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1905 races


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#1 anjakub

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 17:58

I am looking for the details of these races, which were held in 1905.

Cuba
February 13 (?), 1905
St. Cristobal - Havana 160 km
1. Carricaburu - Mercedes 90 hp - 1:50.53
2. Tracy - Renault 40 hp - 1:52.06
3. Robinson - De Dietrich 40 hp - 2:30.16
4. Birk - Mercedes 90 hp - 2:34.25


India
Delhi - Bombay
1. ? - De Dietrich 24 hp

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#2 David McKinney

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 18:26

I have the course as Arroya Arenas-San Cristobel-Arroya Arenas but not being very well up on my Cuban geography that might mean the same thing as Havana-San Cristobel-Havana. I also have Ernesto Carricaburo as the winner in a 60hp Mercédès but agree on Joe Tracy's 40hp Renault.
And, before you ask, I have no other information on the race :)

#3 FEV

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 20:02

Gilbert Hatry's book "Renault et la Compétition - l'époque héroïque" (Ed. Lafourcade, 1979) aims at covering all of the races Renault cars competed in between 1899 and 1908. This nice book covers in detail the great races of the era and gives some tables at the end with all the results of Renault cars in competition for this same period. Anyway you made me realise it has apparently a few gaps since the only mention to a Cuban race is for the "Meeting de Cuba" held on February 12th, 1906 in which good old Bernin finished second. Not sure this is of any help for you... :|

#4 Doug Nye

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 21:39

The speed with which detailed information was telegraphed around the world even in 1905 is impressive even today...

On February 15, 1905, the Havana-San Christobal race was billed to take place over 200kms - the race being part of a speed week 'like that at Ormond Beach, Daytona, Florida, including power boat races offshore'.

'La France Automobile' February 18, 1905 page 102 -

The 100 miles (sic - a change of '200kms' in the prior publicity) race in Cuba was a most dynamic success and attracted not only a great number of the inhabitants of the island but also as many Americans. The starters were:

Fletcher - 80hp Dietrich
Carricaburu - 90hp Mercedes
Tracy - 60hp Renault
Brik - 90hp Mercedes (later spelled 'Birk'), and
Robinson - 40hp Dietrich

At San Christoval (sic) - 79kms from the start - Tracy held the lead in 51 mins 22 and 3/5 seconds - followed very closely by Carricaburu.

(Then something beyond my accurate translation capabilities - "Un choc qui lui fit perdre ses batteries et le siege de son mecanicien le mit presque hors de courses". HELP?)

Fletcher, big favourite on his 80hp Dietrich lost around 6 minutes changing his tyres and then 36 minutes during which he had to solder a split in the fuel tank. The finish was in the following order:

1 - Carricaburu Mercedes '90' in 1hr 50mins 53 2/5secs
2 - Tracy 40hp (sic) Renault 1:52.26
3 - Robinson 40hp Dietrich 2:30.16
4 - Birk (sic) 90hp Mercedes2:34.25

Some record runs were made and the following constitute local speed records:

Fletcher - 1 mile in 45 secs - 1km in 28 3/5 secs - 5kms in 3:4 1/5 - 10kms in 5:57s - 20kms in 11:18 1/5s.

Tracy - 1 mile in 52 secs.

Mendoza (40hp De Dietrich) 1 mile in 53secs.

THE DELHI-BOMBAY

Got some pix of this event - A De Dion-Bouton won the Coupe du Rajah de Kapurthala - no driver named but maybe it simply means that said Rajah in his De Dion won 'The Coupe Delhi-Bombay'???

M.W. Sorel in a 24hp De Dietrich won the Concours Delhi-Bombay - however - which sounds like the event overall???


DCN

#5 Felix Muelas

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 22:25

Originally posted by Doug Nye
"Un choc qui lui fit perdre ses batteries et le siege de son mecanicien le mit presque hors de course".


On a goodwill basis...

An accident as a result of which he lost his battery(ies) and his mechanic´s seat almost put him out of the race.

#6 Jimmy Piget

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Posted 23 May 2002 - 22:59

<>

I guess it only means that a De Dion-Bouton won the Kapurthala Rajah Cup.

"Rajah", in India, is a king (and a Maharajah, a "great king"). This one Rajah (of Kapurthala, may be in the Rajastan State, sorry for Atlas, but I have not mine under my hand) gently presented with a cup one unidentified winner of a De Dion-Bouton.
But definitely not that a man called Rajah won the cup.

#7 quintin cloud

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 08:55

Some questions:

1: The Cuban GP, Doug notes a race distance of 100 miles, how long was the track and/or number of laps was the race run over ?

2: Doug do you possibly have a result for the event ?

:up: :smoking:

#8 David McKinney

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 12:26

Originally posted by quintin cloud
The Cuban GP, Doug notes a race distance of 100 miles, how long was the track and/or number of laps was the race run over ?

Quintin, this is the same race Andrzej mentioned at the top of the thread. The course was from Arroya Arenas (possibly a suurb of Havana) to San Cristobel and back to Arroya Arenas, presumably on public roads. My guess is the results posted by Andrzej and Doug are all you'll get ;)

#9 Doug Nye

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 18:14

First four places as posted above are indeed the only reference I have found, but then I haven't looked at any other contemporary publications. It was a public road event, and I believe it was purely point-to-point - or at least 'out' to San Cristobal (or however one should spell that name) and then 'back' to the original starting point on the outskirts - I presume - of Havana. No question of 'laps'.

DCN

#10 anjakub

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 18:37

Thanks all.
Doug, you are unfailing.

Andrzej

#11 Felix Muelas

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 19:33

Very small last point concerning names and its right spelling:

it is Arroyo Arenas and San Cristóbal

In local quotation, Havana would appear as La Habana and
if you want to abbreviate a San (Saint) you do not use St. but just S.

Un abrazo

Felix

#12 David McKinney

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Posted 24 May 2002 - 21:27

Thanks Felix - always happy to be put right ;)

#13 fines

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Posted 19 February 2003 - 17:05

Gerald Rose in "A Record of Motor Racing" mentions a race in Cuba on Feb 12, 1906, and apart from Frank's post and Hans' GP winners list I don't think I ever read about that one anywhere else. Here's what I can glean from Rose:

1st Victor Demogeot, Darracq 80CV (1905 Gordon-Bennett type), "almost" 60 mph
2nd Maurice Bernin, Renault 60CV (1904 Vanderbilt type)
etc.

Retired:
Vincenzo Lancia, FIAT, lost mechanic on lap 1
Emanuel Cedrino, FIAT, accident on lap 1
etc.

Anyone with more info? How many laps? What circuit? What distance? Winner's time? Other finishers/starters? What type of FIATs, 75 or 110 HP?

About Tracy's Renault in 1905, I gather this is the same car that Bernin used in 1906, i.e a 60 HP. I don't know of any 40 HP Renault at the time. The 60 HP was owned by an American (Gould-Brokaw) and did not yet have the underslung frame of the 1905 cars. The 40 HP De Dietrich would then probably be a 45CV, the 1903 Madrid type.

#14 Marcor

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 18:37

I've just found some infos about the 1906 Cuba race in "La Vie Automobile", 1906.

After the speed Ormond Beach meeting in Floride (January, 22 to 28), a motosport meeting was organised in Cuba on february, 12th, 1906. There were only 4 starters : Demogeot (Darracq), Bernin (Renault), Lancia and Cedrino (F.I.A.T).

results: 1 Demogeot, 4 laps of 87.5 km (350 km) in 3 h 38 m 18 s 4/5 (96.3 kph)

The two Italian cars crashed, being victims of the very bad roads. Lancia's riding mechanic was thrown out of the car (as also said Gerald Rose).

The accident of Cedrano was more important; the driver was slightly hurt but his mechanic was to be rushed to an Habana's hospital.

"La Vie automobile" was a French publication.

#15 Marcor

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Posted 24 September 2003 - 23:37

same race, other source: Le Matin, Belgian newspaper, February 1906.

Starting order, from 3 to 3 minutes.
1- Bernin, 2- Lancia, 3- Cedrino, 4- Demogeot.

results, 1- Demogeot (former mechanic of Victor Hémery), 2- Bernin.

After this race, there were also a match between 3 wealthy Cuban drivers:
Luis Marx (Mercedes)
Julio Rabel (Bayard-Clément)
Juan Aguiles (Mors).

They started just after the international race and had to cover 175 km. The stake was a kitty of 15,000 $. And the results was:
1- Rabel, 175 km, 2 h 04m 52s
2- Aguiles, 2 h 05m 31s
3- Marx, 2h 14m 02s.

On Saturday 17th, February, Cedrino, Lancia and Demogeot went on board of the St-Paul to come back in Europa, while Bernin returned to New York.

I have also found something about the 1905 Cuba race meeting...

#16 fines

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 15:42

Thanks, Marc!

Originally posted by Marcor
I have also found something about the 1905 Cuba race meeting...

Waiting in an.......................................................ticipation!

#17 Marcor

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Posted 30 September 2003 - 01:18

The Belgian newspaper LE MATIN (not to be mistaken for the Parisian newspaper LE MATIN) seems indeed a very interesting source

After the Ormond Beach Speed Meeting (short sum up each day), the newspaper published the entry list of the Cuba race on Thursday 14 February 1905:
O. E. Thomas, 80 HP De Dietrich, driver = Fletcher
Colonel Millers, 40 HP Renault, driver = Joe Tracy
Marx, 90 HP Mercedes, driver = Joseph Birks
Conill, 90 HP Mercedes, driver = Ernesto Carricaburu
Mendoza, 40 HP De Dietrich, driver = E. Robinson.

Robinson is said to be the mechanic of O. E. Thomas.

On Wednesday 15th, February they gave the results of the 100 miles race:
1- Carricaburu, 1h 50m 53s 1/5
2- Tracy, 1h 52m 26s
3- Robinson, 2h 30m 16s 4/5
4- Birk, Mercedes, 2h 34m 25s 1/5

#18 Marcor

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Posted 11 October 2003 - 13:32

Here some infos about the 883 miles Delhy-Bombay event, from Automobile Véloce (French publication) and Le Matin (Belgian newspaper)
Around September 1904, The Motor Union of Western India announced a new motorsport contest for December 1904 / January 1905, a 8-days reliability trials, not a speed event (as the maximim speed would be 30 mph).
1st day, December 26th, 1904: Delhi - Agra, 128 miles
2nd day, December 27th, 1904: Agra - Cwalior, 71 miles
3rd day, December 28th, 1904: Cwalior - Goona, 127 miles
4th day, December 29th, 1904: Goona - Sarangpur, 94 miles
5th day, December 30th, 1904: Sarangpur - Indore, 74 miles
6th day, December 31th, 1904: Indore - Dhulia, 145 miles
7th day, January 1st, 1905: Dhulia - Nasik, 97 miles
8th day, January 2nd, 1905: Nasik - Bombay, 147 miles.

The result was only for amateurs, ie each entry was to be made by the owner of the car.

From le Matin (November 1904)
Cars expected / promised : Darracq, Richard-Brasier, Bayard-Clément, de Dietrich, de Dion-Bouton, F.I.A.T., Mercedes and some british cars...

#19 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 12 October 2003 - 03:35

Marc - Thanks a lot! :up:

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#20 Doug Nye

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Posted 12 October 2003 - 14:43

'La France Automobile' January 6, 1905 page 5 first reported that the 1,417 kilometre Delhi-Bombay event began from Delhi on December 26, staging to Agra, then December 27 Agra to Gwalior etc as Marc has found... 38 entries took the start to compete for trophies presented by the rajahs of the various cities, towns and regions encountered. Victory fell to a 24hp Dietrich driven by a M. Sorel, who won the Gatewar of Baroda Cup presented for the greatest number of points scored in each of the different classes - no clue as to the scoring system applied...

Fine performances were claimed for De Dion-Bouton cars which won the Maharajah of Mysore's trophy for the machine finishing in the best condition - plus the Maharajah of Kapurthala Cup for the car which had achieved the most 'regular' performance in each of the eight stages.

A Darracq was victiorious in the 'concours d'endurance' - while a Speedwell won the Maharajah of Gwalior Cup for best fuel economy.

DCN

#21 Ray Bell

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Posted 13 October 2003 - 08:32

Is it true that the Maharajah of Maccador's prize was 10,000 camels and maybe more?

And were there rubies and pearls, and some beautiful girls, along with lessons on how to do the rhumba?

#22 KJJ

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 23:33

Some more prizes from the Times of January 3rd 1905: Mr Jeremiah Lyons's cup for the most reliable car costing under £500 to a Darracq; the Times of India consolation prize to a Wolseley. Surprisingly the Nawab of Rampur's trophy "for the absence of noise and vibration and ease in manipulation" was awarded to a Fiat car and not to one of Ray's beautiful dancing girls.

#23 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 18:40

Interesting that the 1905 AAA National Championship was never mentioned in this thread. As several others have done before me -- possibly far better than my very modest efforts, I have managed to nose around and find considerable information on this topic. Another gap in our knowledge slowly being filled in....

#24 Darren Galpin

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 08:40

You tantalise us Don...... I've seen mention of it in US papers of the time, but I'm still looking at 1906 at the moment. 1905 was the next year to go through.

#25 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 09:43

Some years ago, John Printz made mention of a possible national championship conducted by the AAA Racing Board, but I am not sure that many were given the details of this championship by Printz. I know that I was really unaware of the details unfairly fairly recently.

Elsewhere in the world, Allan E Brown made mention of this championship and had Mark Dill provide him with some information on it. Here is what Dill gave Brown as the schedule:

June 10 - Morris Park, Bronx, NY
June 16 - Charter Oak, Hartford, MA
June 17 - Charter Oak, Hartford, MA
June 21 - Baltimore, MD (either Pimlico or Electric Park)
June 24 - Philadelphia, PA (either Point Breeze or Elmwood)
July 3 - Morris Park, Bronx, NY
July 4 - Morris Park, Bronx, NY
July 22 - Empire City, Yonkers, NY
Aug 1 - Grand Rapids Fairgrounds, MI (later called Grand Rapids Speedrome)
Aug 2 - Grand Rapids Fairgrounds, MI
Aug 4 - Detroit, MI (either Fairgrounds, Grosse Pointe or Highland Park)
Aug 5 - Detroit, MI (either Fairgrounds, Grosse Pointe or Highland Park)
Aug 11 - Glenville Driving Track, Cleveland, OH
Aug 12 - Glenville Driving Track, Cleveland, OH
Aug 18 - Keniworth Park, Buffalo, NY
Sep 4 - Readville, Boston, MA
Sep 9 - Narragansett Park, Providence, RI
Sep 23 - Morris Park, Bronx, NY
Sep 29 - Poughkeepsie, NY
Sep 30 - Empire City, Yonkers, NY

I have managed to find the following events for the national championship with the references for those events:

10 June, Morris Park -- New York Times 11 June 1905

16 June, Hartford, Charter Oak Park -- Washington Post 17 June 1905

17 June, Hartford, Charter Oak Park -- Boston Globe 18 June 1905; Washington Post 18 June 1905

26 June, Empire City -- New York Times 27 June 1905

28 June, Brunots Island -- 29 June 1905 Boston Globe; 29 June 1905 Chicago Tribune

29 June, Brunots Island -- 30 June 1905 Washington Post; 30 June Chicago Tribune.

3 July, Morris Park -- New York Times 4 July 1905; Atlanta Constitution 4 July 1905; Boston Globe 4 July 1905

4 July, Morris Park -- New York Times 5 July 1905; Washington Post 5 July 1905

7 August, Detroit, Grosse Pointe -- Atlanta Constitution 8 August 1905; Washington Post 8 August 1905

8 August, Detroit, Grosse Point -- Boston Globe 9 August; Washington Post 9 August 1905; Atlanta Constitution 9 August 1905; New York Times 9 August 1905

14 August, Cleveland -- Atlanta Constitution 15 August 1905; Washington Post 15 August 1905

18 August, Buffalo -- Chicago Tribune 19 August 1905; Boston Globe 19 August 1905; Los Angeles Times 19 August 1905; New York Times 19 August 1905; Washington Post 19 August 1905

19 August, Buffalo -- Washington Post 20 August 1905; Boston Globe 20 August 1905; New York Times 20 August 1905

9 September, Boston, Readville -- Boston Globe 10 September 1905; Washington Post 10 September 1905

23 September, Providence, Narragansett -- Boston Globe 24 September 1905

29 September, Poughkeepsie, Duchess County Fair -- New York Times 30 September 1905; Boston Globe 30 September 1905

I have been unable to find any articles on Grand Rapids event, nor the possible Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Empire City (30 Sept.) events that would tie them to the AAA national championship. Doesn't mean that they didn't happen -- the direction I am currently leaning in, I just haven't been to find information to confirm that they took place.

Unfortunately, I don't have access to any of the journals of the day, such as The Automobile, something which might help a great bit, especially since Dill mentions that there was coverage of the events in several of the journals.

This championship has been the topic of at least two discussions elsewhere and has generated a good bit of information, but -- as usual, alas! -- not much interest. I have little hope that the same will not happen here.

I have to tip my hat to John Printz, Allan Brown, Mark Dill, Brian Pratt, Phil Harms, and several others for taking the time to dredge this stuff up. I managed to pore through the various newspaper files I had access to and found more information that I ever hoped for on this. It took some digging and there was a lot of frustration, but the information was there, right under our noses.

The only place which seems to have addressed this recently is champcarstats.com which lays out one view of the championship and the appropriate tables.

I simply have not had the time to pull all the race reports together and do a "season review" for 1905, but it was quite a season and one that helps put several forces in American racing into both context and a better perspective. As always, you can't understand 1905 without looking at 1904 and 1906, for starters.....

#26 Darren Galpin

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 09:58

Thanks Don. Those references will help to pint out anything that I am missing when I start to take a look at this.

#27 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 12:49

This topic of the 1905 AAA National Championship brings to mind this old posting on Revisionism and the recent discussions on the 1920 AAA National Chamionship. I hope that we may have put to rest the notion that there were actually "two" champions in 1920 -- the burden of proof is now on those supporting the Milton championship. I think they have a serious challenge since the evidence seems to clearly point in the direction of Gaston Chevrolet.

It makes me sad to comment that I am unaware of any journal or commentator noting the centennial of the first AAA national championship. Nor was there exactly a groundswell of coverage for the W.K. Vanderbilt Jr. Cup last year.

Well, Barney Oldfield being the first AAA National Champion is as ironic a thing as I can imagine.... little wonder that the AAA Racing Board and later the Contest Board ever said much about it!

#28 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 12:55

Rutt row -- something wrong with the link! It should have been this link to Revisionism not the other one.... Sorry, I have no idea how that happened, probably a headspace and timing problem.

#29 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 02:43

And now we have these events nominated for the 1905 AAA Championship by Jimmy Piaget:

1. St. Louis 3 (USA) Delmar 3 (May 7) ? ( ? / ? )
2. New York 5 (USA) Morris Park 3 (May 20) ? ( ? / ? )
3. Chicago 10 (USA) Harlem 3 (May 30) ? ( ? / ? )
4. Cream City 5 (USA) Milwaukee-West Ellis 3 (Jun 2) Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
5. Hartford 5 (USA) 3 (Jun 17) Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
6. Pittsburgh 10 (USA) Brunots Island 3 (Jun 28) ? ( ? / ? )
7. Minneapolis 5 (USA) St. Paul-Hamline 3 (Jul 5) Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
8. Grosse Pointe 5 (USA) 3 (Aug 11) ? ( ? / ? )
9. Buffalo 5 (USA) Kenilworth 3 (Aug 19) Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
10. Readville 5 (USA) 3 (Sep 9) Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
11. Springfield (USA) 3 Barney Oldfield (Peerless)
12. Syracuse (USA) 3 Barney Oldfield (Peerless)


Plus, Darren Galpin has the following events containing championship rounds:

Morris Park, NY, 10th June 1905
Charter Oak, Hartford, CT, 16th-17th June 1905
Brunots Island, PA, 28th-29th June 1905
Morris Park, NY, 3rd-4th July 1905
Grosse Pointe, MI, 7th-11th August 1905
Glenville Driving Track, OH, 12th August 1905
Kenilworth, Buffalo, NY, 18th-19th August 1905
Hyde Park, MA, 9th September 1905
Narragansett Park, RI, 23rd September 1905

Right now, I would venture to suggest that the following are most likely the events which comprised the national championship:

10 June, Morris Park -- Louis Chevrolet
17 June, Hartford, Charter Oak Park -- Barney Oldfield
26 June, Empire City -- Louis Chevrolet
28 June, Brunots Island -- Barney Oldfield
29 June, Brunots Island -- Louis Chevrolet
4 July, Morris Park -- Webb Jay
8 August, Detroit, Grosse Point -- Webb Jay
14 August, Cleveland -- Charley Burman
19 August, Buffalo -- Barney Oldfield
9 September, Boston, Readville -- Barney Oldfield
23 September, Providence, Narragansett -- Barney Oldfield
29 September, Poughkeepsie, Duchess County Fair -- Barney Oldfield

#30 gerrit stevens

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 23:17

Originally posted by HDonaldCapps

Right now, I would venture to suggest that the following are most likely the events which comprised the national championship:

10 June, Morris Park -- Louis Chevrolet
17 June, Hartford, Charter Oak Park -- Barney Oldfield
26 June, Empire City -- Louis Chevrolet
28 June, Brunots Island -- Barney Oldfield
29 June, Brunots Island -- Louis Chevrolet
4 July, Morris Park -- Webb Jay
8 August, Detroit, Grosse Point -- Webb Jay
14 August, Cleveland -- Charley Burman
19 August, Buffalo -- Barney Oldfield
9 September, Boston, Readville -- Barney Oldfield
23 September, Providence, Narragansett -- Barney Oldfield
29 September, Poughkeepsie, Duchess County Fair -- Barney Oldfield


Most of these races are also listed on
http://www.champcarstats.com/.


However the Empire City and Poughkeepsie results are not listed. I can't find them either on the files I got from Phil Harms.

Do you have details of these races.


Gerrit Stevens

#31 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 03:19

Originally posted by gerrit stevens
Most of these races are also listed on
http://www.champcarstats.com/.


However the Empire City and Poughkeepsie results are not listed. I can't find them either on the files I got from Phil Harms.

Do you have details of these races.


Gerrit,

I am working on something that I will post here as soon as I can. My major problem is that I am working without having any information from either The Automobile or Motor Age for the 1905 season. I think Horseless Age stopped covering motor racing after a big flap over the 1904 Vanderbilt Cup.

I will endeavor to provide -- in the old RVM style -- some idea of what I have and where it seems to fit into what others -- such as the listing that Phil provided to you -- have generated on this topic. Needless to say, it is a bit of a mess at the moment.

I will try to post it here as soon as I get the time to double-check some items and sort a few things out.

Don

#32 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 17:50

If Rear View Mirror were still around, I might spin all this into an article, but since it isn't, here is the latest information that I have dredged up on the 1905 AAA national championship:

The American Automobile Association National Motor Car Championship for 1905

*********************************************

Los Angeles Times, 14 May 1905, page III 3.
“The American Automobile Association will hold its first national championship track meet at Morris Park, New York City, July 3 and 4, its special committee having completed final arrangements with the Morris Park Motor Racing Club, the president of which is Dave Hennen Morris, who is also the president of the Automobile Club of America.“
“Races will be provided for all classes of cars, and many of the contests will carry a championship title.”

The Automobile, 18 May 1905, page 629.

Boston Globe, 21 May 1905, page 10.
“Announcement by the Automobile Association Racing Board Regarding 1905 Championship.
New York, May 20. Robert Lee Morrell, chairman of the American automobile association racing board, announced today that the track motor car championship of 1905 will be decided on the national circuit by a point score. In order to become eligible for the championship series an entrant must obligate himself to compete at all circuit meets as long as the point score places him in first or second position in the championship table. The current dates include:
June 10 – Morris Park, New York city
June 16 and 17, Hartford, Conn. Hartford athletic club
July 3 and 4, Amateur athletic association meet, Morris park, New York
July 24, Empire City track, New York
Sept. 4, Boston, Athletic club
Sept. 9, Providence, Athletic club
Sept. 23, Morris park, New York
Sept. 30, Empire City track, New York.”

*********************************************

Morris Park
Bronx, New York
10 June 1905
4 laps of 1.39-mile track for 5.56 miles

Morris Park Motor Racing Club

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J. S. Miller, Fiat 90
4 laps, 4 min 48.8 sec, 62.3 mph

2nd, Dan Wurgis
Reo Motor Car Company, Reo 32 Bird
4 laps, 5 min 30.0 sec, 54.5 mph

3rd, Guy Vaughn
Decauville Automobile Company, Decauville 40
2 laps, gasoline feed

Major C.J.S. Miller
Major C.J.S. Miller, Renault
Withdrawn

Boston Globe, 4 June 1905, page 31.
“The proposed 500-mile on the Morris Park track next Saturday has been abandoned. In the meet to be held there that day will be a circuit championship at five miles….”
New York Times, 11 June 1905, page 12.
“Three cars started in the five-mile championship, the first of the National circuit events of the season.”

Notes:
Major C.J.S. Miller just acquired the Renault 90 owned by William Wallace and driven by Wallace in the 1904 Vanderbilt Cup and by Chevrolet at Morris Park on 20 May.
Attendance: “About 3,000 persons saw the races…” (NYT, 11 June 1905, pg. 12)

*********************************************

Charter Oak Park
Hartford, Connecticut
17 June 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Hartford Automobile Club

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
5 laps, 5 min 01.4 sec, walkover

Washington Post, 17 June 1905, page 8.
Boston Globe, 18 June 1905, page 17.
“An exciting exhibition was given by Oldfield later in the afternoon. He responded for the championship race, five miles, for the A.A.A. national championship trophy, and was given the race in a walkover, thus securing four points.”
Washington Post, 18 June 1905, page 6.
The AAA national championship. Won by Oldfield. Time by miles, 1;02, 2:01 2-5, 3:01 1-5, 4:01 2-5, 5:01 2-5.”

Notes:
Attendance: 3,000
“What promised to be the star racing event, a pursuit race between Barney Oldfield in his Peerless Green Demon and Louis Chevrolet in the mammoth F.I.A.T. racing machine proved a fizzle. Oldfield, at the tape, started on the pistil signal, but the Frenchman’s car remained at the half-mile pole as if anchored. The second speed gear was stripped in going to the post, and the car was out of commission for the afternoon.” (BG, 18 June 1905, pg. 17)

///////////////////////////////////
Free-for-All Event
16 June 1905

Heat No. 1
1 lap of 1.0-mile track for 1.0 miles

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
1 lap, 1 min 03.4 sec

2nd, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
1 lap, 1 min 05 sec

Heat No. 2
1 lap of 1.0-mile track for 1.0 miles

Results
1st, Charles Soules
Pope-Toledo 30
1 lap, 1 min 08 sec

2nd, A.M. Roberts
Thomas Flyer
1 lap, flagged

Final
1 lap of 1.0-mile track for 1.0 miles

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
1 lap, 1 min 03 sec

2nd, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
1 lap, 1 min 04.8 sec
(WP, 17 June 1905, pg. 8)

*********************************************

Empire City
Yonkers, New York
26 June 1905

Heat No. 1
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Webb Jay
White Steam Car Whistling Billy
5 laps, 4 min 58 sec

2nd, Paul Satori
Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Fiat 90
5 laps, 5 min


Heat No. 2
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
5 laps

2nd, Montague Roberts
Harry S. Houpt, Thomas 60
Tire trouble

Final
10 laps of 1.0-mile track for 10.0 miles

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
10 laps, walkover

2nd, Webb Jay
White Steam Car
3 laps, engine

New York Times, 27 June 1905, page 6.
“Louis Chevrolet carried off the honors of the day yesterday in the automobile races at the Empire City track, which had been postponed from Saturday. He won the third event in the series of National motor-car championships, and also triumphed over Barney Oldfield in the special two-thousand dollar match race arranged as the big feature of the meet.”
“National Motor Car Championship.”

Notes:
Attendance: “Nearly 2,000 persons gathered to see the big men whiz around the track.” (NYT, 27 June 1905, pg. 6)


*********************************************

Brunot Island
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
28 June 1905

Pittsburgh Automobile Club

Heat No. 1
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Earl Kiser
Winton Bullet
5 laps, 4 min 44.4 sec

2nd, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
5 laps, flagged

Heat No. 2
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
5 laps, 4 min 50.2 sec

2nd, Earl Kiser
Winton Bullet
0 laps, broke down

Boston Globe, 29 June 1905, page 8.
Chicago Tribune, 29 June 1905, page 10.


Brunot Island
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
29 June 1905
10 laps of 1.0-mile track for 10.0 miles

Results
1st, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
10 laps, 9 min 53.4 sec

2nd, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
10 laps, flagged

Washington Post, 30 June 1905, page 9.
“The closing day of the National Motor Championship races at Brunot’s Island track….”
“In the ten-mile championship free-for-all, Oldfield led up to the two and one-half-mile turn, when the Green Dragon’s engine went bad, and before Oldfield could get going again Chevrolet was three-quarters of a mile in the lead, which he maintained to the finish.”

Chicago Tribune, 30 June 1905, page 10.
“Kiser’s machine was so badly damaged yesterday he could not enter today.”

Notes:
“In the 10-mile free-for-all with Oldfield and Chevrolet competing, the former led for four and a half miles, when one of his rear tires burst. Chevrolet then took the lead and made the 10 miles in 10 minutes flat.” (BG, 29 June 1905, pg. 8)
Track owner: Gentleman’s Driving Association


*********************************************

Morris Park
Bronx, New York
4 July 1905
1 lap of 1.39-mile track for 1.39 miles; originally scheduled for 4 laps of 1.39-mile track for 5.56 miles

Morris Park Motor Racing Club

Results
1st, Webb Jay
White Steam Car Whistling Billy
1 lap, walkover

2nd, Louis Chevrolet
Major C.J.S. Miller, Fiat 90
Did not start – cracked cylinder

Los Angeles Times, 2 July 1905, page III 1.
“The big cars entered for the national circuit championship include Webb Jay (White Steamer), Walter Christie, with his new 120-horsepower front and rear driver racer; Paul Satori with Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt’s ninety-horsepower Fiat; Louis Chevrolet, with Maj. C.J.S. Miller’s ninety-horsepower Fiat; Dan Wurgis, with the Reo Bird; W/Gould Brokaw, sixty-horsepower Renault; and Guy Vaughn with his Decauville, which holds the 1000-mile record.”
“The programme for the second day includes…the national circuit championship, open to all, at four laps.”

Boston Globe, 4 July 1905, page 8.
“While driving a 90-horsepower car in the heavyweight championship race, Paul Satori dashed through a fence, fatally injuring a boy named Joseph Holahan who was looking on, but escaped unhurt himself.”

New York Times, 4 July 1905, page 4.

Washington Post, 5 July 1905, page 9.
“The first event was the National Circuit Championship, free for all, four laps, 5.56 miles. Webb Jay and Louis Chevrolet were the only starters, but at the last moment the latter’s engine broke down and Jay took the race by default.”

New York Times, 5 July 1905, page 8.
“Owing to the cracking of a cylinder in Chevrolet’s car as he was to start in the National Circuit Championship, Jay won in a walkover, going once over the course.”

Elyria, Ohio, Elyria Reporter, 5 July 1905, page 2.


*********************************************

Grosse Pointe
Detroit, Michigan
8 August 1905

Detroit Automobile Racing Association

Atlanta Constitution, 8 August 1905, page 9.
Washington Post, 8 August 1905, page 8.

Atlanta Constitution, 9 August 1905, page 8.
“After the accident had broken up the five mile event, Jay and Burman drove a five mile race instead, which Jay won in 5:21.”

Boston Globe, 9 August 1905, page 8.
“Barney Oldfield had an almost miraculous escape from death today at Grosse Point track, when Dan Wurgis’ machine came into collision with Oldfield’s car in the three-quarter stretch, during the first mile of the five-mile open event.”
“After the accident had broken up the five-mile open event, Jay and Burman drove a five-mile race in its stead, which Jay won in 5:12 2-5.”

Washington Post, 9 August 1905, page 9.
“Five-mile open - $150 purse; unfinished, owing to accident. Entries were as follows: Barney Oldfield, Cleveland; Webb Jay, Cleveland; Dan Wurgis, Lansing; Charles Burman, Cleveland.”

New York Times, 9 August 1905, page 4.
“Five-mile Open, $150 purse, unfinished owing to accident.”

Notes:
8 August 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Webb Jay
White Steam Car Whistling Billy
5 laps, 5 min 21 sec

2nd, Charles “Charley” Burman
Peerless
5 laps, 5 min 28 sec

Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
Crashed on first lap, did not restart

Dan Wurgis
Reo 32 Bird
Crashed on first lap, did not restart

Ten-mile Open
7 August 1905
10 laps of 1.0-mile track

1st, Webb Jay
White Steam Car Whistling Billy
10 laps, 9 min 36.6 sec

2nd, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
10 laps, flagged
(AC, 8 August 1905, pg. 9; WP, 8 August 1905, pg. 8)


*********************************************

Glenville Driving Track
Cleveland, Ohio
14 August 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Cleveland Automobile Club

Results
1st, Charles “Charley” Burman
Peerless
5 laps, 5 min 15.8 sec

2nd, Herbert Lytle
Pope-Toledo
5 laps, flagged

3rd, Webb Jay
White Steam Car Whistling Billy
Flagged

4th, Dan Wurgis
Reo Bird
Flagged

Atlanta Constitution, 15 August 1905, page 9.
“The five-mile national championship was won by Burman.”

Washington Post, 15 August 1905, page 9.
“After three of the regular events and a special exhibition by Barney Oldfield had been completed this afternoon, the remainder of the race meeting of the Cleveland Automobile Club were declared off on account of rain.”
“The five-mile national championship was won by Burman, Lytle and Jay having trouble with their cars, which caused Burman, who was third at the end of the third mile, to shoot ahead and win practically without opposition.”
“Five miles – National championship: free-for-all; $150 trophy. Charles Burman, Cleveland, won; H.H. Lytle, Toledo, second. Time 5:15 4-5. Webb Jay, Cleveland, and Dan Wurgis, Detroit, also started.”

*********************************************

Kenilworth Park
Buffalo, New York
19 August 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Buffalo Automobile Club

1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
5 laps, 4 min 52.6 sec

2nd, Montague Roberts
Thomas
5 laps, 4 min 58 sec

Chicago Tribune, 19 August 1905, page 1.
Boston Globe, 19 August 1905, page 2.
Los Angeles Times, 19 August 1905, page II 3.
New York Times, 19 August 1905, page 4.
Washington Post, 19 August 1905, page 1.
Articles on Webb Jay’s accident

Washington Post, 20 August 1905, page S 1.
“Barney Oldfield won the national championship for five miles in his green dragon. Montague Roberts was second. Oldfield’s time was 4:52 3-5.”

New York Times, 20 August 1920, page 8.
“Barney Oldfield won the National championship for five miles in his green dragon. Montague Roberts was second. Oldfield’s time was 4:52 3-5.”

Boston Globe, 20 August 1905, page 9.
Los Angeles Times, 20 August 1905, page III 1.
Winnipeg Free Press, 21 August 1905.

*********************************************

Hyde Park
Readville, Massachusetts
9 September 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Bay State Automobile Association

Heat No. 1
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless 60 Green Dragon
5 laps, 4 min 55.2 sec

2nd, Emanuel Cedrino
Fiat 24
Flagged


Heat No. 2
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Frank Durbin
Stanley Steamer 20 Runabout
5 laps, 5 min 45.2 sec

2nd, J.A. Crowell
Stanley Steamer 15
Flagged

Final
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless 60 Green Dragon
5 laps, 4 min 52 sec

2nd, Emanuel Cedrino
Fiat 24 Junior
5 laps, 4 min 58 sec

3rd, Frank Durbin
Stanley Steamer 20 Runabout
5 flagged, flagged

J.A. Crowell
Stanley Steamer 15
Did not transfer from the heats

Boston Globe, 31 August 1905, page 14.
“The Bay State A.A. yesterday gave out its entries for the races to be held at Readville on Labor Day.”
“Five miles, national championship:
Frank Durbin, Stanley
Barney Oldfield, Peerless
Manuel Cedriano, Fiat
J.A. Crowell, Stanley
George Otis Draper, Stanley
W.L. Hilliard, Napier
Ralph Coburn, Maxwell”

Boston Globe, 3 September 1905, page 18.
“W.S. Hilliard, the Boston driver who sent the Napier racing up Mt. Washington in record time is also entered.”
“Of the five-mile events the one for the national championship should be very good. The race is insisted upon at all the meets by the A.A.A. so that when the season ends the cars may graded according to the points they have won. There are seven entries, all with good cars, and there will be some good maneuvering to win out.”

New York Times, 3 September 1905, page 10.
New York Times, 3 September 1905, page 11.

New York Times, 10 September 1905, page 10.
“National Championship, Five Miles – First Heat – Won by Barney Oldfield, 60 horse power; E. Cedrino second. Time – 4:55 1-5.
Second Heat – Won by Frank Durbin, 20 horse power; J.A. Crowell second. Time – 5:45 1-5.
Final Heat – Won by Oldfield, Cedrino second, Durbin third. Time – 4:52.”

Washington Post, 10 September 1905, page 4.
“The best events of the day were the races for the national championship, for which points were given the winners for the final summary at the close of the year, and the contest for the silver trophy. Oldfield won the first without difficulty, taking his heat and the finals without being headed. In the final heat he led Cedriano by a quarter of a mile at the finish.”

*********************************************

Narragansett Park
Granston, Rhode Island
23 September 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
5 laps, 4 min 43 sec

2nd, Emanuel Cedrino
Fiat 24
5 laps, flagged

Boston Globe, 24 September 1905, page 16.
“The national championship race between Oldfield and Cedriano was easily the feature. Oldfield had the worst of the start, but overcame the Italian’s lead in the first mile, and won by nearly three-eighths of a mile.”

*********************************************

Hudson River Driving Park
Dutchess County Fair Grounds
Poughkeepsie, New York
29 September 1905
5 laps of 1.0-mile track for 5.0 miles

Results
1st, Barney Oldfield
Peerless Motor Car Company, Peerless Green Dragon
5 laps, 5 min 50.6 sec

2nd, Dan Wurgis
Reo 32 Bird
Flagged

3rd, Frank Ridgeway
Peerless 60
Flagged

New York Times, 30 September 1905, page 10.
“The closing day of the Dutchess County Fair brought together 20,000 people at the Hudson River Driving Park, who were intensely interested in the Grand Circuit automobile races, which were run off over a perfect track and under auspicious weather conditions.”

Boston Globe, 30 September 1905, page 3.
“Five-mile national championship, open to all: first prize $150, second prize $60 – Won by Barney Oldfield (50-h.p. Peerless; Dan Wurgis (32-h.p. Reo), second; Frank Ridgeway (35-h.p. Peerless), third. Time, 5m. 50, 3-5s.”

*********************************************

Standings:

22 points, Barney Oldfield
16 points, Louis Chevrolet
7 points, Webb Jay
4 points, Dan Wurgis & Charles Burman & Emanuel Cedrino
2 points, Herbert Lytle & Montague Roberts
1 point, Guy Vaughn & Frank Durbin & Frank Ridgeway



#33 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 26 December 2005 - 16:27

Sorry, this got left out:

New York Times, 21 May 1905, page 11.
“Motor Car Championship
Will Be Based on Points Won in National Circuit Race Meets
An important decision regarding the motor car championship for 1905 has just been determined by the Racing Committee of the American Automobile Association. The championship will be decided on the point system, and the race upon which the points will be based will be the free-for-all contest. It is stipulated that this event must be not less than five miles nor more then ten miles in length. The winning car will receive four points, the second two points, and the third one point.
These points for the championship will be awarded in the National circuit meet, as sanctioned by the American Automobile Association. Not all the meets will necessarily be in the National circuit, as several of the local track contests are not in the circuit. The circuit automobile racing dates, as at present, are:
June 10 – Morris Park, New York City; June 16-17 – Hartford, Conn.; June 21 – Baltimore, Md.; June 24 – Philadelphia, Penn.; June 28-29 – Pittsburgh; July 3-4 – A.A. Meet, Morris Park; July 22 – Empire City track; Aug. 1-2 – Grand Rapids, Mich.; Aug. 11-12 – Cleveland; Aug. 18-19 – Buffalo; Aug. 26 – To be granted; Sept. 4 – Boston; Sept. 9 – Providence; Sept. 23 – Morris Park; Sept. 29 – Poughkeepsie; Sept. 30 – Empire City track.”



#34 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 26 December 2005 - 22:36

Don - Thank you very much. I appriciate this obscure information you are sharing with the interested audience.  ;)

#35 humphries

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 11:34

Don

Like Hans, I value the information you have uncovered. Thanks.

John

#36 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 12:10

Actually, there is much more, especially in the aftermath of the championship and particularly what the AAA did during 1906 and the following seasons....

But, that is another story....

#37 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 14:17

Well, at any rate, maybe there is now sufficent evidence to include this national championship among those that the AAA supported in 1916 and from 1920 (I assume we all agree that it was Gaston Chevrolet that year, correct?) to 1941 and from 1946 (again, I assume we all agree that there were only six championship events that season, right?) until 1955.

#38 fines

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 14:20

Well done, Don, but there were definitely more than six championship races in 1946...

#39 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 14:56

Originally posted by fines
Well done, Don, but there were definitely more than six championship races in 1946...


Michael, Don't tell me, prove it. Don

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#40 fines

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 18:02

Don, buy the Buzz Rose Sprint Car books, "Kings of the Hills" and "The Eastern Bullrings" - it's all in there. Also, all contemporary reports I have found, including a facsimile of a 1946 mag on the web (I believe it was in Rumbledrome's Ted Horn story, so you should be able to find it) make it clear that all AAA sanctioned races counted for the championship. Actually, I think it's on you to prove your theory.

I was preparing a post for my old thread for when I am going online again, but it appears this will take a bit more time. I actually enjoy life w/o the net! :)

#41 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 18:33

Michael,

They may have all counted towards some championship -- Eastern, Midwest, whatever -- but it seems that only six may have counted towards the National Championship. Should I simply disregard the 1946 AAA annual as being wrong?

Also, Speed Age May 1947, states on page 22, "To date eleven national championship races, including the 500-mile Indianapolis Speedway classisc, have been scheduled. This is nearly twice the number run during 1946."

Also, on page 27 of the same issue of Speed Age the following can be found:

AAA Drivers Took Home Over $300,000

The 3600 miles of dirt track and championship events under the AAA sanction paid off at the rate of $84.50 a mile for a total of $304,432 last year, according to statistics released by Col. Arthur W. Herrington, chairman of the contest board.

There were 177 racing cars, 193 drivers and 254 mechanics registered by the board last year, while 469 temporary permits were issued. Six championship events and 71 dirt track races were held, with 21 others rained out.


The ball is back in your court, Michael.

#42 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 20:04

The idea for the 1905 Motor Car Championship apparently originated with Dave Hennen Morris and was presented to the AAA Racing Board in April 1905, soon after the new chairman, Robert Lee Morrell, came on board. This has been garnered from page 12 of the 25 April 1905 issue of the New York Times.

Naturally, this and so other information I have found now means that I do a re-write of my 1905 article....

#43 john glenn printz

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 13:07

My remarks on the 1905 AAA Championship are contained in the CART NEWS MEDIA GUIDE 1985, page 267, not in RACER magazine.

#44 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 11:10

As I am away from my reference materials at the moment, I don't have access to that issue of the CART Media Guide. Does your account differ from what I managed to find by combing the contemporary sources?

#45 john glenn printz

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 16:55

1905 season. My statements on the 1905 AAA Championship contained in the 1985 CART NEW MEDIA GUIDE, page 267, are brief and cursory, i.e. hardly more than one paragraph. However I had three reasons for including them in the 1985 CART guide. First off, this is the first time a series of motor races crowned a championship driver using a "point" system. Secondly, all knowledge of this 1905 AAA point Championship had faded out. I had never heard of it until Mr. McMaken informed me of this fact. And somewhat later Mr. Allen Brown, by chance, mentioned it to me as well. I was so astonished that Allen knew of it that I included his name in my brief writeup. And thirdly, I couldn't resist taking another poke at Catlin, who had never heard of the AAA 1905 Driver Championship either. Thus Russ didn't include it in his made up (c. 1951/52) "bogus" listing of the 1902 to 1908 AAA Driving Champions.

#46 john glenn printz

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 17:46

Catlin: The real origin of the 1902-1908 AAA National Driving Champions. When the AAA fiftiest anniversity was about to occur, in 1952, Mr. Russ Catlin got a brainstorm. Wouldn't it be wonderful if there existed AAA National Championship Drivers for every year that the AAA itself existed? The "fake" 1909 to 1915 and 1917 to 1919 AAA Championship seasons had long been considered canonical by the year 1951, and nobody remembered or knew (certainly not even by Catlin himself) that they were actually created and manufactured by Arthur Means and Val Haresnape in 1926/1927/1928. But it was obviously known in 1951, that the AAA had staged no racing events during 1942-45, so that these four years could not be filled in. So the only remaining missing years were 1902-1908. Catlin had already in 1951 changed the traditional 1909 Champion, Bert Dingley, and substituted George Robertson instead; and altered the 1920 AAA driving titlist from Gaston Chevrolet to Tommy Milton. And so Mr. Catlin, in 1951/52, simply added his own 1902-1908 picks and added them into the AAA record. Catlin's "new" or "AAA Champions" results for 1902-1908 were first published the Indianapolis 500 race program for 1952 in a one page article entitled AUTO RACING'S GOLDEN JUBILEE. Catlin is sited here as the Director of the AAA Contest Board News Bureau. Catlin acknowleges that the (or actually his) 1902 AAA titlists, Harry Harkness, and the 1903 AAA Champ, Barney Oldfield, were both "unofficial" AAA Champions, whatever that means in this context and/or 1902 and 1903. Russ goes on to say (quote), "But during the next few years, with one exception, the Vanderbilt Cup determined the championship." In the very next paragraph Catlin asserts that a AAA National Championship Title, based on the assignment of points, began in 1909. Nowhere does Mr. Catlin affirm or even hint that the 1902-1908 AAA driver champions now given, were just created or added by himself!

#47 john glenn printz

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 19:17

Catlin: The real origin of the 1902-1908 AAA National Driving Champions. (cont-2) In 1958 Charlie Brockman then the USAC Publicity Director, remembering that Russ had listed AAA Championship seasons back to 1902 in the 1952 Indianapolis program, incorporated those findings into the 1958 USAC Yearbook. And even later, in 1973, Dick Jordan, another USAC official, put them in Carl Hungness' first Indianapolis 500 Yearbook which covered the 1973 Indianapolis race. But every precious bit of American racing lore must be saved (!) and so both Brockman and Jordan preserved this valuable and priceless lore. I must say that I believe that neither Mr. Brockman, nor Mr. Jordan, knew anything at all about Catlin making up the whole AAA 1902-08 listing or reckonings in late 1951/early 1952, to celebrate the AAA's (50 year) Golden Jubilee. It was Mr. Ken McMaken, c. 1978/79, who notified me that the 1952 Indianapolis program is the oldest known reckoning of these 1902-08 AAA National Champions. Amen.

#48 Tony Kaye

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 21:54

Andrzej initiated this thread five years ago with a plea for information about a race held in Cuba in 1905. The entry and results were supplied by various contributors, but little more was available at that time. I have pieced together some more details which may fill some of the gaps.

1905 CITY OF HAVANA CUP RACE

The contest was run on Sunday February 12th 1905 over a distance of 160 kilometers - just two thirds of a mile short of 100 miles. It was billed as an international event, the first major motor race to be held in Cuba. The start was at the town of Arroyo Arenas, which is 13 miles southwest of the Cuban capital of Havana. From there the course ran to San Cristobal, where the cars were halted, before commencing their return run to Arroyo Arenas. The eastward run to San Cristobal was 79 ¼ kilometers, and the return 80 ¾ kilometers, which suggests that, at least in part, the two legs traversed different roads.

The local arrangements by the organizing club, the International Automobile Association of Cuba, were said to be excellent. The grandstands on both sides of the road near the start line seated a crowd of 2,500 persons, and thousands of others lined the road at many other points along the route. President Palma, members of the Cabinet, their families and various other Government officials occupied seats in the central boxes. The whole course was thoroughly patrolled by mounted infantry, police, and bicycle club members. Even Mother Nature obliged as the weather was fairly hot, with a gentle westerly breeze.

Six cars were expected to start, but a practice accident on the Friday before the race meant that E. R. Thomas’s ninety horsepower German car (most likely a Mercedes) had to be withdrawn. Thomas was among the spectators on race day having almost recovered from the injuries he sustained in the crash, but his ‘chauffeur’ E. D. Hawley was still in hospital, albeit on the mend.

The five remaining competitors started at ten-minute intervals in the following order:-
Joe Tracy Renault 30/40/60hp owner Major C.J.S.Miller
H.W.Fletcher de Dietrich 80hp owner O.F.Thomas
Joseph Birk Mercedes 40/90hp owner Louis Marx
Ernesto Carricaburu Mercedes 60/90hp owner E.K.Connelly
H.A.Robinson de Dietrich 35/40hp owner R.G. Mendoza

Only two of them were out-and-out racing cars, Fletcher’s mighty 80hp de Dietrich and Tracy’s little Paris-Madrid Renault, which was the lightest car in the race. Major Miller had bought the Renault from W. Gould Brokaw and hired Tracy as one of the most professional racers in America. The de Dietrich was the car which Gabriel had driven in the recent Vanderbilt Cup race on Long Island.

Incidentally, the various sources quote different horsepower ratings, all of which are included in the table above.

The cars started down a slight incline past the grandstands, which were situated a short distance beyond the starting line. Unfortunately the start was just out of the spectators’ line of vision. The ‘autoists’, as the drivers were referred to in the American press, then crossed a bridge and sped up a long hill, being in sight of the grandstands for quite a while after the start.

The starting procedure took about 45 minutes and one could imagine that once the five cars had disappeared on their way to San Cristobal, the crowds in the grandstands would have become restless. After all, it was a warm day and the cars were not due to return for several hours. Apparently this was not the case, as announcements of the times and progress of each car were telephoned promptly from all the villages along the route. This information was then announced from the judges’ stand to the spectators in the grandstands. These announcements were made in both Spanish and English as there was a large contingent of Americans in attendance.

Apart from that, there was much betting especially on the cars driven by Fletcher and Tracy, although before the start the three other cars, all owned by residents of Havana, had had their backers. In the days leading up to the race the Mercedes (?) of E.R.Thomas had been the popular favourite, but how the bookies handled its enforced withdrawal was not explained.

One tends to think of protests in motor racing as a fairly recent development. Not so. The de Dietrich driven by H.W. Fletcher had been over-filled with oil and as a result its engine refused to fire on the start line. Taking advantage of the slight downward slope, the car was pushed more than the entire length of the grandstand before it finally fired up. Major Miller, the owner of Tracy’s car, filed an official protest, which proved to be redundant as the de Dietrich was never in contention during the race.

On the outward leg and not long after the start, Fletcher’s de Dietrich suffered a puncture necessitating a lengthy wheel change. Apart from that, the first half of the race must have been fairly uneventful as the five cars finished at the San Cristobal checkpoint in the same order as they had started. Tracy, the fastest of the five, covered the distance in 51 minutes 22.6 seconds. Robinson’s de Dietrich was the slowest in 1 hour 17 minutes 1.8 seconds. Ernesto Carricaburu’s time in the Mercedes must have been very little more than Tracy’s.

The cars left San Cristobal in the same order as before. On the way back Fletcher had to make a number of stops for water and various repairs, including one of 36 minutes to solder a split in the de Dietrich’s fuel tank.(Last info courtesy Doug Nye.) The car finally completed the race a long way behind the other competitors, so much so that it failed to finish within the time limit. Another casualty of the return leg was the Renault of Joe Tracy. Towards the end of the race he was passing over a railway crossing when his battery shook loose and ended up into a nearby stream. They pulled it out and re-attached it to the car. At the same time the mechanic’s seat had also come loose. Then, within sight of the finish line, a fuel line broke. It was tied in place with a rag and they managed to finish the race.

Despite these mishaps, Tracy was the first to cross the finish line, his time for the second leg being 1 hour 1 minute and 3.4 seconds. At first it was believed that he had won, but Carricaburu, who started half an hour after Tracy, was gaining fast, his time in each village being announced to the excited spectators in the grandstands. All eyes were focussed on the top of the hill across the valley. When he sped down the long hill and up the narrow lane between the grandstands he was greeted with a roaring ovation. The band played the Cuban national anthem, and the ovation was repeated when the result was officially announced.. Carricaburu had covered the whole course in a little over a minute and a half less than Tracy.

Results:
1. Ernesto Carricaburu Mercedes 1.50’53.6” 53.7 mph
2. Joe Tracy Renault 1.52’06”
3. H.A.Robinson de Dietrich 2.30’16”
4. Joseph Birk Mercedes 2.34’25”
H.W.Fletcher de Dietrich outside time limit

Carricaburu’s average of 53.7 mph was slightly faster than the winning speed in the previous year’s Gordon Bennett and 6 mph faster than that year’s Vanderbilt Cup race. Admittedly both of these races were considerably longer, but against that their entry was much larger and consisted of purpose-built racing cars. Carricaburu’s victory was all the more impressive in that it was his very first motor race!

On the following Tuesday sprint races were held on a stretch of road between Guanajay and Artemis, thirty miles from Havana.

The overall race meeting was considered a great sporting success, but was conducted at some financial loss. Nonetheless, the International Automobile Club of Cuba decided to prepare for a larger meeting in 1906.

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#49 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 02:52

Tony - thank you for bringing the thread back on track and then with such an interesting story.

#50 humphries

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 09:16

Tony

As Hans says top-notch stuff. What would be the chance of an article like this appearing in Motor Sport?

John