 4 seconds in front of him, but he started 2 minutes earlier. Minoia had a tyre failure, lost 3 minutes, and dropped back to 8th. Good performance of the Talbots, with Urban-Emmerich even taking fastest lap. Also very good performance of Kimpel with the small T37.

Retirements in lap 3:
Loge (Aga)



#22 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:43

Lap 4:

The 10 fastest times:

E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 7:34.2
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 7:46.0
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 8:00.1
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:11.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:34.3
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:40.3
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 8:48.4
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 8:50.4
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:51.0
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:58.0

Classification after 4th lap:

1 - E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 30:26.4
2 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 31.24.2
3 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 31.27.1
4 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 32:17.3
5 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 34:27.4
6 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 34:39.1
7 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 35.12.2
8 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 35:20.1
9 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 35:26.3
10 - F - Minoia (OM) - 35:29.2

Rosenberger increased his lead, now 1 minute in front of Urban-Emmerich, who changed place with team mate Chassagne. Caracciola slowed down somewhat, now nearly 1 ½ minutes behind Rosenberger, but still in 4th position. The NAGs of Riecken and Berthold had to enter the pits due to tyre failures costing them more than 3 minutes. Minoia had technical problems resulting in lap time of 9:39, and dropping him back to 10th.

Retirements in lap 4:
Krüger (Alfa-Romeo)



#23 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:44

Lap 5:

The 10 fastest times:

F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 7:55.4
E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 7:56.3
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 7:57.3
D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:07.1
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:17.0
F - Minoia (OM) - 8:28.0
D - Berthold (NAG) - 8:39.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:40.0
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 8:52.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:55.4

Classification after 5th lap:

1 - E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 38.23.2
2 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 39:22.0
3 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 39:23.0
4 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 40:34.3
5 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 43:07.4
6 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 43:56.3
7 - F - Minoia (OM) - 43:57.2
8 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 44:08.1
9 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 44:34.4
10 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 44:45.0

Not much happened, Rosenberger still leading Urban-Emmerich and Chassagne for 1 minute. Caracciola lost even more ground on his team mate, now more than 2 minutes. Minoia and Riecken improved their positions. Since lap 3 Ludewig had technical problems with his Bugatti, which dropped him back to last place. However, he will finish the race with 5 laps behind.



#24 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:45

Lap 6:

The 10 fastest times:

F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:08.3
E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 8:18.3
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 8:21.2
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:31.1
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:48.2
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 8:56.1
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:10.0
F - Minoia (OM) - 9:19.2
F - Klöble (NSU) - 9:18.3
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:24.0

Classification after 6th lap:

1 - E - Rosenberger (Mercedes) - 46:42.0
2 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 47:30.3
3 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 47:44.2
4 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 49:05.4
5 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 51:56.1
6 - F - Minoia (OM) - 53:16.4
7 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 53:16.1
8 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 54:03.3
9 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 54:07.3
10 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 54:38.3

Rain started to fall, although the reports differ. Schumann in "Der Motorwagen" wrote about fine spray rain, whereas Kubisch/Rietner in the book "Die AVUS im Rückspiegel" are quoting another contemporary press report talking about a thunderstorm which mainly effected the northern part of the circuit. Lap times dropped, but not considerably.

Rosenberger still leading, but Urban-Emmerich was pushing despite rain, narrowing the gap to 48 seconds. Chassagne 14 seconds behind his team mate, and Caracciola still in 4th place with 1:21 behind Chassagne and 2:23 behind Rosenberger. No danger from the back with Deilmann and his Austro-Daimler 3 minutes behind.

Riecken (NAG) lost again time due to tyre problems and dropped back to 10th, and also Kimpel with his T37 lost 6 minutes at the pits. Minoia again had technical problems, but slipped from 7th to 6th due to Kimpel's pitstop.

Berthold with the private Neugebauer NAG had to retire, the bursting tyre in lap 4 damaged brake rod and front axle.



#25 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:47

Lap 7:

Rosenberger probably knew that the Talbots had been rather close behind, he passed the north curve already heavily sliding, and when entering the straight he accelerated too early. He slided from the track, hit the grass slope, the car turned on its side, and crashed with the bottom against the iron poles of a large timing board and a timekeepers hut. The marshal in the hut died immediately, and 2 others, which had been busy on the board, dropped down, and were killed by the collapsing iron structure. Rosenberger himself was injured at his head, and his mechanic Curt Coquelline was delivered to hospital with various fractures.

The 10 fastest times:

F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 8:31.2
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:36.4
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:42.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:45.3
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:49.4
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:54.1
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:00.1
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:11.3
D - Riecken (NAG) - 9:13.0
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:22.3

Classification after 7th lap:

1 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 56:07.2
2 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 56:15.4
3 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 57:48.1
4 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:00:41.4
5 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:02:12.2
6 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:03:07.4
7 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:03:51.3
8 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:04:09.3
9 - F - Müller (NSU) - 1:05:43.3
10 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:07:34.0

Minoia was still troubled by technical problems, which finally forced him to retire. Neubauer talks about transmission failure.

So the race was led by the two Talbots of Urban-Emmerich and Chassagne, on 8 seconds between them. On position 3 Caracciola 1 ½ minutes behind.

Other retirements in lap 7:
Lohmann (Komnick)



#26 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:48

Lap 8:

The 10 fastest times:

F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:05.4
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:42.4
F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 8:47.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:54.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:02.0
F - Scholl (NSU) - 9:09.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:11.2
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 9:13.3
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:36.1
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:41.4

Classification after 8th lap:

1 - F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 1:04:13.1
2 - F - Chassagne (Talbot) - 1:05:02.4
3 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:07:01.4
4 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:09:24.3
5 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:11:06.12
6 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:12:09.4
7 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:14.21.1
8 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:14.33.0
9 - F - Müller (NSU) - 1:15.25.2
10 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:16:43.3

No change in top 10 classification, but Urban-Emmerich obviously saw his chance and drove like hell despite heavy rain, increasing the distance to Chassagne to 49 seconds. Caracciola had to slow down due to failing spark plug.



#27 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:50

Lap 9:

Chassagne crashed in the south curve, he and his mechanic got severely injured and put to hospital.
Team mate Urban-Emmerich slid from the track in the north curve, broke through the fence into the spectators, where a girl and a police officer were injured. After repairing a broken pressure pipe he continued the race, but lost 15 minutes.
On the straight just before the north curve the Pluto of Mederer slid from the wet track onto the grass infield, where it hit the Mercedes of the race director, which had been parked there not really intelligently. Mederer was injured at his mouth, and his mechanic at his hand. The car was a total loss.

Caracciola made a pit stop of 8 minutes for changing plugs, but some time was also spent for discussions about retiring or not in respect of Rosenberger's accident. Finally the decision was taken to continue the race.

Other retirements in lap 9:
van Horn (G.M.)

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:00.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:48.0
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:58.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:58.4
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 9:23.1
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:26.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:31.0
E - Ludewig (Bugatti) - 9:42.0
E - Santner (O.M.) - 9:51.3
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:52.4

Classification after 9th lap:

1 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:18:12.3
2 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:20:33.0
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:21:01.3
4 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:22:21.3
5 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:23.25.1
6 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:25:02.2
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:25.41.3
8 - F - Müller (NSU) - 1:26.43.4
9 - D - Orska (NAG) - 1:28:23.1
10 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 1:28:48.3

The 2 leading Talbots were eliminated by accidents, and Caracciola lost 8 minutes at the pits, so suddenly Deilmann and Cleer with their heavy class D cars were in the lead. The Swiss Pierre Clause with his Bignan who drove regularly and free of problems found himself on 3rd position. Riecken drove a phantastic lap and was on place 4.



#28 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:50

Lap 10:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:04.4
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:55.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:58.1
E - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:02.4
F - Scholl (NSU) - 9:12.4
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:13.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:17.4
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:25.1
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 9:36.1
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:42.3

Classification after 10th lap:

1 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:27:10.4
2 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:29:50.4
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:30:21.3
4 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:30:26.2
5 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:32:20.3
6 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:34:54.2
7 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:35:38.2
8 - F - Müller (NSU) - 1:36.56.0
9 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 1:38.05.4
10 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 1:38:46.2

Again a phantastic lap by Riecken fighting for 3rd place. "Rainmaster" Carracciola 51 seconds slower, in the range of Deilmann's heavy Austro-Daimler and Kimpel's 4-cylinder Bugatti.

Retirements in lap 10:
Breier (Bugatti)



#29 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:51

Lap 11:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:37.1
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:41.2
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 8:57.2
E - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:07.4
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:15.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:24.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:31.4
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:47.2
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 10:01.4
F - Bakasch (Brennabor) - 10:08.0

Classification after 11th lap:

1 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:36:08.1
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:39:03.3
3 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:39:22.3
4 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:39:37.1
5 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:41:02.0
6 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 1:47.53.1
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:48:03.2
8 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:48:12.2
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 1:48:55.0
10 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 1:49:43.3

No real action. Von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) slowed down, Scholl and Klöble (NSU) lost 3 minutes, team mate Müller 5 (probably pitstops).
Riecken took again fastest lap, and Caracciola still disappointing with 5 minutes down on the leader.



#30 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:52

Lap 12:

The 10 fastest times:

E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:45.3
E - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 8:49.0
D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 9:06.0
F - Scholl (NSU) - 9:11.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:11.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:16.3
E - Ludewig (Bugatti) - 9:39.3
F - Klöble (NSU) - 9:41.1
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:56.4
F - Bakasch (Brennabor) - 10:06.3

Classification after 12th lap:

1 - D - Deilmann (Austro-Daimler) - 1:45:14.1
2 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:48:48.4
3 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:49:33.0
4 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:49:47.3
5 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:50:41.2
6 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 1:57:14.2
7 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 1:57:53.3
8 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 1:58:50.4
9 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 1:59:00.1
10 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 1:59:02.1

Riecken lost 2 ½ minutes due to another puncture and dropped back from 2nd to 5th, and Cleer had gearbox problems allowing Clause with his Bignan to take 2nd position. Clause drove reliable and constant without any pitstop yet, and climbed from 14th after lap 1 to an unexpected 2nd position. Islinger had a pitstop of 3 minutes resulting in dropping to 11th. Urban-Emmerich lost abt. 15 minutes, reason unknown, he dropped back to the end of the field where also Ludewig (Bugatti) still faced technical problems. Islinger made a pitstop of 3 minutes.



#31 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:53

Lap 13:

The 10 fastest times:

E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:22.2
D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:28.4
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:58.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:59.3
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:59.4
E - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:03.2
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:14.2
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:15.1
F - Klöble (NSU) - 9:30.4
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:35.4

Classification after 13th lap:

1 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 1:57:48.2
2 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 1:58:10.0
3 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 1:58:47.2
4 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 1:59:10.1
5 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:06:14.1
6 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:07:24.2
7 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 2:07:54.1
8 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:08:15.2
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:08:46.1
10 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:10.13.0

After leading the race for 4 laps Deilmann with his Austro-Daimler retired due to unknown reasons. Caracciola overtook Cleer with his Alfa and gained 2nd position. Clause was in the lead, although it is doubtful that he was aware about it, but Caracciola was only 22 seconds behind. The 4 NSU still drove rather constantly with positions changing within the team lap by lap.



#32 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:54

Lap 14:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:01.3
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:12.4
D - von Guilleaume (Austro-Daimler) - 8:43.0
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:47.1
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:52.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:59.1
F - Scholl (NSU) - 9:02.0
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 9:03.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 9:06.1
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:11.4

Classification after 14th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:06.22.4
2 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:06:47.3
3 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:07.11.4
4 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:07:53.3
5 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:15:16.1
6 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:16:16.2
7 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:17:18.2
8 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 2:17:30.0
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:18:34.3
10 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:19.24.4

Caracciola passed Clause as expected, and was leading the race now. Riecken again drove fastest lap and overtook Cleer. However, still 24 seconds behind Clause, and 49 seconds behind Caracciola.
Guilleaume had some very slow laps before, so his 8:43 did not really push him forwards. Also Urban-Emmerich was pushing hard, but he lost too much time with his accident in lap 9.

Retirements in lap 14:
Komnick (Komnick)



#33 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:55

Lap 15:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 7:57.1
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:06.4
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:37.1
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:48.1
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:47.0
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:53.2
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:54.4
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:56.2
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:04.2
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:26.0

Classification after 15th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:14:29.3
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:15:09.0
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:15:35.4
4 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:16:50.0
5 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:24:11.0
6 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:24.53.3
7 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:26:11.4
8 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:28:17.4
9 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:28:29.1
10 - F - Müller (NSU) - 2:30:17.4

Riecken still pushed hard with a lap below 8 minutes, and passed Clause (in theory, because he started 2 minutes earlier). 40 seconds behind Caracciola and still 5 laps to go. Unfortunately we know the result already, otherwise it would be a thrilling story...!

Von Guilleaume with the second Austro-Daimler retired in 15th postion, and Kimpel (Bugatti) lost 5 minutes throwing him back from 8th to 11th.



#34 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:56

Lap 16:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 7:56.0
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:06.0
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:33.1
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:40.2
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:42.3
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:43.0
F - Islinger (NSU) - 8:59.0
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:59.3
F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 9:05.2
E - Santner (O.M.) - 9:38.3

Classification after 16th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:22:35.3
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:23:05.0
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:24:18.4
4 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:25:32.3
5 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:33:26.4
6 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:35:11.2
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:35:45.3
8 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:37:28.1
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:37:56.3
10 - F - Kimpel (Bugatti) - 2:40:49.3

It was still raining, so Riecken must have driven like hell, another 10 seconds faster shortens the distance to Caracciola to 30 seconds only. Did he know this? I believe, yes. Did Caracciola know it? For sure not, considering his statement "Nobody in sight to fight against, every kilometer a useless risk without sense".

Clause was still driving like a clockwork without any pitstop yet, keeping 3rd position. Klöble was driving fast, but Cleer being 8 minutes ahead. Scholl lost another 3 minutes at the pits, and Müller had a rather slow lap (pitstop?).

Ludewig after continuing troubles with his Bugatti finally retired.



#35 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:57

Lap 17:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 7:49.0
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 7:55.0
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:31.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 8:42.2
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:44.4
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:48.2
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:55.1
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:10.1
D - Orska (NAG) - 9:20.4
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:25.3

Classification after 17th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:30:30.3
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:30:54.0
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:33.01.1
4 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:34:17.4
5 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:41:57.4
6 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:44:06.3
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:45:28.3
8 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:46:38.2
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:47:36.3
10 - F - Müller (NSU) - 2:50:19.4

Riecken again increased his speed and picked away another 6 seconds from Caracciola.
For Kimpel (Bugatti) and Fridrich (Pluto) the race was over.



#36 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:58

Lap 18:

The 10 fastest times:

E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 8:12.1
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:33.0
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:37.2
D - Riecken (NAG) - 8:40.4
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:41.0
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:48.3
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:57.0
E - Clause (Bignan) - 9:02.0
D - Orska (NAG) - 9:02.0
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:07.1

Classification after 18th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:38:42.4
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:39:34.4
3 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:42:03.3
4 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:42:54.4
5 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:50:30.4
6 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 2:53:03.3
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 2:54:17.1
8 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 2:55:45.3
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 2:57:20.0
10 - F - Müller (NSU) - 2:59:27.2

Riecken slowed down 1 minute on the lap, what happened? Caracciola also slowed down somewhat, but increased the lead to 52 seconds.

Hanft (Bugatti) finally retired, after continous lap times in the range of 12 minutes, which made him one of the backmarkers. Seems this race was a one-off for him, as I never found him elsewhere.



#37 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:59

Lap 19:

The 10 fastest times:

E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 7:49.4
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:27.0
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:39.1
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:42.3
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:46.2
D - Orska (NAG) - 8:51.4
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:53.4
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:04.4
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:33.3
E - Santner O.M.) - 9:41.4

Classification after 19th lap:

1 - E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 2:46:32.3
2 - D - Riecken (NAG) - 2:49:50.2
3 - D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 2:51:37.2
4 - E - Clause (Bignan) - 2:52:17.3
5 - F - Klöble (NSU) - 2:58:57.4
6 - E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 3:01:57.2
7 - F - Scholl (NSU) - 3:03:03.3
8 - F - Islinger (NSU) - 3:04:50.2
9 - E - Santner (O.M.) - 3:07:01.4
10 - F - Müller (NSU) - 3:09:01.0

Drama in the last but one lap! Riecken drove only 10:15 due to yet another tyre failure, and Clause only 10:14. No chance anymore for Riecken to catch Caracciola, who also drove a relatively fast lap. Clause lost 3rd position to Cleer.



#38 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 22:59

Lap 20:

The 10 fastest times:

D - Riecken (NAG) - 7:42.4
E - Caracciola (Mercedes) - 7:45.1
F - Klöble (NSU) - 8:29.1
D - Cleer (Alfa-Romeo) - 8:39.2
F - Scholl (NSU) - 8:50.3
F - Urban-Emmerich (Talbot) - 8:51.0
D - Orska (NAG) - 8:56.4
E - Schaumburg-Lippe (OM) - 8:59.4
F - Islinger (NSU) - 9:08.2
F - Müller (NSU) - 9:24.2

Final Classification:

1 - E - Rudolf Caracciola (Mercedes 2 Liter GP) - 2:54:17.4
2 - D - Christian Riecken (NAG C4b) - 2:57:33.1
3 - D - Willy Cleer (Alfa-Romeo RL/SS) - 3:00:16.4
4 - E - Pierre Clause (Bignan) - 3:02:07.2
5 - F - Georg Klöble (NSU 6/60) - 3:07:27.0
6 - E - Max Prinz zu Schaumburg-Lippe (OM 665) - 3:10:57.1
7 - F - Jakob Scholl (NSU 6/60) - 3:11.54.1
8 - F - Franz Islinger (NSU 6/60) - 3:13:58.4
9 - E - Hans Santner (OM 665) - 3:16:54.1
10 - F - Josef Müller (NSU 6/60) - 3:18:25.2
11 - F - Fritz Backasch (Brennabor) - 3:21:26.1
12 - F - Eduard Reichstein (Brennabor) - 3:26:33.4
13 - D - Fritz Feldmann (Hansa) - 3:27:45.4
14 - D - Edwin Orska (NAG C4b) - 3:28:11.0
15 - F - Albert Mitzlaff (Brennabor) - 3:29:01.3
16 - F - Hugo Urban-Emmerich (Talbot 70) - 3:29:37.4
17 - F - Max Wälti (Bugatti T13) - 3:31:17.4



#39 Michael Müller

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 23:09

What are the conclusions?

Well, first of all we have to consider the special layout of the track. As we all know the AVUS was only 2 long straights connected with 2 180 degree curves. On the straights the cars could be driven flat out, high power output and rev-resisting engines paid out. It seems that especially the Bugattis and the cycle cars were not constructed for longlasting full throttle passages.

The 2 liter Grand Prix Mercedes with its 170 hp should have been able to reach high top speeds on the long straights, but it did not show the performance one should expect. There are reports that the track condition was rather bad, so not the full potential of the Mercedes' could be used.

The NAG is a rather unknown animal, no figures are known about engine details and power output, but I don't expect more than a tuned production engine. Would Riecken without the 4 tyre failures have been able to beat Caracciola's Mercedes?

Very interesting also the 2 Talbots, nothing more known than 4-cylinder supercharged engines. And a miracle is also Minoia's works O.M., which acc. to the press reports was a supercharged 1.5 litre 8-cylinder. The type 665 was a 2 litre six cylinder, so could this be the new tipo 865 which was "not ready" for Monza 2 months later? Minoia drove fastest lap with 7:17.3, but was later confronted with technical troubles, possibly gearbox.

The NSU achieved a fine result, very reliable machines, but it seems that they had a tyre problem.

After all Caracciola's win was not as glorious as crowds of authors and writers made us believe. All serious competitors retired, and there was a rather good chance that he was beaten by a semi-professional driver (Riecken was NAG's chief engineer) with a car I assume had less than half the power of the Mercedes. But the 2nd is the first looser, and this win was Caracciola's breakthrough to one of the best racing drivers of his era.

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#40 Tim Murray

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 00:13

Thank you Michael.

The main contenders in class E (< 2.0 litre) had been the 2 Mercedes GP racers from 1924, which carried some kind of ugly duck tail hosting 2 seats in order to fulfill the regulations. However, the seats were either for max. 6 year old children, or for some poor chaps who lost both legs in the Great War. The Mercedes works team with Neubauer and the top drivers had been in Spain participating in the Grand Prix de Guipuzcoa, a 12 hour handicap race at San Sebastian held on July 22. This was “only” a reliability run, and it shows how little attention they give to their home “Grand Prix”. Unclear whether whether the Berlin entries had been official works ones, but for sure the cars were factory owned, and also the mechanics were DB employees.

Caracciola claims in his autobiography that DB had originally not planned to enter this event, and it was only after he had made representions to the directors that they agreed to provide cars and support, but on the condition that Caracciola and Rosenberger entered under their own names.

Edited by Tim Murray, 02 December 2010 - 00:21.


#41 jj2728

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 02:43

Fascinating reports and stats Michael. Very much appreciated.
The following photo is copyright of and attributed to: Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-02915 / CC-BY-SA
Posted Image

Edited by jj2728, 02 December 2010 - 02:51.


#42 Otto Grabe

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:18

I'd like to add a small note to a great work already done.
The "Allgemeine Automobil-Zeitung" (#15/26) wrote that all cars were delivered with coloured stripes around the bonnet to characterize the classes (D=white, E=red & F=black). And next: the headgear (?) of the drivers corresponded to the race colors of their nations (the pictures don't show that, do they?) and the precise race distance was 391,461 km.

#43 Michael Müller

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 14:02

Last entry in this class was Swiss Pierre Clause with his Bignan, who between 1924 and 1927 toured through Europe. Not much known about the Bignan, but it seems it had a 4 cylinder 16 valve engine.

In the meantime I was able to find a photo of this very special Bignan. It had a streamlined bodywork very similar to that of the 1923 Bugatti T32 "Tank", with 2 additional dickey seats in the rear.

#44 Michael Ferner

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 16:45

Some time ago I did some research on this race. The car specifications had been indeed strange, officially for sports cars, but without lamps and fenders, thus more or less Formula Libre, but the cars from class E (< 2.0 litre) upwards needed 4 seats.
 

(...)

Unclear is whether there had been classes also above 3 litres (A-B-C?), but if so, there had been no entries. Strange, because there was some interesting machinery around, and even more strange if the organizers did not allow them.
 

 

Fascinating info, Michael, many thanks! I wonder how I managed to miss this thread all those years.

 

A few clarifications (I hope) about the historical background: car classifications in the twenties differed widely from the ones in use today, and a "sports car" race then would be for racing cars of our understanding, i.e. pretty open in specification, with no minimum production numbers. The fledgling "touring car" scene, mostly found competing for the French Touring Grand Prix in those days, would eventually develop into sports car racing proper.

 

About the classes (D, E and F), they were the international classes used throughout most of the prewar era, and for many years after WW2, too - the absence of any entries in classes A, B and C does not necessarily indicate that the race would have been open for cars of these classes, and very likely it wasn't. There were ten AIACR classes in all, and I don't think they changed at all for thirty or forty years:

 

A - 8,000 cc and over

B - 5,000 to 8,000 cc

C - 3,000 to 5,000 cc

D - 2,000 to 3,000 cc

E - 1,500 to 2,000 cc

F - 1,100 to 1,500 cc

G - 750 to 1,100 cc

H - 500 to 750 cc

I - 350 to 500 cc

J - up to 350 cc


Edited by Michael Ferner, 08 April 2014 - 16:47.


#45 Michael Müller

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 19:57

In the meantime some additional data could be found. Breier's Bugatti indeed could be identified as T30 by photo, and Kimpel's Bugatti was no T13 or T37 but one of the rare T39 (8C-1500). To be exact, chassis #4603, a 1925 works car which was sold to Edgar Morawitz in March 1926. After only 2 or 3 months Morawitz sold the car to Georg Kimpel, or more likely, to the BASF / IG Farben chemical company as testbed for their newly developed octane booster on Ferrocene basis. Kimpel at that time was simple employee and in charge for the test fleet of cars. Only 3 months later the unreliable and worn T39 was substituted by the brand new T35C #4821, the very first supercharged 2 litre Bugatti built! #4603 was sold to Willi Cleer of Frankfurt, the guy who at the AVUS drove the RLSS Alfa.

I have a photo of Minoia's OM confirming that it was indeed the tipo 855 (8C-1500)!



#46 Michael Müller

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 20:28

Afaik the AVUS GP was not for touring or sports cars, but obviously for race cars although not expressly. In the 1500 cc class there had been pure GP racers like the OM and the Bugatti T39, and also most of the 1100 cc cycle cars had been pure race cars. All cars had been without wings/fenders and lights. I assume that the organizers knew quite well that the T35 Bugattis at that time had been the cars to beat, and in that period nobody wanted a French car fetching the laurels of a German Grand Prix. So they simply introduced the "4 seats rule" in order to keep the Bugattis out, and also any other 1925 2 litre GP cars like the Alfa P2 or the Sunbeam. It is worth to mention that in 1926 the AIACR required for 2 litre sports cars 2 seats only, and for the 3 litre class three. The only potential national contender was indeed the 1924 Mercedes GP racer, and it seems this was a victim of "friendly fire". I also assume that there was indeed no class for cars above 3 litres, so that also the Mercedes Model K (6.3 litre) as well as the type 400 were de facto excluded by organizers decision. Obviously a result of a quarrel between the AvD and Daimler- Benz, I am curious for any details! Logical decision therefore for Mercedes to travel to San Sebastian instead. Finally they fooled the AvD by converting the 2 litre GP cars to "four seats", as obviously they failed to specify the rear seats...