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#1 Jhope

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Posted 15 October 2001 - 01:12

Why were they added to tracks? were they there to stop cars from Jumping corners during a race? I know that until recently, kerbs were not used that much by drivers to gain an avantage over a whole lap, yet recently, they have become an integral part of the corner. Drivers use them as if they were the track, and some drivers even demand that the kerbs be altered as not to ruin their cars when they drive over them? Wasn't this the whole reason of having them high in the first place, so no one can cut any corners, otherwise risk your car being damaged?

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#2 Rob G

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Posted 15 October 2001 - 01:57

I've noticed that on some corners there are now flat green extensions that separate the kerbing from the grass, and drivers now use the kerbs as the track and the extensions as the kerbs!

#3 tac5

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Posted 15 October 2001 - 02:18

drivers like kerbs so much because when they go over them they gain potential energy by having the kerbs lift the car into the air. Thus when the the car lands the springs compress. When the spring is compressed it gives the tires added traction because they are pushing down. Thus the drivers can apply the gas earlier, thus achieving better lap times.

#4 unrepentant lurker

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Posted 15 October 2001 - 05:43

From the clips I have seen of the 80's, the kerbs they had were quite high (maybe a foot or foot and a half). They also had a round shape. If the drivers clipped them, it would have caused big problems. So it appears that they were originally intended for drivers not to cut a corner.

I think Rubens accident at Imola '94 made the FIA reconsider kerbing. Thats the one where he hit the kerb, launched into the air right over the tirewall straight into catchfencing. Naturally, as kerbs became shorter, drivers started to look for ways for improving their time.

Maybe the pendullum is swinging the other way now. In Canada, they installed that new rumble strips at the final chicane(inside the kerbs) to prevent the drivers from cutting it too much. Ironically, Rubens was a victim of this (and also KR, I think).

#5 oldtimer

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Posted 15 October 2001 - 22:59

A pox on them!

When I heard Murray Walker commenting that setting up a car to ride the curbs at the bus-stop chicane at Spa, I cringed, and wondered what the likes of Fangio, Clark and Gurney would have thought. And what is the bus-stop chicane doing at Spa anyway? Why not let us see some smoking brakes at La Source?

And why not let the real kerbs alone at Monaco? If Fangio could leave scuff marks on his tyre without damaging his wheels, why can't the modern 'aces'?

#6 William Dale Jr

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Posted 16 October 2001 - 07:15

Originally posted by Rob G
I've noticed that on some corners there are now flat green extensions that separate the kerbing from the grass, and drivers now use the kerbs as the track and the extensions as the kerbs!


You're right, the extensions do increase the the amount of track that is perceived to be available by the driver. Unfortunately, this played a part in the accident Troy Bayliss had in the final round of the SBK Championship at Imola.

Coming out of Traguardo, Bayliss drifted the back of his bike over the white kerb exiting the corner, getting his rear wheel onto the extension. This caused his rear wheel to spin up, highsiding Troy off the bike, breaking his collarbone.



Originally posted by unrepentant lurker
From the clips I have seen of the 80's, the kerbs they had were quite high (maybe a foot or foot and a half). They also had a round shape. If the drivers clipped them, it would have caused big problems


If my memory serves me correctly, the size of the kerbs played a part in the accident at Jacarapagua that left Philippe Streiff a paraplegic. Can someone please confirm?