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1902 Fournier's Mors: Car vs Locomotive


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#1 Flicker

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Posted 22 September 2001 - 12:12

Please, can anybody provide us with pics or drawings about duel, occured in 1902 Paris-Vienna Trial, when Henri Fournier, who started with No.1 was catched by special express-train and after hard battle Fournier won this fight! On first 80 kms he reached an average of 112 km/h.
Unfortunately gearbox of his Mors Z braked soon.. :-(

So the Q. is: if anybody know some graphical illustrations about this duel?

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#2 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 22 September 2001 - 17:19

Nothing in the books by Peter Helck or Carlo Demand.

#3 Flicker

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Posted 22 September 2001 - 19:15

Oh, Hans!

Why i'm asking...:stoned:

Look here: http://speedvision.c...ad/200304a.html

And especially this words: "A contributing force to the Legends Series broadcast by Speedvision, Doug Nye brought a wonderful selection of edited segments from the series. He was most proud of the recently discovered and incredibly sharp racing footage from 1902. The film presentation was given in two parts and chronologically followed racing into the 1960s".

#4 Vitesse2

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Posted 23 September 2001 - 11:46

No picture, but a description from Lord Montagu's "Gordon Bennett Races":

The first stage to Belfort eliminated half the field for the Gordon Bennett Cup .... Fournier's defection had been especially disappointing, since his time of eighty minutes from Champigny to Troyes was a clear indication of the Mors' potentialities. Further, he had given the press a practical demonstration of these: their special train had left an hour behind the cars, but, thanks to various neutralizations, it had been able to catch up, and near Nangis Fournier was seen to shoot past the rapide, which was doing 50-55mph at the time. Ten kilometres short of Langres, the clutch-shaft on his Mors broke, and the disgusted driver took the train on to Belfort, leaving his mechanic to guard the derelict car.

#5 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 30 September 2001 - 05:22

In last month's 8W contest, about the 1902 Gordon Bennett Race, I wrote the following about the first day's events:

The cars left Paris at daybreak of 26 June, a Thursday. The previous year’s winner, Giradot, on the C.G.V. was sent off at 3:30 from Champigny. Fournier followed him at 3:32 on the Mors. At 3:34 came Edge and de Knyff two minutes later, the last of the Gordon Bennett competitors. The other cars, which were to go on past Innsbruck all the way to Vienna, were dispatched in two minutes intervals. The French entries all ran into trouble early on. Giradot had to give up with a split fuel tank after 140 kilometers at Troyes. Fournier had made an excellent time to Troyes. Then, as he went at high speed past Nangis and just ten kilometers before Langres, a broken clutch shaft on his Mors decided his fate. De Knyff was now France’s only hope and he drove superbly, finishing first over the first stage to the frontier town of Belfort. He was followed by Henry Farman, Charles Jarrott and Maurice Farman. There were only two contestants left for the Gordon Bennet Cup, Edge on the notoriously unreliable Napier and De Knyff on his fast 70 hp Panhard. However, a weakness had developed within the Panhard’s differential, which caused the Frenchman considerable concern in view of the rough roads ahead. All the cars were locked up over night in a huge riding-school and cars could not be checked over or repaired.