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1946 AAA National Championship


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#151 john glenn printz

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 13:02

1946 AAA Season. (cont.-46) Joseph "Joe" Dawson (1889-1946) the AAA Philadelphian zone director for the Contest Board, died on 17 June 1946, just after inspecting the Langhorne oval to ensure it was ready for the Langhorne 100 set for 30 June 1946. This was the same Joe Dawson who had won the second Indianapolis 500 (with relief help from Don Herr) in 1912. Dawson's racing career spanned five seasons, i.e. 1910-1914. Dawson's 1912 Indy win was lucky, and as is well known, Ralph DePalma in a Mercedes had led laps 3-198 before a piston broke, which put him out. Dawson, in a National, then sped to victory by leading just the last circuits, i.e. numbers 199 and 200. DePalma's ill luck here is one of the most famous incidents in early Indianapolis 500 history. Dawson's 1912 Indianapolis win perhaps made up for his 1910 loss of the Vanderbilt Cup by 25 seconds. Crowd control at that race was minimal and Dawson hit a spectator who had wandered onto the race course. Dawson stopped at the spot and later pitted for consultation about this accident, thereby losing in all, perhaps as much as five minutes in actual running time. In the 1914 Indianapolis classic Dawson deliberately threw his Marmon askew on lap his 45th lap to avoid hitting a prone Ray Gilhooley (1887-1973) who had overturned his Isotta, just seconds before, on his 42nd lap. In avoiding Gilhooley, Dawson's car also overturned when it made contact with the inside dirt surface. Dawson was very seriously hurt, with internal injuries and a broken collar bone, but Joe recovered although it took many weeks. In early 1915 it was rumored that Dawson would drive again in the upcoming 1915 Indianapolis 500, possibly in a Sunbeam owned by C. B. Erbstein, a Chicago lawyer, or in a Mercer, as a teammate to Eddie Pullen. However neither event took place and Dawson never drove in competition again after his 1914 Indy mishap. Joe however had the honor of driving the Marmon pace car at Indianapolis in 1928.

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#152 john glenn printz

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 17:47

1946 AAA Season. (cont.-47) On 4 Oct. 1946 Berner "Barney" Eli Oldfield (1877-1946) was found dead in his bed, by his wife Bessie, at their home in Beverly Hills, CA. Barney Oldfield was a very famous and early American "Speed King" in his racing heyday, 1902 to 1918, and even thereafter. Oldfield was enlisted by Henry Ford (1863-1947) to pilot his new "999" race car at Grosse Point, MI on 2 Oct. 1902. Oldfield had been a mid-western bicycle racer before that. Soon Oldfield quit the Henry Ford "999" and raced Alexander Winton's "Bullets" and a bit later, the Louis P. Mooers' Peerless "Green Dragons". During the period 1902-1907 Barney drove in only low milage, sprint events or short dashes. Oldfield barnstormed across the entire U.S. in 1903-1904 and became nationally famous, but much of it was probably staged and fakeroo, however there was money to be made in such activitiy; as the automobile was still a great novelty, particularly in the remote rural areas. Barney was as much a showman or entertainer, as he was a driver. Oldfield entered no important or major automobile races until 1908, although he did win an AAA sponsored National Championship sprint title in 1905. Oldfield's non-appearance in the 1904, 1905, and 1906 Vanderbilt Cup contests was conspicuously noticed.

In fact Barney's first Vanderbilt Cup try was its ninth running, staged in 1914. His first major racing venture was the 24 April 1908 Briarcliff, NY road race where he drove a 30 horsepower Stearns. Briarcliff also witnessed the automobile racing debut of Ralph DePalma. Ralph had previously raced bicycles and motorbikes. DePalma here replaced the driver Arthur Campbell who had been injured in a practice accident. Ralph previously had been the riding mechanic for Campbell on the Briarcliff, Allen-Kingston entry. After the Briarcliff race Oldfield entered many major U. S. races. Barney's best results were a 4th in the American Grand Prize (5 Oct. 1912) using a huge Fiat, and a 2nd in the Vanderbilt Cup (26 Feb. 1914) with a Mercer. Barney also made two starts at Indianapolis, in 1914 for Stutz, and 1916 using a 1914 Grand Prix type Delage, and placed 5th in both contests. For the 1914 "500" Oldfield had some relief from Gil Anderson (1880-1935) who was also on the Stutz team that year. Oldfield's Stutz was the first American built car to cross the line in 1914. The French took the first four places, i.e. 1. Rene Thomas, 2. Arthur Duray, 3. Albert Guyot, and 4. Jules Goux, piloting their "high-tech" Delages and Peugeots.

Oldfield certainly knew how to keep his name before the public and in the press. On 3 March 1910 he set a new world land speed record, at Daytona Beach, FL, in a 200 horsepower "Blitzen Benz". Barney's new mark was 131.267 mph. Later in the year (25 Oct. 1910), Oldfield ran match races with the then black heavyweight World Boxing Champion, Jack Johnson (1878-1946), who was a fancier of fast cars and fast women. The site chosen was Sheepshead Bay, then a dirt horse track, and Barney had no trouble throughly defeating the great boxer, who used a 40 horsepower Chalmers. For this stunt Oldfield was suspended by the AAA and Barney soon went off barnstorming again.

In 1917 Barney purchased the first complete car constructed by Harry A. Miller. It sported a fully enclosed body at first and was soon dubbed the "Golden Submarine" because of its shape and paint color. The car, in actual AAA competition, was not particularly successful and some began instead, calling it the "Golden Egg". In 1917 Oldfield and DePalma engaged in a series of match races at Milwaukee, Providence, St. Louis, Detroit, and Atlanta, which some contemporary observers thought might be partly staged, and I have to concur with their suspicions. In any case, it was DePalma's V12 Packard vs. Oldfield's Golden Submarine. By January 1918 the enclosed body on the Miller was cut off and the machine then just became another normal race car. After the 1918 season Oldfield retired from competitive driving, but retained possession of this 1917 Miller for two more years. In 1919 it was raced by Roscoe Sarles (1892-1922), and then later, in late 1919 and early 1920, by Waldo Stein (1889-1965). The Oldfield Miller was entered in the 1920 Indianapolis 500 with the idea of replacing its original 289 cubic inch motor with a new 179 cu. in. Miller, but the new Miller 4 was not yet ready for actual use, in fact, it never would be.

In late 1920 Barney sold the ex-Golden Sub to J. Alex Sloan, the IMCA impresario. Under the IMCA in 1921-1922, the car was raced by the supposed Frenchman, Leon Duray (1894-1956), who didn't know a word of French. Duray was not French and his real name was George Stewart. Sloan, who invented the name "Leon Duray", evidently was hoping the public would confuse Stewart for a genuine French pilot named Arthur Duray (1882-1954), who was the 2nd place finisher at Indianapolis in 1914 in a three litre Peugeot. After the 1920 season Oldfield ceased to have any direct connection with the AAA, either as a driver or car owner, although he did drive the pace car at Indianapolis in both 1920 and 1922. Oldfield could claim, probably correctly, to have been the first professional racing driver, in the U.S.

Edited by john glenn printz, 23 December 2009 - 16:48.


#153 jimmyc

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 02:21

Barney got the 999 ride through his connections with Tom Cooper. Cooper, Fords partner, was an ex bicycle racer and sometime team mate of Oldfield. As a cyclist it was Cooper who was the star. He and Eddie Bald, the unoffical AAA champion of 1907 were the top two American riders of the latter half of 1890s.

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 13:08

Originally posted by pete3664
I noticed earlier on the history something about a Voelker engine being used in a car and then no further mention of it. Do you have any information re the engine? It sounded as though it was an aircraft engine based on the Hispano-Suiza.

The Voelker was a V12 designed by a German born engineer, I don't recall his first name or other details except that it had a "master-and-slave" con-rod arrangement (the power of pictures! they imprint so much better in your brain than words or sounds...). There's quite some detail in Karl Ludvigsen's recently published "The V12 Engine". The Voelker is supposed to have been installed in the 1938 Lyons chassis that Charley van Acker qualified too slowly, but I have my doubts. The chassis initially had a bored out Miller 122 engine, some sources say it was supercharged, but pictures show it wasn't. Then the car was entered by Joe Lencki and possibly had a Lencki 6, more likely it ran with an Offy until it was retired in the mid-fifties.

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 13:19

Originally posted by john glenn printz
1946 AAA season. (cont.-10) Mays drove for Bill White at Indy in 1937 and 1938. William S. White, at the 1936 Vanderbilt Cup, bought from the Scuderia Ferrari team, an Alfa Romeo straight 8, Type 8C-35, which the Scuderia Ferrari team were then using as a practice car. "Hollywood" Bill White, as he was more generally known, had been a prominent and well recognised figure in American automobile racing for quite some time by 1936. Bill had started owning racing cars in 1924 and had purchased a 183 cubic inch, straight 8 Miller that year.

I can't be sure, but I believe Bill White started owning race cars in 1919 by purchasing Barney Oldfield's Delage S chassis with Miller 289A engine - at least it seems the car ran a few times on the West coast as "White Special", could've been another White, of course!

#156 fines

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 13:32

An astounding footnote to Rex Mays's 3rd place in the 1937 Vanderbilt Cup: it was the only time a non-German car finished in the top 3 that year (in races in which Mercedes-Benz or Auto Union participated)!

Originally posted by john glenn printz
(...) Three such modified 91 1/2 cu. in. Duesenbergs ran in the 1930 "500", i.e., those piloted by Chet Gardner, Deacon Litz, and Babe Stapp. Hartz's 1931 Duesenberg entry for Fred Frame (1894-1962) was probably one of these, (...)

Yes, it was the car Babe Stapp drove in 1930, and to be pedantic, the cars were modified 122 chassis and modified 91 engines.;)

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 13:36

Originally posted by john glenn printz
1946 AAA season. (cont.-15) In the 1931 "500" itself Arnold, having started 18th, moved into the lead on lap 7 and then proceeded to increase his advantage on every lap. It looked for a long time like a repeat, runaway victory similar to that of 1930. Arnold held the front position until lap 162, when either Arnold lost control or the rear axle snapped, causing the car to crash in turn four. Arnold had led laps 7 to 161 with ease. Fred Frame however, in Hartz's Duesenberg, gave some good consolation to Harry, as Frame ended up 2nd overall, behind only the winner Lou Schneider (1901-1942). After the race Frame bought the Duesenberg from Hartz and used it for the rest of the 1931 season, though without much success.

Well, he had some success, if not in Championship racing, but Frame actually won many races with the Dusey on the half-miles that year, against the better-suited single-seaters at that!

#158 fines

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 13:55

Originally posted by john glenn printz
1946 AAA season. (cont.-17) (...) Horn was docked all his 1941 AAA Championship points because he bolted the AAA and joined the Ralph A. Hankinson "outlaw" circuit in mid-1941. For the first post-World War II "500", in 1946, Horn was reunited with sponsor Mike Boyle and the chief mechanic Cotton Henning. Henning had originally hailed from Kansas City and in 1919 had worked alongside Riley Brett and William Wayne "W. W. Cockeyed" Brown (1886-1958), on the "Richards Special", which had run at Indianapolis in 1919, the owner then being C. L. Richards. The car used a Hudson "Super Six" block as altered by Brett. In 1921 Henning had worked on the two "Junior Eights", which belonged to George L. Wade, one of the men Hartz had unintentionally killed at Beverly Hills on 29 Nov. 1923. There exists a rather famous photograph of Henning hovering over a prostrate and unconscious Peter DePaolo at the inaugural Kansas City 300 (17 Sept. 1922), after they wrecked in a Junior Eight Special, in a race which took the life of Roscoe Sarles (1892-1922). Henning, like Gene Marcenac, was credited with four Indianapolis wins as a chief mechanic before the second World War. Henning's victories at the Speedway occurred in 1925 (DePaolo/Batten), 1934 (Cummings), and 1939-40 (Shaw). Horn, now in 1946, was put in Shaw's victorious 8CTF Maserati of 1939 and 1940. Such then is a brief background of the three top ranked American pilots, (i.e. Rose, Mays, and Horn), at Indianapolis in 1946.

:mad: Typed a complete post and lost it before posting! :mad:

So, da capo, a few notes: the Hankinson circuit moved to the big AAA rival CSRA in 1941, and most of the star drivers followed suit. Horn won the 1941 and '45 CSRA titles, Joie Chitwood the 1942. In those years, CSRA was the main thrust in American racing, not AAA. Bill Holland won the 1941 AAA Eastern title, but not many people ratet him very highly at the beginning of 1946, because of the leading drivers competing in CSRA. One of the things to change very soon in 1946, as we will see...

As for the Riley Brett/Billy Brown collaboration, these cars were called "Junior Special", not "Junior Eight Special" - often confused, but the latter was the name for some of Cliff Durant's cars in 1925. The "Junior" was allegedly named after C. L. Richards Jr., and the cars were "Sixes" anyway...

#159 fines

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 14:08

Originally posted by john glenn printz
1946 AAA season. (cont.-18) (...) None of these three constructors, i.e., Adams, Stevens, or Wetteroth, seems to have seriously resumed their racing chassis businesses after World War II, except Wetteroth may (?) have constructed a "rail job" for Murrel Belanger in 1948, and Stevens seems to have constructed a couple of Indy cars in 1952.

You are probably thinking of the Belanger #34, which is often given as a Wetteroth chassis. It was the 1932 Sparks-Weirick "Poison Lil" No. 1, done over (probably) by Wetteroth around 1939, when either Jimmy Snyder or Emil Andres owned it. So, a pre-war car, if you like - the Wetteroth shop was used after the war by Lujie Lesovsky.

I have often stated my dislike of these more or less "official" chassis designations. In my line of thinking, guys like Wetteroth, Stevens or Adams weren't constructors, but fabricators. It is like calling a 1950's Ferrari a Gilco/Ferrari, because its chassis was built by Gilco. Also, many of these "chassis makes" circulating are not consistent, even with one and the same car, because many of those fabricators frequently collaborated on these cars. I don't want to start this discussion in this thread, but I have done a lot of research on these cars and would like to propose a different, more substantial nomenclature, in another thread soon.

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 14:58

Originally posted by john glenn printz
1946 AAA season. (cont.-31) (...) At first Oakland was an AAA track and its first race was a 100 miler, run before 25,000 fans, on 18 Oct. 1931. The Pacific Coast ace Ernie Triplett (1906-1934) won this event in a Miller powered sprint car, averaging 75.37 mph. Oakland however hosted only one AAA Championship race, a 150 miler staged on 13 Nov. 1932, won by Bill Cummings at an average speed of 90.45 mph. In March 1936 Oakland bolted from the AAA and became an "outlaw" track. Thereafter its activity was of only local interest, but because of its banking Oakland had been the fastest AAA one mile dirt oval in the country. Al Gordon held the AAA one lap record here, set on 12 Nov. 1933, of 33.86 seconds or 106.320 mph in a "Gilmore Special", another single seat Miller powered sprint car.

FYI, the Triplett car was the White/Miller, a new 1931 chassis with a new Miller 200 4-cylinder engine, and the Gordon car was "Poison Lil" No. 1, a 1932 chassis, with a stroked Sparks-Miller 4-cyl. of probably 245 ci.

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 15:10

Originally posted by fines

I take it you mean 1930? There were a few at least, but my research is uncomplete about this. This is now from memory, but I'm fairly certain Snowberger's "Russell 8" and Guiberson's "Waverly Oil" (Gleason) were there already,

Oh dear, I did it again! I often confuse the Allen Guiberson Miller and the Reed & Mulligan "Waverly Oil", presumably because both were predominantly white and had a "7" in their race number... :blush:

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 15:13

Originally posted by fines


Schneider won in 1931 with a new car, his 1930 car was driven by Freddie Winnai in 1931 (perhaps to mend the burns received while driving the car in relief for Schneider at Altoona?).

From memory, the two cars had the following Indy history:
- 1930 Schneider, 1931 Winnai, 1932 Cummings, 1933-37 Litz
- 1931-33 Schneider, 1936 Andres, 1937 ? (Midwest Red Lion), 1938 de Vore, 1940 Andres


Yep, messed up again: the 1931 Schneider's history is 1931-33 Schneider, 1936 Winnai, 1937 Bergere, 1938 de Vore and 1939 Andres :blush:

#163 fines

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 15:49

Brillant stuff, really! :)

Thank you, Mr. Printz!

The story about Bill Corley owning the #16 Moore Offy intrigues me - I didn't know that, thinking the car still belonged to Bergere. But Corley is something of a mystery man, anyway: apart from #67 being entered as #7 "Russo Offy", it appears the car was also entered under a number of different names during the following years (from memory, I believe in 1947 it also ran as #27 "Andrews Special"), causing me a lot of head scratching trying to figure it out. I will need to go back to my material at home, as I don't recall these details now.

But first, back to 1946:

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 16:23

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
Distribution of National Prize Fund for 1946 to the Drivers and Car Owners Holding Ten Highest Places in the National Point Standings

Position/ Driver/ Amount/ Car Owner/ Car No.

1. Ted Horn, $490.00, Ralph Malamud, No. 29, $490.00
2. George Robson, $350.00, Ted Horn, No. 5, $350.00
3. Emil Andres, $245.00, Joe Thorne, No. 16, $245.00
4. Bill Holland, $157.50, Ted Horn, No. 3, $157.50
5. T. Hinnershitz, $122.50, Ted Hyquist, No. 6, $122.50
6. Walt Ader, $105.00, Ted Horn, No. 4, $105.00
7. Jimmy Jackson, $70.00, Jimmy Jackson, No. 61, $70.00
8. Joie Chitwood, $70.00, Fred Peters, No. 24, $70.00
9. Rex Mays, $70.00, Boyle Racing Team, No. 29, $70.00
10. Duke Dinsmore, $70.00, Frank Blake, No. 18, $70.00

Total: $3,500.00

The car owner's listing is very interesting: Five cars are the well known top 5 finishers at Indy:
- Thorne #16, the 1938 Sparks "Little Six" first driven by Ronney Householder
- Jackson #61, the 1938 Boyle front-drive, a rebuilt of the 1932 Boyle front-drive, itself a rebuilt of a 1928 Miller front-drive
- Boyle #29, the Maserati 8CTF, chassis #3032
- Brisko ("Blake" is probably a typo) #18, the 8CTF #3030
- Peters #24, the 1939 Moore

Of these, only the Peters "ran on the dirt", so we know the points totals of the other four by simply taking their Indy 500 helpings:

1. Malamud #29, ? pts
2. Horn #5, ? pts
3. Thorne #16, 1000 pts
4. Horn #3, ? pts
5. Nyquist #6, ? pts
6. Horn #4, ? pts
7. Jackson #61, 800 pts
8. Peters #24, ? pts
9. Boyle #29, 700 pts
10. Brisko #18, 600 pts

It is strange, however that the Peters should have between 700 and 800 points, because Ted Horn scored 660 points after Indy, supposedly all in the Peters. Perhaps the 372.5 pts of Sam Hanks as Indy relief driver did not count, but that sounds a bit strange. Also, the Andres #44 should be on the list, with 660 pts also, while the Bowes #1 should tie the Brisko #18 and perhaps even break the tie with 3 wins to none!?

Now to the sprint cars: the Malamud #29 was Bill Holland's main ride during all of the forties (1941 AAA Eastern Champion), and he actually bought the car in 1951 to compete in IMCA during the time of his AAA banishment. Other drivers, such as Spider Webb, Lee Wallard and Bill Schindler have driven the car over the years and even won with it, but in 1946 it appears Holland was its only driver, and since he scored 1280.6 pts, all of those should go to the Malamud. Fits into the table!

The Horn #5 was Ted's main car, his "Baby". A lot has been written about the Horn cars, but they still remain a bit of a mystery, mainly because he kept modifying them out of all recognition, and he had at least four. "Baby" was probably a 1939 car, built from scratch for Horn, and would be his only sprint car by 1947. After his death, it was raced by Schindler, Hinnershitz and then, much much later by Mario Andretti. He probably scored most, if not all of his sprint points (1088) in this car. Fits also!

Horn #3 was probably the 1934 Ralph Morgan Miller, the 1936 CSRA Champion car and death car of Bud Henderson, later owned by Joie Chitwood (1938/9 AAA Eastern Champion), and then sold to Horn, mainly driven by Tommy Hinnershitz, who scored 896.8 points. Another fit!

When Fred Peters bought the Lou Moore Champ Car #24, he sold his successful sprint car (1942 CSRA Champion) #6 to Ted Nyquist, and the points scored by Peters are probably part of Nyquist's score. Chitwood had cut back his sprint activities because of his stunt show business, but he still won many races and 565.5 points with the car. In 1946 it was also driven by Johnny Shackleford (2 wins), Lee Wallard and Hank Rogers (1 win each) and Emil Andres (two 2nd place finishes), as well as possibly others. A possible fit.

The Horn #4 was probably the 1932 Gus Schrader Miller (1933-6 IMCA Champion), sold to Bob Sall. Sall and Floyd Davis had scored top 4 finishes in National Championship events in 1937/8 in it, then Sall ran it for Horn on the CSRA circuit, Dave Randolph in 1942, Walt Ader in 1945/6. Ader scored 850 points, probably most if not all in this car. Fits perfectly.


1. Malamud #29, 1280.6? pts
2. Horn #5, 1088? pts
3. Thorne #16, 1000 pts
4. Horn #3, 896.8? pts
5. Nyquist #6, ? pts
6. Horn #4, 850? pts
7. Jackson #61, 800 pts
8. Peters #24, 787.5??? pts
9. Boyle #29, 700 pts
10. Brisko #18, 600 pts

#165 fines

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 16:37

Originally posted by humphries
I could not find any reference to the points awarded at non-championship races although it was a pittance compared to the National Championship races. On May 30 the AAA National Drivers Point Standing " The standing does not include points earned at Indianapolis" showed the following - Ader (186), Chitwood (184), Horn (144), Holland (133), Eddie Husch (115), J.Shackleford (64) etc.

Another interesting post: As far as I know, championship points from 1946 through 1956 were scored along the following table:
1-mile event: 2-1.6-1.2 (Pos. 1-3)
2-mile event: 4-3-2 (Pos. 1-3)
3-mile event: 6-5-3.5-2 (Pos. 1-4)
...
10-mile event: 20-16-12-8-4-2 (Pos. 1-6)
12.5-mile event: 25-20-15-10-5-2 (Pos. 1-6)
15-mile event: 30-24-18-12-6-3 (Pos. 1-6)
20-mile event: 40-32-24-16-12-8 (Pos. 1-6)
25-mile event: 50-40-30-25-20-10-5 (Pos. 1-7)
...
50-mile event: 100-80-70-60-50-40-etc.
75-mile event: 150-120-105-90-75-60-etc.
100-mile event: 200-160-140-120-100-80-60-50-40-30-20-10 (Pos. 1-12)
and thereafter multiples of the last table.

Clearly, the AAA Contest Board members weren't lovers of mathematical beauty and simplicity! :rolleyes:

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 16:59

There were, apparently, nine events scheduled before May 30, and two more on the same day as the Indy 500:

Mar 31, Atlanta, GA, Lakewood Speedway, 20 laps of 1-mile DO
Apr 14, Mechanicsburg, PA, Williams Grove Speedway, 50 laps of 0.5-mile DO
Apr 28, Mechanicsburg, PA, Williams Grove Speedway, 30 laps of 0.5-mile DO
May 5, Dayton Speedway, OH, rained out
May 5, Trenton, NJ, New Jersey State Fairgrounds, 20 laps of 1-mile DO
May 12, Winchester, IN, Funk's Speedway, rained out
May 19, Mechanicsburg, PA, Williams Grove Speedway, 30 laps of 0.5-mile DO
May 26, Reading Fairgrounds, PA, 25 laps of 0.5-mile DO
May 26, Winchester, IN, Funk's Speedway, 30 laps of 0.5-mile DO


A few of the dates are shaky, and most of the lap numbers of the feature event are at least suspect - for the 1st Williams Grove event I have actually three different numbers: 30, 40 and 50! The Trenton event had four 8-lap heats and a 20-lap feature event, and as I have results with winner's times for all of these I was able to check the race distances with a calculator - it is by far the best reported event of the lot.

Two of the three Midwest events rained out, which explains why the table is dominated by Eastern drivers. Of those, only Shackleford and Rusch (or, perhaps Zalucki?) feature, who could be expected to run as "carpetbaggers" on the Eastern circuit as well.

Mar 31, Atlanta:
1. Jimmie Wilburn, Wilburn #39 (also Fast Time)
2. Ted Horn, (Horn #5?)
(3. Joie Chitwood, Peters #6?)
(4. Bill Holland, Malamud #29?)

Notes: Wilburn had two cars during most of the 40s, and like with the Horn cars they are a bit difficult to follow. This was probably the ex-Ralph Morgan (ca. 1938), not the ex-Bill White car, and the one which later turned up as Ken Gottschalk's KG Special in USAC National Championship events. Anyway, it's likely it had at least a 270 Offy, if not a 318. In those days, car count was far more important than rules, but Wilburn probably couldn't score points. Actually, Champ Cars in Sprint Car events on 1-mile circuits were pretty much common during all of the 30s, 40s and even early 50s, and many Sprint Cars ran in National Championship events.

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 17:16

Apr 14, Mech.:
1. Walt Ader, Horn #4 (also FT??)
2. Joie Chitwood, (Peters #6?, also FT?, 1st in Heat 1)
3. Ted Horn, (Horn #5?)
4. Dee Toran, ?
5. Bill Holland, (Malamud #29?)
6. Danny Goss, (Goss #33?)
? Tommy Hinnershitz, Horn #3
? Frank Luptow, ?
? Lee Wallard, (Wallard #99?, 2nd in H1?)
dns Duke Nalon, (Weirick #1?), FT 26.92", engine in H1
dns Joe Sanco, Furslew/Riley, fatal accident in H3

Apr 28, Mech.:
1. Ted Horn, Horn #5
2. Joie Chitwood, (Peters #6?, also FT)
3. Walt Ader, (Horn #4?)

May 5, Trenton:
1. Joie Chitwood, Peters #6, 15'02.01", FT 42.73", 1st H1 6'10.79"
2. Ted Horn, (Horn #5?), 1st H2 6'07.72"
3. Walt Ader, (Horn #4?), 2nd H1
4. Eddie Zalucki, (Iddings #2?), 3rd H3
5. Hank Rogers, 3rd H2
ret Bill Holland, (Malamud #29?, running 2nd), 2nd H3
? Al Fleming, 1st H3 6'09.52"
? Earl Johns, 4th H2, 1st H4 6'33.73"
? Charlie Breslin, 2nd H2
? Danny Goss, (Goss #33?), 2nd H4
? Ducky Phelman, 3rd H1
? Stan Jones, 3rd H4
? Larry Smith, 4th H3
? Ed Zimmerman, 4th H4
? Dub Hoffman, 5th H4
dns George Ruddy, accident in H1
dns Lee Wallard, (Wallard #99?), accident in H2 (broke leg)

May 19, Mech.:
1. Joie Chitwood, Peters #6, also FT
2. Walt Ader, (Horn #4?)
3. Ted Horn, (Horn #5?)

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 17:31

May 26, Reading:
1. Walt Ader, Horn #4
2. Ted Horn, (Horn #5?)
3. Bill Holland, (Malamud #29?)
? Joie Chitwood, (Nyquist #6?), FT

May 26, Winchester:
1. Bus Wilbert, Engle #17
2. Eddie Zalucki, Iddings (#2?)
(3. Spider Webb?)
(4. Johnny Shackleford, Bowles (#3?)?)
(5. Joe Langley, Stover Hal?)
(6. Duke Dinsmore, Johnson Offy?)
ret Bud Rose, Rose Miller

May 30, Altamont, NY:
1. Bumpy Bumpus, Bumpus #5

May 30, Trenton, NJ:
1. Johnny Shackleford, Nyquist #6

With this little info, I run up the following score:

Ader, 154
Chitwood, 184
Horn, 178
Holland, 64
Zalucki, 50
etc.

It is strange that Horn has more points than in humphries's find, and though Chitwood's score is the same, he's very likely to have scored in the heats more than that. Perhaps some of the distances are wrong? Perhaps the heat results didn't count? It's impossible to say at this stage. If anyone can find other Championship standings for the year, maybe we can leap forward!!?

#169 Disco Stu

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 23:49

It appears the April 14 race at Williams Grove may have been a 30 lapper and not 50. There's a file at the Yahoo Racing History Group of notes from the era that someone had compiled, there may be some useful bits in there to try and fill in a few blanks. Here's the entry for Dee Toran:

Toran, Dee
Dee drove the sprints just before and right after WWII with AAA, but then, moved into the midgets during their heyday in the late 1940s. Toran broke both arms in a midget accident at Middletown, NY on June 26, 1946, when he flipped after running over Johnny Ritter's wheel.

1941 East AAA Wm. Grove May 30 - 3rd in 30 lap feature.
1946 East AAA Wms. Grove. April 14 - 4th in 30 lap feature.
1946 East AAA As of April 15 in 4th pl. with 20 pts.

Resources:
ISN. July 5, 1946.

Reducing that race to 30 laps would take 12 points off of Horn's total and bring it closer to the number Humphries found. The entire file is here. You'll need to be a member of the group to access it, but it's a simple and free registration.

#170 john glenn printz

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 17:36

1946 AAA Season. (cont.-48) And on 14 Oct. 1946 Howard S. "Howdy" Wilcox II (1904-1946) died instantly, when struck by a car driven by Kenneth Wines, at the Converse, IN, half mile dirt track. Wilcox was acting as the flagman that day and had just waved the checkered flag to Jimmy Wiburn, as the winner in a 20 lap event. Wilcox obviously didn't spot a second vehicle, piloted by Wines, running just behind Wilburn. Howard Wilcox II was so numbered "the second" by the U. S. racing fraternity to avoid confusing him with an earlier Howard Wilcox (1889-1923), who was a starter in the first eleven (1911-1923) Memorial Day Indianapolis races, and who was the winner of the 1919 "500" in a EX5 type Peugeot. Although both of these two men resided in Indianapolis, they were not directly related to each other. Howdy Wilcox I, had been a fatality at the inaugural Altoona board track race, a 200 miler run on 4 Sept. 1923, and won by Eddie Hearne in a Miller 122. Howdy Wilcox II was a mid-western dirt track pilot who moved up to the AAA Championship division ranks in 1932. His first Champ car event was the 1932 running of the "500" where, as a rookie he finished 2nd. Wilcox II ran in all six of the 1932 AAA Championship contests and added a 2nd at Detroit (June 5) and a 4th at Roby (June 19) to his resume. However, after that, Wilcox failed to finish in the last three 1932 AAA Championship races. Still Wilcox II had accumulated enough points to place 3rd overall in the final 1932 AAA Championship standings.

For the 1933 season, Wilcox II had procured the Miller/Stevens car in which Bob Carey had won the 1932 AAA National Driving Title. Louie Meyer, who owned this car in 1931 and 1932, had meanwhile sold it to Joe Marks. Carey himself had been killed at Ascot on 16 April 1933 using a car powered by a new Miller 255 cubic inch motor, in a test run. Wilcox II duly qualified for the 1933 "500" but on the very morning of the race was informed that he could not drive because of his epilepsy. The other drivers objected to Howdy's rather abrupt elimination by the AAA and the Speedway, and there then ensued a huge rhubard at the start/finish line, which delayed the start of the 1933 "500" for about an hour, with the crowd in the grandstands getting more and more restless all the while. In the end, a promising new rookie (Mauri Rose), who had failed to make the starting lineup, was put in Wilcox II's car which was then moved to the rear of the field. Wilcox II was never allowed to drive thereafter in any AAA race. In early 1936 Joe Marks sold this Miller/Stevens car to Murrel Belanger and this was Murrel's start as a car owner in the AAA Championship division.

1946 also saw the first published book on the history of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, i. e. Floyd Clymer's (1895-1970) INDIANAPOLIS 500 MILE RACE HISTORY (Los Angeles, 1946). Its 318 pages reprinted contemporary reports (1909-1941) from American automobile journals on all the contests conducted at the Speedway. Clymer's miscellanea here does contain a lot of information and will always retain its value. Clymer, also beginning in 1946, began issuing supplements to the HISTORY, which soon turned into an annual Indianapolis Yearbook. The last of these Clymer Indy Yearbooks was published on the 1968 "500". Until Al Bloemker's (1906-1996), 500 MILES TO GO; THE STORY OF THE INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY (New York, 1961), Clymer's efforts were the only substantial books on the history of the races held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway available.

It was this same Clymer who in 1957 (July 1 ?) stated that Fangio was a "phony Champion of the World". This has got to be the most absurb comment ever made about Grand Prix racing. Juan Manuel Fangio (1911-1995) was the greatest of the great. Clymer made this statement after the running of the first Monza 500 (29 June 1957), in which no major European Grand Prix drivers competed, because of a total lack of adequate cars or equipment. The next three indispensable volumes to be published on American racing history in the U.S. were 1. Peter Helck's (1893-1988) THE CHECKERED FLAG (New York, 1961); 2. Griffith Borgeson's (1918-1997) THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE AMERICAN RACING CAR (New York, 1966); and 3. Jack C. Fox's (1925-1987) THE INDIANAPOLIS 500 (Cleveland, 1967). These three books opened new vistas for most of us. Carl Hungness began publishing his Indianapolis Yearbooks in 1973, and they lasted until 1997. Carl also printed a 1969-1972 INDIANAPOLIS 500 YEARBOOK (Speedway, 1980) to cover the gap between his annual yearbooks and that of Clymer's.

Edited by john glenn printz, 14 July 2009 - 19:59.


#171 john glenn printz

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 20:34

1946 AAA Season. (cont.-49) LAP LEADERS OF ALL SIX 1946 AAA CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS. 1. INDIANAPOLIS 500 (MAY 30th). Laps 1-8 Rose, 9-11 Mays, 12-55 Hepburn, 56-68 G. Robson, 69-70 Bergere, 71-87 G. Robson, 88-92 Jackson, and 93-200 G. Robson. 2. LANGHORNE 100 (JUNE 30th). Laps 1-17 Horn, 18-22 Rose, 23-24 Connor, and 25-100 Mays. 3. ATLANTA 100 (September 2nd). Laps 1-15 Horn, 16-18 Mays, 19-31 DeVore, 32-97 Horn, and 98 Connor. Race halted at 98 laps because of accident. 4. INDIANAPOLIS FAIRGROUNDS 100 (September 15th). Laps 1-100 Mays. 5. MILWAUKEE 100 (September 22nd). Laps 1-6 Bettenhausen and 7-100 Mays. 6. GOSHEN 100 (October 6th). Laps 1-2 Andres and 3-100 Bettenhausen.

#172 fines

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 16:18

Originally posted by fines
Horn #3 was probably the 1934 Ralph Morgan Miller, the 1936 CSRA Champion car and death car of Bud Henderson, later owned by Joie Chitwood (1938/9 AAA Eastern Champion), and then sold to Horn, mainly driven by Tommy Hinnershitz, who scored 896.8 points. Another fit!

Another "oops!", and a good thing nobody spotted it before I have the opportunity to correct it here myself :smirk:

The 1936 CSRA Champion who died at the wheel of the Morgan/Miller the next Memorial Day was, of course, Red Campbell, not Bud Henderson (the 1935 Champion who died two years later driving a different car - a "works" Dreyer, I believe).

#173 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 18:00

Contrary to a posting on another list, the data I have for the final
1946 AAA standings are as follows
Ted Horn 2,448 points
Geo. Robson 1,544(there was an adjustment to those points by AAA
Emil Andres 1,348
Bill Holland 1,280.6
Tommy Hinnershitz 896.8
Walt Ader 850
Jimmy Jackson 800
Joie Chitwood 693
Rex Mays 613
Duke Dinsmore 454
These were the top ten. Apparently there were point races in
November and possibly December as there was a published standing in
NSSN in November that had Horn at 2,368 and Andres at 1,208
There was an AAA bulletin of December 14, 1946 saying there had
been 78 races held during the year, paying $304,432 total purses. The
point standings for 11 through 61 make it clear that all AAA races,
100 mile championship races as well as "big car" races, counted toward
the season championship point standings, as AAA had announced in
March. And, clearly, for Horn to amass 2,448 points while placing only
third at Indianapolis while Mays had 600+ and won three 100 mile races
requires the sprint races to be included.
- Gordon White


Postscript: Give proper credit to Michael for keeping this going until it appears that people have no choice but to accept that he is correct.

#174 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 23:22

Thanks to Gordon White, here is a partial listing of Big Car venues & events for 1946....

28 April / Williams Grove
5 May / Trenton
26 May / Winchester
30 May / Indianapolis
23 June / Greensboro
25 June / Dayton
30 June / Langhorne
30 June / Powell
7 July / Lakewood
20 July / DuBois
20 July / Selingsgrove
21 July / Langhorne
27 July / Harrington
3 August / Washington
4 August / Powell
6 August / Milwaukee
11 August / Langhorne
11 August / Batavia
11 August / Bedford
24 August / Hamburg
18 August / Skowhegan
18 August / Uniontown
25 August / Dayton
30 August / Essex Junction
1 September / Flemington
2 September / Lakewood
6 September / Rutland
7 September / Port Royal
15 September / Indianapolis
15 September / Reading
21 September / Allentown
22 September / Milwaukee
22 September / Great Barrington
22 September / Powell
28 September / Lakewood
5 October / Lakewood
5 October / Winston-Salem
6 October / Goshen
6 October / Dayton
6 October / Greensboro
12 October / Richmond
19 October / Raleigh
9 November / Shelby

It certainly is looking as if the winners list will have to be revised....

Postscript. Additional information from Brian Pratt on the RacingHistory Group:

Well I have the 1946 NSSN microfilm and had a look. A few ads caught my
attention:

NSSN March 14, 1946:
Thompson Speedway, Thompson, CT, June 2, Big Cars, AAA Grand Circuit.

NSSN April 11, 1946:
Williams Grove Speedway 1946 Big Car AAA Auto Racing Season
Sunday, April 14

Also dates for the AAA circuit at Williams Grove scheduled for:
April 28
May 19
June 16
July 7
July 28
August 18
September 8
October 6

NSSN April 25, 1946:
Another ad for Sam Nunis Speedways, list of 1946 race dates as of March
21, 1946:

March 31, Atlanta (GA), one mile, sanction no. 3961
May 5, Trenton (NJ), one mile, 3964
May 30, Trenton (NJ), one mile , 3970
June 2, Atlanta (GA), one mile, 3973
June 16, Flemington (NJ), half mile, 3975
June 23, reserved
July 4, Allentown (PA), half mile, 3980
July 4, Atlanta (GA), one mile, 3981
July 21, DuBois (PA), half mile, 3985
July 27, Harrington (DE), half mile, 3986
August 3, Washington (PA), half mile, 3989
August 10, Beford (PA), half mile, 3992
August 11, Batavia (NY), half mile, 3994
August 17, Batavia (NY), half mile, 3995
August 18, Skhowhegan (ME), half mile, 3997
August 24, Hamburg (NY), half mile, 3998
August 30, Essex Jct. (VT), half mile, 4001
August 31, Flemington (NJ), half mile, 4002
September 1, Richmond (VA), half mile, 4005
September 2, Flemington (NJ), half mile, 4007
September 2, Richmond (VA), half mile, 4008
September 6, Rutland (VT), half mile, 4010
September 7, Port Royal (PA), half mile, 4011
September 21, Allentown (PA), half mile, 4015
September 22, Trenton (NJ), one mile, 4016
September 28, Shelby (NC), half mile, 4018
September 28, Atlanta (GA), one mile, 4019
September 29, Trenton (NJ), one mile, 4021
October 4, Frederick (MD), half mile, 4023
October 5, Winston-Salem (NC), half mile, 4024
October 5, Atlanta (GA), one mile, 4025
October 5, Richmond (VA), half mile, 4026
October 6, Greensboro (NC), half mile, 4028
October 12, Charlotte (NC), half mile, 4029
October 12, Spartanburg (SC), half mile, 4030
October 13, Greensboro (NC), half mile, 4031
October 19, Raleigh (NC), half mile, 4034
October 27, Greensboro (NC), half mile, 4037


Adding things together, the 1946 AAA National Championship ("Grand Circuit") begins to look like this (sanction number) :

31 March / Lakewood (3961)

14 April / Williams Grove
28 April / Williams Grove
5 May / Trenton (3964)
19 May / Williams Grove
26 May / Winchester
30 May / Indianapolis
30 May / Trenton (3970)
2 June / Thompson
2 June / Lakewood (3973)
16 June / Williams Grove
16 June / Flemington (3975)
23 June / Greensboro
25 June / Dayton
30 June / Langhorne
30 June / Powell
4 July / Allentown (3980)
4 July / Lakewood (3981)
7 July / Lakewood
7 July / Williams Grove
20 July / DuBois // 21 July / DuBois (3985)
20 July / Selingsgrove
21 July / Langhorne
27 July / Harrington (3986)
28 July / Williams Grove
3 August / Washington (3989)
4 August / Powell
6 August / Milwaukee
10 August / Bedford (3992) // 11 August / Bedford
11 August / Langhorne
11 August / Batavia (3994)
17 August / Batavia (3995)
18 August / Williams Grove
18 August / Skowhegan (3997)
24 August / Hamburg (3998)
18 August / Skowhegan
18 August / Uniontown
25 August / Dayton
30 August / Essex Junction (4001)
31 August / Flemington (4002)
1 September / Richmond (4005)
1 September / Flemington // 2 September / Flemington (4007)
2 September / Lakewood
2 September / Richmond (4008)
6 September / Rutland (4010)
8 September / Williams Grove
7 September / Port Royal (4011)
15 September / Indianapolis
15 September / Reading
21 September / Allentown (4015)
22 September / Milwaukee
22 September / Great Barrington
22 September / Powell
22 September / Trenton (4016)
28 September / Lakewood (4019)
28 September / Shelby (4018)
29 September / Trenton (4021)
4 October / Frederick (4023)
5 October / Lakewood (4025)
5 October / Winston-Salem (4024)
5 October / Richmond (4026)
6 October / Goshen
6 October / Dayton
6 October / Greensboro (4028)
6 October / Williams Grove
12 October / Richmond
12 October / Charlotte (4029)
12 October / Spartanburg (4030)
13 October / Greensboro (4031)
19 October / Raleigh (4034)
27 October / Greensboro (4037)
9 November / Shelby


#175 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:20

Official Bulletin AAA Contest Board, 18 December 1946, p. 3.

POINT SYSTEM
In view of the fact that the payment of appearance deals according to point standing was discontinued in 1946, it was the consensus of opinion that the combined point standing is no longer necessary nor desirable. The Board, therefore, voted to revert to the point system used prior to the war which provides for Sectional Championship as well as National Championship. Points earned in all National Championship programs appear in the National Championship point standing only, etc.



#176 Disco Stu

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 02:16

Is this an end to the concept of the 77 race season?

#177 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 12:04

The Contest Board went to the combined championship in the first place because there were serious and quite legitimate doubts as to the number of entries and venues that would be available for the 1946 season. As it turned out, many of the problems were dealt with in such a way as to allow more events than originally anticipated to develop. Given what a bookkeeping nightmare it must have been, little wonder that the idea was dropped for 1947 and subsequent seasons.

Folks are digging through the files and piecing it tgether so that we might have an idea what things looked like in the not too distant future. Given the lack of information currently available regarding the way the scoring was done -- features only or features and other events since some early published points totals are a bit confusing -- and even the results for most of the events, this will take some time. Someone is currently working through the 1946 issues of NSSN and checking each box score for information. Of course, we are still sorting out much of this and filling in lots of gaps.

Larger issue is, of course, just how botched up the history of the AAA Championship can be at times. We seem to have sorted out the 1905 season, addressed the problem with the 1920 season, and now dealing with the 1946 season. Plus, the entire issue of the lack of legitimacy of the 1909-1915/1917-1919 and the 1902-1908 seasons seems to be settled, but with all the erroreous information floating around due to the triumph of the revisionists, it will be awhile before this is accepted. The myth of the 1933 Tripoli GP is still widely accepted as fact despite it being shown to be anything but what people think it was.

Pity the poor historian.

#178 ensign14

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 12:50

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
The Contest Board went to the combined championship in the first place because there were serious and quite legitimate doubts as to the number of entries and venues that would be available for the 1946 season. As it turned out, many of the problems were dealt with in such a way as to allow more events than originally anticipated to develop. Given what a bookkeeping nightmare it must have been, little wonder that the idea was dropped for 1947 and subsequent seasons.


The paradox is it was a more representative championship. Imagine today if F1 were worth 10 points for the win, ChampCar six, IRL six, NASCAR two (many more races, you see ;) ), Japanese GT 1 or whatever...the idea of MS and FA last year scratching around for Macau F3 rides for a crucial WDC point is an entertaining one at least.

I am most intrigued to see which drivers can be counted as National Championship winners. It'll drive the pure statisticians mad.

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
Plus, the entire issue of the lack of legitimacy of the 1909-1915/1917-1919 and the 1902-1908 seasons seems to be settled, but with all the erroreous information floating around due to the triumph of the revisionists, it will be awhile before this is accepted. The myth of the 1933 Tripoli GP is still widely accepted as fact despite it being shown to be anything but what people think it was.

More the cut & pasters, perhaps. It's still wildly annoying that if you google "Frank Armi" to find out exactly how he felt when he qualified for the 500 by a tiny margin having missed out in the previous years, how he got to Indy, how his career progressed, is reputation and and so on, you instead end up with about 400 pages of the exact same info from the exact same source all talking about his "Formula 1" career, I don't really understand the mentality of regurgitating the very same stuff available freely elsewhere.

#179 Disco Stu

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 13:13

I believe I misread that Dec. 18 notice. When they voted to revert to the prior point system, I was reading that as taking the 1946 season and reverting to the prior point system. That's why I thought the 77 race season may have been wiped off the books. I actually like the idea of this wacky, oddball season in the history books. These little side trips can be a pain to piece together, but it's also what helps make the sport's history fun to delve in to.

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#180 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 14:22

A mere decade ago, I had no clue that there were so many loose, tangled ends left dangling concerning issues that should have been long since resolved. Well, just goes to show that "being right is often irrelevant," as my old boss used to tell me.

I don't really understand the mentality of regurgitating the very same stuff available freely elsewhere.


This is a significant issue relating to a central issue as to what is crushing the Web & internet as a truly useful research tool and as a good platform for collaborative research. We often do what we do in spite of, not because of, the Web & internet. The shameless theft of what was already stolen often boggles the mind. It is easy to see what was stolen from The Black Books since much of the early -- pre-1966 -- information is anachronistic.

I am most intrigued to see which drivers can be counted as National Championship winners. It'll drive the pure statisticians mad.


This alone is making the project worthwhile. Indeed, I was thinking the other night that we need to draw up a corrected listing of National Championship race winners -- adding 1905, dropping the 1909-1915/1917-1919, and the extra 1920 events as well as adding the 1946 winners. This will cause several cows to be had. However, I also expect serious resistance to this since there are still many who cannot either grasp or refuse to accept the level of revisionism that has tainted the AAA Championship. They will point to the endless sites on the web & internet as "proof" that we are wrong....

Hell, I still have no end of folks telling me that I am dead wrong about the recent work on Tripoli and need to get my mind "right." Ditto as to using the web & internet to prove that we are wrong.

I am still a bit puzzled as to why and how the Contest Board wiped the slate clear for 1946. Also, am I the only one that wonders why the Milwaukee 100-miler in August is never included in the "revised" championship?

#181 ensign14

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 14:36

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
However, I also expect serious resistance to this since there are still many who cannot either grasp or refuse to accept the level of revisionism that has tainted the AAA Championship. They will point to the endless sites on the web & internet as "proof" that we are wrong....

Too much money in it...people proclaiming the latest embryo as the youngest-ever winner to grab headlines and overlooking candidates such as Bruce-Brown, Jimmy Davies, Donald Thomas or whoever in whatever championship you choose.

One that still annoys me from a logical perspective is Richard Petty's 200 wins. On the basis that he contributed significantly to a shared win started by someone else, why is this not 201? Cat, here's some pigeons. At least NASCAR has a theoretically simple way out - he who starts, wins - even if (a) I could be a winner if I let Jeff Gordon in after I drove the pace lap and (b) they ignored Donald Thomas from that perspective...

But back to 1946, and astonishment that something within living memory became so confused, discombobulated,misinformed and simply forgotten in the years following.

#182 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 14:54

Originally posted by ensign14
But back to 1946, and astonishment that something within living memory became so confused, discombobulated,misinformed and simply forgotten in the years following.


It takes a certain talent to do this and the utter lack of interest by any serious historians coupled with a general apathy concerning such topics and with gatekeepers not minding the store, you wind up with messes such as this one.

I fully admit to just being unable to accept that this situation actually existed. I just could not believe it could be that dicked up and that no one had done anything by this point. it just did not seem possible, it defied logic. Boy, was I ever wrong!!!! Again, a tip of the hat to Michael for being so adamant and providing the proof that this was indeed the case.

#183 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 18:48

Ah, it just keeps getting better....

from National Speed Sport News, May 9, 1946, page 6, "Nat'l P't
Standings As of April 15th":

The article notes two races but the Atlanta, GA, race of March 31 was an
invitational race so no points awarded.

The only other race to that point was the April 14 race at Williams Grove.

National Point Standing as of April 15, 1946
(driver, address, total points)

Walt Ader, Bernardsville, NJ, 40
Joie Chitwood, Reading, PA, 34
Ted Horn, Paterson, NJ, 28
Dee Toran, Paterson, NJ, 20
J. Gibbons, Richmond, VA, 16
Bill Holland, Bridgeport, CT, 14
Danny Goss, Mt. Holly, NJ, 13
Len Duncan, Mt. Holly, NJ, 12
Earl Johns, Tamaqua, PA, 10
Lee Wallard, Reading, PA, 8
Bus Warke, Allentown, PA, 8
Speed McFee, No. Chili (?), NJ, 8
T. Hinnershitz, Reading, PA, 6
Duke Dinsmore, Osborn, OH, 6
Lawrence Smith, Butler, NJ, 6

Since the finish of the Williams Grove race was Ader, Chitwood, Horn,
Toran, and Holland but somehow Gibbons ends up ahead of Holland in
points more than the feature event finishers must have earned points
.

that is all for the moment,
Brian Pratt


This is similar to seeing something begin to match up on the Rosetta Stone or Linear B....!

Something that I was quite uncertain about, but suspected, was that each heat and semi, as well as the main, awarded points. If the points totals reflect only the three heats, the semi, and the main at Williams Grove then you have five points-paying Championship events. So, for 1946 you already have four different winners: Ader (2), Horn (1), Goss (1), and Chitwood (1).

Needless to say, this will send the stats nerds into orbit since you have the Indy race, the six (not five) 100-milers, and about 70 features, each with its supporting races -- and each paying out championship points.... Life is never easy, is it?

This ought to be really interesting....

#184 Jim Thurman

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 19:30

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
The Contest Board went to the combined championship in the first place because there were serious and quite legitimate doubts as to the number of entries and venues that would be available for the 1946 season. As it turned out, many of the problems were dealt with in such a way as to allow more events than originally anticipated to develop. Given what a bookkeeping nightmare it must have been, little wonder that the idea was dropped for 1947 and subsequent seasons.


When we first kicked this around I theorized that the potential car and venue situation in the immediate post-war era was what likely led to counting the Big Car/Sprint events. I'm sure the AAA figured there would be more than enough Sprint Cars around, but true Champ cars and 1 mile ovals probably were of great concern.

Again, great thanks to Michael for pointing this out and getting this whole ball rolling.

#185 Jim Thurman

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 19:58

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
ensign 14:I am most intrigued to see which drivers can be counted as National Championship winners. It'll drive the pure statisticians mad.

This alone is making the project worthwhile. Indeed, I was thinking the other night that we need to draw up a corrected listing of National Championship race winners -- adding 1905, dropping the 1909-1915/1917-1919, and the extra 1920 events as well as adding the 1946 winners. This will cause several cows to be had. However, I also expect serious resistance to this since there are still many who cannot either grasp or refuse to accept the level of revisionism that has tainted the AAA Championship. They will point to the endless sites on the web & internet as "proof" that we are wrong....

Hell, I still have no end of folks telling me that I am dead wrong about the recent work on Tripoli and need to get my mind "right." Ditto as to using the web & internet to prove that we are wrong.


Not so fast there Kaputnik!

Let's not get carried away and fall into the same trap of revisionism.

I can see adjusting the 1905-1920 events accordingly, but as far as 1946 goes - this information should not mean adding a slew of winners to the list. While these events counted toward "the" National Championship, they were not for the same cars. It wouldn't surprise me that there were a few cars that competed in both types of events (I have not checked each box score), but for the most part these were entirely separate - Champ Cars and Sprint/Big Cars.

I realize this gets into semantics and one's viewpoint or opinion affects same. I don't see anyone championing the cause that the Dirt Car races that counted towards the USAC Gold Crown in the early 1980's should be counted as "Championship race winners". And to me, that's for good reason even though some of those cars even competed in the same event with the Indianapolis type cars (Pocono).

Special notation, or even the dreaded *, yes, but I do not see counting in Sprint Car winners as "Championship" race winners simply for that reason. And, yes, I do know the quandry of Indianapolis and it's differing cars counting towards the WDC from 1950-1960...but there are some unique circumstances there...like everyone being aware of it - at the time!

I am still a bit puzzled as to why and how the Contest Board wiped the slate clear for 1946. Also, am I the only one that wonders why the Milwaukee 100-miler in August is never included in the "revised" championship?


I have offered what I believe to be the reason, and you have echoed it, but it would be great to see it confirmed in print on some document. Though those are the kinds of concerns that would likely have only been spoken at meetings and not committed to paper.

As far as the August Milwaukee 100 miler, no you are not alone...but it's probably something as mundane as not paying the sanctioning fee.

#186 Jim Thurman

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 20:04

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps

Something that I was quite uncertain about, but suspected, was that each heat and semi, as well as the main, awarded points. If the points totals reflect only the three heats, the semi, and the main at Williams Grove then you have five points-paying Championship events. So, for 1946 you already have four different winners: Ader (2), Horn (1), Goss (1), and Chitwood (1).

Needless to say, this will send the stats nerds into orbit since you have the Indy race, the six (not five) 100-milers, and about 70 features, each with its supporting races -- and each paying out championship points.... Life is never easy, is it?

This ought to be really interesting....


Again, see previous post.

I wanted to point out, which you likely are well aware of Don, that traditionally Midget, Sprint and even some short track Stock Car associations awarded points for qualifying, heats, semi-mains or trophy dashes. Some awarded passing points for inverted starts.

Do you have anything, or have you run across anything, on the AAA point system for Sprint Cars for 1946?

I think we went over this, but with the plethora of posts and threads and various fora, please indulge my asking...has it been determined if there was a formal 1946 AAA Sprint Car champion? Wasn't Horn listed as both, or is that simply Catlin again?

#187 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 01:55

First, there was a single, combined National Championship for 1946.

There was no separate Sprint Car championship, nor sectional championships.

POINT SYSTEM
In view of the fact that the payment of appearance deals according to point standing was discontinued in 1946, it was the consensus of opinion that the combined point standing is no longer necessary nor desirable. The Board, therefore, voted to revert to the point system used prior to the war which provides for Sectional Championship as well as National Championship. Points earned in all National Championship programs appear in the National Championship point standing only, etc.

-- Official Bulletin AAA Contest Board, 18 December 1946, p. 3.

Then it gets a bit complicated of course....

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SPECIFICATIONS:
In view of prevailing conditions and circumstances resulting from the war, such as shortage of certain materials and manpower, it was decided that the National Championship specifications would remain the same as they were in 1941/ Maximum displacement limits for 1946 will, therefore, be 183 cu. in. for entries that are equipped with superchargers and 274.59 cu. in. for those that are non-supercharged. Weight restrictions and other general rules and regulations remain unchanged. Cars conforming to National Championship specification will be permitted to participate in Non-Championship sprint races on tracks one mile or more in length.

NON-CHAMPIONSHIP SPECIFICATIONS:
Displacement limits for Non-Championship cars were increased from the 1941 maximum of 205 cu. in. to 210 cu. in. maximum. An opportunity to overhaul and repair of present equipment is hereby provided for. Also, this may possibly make available a number of engines now in existence that heretofore have been slightly oversize. Cars falling in this specification will be permitted to participate as in the past in sprint races on all tracks one mile or less in length


-- Official Bulletin AAA Contest Board, 20 November 1945, p. 2.

Note, however, that both are allowed to compete on one mile tracks....

And the decision to have the combined championship for 1946 seems to be after this date, which shouldn't be a surprise.

Okay, so what do you do?

#188 ensign14

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:30

Originally posted by Jim Thurman


Not so fast there Kaputnik!

Let's not get carried away and fall into the same trap of revisionism.

I can see adjusting the 1905-1920 events accordingly, but as far as 1946 goes - this information should not mean adding a slew of winners to the list.

Yes it should. Cos I want to see Bumpy Bumpus as a National Championship Race winner. :p

What it means is people will have to be careful about definitions. E.g. Alberto Ascari winning 9 consecutive F1 races. A sentence like that is liable to send an historian into conniptions for a number of reasons.

I've alwyas thought it a bit unfair that George Snider is overlooked as a Champion. Cos the rules were there, everyone could comply with them, and he beat those that did. And he had the number 1 at Indy.

#189 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 12:41

The 1946 season is such a complete contrast to most other seasons of the Championship, that it probably is one of the few that fully qualifies for being termed, "unique."

Assuming that we can get the results pulled from the box scores found in NSSN or other sources, hammer down the points system, and then the points distribution for each heat, semi, and main -- then any semblence of sorting things out solely on the basis of semantics and nomenclature becomes largely irrelevant, in my view.

That the 1946 season is going to largely stand on its own, like it or not, apart from the other championship seasons, is becoming quite evident. Even counting just the wins in the feature races will skew the statistics which are apparently carved in stone -- and which are already flawed any way since they inevitably include the Means/Catlin events -- and cause headaches to some. To me, this is the least of our problems.

The major problem, first and foremost, is just getting people to realize and accept that there was a single, combined National Championship sanctioned by the AAA Contest Baord in 1946. That the Contest Board allowed drivers to count all their points earned in Big Car events -- those conforming to the Championship spec as well as those to the Sprint specs -- during the 1946 season is not going to be easily accepted by many. It certainly was not by me in the early stages. By persisting in looking at the events as either Champ or Sprint events misses the point: in 1946 they were all Championship events, with the exception of the inaugral event of the season at Lakewood.

There is the distinct possibility that the entire 1946 Championship season will be one big asterick in both the record books and in the history books. Okay, so be it.

What is of the utmost importance is that the story of the 1946 season finally gets told. I fully realize that 99.99999999999+% of those here or elsewhere really don't care all that much about this, but this is one of those neglected stories that we can actually hope to have some measure of success in getting told. There are some good people working at doing the headache-inducing, mind-numbing, far too often thankless digging through the raw materials and finding those nuggets of information that once assembled tell a story. This is what we do.


Postscript:

Ziggy won races that were for both the Gold and Silver Crowns. Sounds as if USAC and others need to acknowledge that fact.

And, yeah, it would be nice to add Bumpy to the list....

#190 Disco Stu

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 13:40

Here's a handful of misc. stuff:

Looks like there's two events to add to the schedule listed above. According to this file consisting of notes from NSSN compiled by Paul Rhodes and posted on the Yahoo Racing History group there were races at Winchester on August 11 and September 1. No winner was given on the 8/11 race, this was the race where Bus Wilbert was killed. Charles Van Acker won the 9/1 event.

Likewise a few may need to be pulled. According to Richmond International Raceway's website Ted Horn won the track's first race on October 12, 1946. This article has some more details of the race. What this implies is that the Richmond events scheduled for September 1 & 2 and October 5 did not happen for whatever reason.

Not a schedule change, just a note, the July 20 event at Selinsgrove was the track's inaugural race. Bill Holland was the winner over Red Byron.

----

Looking at the standings after 4/14, the points aren't all adding up for some reason. Most of the points seem correct, but there's already five drivers whose numbers don't match up. Buster Warke is the most egregious of the group, having 8 points despite not even being shown in the Williams Grove results. Here they are, thanks to Brian Pratt for digging these up:

The box score from NSSN April 25, 1946:

fast time: Duke Nalon, 26.92

first race (10 laps) : Chitwood, Wallard, Tommy Hinnershitz, Jim Gibbons
(Buffalo, NY), Danny Goss (Mt. Holly, NJ) -- 4:46.47

second race (10 laps) : Horn, Holland, Lawrence Smith (Bloomington, NJ)
-- 4:50.15

third race (10 laps) : Walt Ader, Dee Toran, Duke Dinsmore (Dayton, OH),
Len Duncan (Philadelphia, PA), Earl Johns (Erlton, NJ) -- 4:52.53

semi-final (10 laps) : Goss, Gibbons, Speed McFee (Buffalo, NY), Johnny
Datera (Elizabeth, NJ), Earl Johns -- 4:55.06

feature race (30 laps) : Ader, Chitwood, Horn, Toran, Holland, Goss --
14:27.01

note -- Joe Sanco (real name Joseph J. Hrysenko) of Elizabeth, NJ died
during the third heat after losing control and turning over following a
collision with George Lupto of Detroit. Sanco was born March 19, 1912.

Brian Pratt
Burnaby, BC, Canada


Earl Johns is shown with 10 points when he shouldn't have any. Len Duncan has an extra 8 points, Jimmy Gibbons 4 and Speed McFee 2. Looks like we've got a ways to go yet before having this all sorted out.

----

As for the Gold Crown dirt races, something I've always felt should count, as far as I know the USAC record book still recognizes them as Championship wins. The most recent media guide I have is from 1995, and it does include George Snider as National Champion, and has Rich Vogler scored as having a National Championship win. So someone still recognizes it, it just appears that no one outside of USAC cares, sadly.

#191 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 17:20

Pity the Poor Historian....

Calculating the points as best I can -- I cannot find the break down for the 5 milers and, therefore, guessing.... -- and the headaches start early.....

1st Heat (10 laps, 5 miles)
1. Chitwood, 10 points
2. Wallard, 8 points
3. Hinnershitz, 6 points
4. Gibbons, 4 points
5. Goss, 3 points

2nd Heat (10 laps, 5 miles)
1. Horn, 10 points
2. Holland, 8 points
3. Smith, 6 points

3rd Heat (10 laps, 5 miles)
1. Ader, 10 points
2. Toran, 8 points
3. Dinsmore, 6 points
4. Datera, 4 points
5. Johns, 3 points
(Sanco/Hrysenko)
(Lupto)

Semi (10 laps, 5 miles)
1. Goss, 10 points
2. Gibbons, 8 points
3. McFee, 6 points
4. Datera, 4 points
5. Johns, 3 points

Feature (30 laps, 15 miles)
1. Ader, 30 points
2. Chitwood, 24 points
3. Horn, 18, points
4. Toran, 12 points
5. Holland, 6 points
6. Goss, 3 points


Walt Ader, Bernardsville, NJ, 40 = 10 + 30 √
Joie Chitwood, Reading, PA, 34 = 10 + 24 √
Ted Horn, Paterson, NJ, 28 = 10 + 18 √
Dee Toran, Paterson, NJ, 20 = 8 + 12 √
J. Gibbons, Richmond, VA, 16 ≠ 4 + 8 = 12 (- 4)
Bill Holland, Bridgeport, CT, 14 = 8 + 6 √
Danny Goss, Mt. Holly, NJ, 13 ≠ 3 + 10 + 3 = 16 (+ 3)
Len Duncan, Mt. Holly, NJ, 12 ≠ ?
Earl Johns, Tamaqua, PA, 10 ≠ 3 + 3 (- 4)
Lee Wallard, Reading, PA, 8 = 8 √
Bus Warke, Allentown, PA, 8 ≠ ?
Speed McFee, No. Chili (?), NJ, 8 ≠ 6 (- 2)
T. Hinnershitz, Reading, PA, 6 = 6 √
Duke Dinsmore, Osborn, OH, 6 = 6 √
Lawrence Smith, Butler, NJ, 6 = 6 √

Johnny Datera ? 4 + 4 = 8 ?

This is only from the 14 April event so.....


The dates for the early September Richmond races were taken from a Nunis advertisement in April dated from March and, therefore, projected dates; when I can, I will check the sanction records for any notations on date changes.

Will include the notes on Selinsgrove and Richmond in the next update.

#192 Disco Stu

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 18:00

That's what I had, except I didn't award the 3 points for a 5th, since that would throw Goss off by 3. Doesn't mean it's right, since this is all sorts of messy right now, just what I went with. That's Duncan in the 3rd heat and not Datera by the way, that would give each driver 4 instead of Datera 8 and Duncan 0.

#193 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 18:17

Doh.... Did that during lunch while trying to juggle the usual phones calls and emails and people popping into my office to ask about this or that while trying to type and cipher. Multi-tasking is obviously not one of my strengths these days.

#194 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 18:59

Does anyone have a copy of "Eastern Bull Rings," by Buzz Rose? I am informed that it covers the Eastern Sprint events 1945-1960, AAA & USAC, and has some statistics (annual? event by event?) and clippings on the races.

#195 Jim Thurman

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 20:17

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
First, there was a single, combined National Championship for 1946.

There was no separate Sprint Car championship, nor sectional championships.

-- Official Bulletin AAA Contest Board, 18 December 1946, p. 3.

Then it gets a bit complicated of course....

-- Official Bulletin AAA Contest Board, 20 November 1945, p. 2.

Note, however, that both are allowed to compete on one mile tracks....

And the decision to have the combined championship for 1946 seems to be after this date, which shouldn't be a surprise.

Okay, so what do you do?


Wait and gather more data first.

Don, thanks for posting the bulletins. Very interesting. Sorry if some is redundant, but with the length of this thread and similar at other fora, it's hard to keep track.

Is there a possibility that the AAA reversed itself and did not clue everyone in? It would not be a first.

And, no, I'm not suggesting a cover-up a la what was proposed about Milton v. Gaston Chevrolet. Just sheer sloppiness, which I would not rule out.

#196 Jim Thurman

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 20:25

quote:
I can see adjusting the 1905-1920 events accordingly, but as far as 1946 goes - this information should not mean adding a slew of winners to the list.

Originally posted by ensign14

Yes it should. Cos I want to see Bumpy Bumpus as a National Championship Race winner. :p


:lol:

And a very good point about Snider, though it gets into semantics of cars used in competition for "championship".

The comparison to Ascari is a good one - but at least in that case the cars on the grid at any given "championship" round were to the same regulations...

weren't they? :

#197 Jim Thurman

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 20:26

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
Does anyone have a copy of "Eastern Bull Rings," by Buzz Rose? I am informed that it covers the Eastern Sprint events 1945-1960, AAA & USAC, and has some statistics (annual? event by event?) and clippings on the races.


No Don, but if you underwrite it, I know where I can buy it :) (not only that, but I get a discount there ;) ) ...and then it could be put to use for research purposes.

Seriously, I did quickly thumb through it last time I was at the regional specialist auto book store. I was not specifically thinking ahead to something like this coming up, but Buzz' other books feature many photos, text on the season and some events, reprinted articles from the time on individual races and yearly point standings.

Would you like me to, or would you like to, contact Buzz about it's contents?

Or I might see him and/or the book at the Literature Faire this weekend. Any questions?

#198 Jim Thurman

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 20:28

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps
Okay, so what do you do?


Contact Chris Economaki and ask him about it?

#199 Disco Stu

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Posted 19 June 2007 - 16:06

Williams Grove was able to provide a list of dates and race winners. There are a couple of date changes as compared to the earlier schedule listed.

1946 race results
4-14 Walt Ader
4-28 Ted Horn
5-19 Joie Chitwood
6-9 Joie Chitwood
7-7 Johnny Shackleford
7-28 Ted Horn
8-18 George Robson
9-8 Ted Horn
10-6 Lucky Lux
10-20 RAIN
10-27 Bill Holland

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#200 Disco Stu

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Posted 20 June 2007 - 13:55

Richmond International Raceway provided the following stories about their October 12 race:

Note: The first race at Richmond International Raceway-then known as Atlantic Rural Exposition or Strawberry Hill Speedway- took place on October 12, 1946. These open wheel races took place in conjunction with the Virginia State Fair each year from 1946 through 1968. The following articles, which are reprinted with permission from Media General and the Richmond Times-Dispatch, chronicle the first racing events at what is now Richmond International Raceway. Remember, Richmond at that time had two major papers, the Richmond News Leader (which is now defunct) and the Richmond Times-Dispatch. The Richmond News Leader, like many papers from that ERA, was an afternoon paper.

Richmond News Leader

Fair Plans Full Auto Race Card Despite Threat of Rain

October 12, 1946

Auto Racing Day at the Atlantic Rural Exposition started under a handicap from the weatherman today, with a prediction of rain in the early afternoon. Race officials, however, accustomed to the weatherman’s gloomy headshakes, made preparations for a full card of big car events, including time trials, four eight-lap heat races and a 20-lap sweepstakes final.
Many of the country’s top drivers were slated to appear in the races scheduled to start at 1:30 p.m. Entrants included Ted Horn, of Paterson, N.J., current point leader in the AAA national speed championship; Hank Rogers, of Trenton, N.J., former champion of an independent speed circuit in Pennsylvania and New Jersey; Mark Light, of Lebanon, 1938 Eastern AAA dirt track champion, and “Red” Byron, of Atlanta, leading money winner in recent races at the Southeastern World’s Fair in Atlanta.
Other top entrants include George Marshman, of Philadelphia, former midget car driver; Al Fleming, veteran Richmond driver’ Danny Gross, of Bridgeton, N.J.; Earl Johns, of Somerville, N.J.; Warren Bates, of Monroesville, N.J., Otis Stine, of York, Pa.; Charley Berslin of Philadelphia, and Ben Smerto of Newark, N.J.
Livestock exhibits were scheduled to be removed from the Exposition grounds today.
Grandstand perfomers and midway attractions, however, were looking forward to record crowds. They counted heavily on the fact that Saturday is a full or half-day holiday for many Richmonders and expressed the belief that today would see a large turnout from persons who visits to the exposition were delayed two days this week by persistent rain.
So far the job of the law enforcement officer at the exposition has been an easy one. Major E.H. Organ, chief of police, reported today.
The police chief said he had deputized about 80 men to help county and State police at the Fair Grounds. So far only one arrest and one accident have been reported.
“Fairs aren’t what they used to be,” Major Organ said. “In the old days police used to make from 50 to 100 arrests during the week and accidents would number well over 50.”






Richmond Times-Dispatch

Ted Horn Cracks Half-Mile Speed Mark Here,
Wins Feature Race at Atlantic Exposition

October 13, 1946
By Max Ailor

It was Ted Horn day at the Atlantic Rural Exposition yesterday as the Paterson, N.J. speedster established a new half-mile sprint record during the time trials and then went on to lap seven cars to win the 10-mile Sam Nunis feature race before 8,000 onlookers. The time was seven minutes, 27 seconds.
The uncrowned national big car champion had no competition on Richmond’s new half-mile banked track. Horn sped through the first qualifying eight-lap heat in the fast time of 3:15 a full half lap in front of Hank Rogers, of Trenton, N.J., who was driving the second fastest car on the track.
The Offenhausers were proved to be everything that the experts say as both Horn and Hank Rogers, driving the only “Offeys” in yesterday’s competition, monopolized the feature race. Horn finished the 10-mile sprint three quarters of a lap in front of Rogers who in turn finished a half lap ahead of third place driver Red Byron of Atlanta, who was driving a Dreyer powered automobile.
The racing champion did not waste time in getting a comfortable lead in the feature. Starting on the pole position, Horn jumped into a five-length lead on the first time around the oval; was leading by 10 lengths on the fourth lap. He was a half lap ahead of Rogers who was in second place with a comfortable lead.
When Horn started to lap his opponents, Rogers was able to close in on the lead to within a quarter lap by the fifteenth sprint but Horn was not long in breaking in the clear and had the lead well out in front again by the eighteenth lap.
Richmond was represented by three drivers, Jimmy Gibbons, Al Fleming and Burt Stark.
Gibbons showed up well in the final race, finishing fourth in a close contest for the No. 3 position. Gibbons ran No. 3 throughout the first 15 laps before giving way to Red Byron. He drove the third fastest lap during the time trials.
Al Fleming won the third qualifying heat and was running well up in the money during the first three laps of the feature but an over-heated motor finally forced him back in the field of finishers. Fleming placed seventh in the feature race.
Instead of a consolation race, the promoters gave the fans a five-lap post feature show between Horn and Rogers. Horn stuck to the outside of the track all the way turning up plenty of dirt on the turns to thrill fans and then made a final sprint to edge out Rogers by a length on the final straightaway.

First heat (8 laps) : First, Ted Horn; second, Hank Rogers; third, Jimmy Gibbons. Time: 3:15
Second heat (8 laps) : First, Mark Light; second, Earl Jones; third Red Byron. Time: 3:30
Third heat (8 laps) : First, Al Fleming; second, Dan Goss; third, Stan Jones; fourth Marx Sooy. Time: 3:32
Sweepstakes (20 laps) : First, Ted Horn; second, Hank Rogers; third, Red Byron; fourth, Jimmy Gibbons; fifth, Earl Johns; sixth, Dan Goss; seventh, Al Fleming; eighth, Marx Sooy. Time: 7:27