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Andrea de Cesaris - pictures and articles


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#101 MattFoster

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Posted 15 January 2002 - 21:33

Andrea's best race for me was the 1982 Belgian GP. He would have won that one no doubt about it if the car hadn't let him down.

Woo hoo 100 posts!! Watch out Keir we are catching up to your Amon thread :)

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#102 deangelis86

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Posted 16 January 2002 - 09:48

I'll make it 101 posts with the query over the year of Andrea's Belgian GP success!

I thought it was 1983 not 1982? :drunk:

#103 Maldwyn

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Posted 16 January 2002 - 11:18

Originally posted by deangelis86
I thought it was 1983 not 1982? :drunk:

I'd agree with 1983 :up: The '82 GP was held at Zolder (how could we forget :cry: ) and AdeC certainly blasted away from the Spa grid twice :eek: after the race was restarted.

Can I nominate this as one of my favourite AdeC photos:

Posted Image

from the 1991 Mexico GP :rotfl: His Jordan stopped on the last lap and he pushed the car across the line. The stewards decided he hadn't begun pushing the car until the race ended so he kept 4th place.

#104 mikedeering

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Posted 16 January 2002 - 12:58

Maldwyn - it would appear from your photo that a TV man is trying to interview Andrea! Does anyone know which company/country the guy worked for, and what he was asking?

As for another top AdeC performance - 4th at Monaco 1994. Eddie told him to take it steady, and he did - bringing home 3 points for Jordan in an unfamiliar car.

#105 Maldwyn

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Posted 16 January 2002 - 13:05

Originally posted by mikedeering
Maldwyn - it would appear from your photo that a TV man is trying to interview Andrea!

Yeah, and I'd love to hear the interview:

Interviewer: "Do you have a moment to talk Andrea?"
AdeC: "Well, I'm kind of busy at the moment!"
Interviewer:"It wont take long. Just a few questions..."

:rotfl:

#106 deangelis86

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Posted 16 January 2002 - 15:51

That's a quality photograph Maldwyn!

As mentioned, one of his best races - and a great race all round if I recall correctly with Riccardo being involved?

I think that Andrea was disqualified at this race, but then reinstated when Eddie Jordan pointed out that the race had in fact finished before Andrea got out and started to push.... :up:

#107 MattFoster

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Posted 17 January 2002 - 00:05

Originally posted by deangelis86
I'll make it 101 posts with the query over the year of Andrea's Belgian GP success!

I thought it was 1983 not 1982? :drunk:


I did mean 82

that was the fateful race meeting at Zolder. Andrea was second and hauling in Rosberg hand over fist. Rosberg's tyres went off later in the race but Andrea had gone out with what I think was clutch problems from memory.

#108 Geza Sury

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Posted 18 January 2002 - 08:12

Originally posted by italia
I don't have a picture of him from 1980, but scanned one from 1983 at Monza during warm-up in his Alfa-Romeo:


I can't see this picture!

#109 Hitch

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Posted 19 January 2002 - 14:17

Found this interesting article in a paper from late '82(!) and scanned it (incl. picture that shows Andrea and Ron Dennis at the Nurburgring '80). Hope you like it:

Few drivers arouse passions quite like Andrea deCesaris. lt may be because of his age, but Andrea has attracted a lot of unwanted publicity, and has established several unenviable reputations. Too many of his fellow drivers have climbed out of their cars after a race with harsh words to say about Andrea. The man himself, still one of the youngest Grand Prix drivers on the grid, fails to recognise his errors. He is shy about his controversial driving and gets just as upset about the accusations as his accusers do about his driving, but however upset his fellow competitors may become, one thing is for sure: Andrea deCesaris has undoubted talent and is one of the fastest Grand Prix drivers around. He simply has to harness his latent talent.

Despite what might be termed his 'bad manners' on the track, Andrea is sensitive, but this shyness has been sorely tested. For apart from his controversial driving, two other factors have caused his critics to comment. The first is a nervous twitch which some blamed for an above average accident rate particularly during his first year of Formula One with McLaren. Why should this man land such a good ride when he is obviously so expensive, they asked? The reason, some felt was because Andrea's father was clearly involved in the importing of cigarettes, and more importantly, Marlboro. Some said that he was the sole importer of Marlboros, but that was largely inaccurate. Although Andrea's father has helped his son meet the right peopie at Marlboro, it is Andrea who has managed to maintain their support.

Andrea was born on 31st May, 1959 in Rome where he still lives. In 1972, aged 13, Andrea began his competition career in karts. Four years later, he won the World Championship in the 100cc class, and the next year won the 125cc class. Interestingly, deCesaris was in the same kart team as Teo Fabi in 1976, and after winning his second championship the following year, An-drea did three SuperFord races. He won two of them, and finished second to Fabi in the third.

Andrea was obviously on his way to becoming a racing driver, and one of the first things he did was make a presentation to Marlboro in Lausanne. The tobacco comparly was sufficiently impressed to sponsor Andrea in his first full season of motor racing. The Italien driver chose to benefit from Tim Schenken's experience, and the Australian ran Andrea in a secondhand Ralt-Toyota RT1 in the British BP championship. lt was a difficult year for them all. DeCesaris didn't know the circuits, had only done three races in his life and was lonely and a long way from home. Schenken was equally at sea with the circuits and the car. In the end, they scored some good results, including seconds and thirds, and Andrea even threatened future champion Nelson Piquet on accasions. Sensibly though, he put the whole year down to experience, and set about trying again in 1979.

Once again, he had Marlboro sponsorship and his car, this time a March-Toyota 793, was new and again run by Schenken. lt was an altogether better season with Andrea finishing second to Chico Serra in the Vandervell championship. With a little more luck, he felt he could have been champion for he won six races (as many as anyano else), took three lap records and started nine out of 20 races from pole position. There were two more races he won 'on the road', and a third that he was leading when the race was stopped. Andrea reckoned that he could do no more. The championship should have been his.

At the end of the year, he returned home to Italy for his first Formula Two race in an ICI March at Vallelunga. lt was a fine debut: second fastest race lap and sixth place after a pit stop. Ron Dennis was sufficiently impressed to sign up Andrea for a full F2 season the following year, ironically with Chico Serra as his teammate. lt was a year that he thoroughly enjoyed, especially as it ended with his first F2 win at Misano in the final round. He also scored two second places in his Marlboro-backed March-BMW. At the end of the year, he made his 'World' debut. Firstly, he drove a Lancia Beta Monte Carlo in the World Championship of Makes round at Vallelunga, but more importantly, made his Formula One debut in the Canadian Grand Prix, followed by a second race in a works Alte Romeo in the United States. After qualifying eighth in Canada, he ran fourth or fifth until the gearbox broke, while at Watkins Glen he ran wide when blinded by dust from Alan Jones' off-track excursion at the first corner.

lt wasn't surprising to find Andrea in the revamped McLaren International team run by Ron Dennis in 1981, but it was a year that saw Andrea forge a unenviable reputation for crashing. The record books show that he crashed out of six Grands Prix that year, but that doesn't include practice accidents... He scored his first World Championship point at Imola and worn the class with Pescarolo in the World Championship of Makes round at the Nurburgring in a Lancia.

Andrea was lucky to find a seat in the Alfa Romeo team in 1982, but he proved to have calmed down. He confirmed his talent with pole position at Long Beach, and an exceIlent third (despite being out of petrol) in tricky conditions at Monaco. He finished sixth in Canada. Although he frequently upset future World Champion Keke Rosberg with his driving (particularly at Dijon), Andrea proved to have tempered a little. He is, above all, a competitive person. Even playing football, Andrea is in the thick of things as though nothing else mattered.

Andrea still lives at home, enjoying various sports in his spare time including tennis, skiing and swimming although his real love is enduro motor-cycling. Andrea uses either his own Mercedes 500 SEL or a loaned Alte Romeo 2.5 six cylinder GTV on the road.


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#110 andrea

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Posted 19 January 2002 - 15:24

Originally posted by mikedeering
Maldwyn - it would appear from your photo that a TV man is trying to interview Andrea! Does anyone know which company/country the guy worked for, and what he was asking?

As for another top AdeC performance - 4th at Monaco 1994. Eddie told him to take it steady, and he did - bringing home 3 points for Jordan in an unfamiliar car.


The guy who interviewed Andrea in Mexico 1991 was working for RAI DUE TV,but I forgot his name.

Forza Andrea,

#111 MattFoster

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Posted 20 January 2002 - 18:37

Thanks Hitch for the article I can vaguely remember reading it

#112 Hitch

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Posted 20 January 2002 - 19:32

Some further footnotes to Andrea deCesaris: the hardest crash I saw from him was probably at Silverstone '91 when he hit the wall near the underpass. I really thought he has hurt himself badly - but he climed out of that wreck unhurt. Found a picture of the incident in my archive... but it only gives a small impression of what really happend. I thought it was his last major crash in his career.

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Another thing I found about Andrea was his 'relationship' to Keke Rosberg, especially in the years of 82-84. Keke and Andrea really 'loved' each other: I remember some statements about Andrea by Keke and recently read them again in Geoff Tibballs '50 years of the formula one world championship in the words of those who were there'. Here they are... statements by Keke Rosberg...

'His attitude is that if someone's on his tail trying to get by, he sould prevent it by any means. If it had been possible I would have got out of the car in the middle of the straight and hit him as hard as I could stright in the face, climbed back in the car and gone on' - Keke Rosberg after being held up by deCesaris at the 1982 French GP.

'What really worries me about Andrea is his unwillingness to learn. This is his fourth year in Formula 1 and he's still doing the same things, making the same mistakes' - Keke Rosberg 1984.

'Now we're equal. I blew Monaco and you've blown this race for me' - Keke Rosberg to the Williams team after his car, already badly understeering, finally gave up the ghost at the 1982 British Grand Prix. Four races earlier, Rosberg had been forced to retire at Monaco after hitting the kerb and breaking the car's suspension while trying to pass his old friend Andrea deCesaris.

'Fast on his day. Otherwise he usualyy connects with the scenery.'

:

#113 MattFoster

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Posted 20 January 2002 - 21:07

Hitch,

I agree with you about the Silverstone crash, it was frightening to watch. It could have been so much worse than it was as Nakajima had to slam on his brakes to stop from hitting Andrea's car as it careened back across the track under the overpass.

#114 McRonalds

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Posted 21 January 2002 - 14:25

Can anybody confirm this story about Andrea?

In 1986 Ferrari Indy car designed by Gustav Brunner is finally made public, using a single turbocharger V-8 with a top-mounted exhaust system. The 2.65 liter engine produced 690 bhp, but the car never got past the development stage. Andrea de Cesaris was rumored to be the driver.

:confused:

#115 MattFoster

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Posted 21 January 2002 - 23:23

I seem to recall hearing or reading that. Andrea was linked with Ferrari a few times. The Ferrari Indy engine in a roundabout way became the Alfa Romeo Indy engine.

#116 McRonalds

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Posted 22 January 2002 - 11:23

Originally posted by MattFoster
I seem to recall hearing or reading that. Andrea was linked with Ferrari a few times. The Ferrari Indy engine in a roundabout way became the Alfa Romeo Indy engine.


I think it was really just a rumour...

By the way: there is a strange relationship between Andrea and Nigel Mansell's GP debut. In 1979 Rosanne, Nigels Wife and he sold their house to pay for a couple of Formula 3-races with the March-team. Although the March was anything, but competative, the efforts of Nigel Mansell were unbelievable and soon attracted the attention of Lotus-Formula 1 boss Colin Chapman, who invited him to a Lotus-Test. Shortly before that test, Nigel crushed vertebrae in the neck after he had collided with italian Andrea de Cesaris in Formula 3-race. Chapman was in doubt, whether Mansell would be fit enougth for a Formula 1 test, but Nigel answered "Don' worry, I'll be there !".

#117 MattFoster

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Posted 24 January 2002 - 01:58

I read about that in one of Nigel's biographies. He didn't seem to speak of Andrea in high terms

#118 andrea

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Posted 24 January 2002 - 10:05

Does anyone know de Cesaris' home adress and his e-mail?
Thanks in advance.

Forza Andrea,

#119 deangelis86

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Posted 24 January 2002 - 16:57

Bit of a long shot that one Andrea!

You could try emailing the Webmaster of the Andrea de Cesaris Website, he's had contact with de Cesaris before via email. You can find the address from the links page of my website.

Cheers, and good luck :up:

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#120 MattFoster

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Posted 27 January 2002 - 21:47

I agree it will probably be a long shot

#121 andrea

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Posted 29 January 2002 - 18:33

I hope you'll like this article about Andrea from Jordan magazine from 2000:
Andrea has a special place in the history of Jordan,having been the team's main driver in the debut season of 1991.He twice finished fourth,and at Spa he was even in with a chance of winning until the engine failed
"All that season in 16 races,the engine broke in only one race,"recalls Andrea."At Spa when I was leading!Ford had modified something without telling the team..."
After '91,de Cesaris spent two years at Tyrrell before returning to EJ for a couple of races in 1994,deputising for the banned Irvine.He finished that season with Sauber,before retiring to pursue a very different life.
"Now I basically spend most of my time buying and selling currencies.I put a lot of effort into that."But does he have any innterest in finding job in F1?
"At the momennnt I don't feel like it,because I was around for such a long time,I was a bit fed up!It's nice to come to a couple of GP's each year,but I don't think I'd like to be there every weekend."

Forza Andrea,

#122 marglar

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Posted 29 January 2002 - 18:47

So thats what he's up to nowadays, been wondering about that for a while now, thanks Andrea. :)

#123 andrea

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Posted 04 February 2002 - 13:30

This is an article from GPI about de Cesaris after Belgian GP 1983:
Stage direction:One Italian driver walks down through the paddock on the stones.His face is white with anger.The following speech is delivered sotto voce and in great haste:"I don't know what happened at the start.I started that's it.I started twice and they were both good starts.Something happened behind me.I have nothing to do with what goes on behind me.Something always happens.The car was fantastic and very,very quick.It was the best it's ever been.I had no problems of any kind with anyone.As for the pit-stop,it was bloody slow,wasn't it?It was slowest you could do.That didn't help.I came through Eau Rouge and was climbing up the hill and sudden the engine just stopped on me.It's great ,isn't it?You lead the race,your car is going fine,then first they bugger up the pit-stop and then the engine stops.Detroit?It can't be worse,can it?
(Big smile and farewell sweet prince).

Forza Andrea,

#124 clickhappy

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Posted 04 February 2002 - 20:33

You have confused two stories here...in the mid-80's Enzo Ferrari threatned to boycott F1 and race at Indy, and even built an engine for it...

Around the same time, Ferrari were working on a turbo 4 cylinder engine, a la BMW, and there was a rumor Andrea would be driving that car...a third Ferrari, with a Ferrari 4-cyl motor.

Originally posted by McRonalds
Can anybody confirm this story about Andrea?

In 1986 Ferrari Indy car designed by Gustav Brunner is finally made public, using a single turbocharger V-8 with a top-mounted exhaust system. The 2.65 liter engine produced 690 bhp, but the car never got past the development stage. Andrea de Cesaris was rumored to be the driver.

:confused:



#125 ghinzani

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Posted 04 February 2002 - 21:01

Originally posted by clickhappy
You have confused two stories here...in the mid-80's Enzo Ferrari threatned to boycott F1 and race at Indy, and even built an engine for it...

Around the same time, Ferrari were working on a turbo 4 cylinder engine, a la BMW, and there was a rumor Andrea would be driving that car...a third Ferrari, with a Ferrari 4-cyl motor.


I think the correct way round was that Andrea was rumoured to be driving the Indycar in 86 when he was a Minardi F1 driver, perhaps to be run by Truesports (Rahals team). The four cylindeer Ferrari engine was the year before and the driver was supposed to be Dumfries - an entry was made for the 85 Euro GP at Brands but then withdrawn.

#126 clickhappy

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Posted 04 February 2002 - 23:15

That is not how Road and Track told the story, but perhaps you have better info then they did?

Originally posted by ghinzani


I think the correct way round was that Andrea was rumoured to be driving the Indycar in 86 when he was a Minardi F1 driver, perhaps to be run by Truesports (Rahals team). The four cylindeer Ferrari engine was the year before and the driver was supposed to be Dumfries - an entry was made for the 85 Euro GP at Brands but then withdrawn.



#127 andrea

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Posted 05 February 2002 - 19:26

Does anyone know is there any book about de Cesaris (biographes etc.)?

Forza Andrea,

#128 ghinzani

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Posted 06 February 2002 - 20:03

Originally posted by clickhappy
That is not how Road and Track told the story, but perhaps you have better info then they did?


Im basing it on what I read in Autosports from 85 and 86. Andrea was with Ligier in the early part of 85 when Ferrari were developing the four cylinder car, indeed the Autosport issue announcing Dumfries had been signed as test driver had Piccinni stating Dumfries had been employed to develop the four cylinder engine. When it became rumoured that F1 might reduce capacity to 1200cc and with Ferraris drop in performance towards the end of 85 the four cylinder project was put on the backburner and then quietly dropped. Andrea was never linked with the four cylinder, however over the winter of 84/85 Marlboro had attempted to have Rene Arnoux swap seats with Andrea at Ligier. The Commendatore, with his dislike of running Italian drivers after the criticism of the deaths of Bandini and Giunti by among others, the Vatican, declined to have two Italians in his team. However it was rumoured also that it took the intervention of Arnouxs lawyer to prevent this Marlboro backed swap. Looking at what happened to Capelli years later and the awful performance of the Scuderia in 86 it was probably best that Andrea didnt end up at Ferrari in this period.

The Indycar project was first rumored in 85 and then officialy announced in 86 when Enzo was threatening to leave F1 (unless rule changes went his way...). The car was designed by Brunner and featured a development of the Ferrari engine supplied to the group c Lancia lc2. Initial information gathering had centred around results gained when Rahal tested his Truesports March 85c at Maranello in the fall of 85. This is why Truesports were often linked with the project. However when the car was announced in 86 it was Andrea who was named as the driver, perhaps as some compensation to him and Marlboro for him having to drive a Minardi (Im not knocking Minardi but in the turbo days they were well adrift). In the end the FIA capitulated to Enzo's rule wishes and the project was canned, although the engine reappeared in 1989 as an Alfa for thei ill-fated CART campaign with Guerrero and Sullivan.

Road and Track got it wrong Im afraid.

#129 clickhappy

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Posted 07 February 2002 - 22:26

wow!

this is great stuff, thank you for setting the record straight...

#130 andrea

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Posted 14 February 2002 - 18:58

This is an article about de Cesaris from Donongton F3 race programme from1979:
"Currently second in the British Championship is De Cesaris who,I think is going to be around for a long time.After running a Ralt in the BP series last year and improving immeasurably throught the season,his Marlboro backingh has enabled the Tim Schenken-run Team Tiga outfit to run him in a March this year.Like Serra he's had three wins but his four points deficit is due to a lack of consistency in the minor placings.But one has to remember that he's only 20 years old,until last season,his racing experience was virtually nil.He's still prone to mistakes but he's winner through and through.The mistakes are due to over enthusiasm which at this stage in his career is a plus point.By the time you read this we'll know the result of his F2 debut at Valelunga in one of the ICI Marches(sixth).I think he'll go well there and everything about Andrea's F3 set-up convinces me he'll win the championship this year and give the Europeans a hard time this weekend.


Forza Andrea,

#131 MattFoster

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Posted 14 February 2002 - 21:23

Thanks Andrea. That story reminds me of when I was first aware of Andrea, I was in Britain in early 1980 and I bought a motoring mag from a train station to read on the trip and it had a story about up and coming drivers in Britain and two of the ones they rated highest were Andrea and Mike Thackwell, I decided to keep an eye on their careers after that, not easy back then down here in Australia and I was surprised to read that they both made their F1 debuts at the same race that year. So I chose Andrea as my fav then and there.

#132 andrea

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Posted 20 February 2002 - 12:50

This is very interesting Andrea's interview from Grand Prix International 1981:
ANDREA DE CESARIS
In the paddock at any Grand Prix, there are surely twice as many stories in circulation about Andrea de Cesaris as there are about any other driver. Whether it's his family's influence with Marlboro, his future in F1 or the reasons for the 22 year old Roman's latest accident, some paddock "expert" always has the answer. Maybe this interview will quell some of the less well-founded rumours, for it reveals a young man who refuses to yield to the not inconsiderable pressures upon him.

You have told me that you were very upset about some of the things that were written about your driving, for example after the accident during prac-tice at Zandvoort. What, in fact, happe-ned there?
I know exactly what happened. At the end of the straight I put my foot on the brake pedal, and for the first one-tenth of a second the brakes were OK. Then the pedal went down. In my opinion, I didn't have any braking at all from that instant. But some people have told me (and I have photographs which show the same thing) that the rear brakes were locked up, so I have to accept that the rear bra-kes were working, In any racing car, though, the rear brakes only do a small amount of the work. And when we loo-ked at the front tyres, they were not flat-spotted... which suggests that the front brakes were not working at all.
I know that the accident at Zandvoort was not my fault. Several people have said that I was braking very late for that comer, but if I had made a mistake (and I admit that I do make mistakes someti-mes, just like anybody else), I would not have missed my braking completely. At that speed you would not choose to go straight on like I did: you would spin the car, or run wide on to the grass, I don't blame my team, because they did the best Job they could. I do not accept it, though, when people say that it was my fault. If they don't want to believe me, that's their choice. But I am telling the truth.
In the various accidents in which you been involved this year, have there been many mechanical failures?
Let's talk first about accidents in general. The worst kind of accident which you can have is during a race, because that means you get no points and there is less publicity for the car. If you have an acci-dent in practice, it's bad... but even though it makes things difficult for the team, at least they can repair the car for the race.
If you look at our team's record, you will find that we have done 12 world cham-pionship races this year, before Monza, In races, I have had three or four acci-dents: Monte Carlo... Spain... Silvers-tone... and Hockenheim, In some (but not all) of these accidents, I accept that it was
me who made the mistake. For example, at Hockenheim, maybe I should not have tried to overtake Patrick Tambay at the moment which I chose. But accidents like Monte Carlo and Sil-
verstone, where people spun in front of me, well, they were not my fault. For sure, I have made mistakes this year -maybe even more than I should have done - but there are many, many things which people don't understand comple-tely.
I am with McLaren this year, a team that is coming up again after a few years when it was not competitive. The car is new and so are many of the people invol-ved. There is a lot of pressure on the team. It is not acceptable if I qualify 12th or 13th, as some other drivers are able to do: I know that I have to qualify in a decent position and finish the race well. I was only given the new MP4 car at Monaco, which for me is only six races ago, and so far I haven't finished in a good position with the MP4.1 finished at Zeitweg, but in the other races I had acci-dents. As I said before, some of these accidents were my fault, others no. But because of the team's situation, every-body watches me very closely, perhaps because of their interests. This puts pres-sure on me which should not be there because this is still my first year (in For-mula 1). I am in what you call a "vicious circle:" you have an accident and the pressure becomes more, not less.
I don't want to blame my team, but there is one thing I want to say. This year, except for a few laps before we went to Monaco, I have only tested my Marlboro McLaren MP4 once outside official race practising, at Silverstone. I never tested the M29 at the begining of the year.So every 15 days,when I go to race,I have problems which I have difficulty in solving... and every time I go to a race track I find a lot of pressure on me in qualifying. I don't have the relaxed atmosphere which you get in testing, when you can try different things on the car. I don't think it's very easy... Do you think, therefore, that rt would have been better for your career if you had stayed in Formula 2 this year? You are, after all, still the youngest driver in Grand Prix racing...
I don't think it would have been any diffe-rent if I had done another year in F2. There are two important things taht you have to consider (when you are new to F1). First of all: are you going quick enough in a good car to qualify well? I have been doing that, especially conside-ring the lack of private testing. So, from the point of view of speed, I think I was ready to go into F1.
From a second point of view, in F1 you have to be good in the races. You have to get used to long races, to being patient and knowing the right moment to over-take. because it's completely different from 10-lap races in F3. And last year in F2 I think I showed that I (had this ability), because I finished some good races, some long races. OK, in F1 I made some mistakes from this point of view, but I think they are sort of mistakes which every driver makes in his first year of F1.1 don't think there are many drivers in their first year in F1 who got points, not even with a good car. There are very good examples: Giltes (Villeneuve), or Nelson (Piquet). Now they are in a position to do well, to score points, but earlier (in their careers) I think they did the same as I am doing now.
Last year you drove the Atfa Romeo V12-engined 179 in two Grands Prix. Apart from the different tyres and the different of skirts, what were the contrasts you felt between last year's Alfa and this year's McLarens,from a dreiver's point of view?
The first thing is that engines avery different. The Ford V8 is very much more "elastic," it has power over a much wider range than the Alfa. With the Alfa, the moment you touch the throttle, you find that all the power is there, suddenly. But I can't really say whether I felt that the Alfa had more power, because the whole car is so different and because there was a gap of almost five months before I drove the McLaren M29.
From a handling point of view, I would say that in fast corners the present McLa-ren feels very similar to the Alfa Romeo last year with sliding skirts. The Alfa was very well balanced in fast corners, and so is the McLaren. With full tanks, though. you could feel the extra weight of the Alfa: my car this year, even on full tanks, feels light to drive.
There has been a lot of comment in the press about the dose relationship between your family and the Philip Morris/Marlboro company. Can you ex-plain these connections and how impor-tant they are?
Well, in Italy the sale of cigarettes is a monopoly which is owned by the go-vernment. But between the government and the tobacconists there are distribu-tors, and my father is one of these distri-butors. He distributes all brands of ciga-rettes, including Marlboro, but there is no special relationship between his busi-ness and Marlboro. He has friends at Marlboro, just as he has friends in the Italian and American tobacco compa-nies. That is his job. But he is not em-ployed directly by Marlboro, which has been suggested
What my father did tor me, when I was racing karts, was to introduce me to these people because he knew they were interested in racing. They gave me help when I was beginning in kart racing, to get things which I couldn't get in Italy. And when I decided to race cars, I went to the Marlboro offices in Lausanne, to speak to (Marlboro Vice-President) Mr Buzzi. It was the first time that I had met him, and I asked him if there was a chance for me to race in a Marlboro For-mula 3 team. He said "Yes," and I had the same deal which all the other Marlboro drivers have had.
You must understand that my father can have no influence on Marlboro. For sure, I havea very good relationshipwith Marl-boro, because of the years that I have been with them, and they have been good to me. But that is all.
Of the 15 races which you have done in F1, which for you was the most satis-fying?
The most satisfying was Imola, because that is where I got my first championship point. I started with the old carfrom 14th place and finished 6th, not because other cars stopped but because I passed many, many cars including an Alfa and a Re-nault. I was not lapped, so that was a good 6th place for me.
But speaking from a personal point of view, I got a lot of satisfaction from qualifying 5th on the grid at Dijon, t was ha-ving a very good race there, too, until I had to stop when I had trouble with a wheel. I would have scored some good points, I think.
But speaking from a personal point of view, I got a lot of satisfaction from quali-fying 5th on the grid at Dijon. I was ha-ving a very good race there, too, until I had to stop when ) had trouble with a wheel. I would hav scored some good points, I think.
And the greatest disappointment in F1?
I know that some people believe that I have accidents because I am not good enough. But I also know that this is hot the real Andrea, not the guy who was driving 100 per cent in F3 and last year. I don't like it when people talk about me like that. I want to get rid of this image and show all the people that it is not true that) am a crasher
What are your interests outside motor racing?
Well, I have been doing a lot of racing this year with Lancia in long-distance events, so I haven't had much free time. Last year I was living in England, but this year, partly because there hasn't been much testing, I have been living in Italy and travelling to the races from here.
I liKe sports, not just to keep fit but for enjoyment. For example, I like wind-surfing, which is easy to do in Italy. I have a small house near Rome, where I go for my holidays: I also like water skiing very much. and snow skiing. I enjoy horse riding... and animals generally. When I am not racing I spend as much time as possible with my family and with my girl-friend.
Is there any driver of the past that you particularly admire?
You ask about the past, but I don't know very much about the past. I haven't any idea about people like Fangio, for exam-ple! But I remember when I was racing karts, that was the time of Niki Lauda, and I really liked him. I don't know him at all, but I don't think that I am the same type of driver as he was. Obviously, I would like to have the sort of success that he had.
What are your hopes for the future, and in particular for 1982?
First of all, I want to finish the F1 season well, so that people who have trusted me - including McLaren - can have more confidence in me. I hope to be with a good team in F1 next year. I don't know yet exactly which one it will be, because there is a lot of negotiating going on.
Forza Andrea,

#133 andrea

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Posted 06 March 2002 - 18:44

Okay guys,if you don't send any comments in the next few days,I'll finish this thread.

Forza Andrea,

#134 MattFoster

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Posted 07 March 2002 - 01:20

Keep it going Andrea. this is too good a thread to shut down

#135 Maldwyn

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Posted 16 March 2002 - 17:28

Another great photo of Andrea I've just come across...
Road rage

#136 MattFoster

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Posted 18 March 2002 - 04:39

Great pic Maldwyn

I remember that race well, Andrea was on a flyer as usual at Monaco and was making the Dallara look good.

#137 marglar

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Posted 19 March 2002 - 20:08

I came across couple of interviews with Andrea the other day on www.grandprix.com if anyone is interested.

http://www.grandprix...ft/ft00082.html

and

http://www.grandprix...ft/ft00113.html

Lets keep this thread going!

#138 MattFoster

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Posted 20 March 2002 - 07:41

Great interviews! thanks for posting them

#139 deangelis86

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Posted 20 March 2002 - 10:21

Very interesting interviews! :up:

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#140 rdrcr

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Posted 21 March 2002 - 19:18

So as not to respond to that "other" thread... I thought I'd just stand here in this one and be counted with the apparent minority (at least on this forum) that disliked Andrea. You will almost never find me throwing a disparaging word at anyone with the courage and determination to enter racing. Racing drivers are a special breed... especially the ones that try and earn a living at it. Some, don't need to earn a living at all, thus they enter a field that they love, just for that reason. Motor racing often has individuals that enter via that premise and for one reason or another fail to achieve any sort of success... either in terms of commercial success or record book (actual) success. IMHO, Andrea de Cesaris was one such individual. He continued long after he was welcome by his other competitors or the fans... at least what I was exposed to... We, all my racing buddies and I, at the time used to cringe when he made the field and prayed that he wouldn't take out our favorites... It got to be like a running gag after a while. I offer just a smattering of offences that the hapless Andrea has committed whilst vainly trying to vie from being lapped. This was from F1 Rogues and I've edited out almost all of the spins and such that we not his fault.

The record:

GP Starts: 208

Active from: 1980 to: 1994 (ed. That's 14 long years...)

DNQs: 0, DNPQs: 0, Poles: 1, Fastest laps: 1, 1sts: 0, 2nds: 2, 3rds: 3, Championships: 0


The ruin:

1990

Race: Grande Premio do Brazil: Interlagos
Date: 22-24 March 1990

Offence:
At the start of the race Alesi made a poor start and de Cesaris got a flyer. The result was that the Dallara moved ahead of the Tyrrell but Alesi was not going to be perturbed. He fought back at the entrance to the first corner. Both Alesi and de Cesaris tried to run around the outside of Patrese’s Williams. There was not enough room and the Tyrrell and the Dallara made contact with each other. The Dallara was pitched into the gravel; de Cesaris's race was run. Alesi was fortunate not to have damaged the suspension on his Tyrrell.

Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 11-13 May 1990

Offence:
de Cesaris took out Alessandro Nannini’s Benetton in practice at Villeneuve. de Cesaris had just exited the pit and he moved his Dallara across the Benetton as it tried to over take him. Nannini was sent flying into the wall and was very lucky to escape the near 200-mph crash uninjured. The car was a right off and Nannini was condemned to the spare B190 for the rest of the weekend.

Offence:
After his altercation earlier in the weekend with Nannini de Cesaris pushed a furious Mansell of the track at Rivazza whilst the Ferrari was trying to lap the Dallara.

Race: Gran Premio de Mexico: Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez, Mexico
Date: 22-24 June 1990

Offence:
Come the Friday night of the race weekend de Cesaris was out of the event. There was no spare car for him after wiring problems with his Dallara and following that a dispute with Grouillard over the same piece of track would see the Italian crash his Dallara heavily, seriously damaging it’s chassis.

Race: Grande Premio de Portugal: Estoril
Date: 21-23 September 1990

Offence:
de Cesaris was dawdling around the track just as Alliot was coming past him on a fast lap in qualifying. de Cesaris turned his Dallara in on Alliot’s Ligier. The two cars made contact, the Ligier launched into the air, coming down to earth with a impact so mighty it was to completely write off the band new Ligier chassis. Alliot was unhurt but he was blinded by rage. He marched off to confront de Cesaris in the Scuderia Italia pit garage. Alliot tried to give Andrea a beating with a trolley jack but he was held back by some burley mechanics.

Offence:
de Cesaris was out of the race on the very first lap. The throttle on his Dallara stuck open and all he able to do was spin the car into the gavel and retirement. (ed. granted not his fault)

Race: Gran Premio Tio Pepe de Espana: Jerez
Date: 28-30 September 1990

Offence:
In Saturday's qualifying de Cesaris ruined on of Berger's fast laps much to the anger of the Austrian. “What is there to be said about de Cesaris? It was unbelievable. My first run was spoilt by a slight gearbox problem, my second by Andrea and my on my third, naturally my tyres had gone off,” complained Berger. Berger's race engineer visited de Cesaris to give him a stern lecture after the incident.


1991

Race: Rhone-Poulenc Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 5-7 July 1991

Offence:
On lap twenty de Cesaris was fully occupied trying to lap one of the Brabhams. He did not notice Prost approach in his rear view mirrors. In one lap Prost’s advantage over Mansell had been slashed from over two second to two tenths of a second as he was stuck behind the Jordan. When he finally let Prost through he did not do it cleanly and Mansell was able to get the jump on Prost, out braking the Ferrari and the Jordan into Adelaide hairpin.

Race: British Grand Prix: Silverstone
Date: 12-14 July 1991

Offence:
After his poor showing de Cesaris had been charging hard in his Jordan and was making good progress though the field. He stopped for fresh rubber on lap twenty-seven, dropping him to twenty-third. By lap forty-seven he had battled his way up to eighth position when disaster struck. As he swept through Abbey curve a stud broke on the Jordan’s right rear suspension. The Jordan speared into the barriers and slithered down them before shooting across the track in front of Nakajima and Prost who were approaching at over 170 mph. Prost had to brake very hard, flat spotting his tyres and picking up a puncture. He had to make an unscheduled pit stop that effectively cost him second place in the race. Andrea was very lucky to escape his huge 150 mph plus shunt uninjured.

Race: Fuji TV Japanese Grand Prix: Suzuka
Date: 18-20 October 1991

Offence:
Ayrton Senna was approaching the chicane at toward the end of his out lap in Friday qualifying and he inadvertently baulked de Cesaris who was at the end of a flying lap. de Cesaris was livid and to exact revenge he rammed the McLaren from behind, putting a serious dent in both his Jordan and Senna’s McLaren.

Offence:
Zanardi snatched ninth place form de Cesaris at the end of lap two. Andrea immediately went on the counter attack. Suddenly his Jordan snapped into a spin. He would later claim that this had been due to debris on his tyres from an earlier move. Whatever the cause he spun across the track and collected both Pirro and Lehto, wiping out the entire Dallara team. Then suddenly Wendlinger arrived on the scene in his Leyton house, ramming the stationary Jordan of de Cesaris. The net result was four cars eliminated in one incident.

1992
Race: Grand Prixtio Pepe Gran Premio de Espana: Catalunya
Date: 1-3 May 1992

Offence:
de Cesaris spun his Tyrrell after the completion of only a couple of laps in Friday’s dry qualifying session. He had to take the spare car for the rest of the session and he found it was not to his liking.

Offence:
de Cesaris spun off and rejoined on the opening lap only to retire on lap four with fading oil; pressure, Perhaps this was due to damage picked up in the first lap spin.

Race: Grand Prix de Monaco: Monte Carlo
Date: 29-31 May 1992

Offence:
de Cearsris’s Thursday qualifying session was punctuated by a dangerous wheel-banging incident with Stefano Modena.

Race: Rhone-Poulenc Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 3-5 July 1992

Offence:
The hapless Italian driver spun his Tyrrell of the road and into retirement on lap fifty-two. He had stayed out on slicks in the rain too long and did not possess the necessary skill too be able to keep the car on track.

Race: British Grand Prix: Silverstone
Date: 10-12 July 1992

Offence:
One of the few drivers to make an attempt in the wet Saturday qualifying session de Cesaris provided the highpoint of the session with a spectacular spin.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 14-16 August 1992

Offence:
In Friday qualifying de Cesaris touched the back of Mansell's’ Williams. This caused de Cesaris to spin off the track. Tyrrell launched a complaint to the race stewards over Mansell’s erratic behaviour.

Race: 63 Pioneer Gran Premio D’Italia: Monza Autodromo
Date: 11-13 September 1992

Race: Foster’s Australian Grand Prix: Adelaide Street Circuit
Date: 6-8 November 1992

Offence:
On lap four Hakkinen made a move on de Cesaris’s Tyrrell. de Cesaris pushed Hakkinen into a spin that cost the Finn a number of places.


1993
Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 23-25 April 1993

Offence:
de Cesaris lost control of his Tyrrell on lap nineteen. He slid off that track and into retirement.

Race: Gran Premio de Espana: Catalunya
Date: 7-9 May 1993

Offence:
de Cesaris’s progress was slowed when he had to make a pit-stop on lap thirty-four to remove three visor tear off’s from hid Tyrrell’s side pods that were causing the car to overheat. Eight laps later his engine cut out on the start / finish straight and he ground to a halt. Marshals leapt to his rescued opening a temporary gate to give the Tyrrell a push start. de Cesaris was black flagged on lap forty-two and he pitted at the end of lap forty-three for good. He had illegally received “outside assistance” for which the stewards disqualified him.

Race: Grand Prix de Monaco: Monte Carlo
Date: 22-25 May 1993

Offence:
In the rain on the Thursday de Cesaris was putting “the pedal to the metal” rather more firmly than Ken Tyrrell would have liked.. The result? Two accidents.

Race: Rhone-Poulenic Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 2-4 July 1993

Offence:
Blundell had been unhappy with the brakes on his Ligier in the warm-up. In an attempt to remedy the problems his brake callipers were changes for the start of the race. Due to this he was taking it too easy in the early stages of the race and Schumacher and Senna were crowding him. On lap twenty-one he came up behind de Cesaris's Tyrrell as they entered the Estoril right hander. As they came round to the end of the lap the Italian took a stage line that seemed to put Blundell off. “He seemed to be trying to hold his car tight to the right and taking bites at the corner, rather than letting it run out,“ explained Blundell. “So I tough he was making room for me on the left but when I pulled level to him - and I mean literally cockpit to cockpit he just wandered into me.” This pushed the Ligier of the track and into the barrier very hard. It was a disappointing end to the race for Blundell, on his team’s home track.

Race: Grand Prix du Canada: Montreal, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
Date: 11-13 July 1993

Offence:
In Friday’s qualifying session Katayama slammed his Tyrrell into the wall. He had to borrow de Cesaris's car to attempt to qualify. What was worse was that de Cesaris had damaged the under tray on his Tyrrell riding the kerbs and Katayama had to wait while the team effected the necessary repairs.

Offence:
de Cesaris had a sizable accident on lap forty-five that would see him eliminated from the race. He was riding the kerbs and got seriously out of shape. His Tyrrell spearing into the retaining wall.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 13-15 August 1993

Offence:
The Italian spun in Saturday's qualifying session. To compound matters he did it in front of his team mate, Katayama, ruining both of their laps. Ken Tyrrell had a rule that in timed session his cars were not to be on the track at the same time. From this incident you can see why.

Race: Fuji TV Japanese grand Prix: Suzuka
Date: 22-24 October 1993

Offence:
In Saturday qualifying the threat of rain loomed larger. The notoriously over exuberant de Cesaris was one of the first cars out on the track. Coming to the end of his first flying lap he got all four of his Tyrrell’s wheels on to the grass on the exit of the infamous 130R corner. The Tyrrell spun to toward the left-hand side of the circuit slamming into the barriers. The session was red flagged as there was debris all over the track’s surface.

Offence:
de Cesaris’s miserable weekend came to a premature end when Martini punted him off the track in the second corner of the race. “Martini hit me on the opening lap and I went on at the second corner,” shrugged Andrea.


1994
Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 27-1 April 1994

Offence:
With many rumours circulating the track about Senna's condition de Cesaris lost concentration and spun out of the race on lap fifty.

Race: Grosser Preis von Deutschland: Hockenheimring
Date: 29-31 July 1994

Offence:
Starting at the rear of the field de Cesaris had a nightmare at the start. When the lights when gear he got too much wheel spin and his Jordan speared out of control, collecting Alboreto’s Minardi and Zanardi's Lotus. One Lotus, one Minardi and one Sauber were all out on the spot, even before they had reached the first corner of the race. Hakkinen had triggered another accident at the head of the field too. All in all it was Hakkinen who got the blame for inducing the first lap chaos. He was judged to have triggered the multiple accident and as he was racing under a one race suspended ban he was prevented form entering the Hungarian Grand Prix.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 12-14 August 1994

Offence:
On lap thirty-one Morbidelli and de Cesaris were both eliminated from the race. Fighting hard for position the Sauber and the Footwork came together and slid into the gravel. Both drivers were out on the spot.

Race: European Grand Prix: Jerez
Date: 14-16 October 1994

Offence:
Along with Blundell, de Cesaris crashed in Saturday qualifying. Both accidents littered the slippery track with dust and debris, wrecking the chances of the other drivers to improve their qualifying times.


I dare say, that even though he has found quite a following here, you guys are the exception to the rule of opinion that has followed this man throughout his professional career. I have read all of this thread and while I have learned some things that I never knew and have been made a little more appreciative of his flashes of brilliance, most will go in the cold storage file of my own personal databanks. In closing, I don't begrudge you for your vaulted opinions of him, you are entitled to think what you will... just don't castrate me for mine...



*rdrcr puts visor down and prepares for debris to be thrown*

#141 deangelis86

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Posted 21 March 2002 - 23:01

That's a very entertaining post rdrcr, thank you very much indeed for posting it. It brought back many fine memories! :up:

I agree with your opinion as I'm sure a lot of pro-Andrea fans would. I don't think that even the most ardent of Andrea fans would not admit that he's had his fair share of smashes over the years - and that's putting it mildly!! :lol:

I personally was pleased that De Cesaris left F1 with his reputation rebuilt. It's all too easy to remember Andrea as a car-destroyer throughout the 80's, but his later excellent form with Jordan and Tyrrell is easily overlooked.

Above all else, I will remember Andrea de Cesaris as an entertainer, a pure 100% racer who together with Senna, Mansell, and Rosberg would always make F1 well worth watching back then.

Although I really enjoyed your report from the Rogues Gallery, I think it's just a teensy-weensy little bit unfair.;) I mean you could pick *any* driver's race weekend and find similar sorts of car destroying chaos! :)

Originally posted by rdrcr
So as not to respond to that "other" thread... I thought I'd just stand here in this one and be counted with the apparent minority (at least on this forum) that disliked Andrea. You will almost never find me throwing a disparaging word at anyone with the courage and determination to enter racing. Racing drivers are a special breed... especially the ones that try and earn a living at it. Some, don't need to earn a living at all, thus they enter a field that they love, just for that reason. Motor racing often has individuals that enter via that premise and for one reason or another fail to achieve any sort of success... either in terms of commercial success or record book (actual) success. IMHO, Andrea de Cesaris was one such individual. He continued long after he was welcome by his other competitors or the fans... at least what I was exposed to... We, all my racing buddies and I, at the time used to cringe when he made the field and prayed that he wouldn't take out our favorites... It got to be like a running gag after a while. I offer just a smattering of offences that the hapless Andrea has committed whilst vainly trying to vie from being lapped. This was from F1 Rogues and I've edited out almost all of the spins and such that we not his fault.

The record:

GP Starts: 208

Active from: 1980 to: 1994 (ed. That's 14 long years...)

DNQs: 0, DNPQs: 0, Poles: 1, Fastest laps: 1, 1sts: 0, 2nds: 2, 3rds: 3, Championships: 0


The ruin:

1990

Race: Grande Premio do Brazil: Interlagos
Date: 22-24 March 1990

Offence:
At the start of the race Alesi made a poor start and de Cesaris got a flyer. The result was that the Dallara moved ahead of the Tyrrell but Alesi was not going to be perturbed. He fought back at the entrance to the first corner. Both Alesi and de Cesaris tried to run around the outside of Patrese’s Williams. There was not enough room and the Tyrrell and the Dallara made contact with each other. The Dallara was pitched into the gravel; de Cesaris's race was run. Alesi was fortunate not to have damaged the suspension on his Tyrrell.

Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 11-13 May 1990

Offence:
de Cesaris took out Alessandro Nannini’s Benetton in practice at Villeneuve. de Cesaris had just exited the pit and he moved his Dallara across the Benetton as it tried to over take him. Nannini was sent flying into the wall and was very lucky to escape the near 200-mph crash uninjured. The car was a right off and Nannini was condemned to the spare B190 for the rest of the weekend.

Offence:
After his altercation earlier in the weekend with Nannini de Cesaris pushed a furious Mansell of the track at Rivazza whilst the Ferrari was trying to lap the Dallara.

Race: Gran Premio de Mexico: Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez, Mexico
Date: 22-24 June 1990

Offence:
Come the Friday night of the race weekend de Cesaris was out of the event. There was no spare car for him after wiring problems with his Dallara and following that a dispute with Grouillard over the same piece of track would see the Italian crash his Dallara heavily, seriously damaging it’s chassis.

Race: Grande Premio de Portugal: Estoril
Date: 21-23 September 1990

Offence:
de Cesaris was dawdling around the track just as Alliot was coming past him on a fast lap in qualifying. de Cesaris turned his Dallara in on Alliot’s Ligier. The two cars made contact, the Ligier launched into the air, coming down to earth with a impact so mighty it was to completely write off the band new Ligier chassis. Alliot was unhurt but he was blinded by rage. He marched off to confront de Cesaris in the Scuderia Italia pit garage. Alliot tried to give Andrea a beating with a trolley jack but he was held back by some burley mechanics.

Offence:
de Cesaris was out of the race on the very first lap. The throttle on his Dallara stuck open and all he able to do was spin the car into the gavel and retirement. (ed. granted not his fault)

Race: Gran Premio Tio Pepe de Espana: Jerez
Date: 28-30 September 1990

Offence:
In Saturday's qualifying de Cesaris ruined on of Berger's fast laps much to the anger of the Austrian. “What is there to be said about de Cesaris? It was unbelievable. My first run was spoilt by a slight gearbox problem, my second by Andrea and my on my third, naturally my tyres had gone off,” complained Berger. Berger's race engineer visited de Cesaris to give him a stern lecture after the incident.


1991

Race: Rhone-Poulenc Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 5-7 July 1991

Offence:
On lap twenty de Cesaris was fully occupied trying to lap one of the Brabhams. He did not notice Prost approach in his rear view mirrors. In one lap Prost’s advantage over Mansell had been slashed from over two second to two tenths of a second as he was stuck behind the Jordan. When he finally let Prost through he did not do it cleanly and Mansell was able to get the jump on Prost, out braking the Ferrari and the Jordan into Adelaide hairpin.

Race: British Grand Prix: Silverstone
Date: 12-14 July 1991

Offence:
After his poor showing de Cesaris had been charging hard in his Jordan and was making good progress though the field. He stopped for fresh rubber on lap twenty-seven, dropping him to twenty-third. By lap forty-seven he had battled his way up to eighth position when disaster struck. As he swept through Abbey curve a stud broke on the Jordan’s right rear suspension. The Jordan speared into the barriers and slithered down them before shooting across the track in front of Nakajima and Prost who were approaching at over 170 mph. Prost had to brake very hard, flat spotting his tyres and picking up a puncture. He had to make an unscheduled pit stop that effectively cost him second place in the race. Andrea was very lucky to escape his huge 150 mph plus shunt uninjured.

Race: Fuji TV Japanese Grand Prix: Suzuka
Date: 18-20 October 1991

Offence:
Ayrton Senna was approaching the chicane at toward the end of his out lap in Friday qualifying and he inadvertently baulked de Cesaris who was at the end of a flying lap. de Cesaris was livid and to exact revenge he rammed the McLaren from behind, putting a serious dent in both his Jordan and Senna’s McLaren.

Offence:
Zanardi snatched ninth place form de Cesaris at the end of lap two. Andrea immediately went on the counter attack. Suddenly his Jordan snapped into a spin. He would later claim that this had been due to debris on his tyres from an earlier move. Whatever the cause he spun across the track and collected both Pirro and Lehto, wiping out the entire Dallara team. Then suddenly Wendlinger arrived on the scene in his Leyton house, ramming the stationary Jordan of de Cesaris. The net result was four cars eliminated in one incident.

1992
Race: Grand Prixtio Pepe Gran Premio de Espana: Catalunya
Date: 1-3 May 1992

Offence:
de Cesaris spun his Tyrrell after the completion of only a couple of laps in Friday’s dry qualifying session. He had to take the spare car for the rest of the session and he found it was not to his liking.

Offence:
de Cesaris spun off and rejoined on the opening lap only to retire on lap four with fading oil; pressure, Perhaps this was due to damage picked up in the first lap spin.

Race: Grand Prix de Monaco: Monte Carlo
Date: 29-31 May 1992

Offence:
de Cearsris’s Thursday qualifying session was punctuated by a dangerous wheel-banging incident with Stefano Modena.

Race: Rhone-Poulenc Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 3-5 July 1992

Offence:
The hapless Italian driver spun his Tyrrell of the road and into retirement on lap fifty-two. He had stayed out on slicks in the rain too long and did not possess the necessary skill too be able to keep the car on track.

Race: British Grand Prix: Silverstone
Date: 10-12 July 1992

Offence:
One of the few drivers to make an attempt in the wet Saturday qualifying session de Cesaris provided the highpoint of the session with a spectacular spin.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 14-16 August 1992

Offence:
In Friday qualifying de Cesaris touched the back of Mansell's’ Williams. This caused de Cesaris to spin off the track. Tyrrell launched a complaint to the race stewards over Mansell’s erratic behaviour.

Race: 63 Pioneer Gran Premio D’Italia: Monza Autodromo
Date: 11-13 September 1992

Race: Foster’s Australian Grand Prix: Adelaide Street Circuit
Date: 6-8 November 1992

Offence:
On lap four Hakkinen made a move on de Cesaris’s Tyrrell. de Cesaris pushed Hakkinen into a spin that cost the Finn a number of places.


1993
Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 23-25 April 1993

Offence:
de Cesaris lost control of his Tyrrell on lap nineteen. He slid off that track and into retirement.

Race: Gran Premio de Espana: Catalunya
Date: 7-9 May 1993

Offence:
de Cesaris’s progress was slowed when he had to make a pit-stop on lap thirty-four to remove three visor tear off’s from hid Tyrrell’s side pods that were causing the car to overheat. Eight laps later his engine cut out on the start / finish straight and he ground to a halt. Marshals leapt to his rescued opening a temporary gate to give the Tyrrell a push start. de Cesaris was black flagged on lap forty-two and he pitted at the end of lap forty-three for good. He had illegally received “outside assistance” for which the stewards disqualified him.

Race: Grand Prix de Monaco: Monte Carlo
Date: 22-25 May 1993

Offence:
In the rain on the Thursday de Cesaris was putting “the pedal to the metal” rather more firmly than Ken Tyrrell would have liked.. The result? Two accidents.

Race: Rhone-Poulenic Grand Prix de France: Mangy-Cours
Date: 2-4 July 1993

Offence:
Blundell had been unhappy with the brakes on his Ligier in the warm-up. In an attempt to remedy the problems his brake callipers were changes for the start of the race. Due to this he was taking it too easy in the early stages of the race and Schumacher and Senna were crowding him. On lap twenty-one he came up behind de Cesaris's Tyrrell as they entered the Estoril right hander. As they came round to the end of the lap the Italian took a stage line that seemed to put Blundell off. “He seemed to be trying to hold his car tight to the right and taking bites at the corner, rather than letting it run out,“ explained Blundell. “So I tough he was making room for me on the left but when I pulled level to him - and I mean literally cockpit to cockpit he just wandered into me.” This pushed the Ligier of the track and into the barrier very hard. It was a disappointing end to the race for Blundell, on his team’s home track.

Race: Grand Prix du Canada: Montreal, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
Date: 11-13 July 1993

Offence:
In Friday’s qualifying session Katayama slammed his Tyrrell into the wall. He had to borrow de Cesaris's car to attempt to qualify. What was worse was that de Cesaris had damaged the under tray on his Tyrrell riding the kerbs and Katayama had to wait while the team effected the necessary repairs.

Offence:
de Cesaris had a sizable accident on lap forty-five that would see him eliminated from the race. He was riding the kerbs and got seriously out of shape. His Tyrrell spearing into the retaining wall.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 13-15 August 1993

Offence:
The Italian spun in Saturday's qualifying session. To compound matters he did it in front of his team mate, Katayama, ruining both of their laps. Ken Tyrrell had a rule that in timed session his cars were not to be on the track at the same time. From this incident you can see why.

Race: Fuji TV Japanese grand Prix: Suzuka
Date: 22-24 October 1993

Offence:
In Saturday qualifying the threat of rain loomed larger. The notoriously over exuberant de Cesaris was one of the first cars out on the track. Coming to the end of his first flying lap he got all four of his Tyrrell’s wheels on to the grass on the exit of the infamous 130R corner. The Tyrrell spun to toward the left-hand side of the circuit slamming into the barriers. The session was red flagged as there was debris all over the track’s surface.

Offence:
de Cesaris’s miserable weekend came to a premature end when Martini punted him off the track in the second corner of the race. “Martini hit me on the opening lap and I went on at the second corner,” shrugged Andrea.


1994
Race: Gran Premio di San Marino: Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola
Date: 27-1 April 1994

Offence:
With many rumours circulating the track about Senna's condition de Cesaris lost concentration and spun out of the race on lap fifty.

Race: Grosser Preis von Deutschland: Hockenheimring
Date: 29-31 July 1994

Offence:
Starting at the rear of the field de Cesaris had a nightmare at the start. When the lights when gear he got too much wheel spin and his Jordan speared out of control, collecting Alboreto’s Minardi and Zanardi's Lotus. One Lotus, one Minardi and one Sauber were all out on the spot, even before they had reached the first corner of the race. Hakkinen had triggered another accident at the head of the field too. All in all it was Hakkinen who got the blame for inducing the first lap chaos. He was judged to have triggered the multiple accident and as he was racing under a one race suspended ban he was prevented form entering the Hungarian Grand Prix.

Race: Marlboro Magyar Nagydij: Hungaroring
Date: 12-14 August 1994

Offence:
On lap thirty-one Morbidelli and de Cesaris were both eliminated from the race. Fighting hard for position the Sauber and the Footwork came together and slid into the gravel. Both drivers were out on the spot.

Race: European Grand Prix: Jerez
Date: 14-16 October 1994

Offence:
Along with Blundell, de Cesaris crashed in Saturday qualifying. Both accidents littered the slippery track with dust and debris, wrecking the chances of the other drivers to improve their qualifying times.


I dare say, that even though he has found quite a following here, you guys are the exception to the rule of opinion that has followed this man throughout his professional career. I have read all of this thread and while I have learned some things that I never knew and have been made a little more appreciative of his flashes of brilliance, most will go in the cold storage file of my own personal databanks. In closing, I don't begrudge you for your vaulted opinions of him, you are entitled to think what you will... just don't castrate me for mine...



*rdrcr puts visor down and prepares for debris to be thrown*



#142 ensign14

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Posted 22 March 2002 - 20:57

I'm with rdcdr and deAngelis86 on this, I didn't really like de Cesaris because he had a drive in F1 through connections when he was patently over the edge on too many occasions. And I can't forgive him for nearly killing Mansell in 1979 (although some here may disagree!) and, perhaps more relevantly, taking out Alex Caffi in Detroit.

And at one point in 1981 McLaren ran out of cars...Wattie was winning races while Andrea scored 1 whole point. But I was still cheering him on like mad at Spa 91 and was SO disappointed when he retired, he could have won that. (Although Andrea trying to overtake Ayrton would have been something!)

#143 Doug Nye

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Posted 22 March 2002 - 21:36

De Cesaris did develop a rather unnerving twitch - I understand - although I never witnessed it personally. Apparently he could be talking to somebody with perfectly normal eye contact at one moment, then the next his eyeballs could swivel up almost out of sight under the upper lid, then flash down again.... The theory was that most of his later accidents commenced when he suddenly, involuntarily, began inspecting the inner fold of his upper eyelids rather than the track ahead.... I believe this may have been a first for a ranking F1 veteran. In serious - SERIOUS terms - he was a pretty ordinary, far below the top drawer, F1 driver in any case, his great attraction to teams being the fact that Papa and the family were Marlboro distributors in Italy or somesuch...

DCN

#144 Catalina Park

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Posted 23 March 2002 - 06:03

The way the twitch was explianed to me was :"That his eyes rolled back to see if the brain was still there and then they rolled back again"
I was told this in the early 80's when I was working on Formula Pacific cars.

#145 ensign14

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Posted 23 March 2002 - 09:04

How did he pass a medical???

#146 Vicuna

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Posted 31 March 2002 - 09:14

I was at Spa in '83. I bet my mate that Andrea' Alfa would be the first car we'd see - we were sitting on the hill above that fast sweeping left hander I think called Pouhan.

It was a friendly bet but no money changed hands. However the race had to be re started. Again I suggested an Alfa would be the first car we'd see. This time the bet was for real and he bought the Stella's for the rest of the day!

#147 andrea

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Posted 12 April 2002 - 17:37

It's been long time since my last replay.My plan is to send some articles every 2-3 days about Andrea since his F1 debut.Here is one from 1980.

The Italian New Wave

Carlo Chiti introduced his new Alfa Romeo recruit with a quick slip of the tongue."Have you met Andrea de Adamich?"Ha,ha,not the former Brabham and Surtees driver who also drove sports cars,but young Andrea de Cesaris,who,at 22 years old,was given the second Alfa Romeo after Brambilla had decided that he wasn't up to driving modern F1 cars.
De Cesaris was born in Rome and cut his teeth in karting.He was World Champion in 1976 at 18,and raced in Formula Ford the following year,winning three races.He went into F3 a year later racing in England with a Ralt in the BP championship.He raced in the same series in 1979,winning six races in a March-Toyota,and finished second in the Vandervell series.He also raced in F2,just one race.He finished sixth at Vallelunga in an ICI March.This year,he's had an average season in F2,but he won the Misano event on August 10.He also drove a works Lancia at Vallelunga in a round of the World Championship of Makes.
It's said that Marlboro is ready to push him into F1.His F1 debut was most certanly impressive.He has good contacts with the cigarette firm.His father is a distributer of cigarettes in Italy,and he's raced under Marlboro colours for some time.

Forza Andrea

#148 andrea

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Posted 15 April 2002 - 11:17

Here is onother article about Andrea from 1981

Andrea does it again

McLaren driver Andrea de Cesaris was not at all happy with the pressimistic suggestions concerning his f1 future.Unfortunately,nobody could overlook the serious accident which befell Andrea in the final session at Zandvort.It was the fourth shunt in a row for the rapid Italian,who at 22 is the youngest driver currently racing in f1.
Throughout practice,the various speed traps on the pit straight had indicated that Andrea was braking as late,if not later,than anyone on the cicuit.It would appear that he left his braking just a moment too late before the shunt,which occured as he started his first flying lap after putting on his second and final set of qualifying tyres.
Almost without slowing.it seemed,McLaren ran straight ahead at breathtaking speed towards the outside of the circuit.It hit the pile of impact absorbing tyres,leaped in the air,and came to rest under the horrified gaze of the large Dutch crowd.
It was a shaken young man who climbed unaided out of the car,and the McLaren mechanics who arrived quickly on the scene were not surprised to find him in an emotional state.
After a long discussion in McLaren pit,it was decided that de Cesaris would not take over the team's spare car.After treatement for a stiff neck,de Cesaris spent much of the remainder of the weekend in the company of Signor Aleardo Buzzi,the European President of Philip Morris."Signor Buzzi has taken a close interest in Andrea's racing career for several years,"explaned a Marlboro spokesman.

Forza Andrea

#149 MattFoster

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Posted 16 April 2002 - 20:11

Excellent posts Andrea. Good articles from early in Andrea's career.

#150 andrea

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Posted 22 April 2002 - 19:13

Here is an article from 1982.

Race of my life-Monaco GP 1982

Monte Carlo in 1982 was a memorable race for me.The Alfa was a very nice car,it had a good balance.I was always in the first three or four cars that year.I think qualifying in Monte Carlo was very unlucky,because I was in the first row on the first day,and on the second day I blew up the engine just before the practice.So I was very disappointed because I lost many positions-I think I was seventh.
So we started,and after a few laps I overtook two or three cars,and then I was in the first four or five.I kept going,and soon there were three cars together,Patrese,Pironi and me.Prost was first,Patrese second,third was Pironi,fourth was myself.
I was quicker than Pironi,but I couldn't overtake him because he had the turbo,so he had more acceleration.But my car was creally good,so I decided to wait until the end.
But I remember that during the race I had a problem with a fuel injector and Rosberg caught me.So it was very tough because Rosberg was a very agressive driver,and I could feel that he was really pushing.I did something like 30 laps with him behind my neck.Luckily,after 30 laps of trying to overtake me he crashed.I wasn't really making anything not so right-I was just taking my line.
At the same time I lost contact with Pironi and Patrese.I already had the injector broken,so I was going slower.And at the end of the race I recognised that there was a little bit of rain coming down.I didn't see Prost crash,but I saw flags.
Then I saw Patrese spun on the exit of the Loews,so I thought maybe I'm second now.Then in another lap anothert car was going slower,and it was Pironi.
I didn't know my position,I was in the last lap confident maybe not to be first,but to be in the first two or three cars.And then I stopped up the hill on the last lap.I couldn't beleive it,because I knew I had a lot of fuel.I think we lost this fuel because there was a problem with the pipe on the tank.
I didn't see Patrese re-pass me,I was so down that I didn't check what was going on.
I went back to the pits,and then they put me on the podium.Nobody knew results at that stage.Even the Olivetti information was not on the screen because they didn't know what was going on!
So then we finished up on the podium.It was Patrese and Pironi,and me.There was also de Angelis,he was fourth,but he didn't know-he thought he had won,so we were four together on the podium.
Until they played the Italian anthem for Patrese,we didn't know who was the winner.I think when they told him,he couldn't beleive it,because he knew he had spun.It was just really something very crazy.
I was third,but I was happy,because after you think you have no points, nothing,and then you are third,then you are quite happy anyway.And I know I drove a good race,because it was very difficult.
For me it was also very good,because after I left McLaren that was the fifth or sixth race,and everybody was really bad with me,and I just proved to myself that I could be up on the podium.