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Journalistic 'noms de plume'


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#51 elansprint72

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 06:47

Hackpen.

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#52 Vitesse2

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 10:30

Still looking for 'Boanerges', 'Cyclops' (possibly 'Blick' Hodgson?), 'Auslander' and 'Overdrive' ...

Just bumping this, but I'd also now really, really, really like to know who 'Short Stroke' was. He took over from Walkerley in 1939 and wrote for The Motor throughout the war years.

It seems he may have perhaps been a staff writer for the magazine who moved (or doubled up) from another job there when 'Grande Vitesse' was called up. Alternatively, he might have been in a reserved occupation and just moonlighting. Circumstantially, he might also have been one of the Oxbridge set which rotated around Seaman, Martin, the Evanses, the Bolsters etc. In fact, thinking about it, could it have been JVB himself? "Motoring is My Business" makes no mention of the war years at all - quite understandable as he lost both his brother and his wife, of course.

Whoever 'Short Stroke' was, he seems to have been a great admirer - and possibly a close personal friend - of Dick Seaman. Although I realise that probably doesn't narrow it down much ...

Even inspired guesses would be useful, since most of the people I can think of were in the services.

Another one I'm hunting is 'Vizor' of The Autocar - again through the war years. Seems to be older (at least in his 40s or 50s) and definitely a sports car man.

#53 AAGR

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:09

Amazing how often the illustrious 'Harry Milne' wrote rally and even race reports for AUTOSPORT in the 1970s and 1980s. That, I can tell you, was merely a useful pseudonym for any of a host of writers who were otherwise contracted elsewhere, or had personal/PR reasons for not being identified by their real names.

'Harry Milne' has been retired for many years, I understand, but that sort of practice continues....

Oh yes, and am I not right, that the thoughts of the legendary 'Edgar Jessop' were usually collated by Ian Norris ?


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#54 Tim Murray

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:20

Oh yes, and am I not right, that the thoughts of the legendary 'Edgar Jessop' were usually collated by Ian Norris ?

Yes indeed - there were some nice reminiscences about both Ian and Edgar in the thread marking Ian's death:

Ian Norris

#55 jcdeleted

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 11:24

I'm fairly sure either Autocar or Motor, in the dim and distant, having a columnist rejoicing in the appalling sobriquet "Miles Pergallon". No idea who it was though.

#56 AAGR

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 14:10

Did you ever hear of 'Eric Neilsen' ? Karl might confirm this, but was this not Karl Ludvigsen's alter ego too ?

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#57 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 11:12

In the original post in this thread I mentioned 'Overdrive', who wrote for The Motor: I suspect that this may perhaps be Donald Parker, who wrote for Classic Cars and other publications in later years. Can anyone confirm or deny that?

NB: this is NOT Don Parker, the 500cc racer. Completely different person.

#58 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 16:54

Just bumping this, but I'd also now really, really, really like to know who 'Short Stroke' was. He took over from Walkerley in 1939 and wrote for The Motor throughout the war years.

It seems he may have perhaps been a staff writer for the magazine who moved (or doubled up) from another job there when 'Grande Vitesse' was called up. Alternatively, he might have been in a reserved occupation and just moonlighting. Circumstantially, he might also have been one of the Oxbridge set which rotated around Seaman, Martin, the Evanses, the Bolsters etc. In fact, thinking about it, could it have been JVB himself? "Motoring is My Business" makes no mention of the war years at all - quite understandable as he lost both his brother and his wife, of course.

Whoever 'Short Stroke' was, he seems to have been a great admirer - and possibly a close personal friend - of Dick Seaman. Although I realise that probably doesn't narrow it down much ...

Even inspired guesses would be useful, since most of the people I can think of were in the services.

Still looking for 'Short Stroke'! In "More Motor Racing" Rivers Fletcher refers to him as "a keen youngster." So probably not JVB. AAARRRGGGHHH!

Another one I'm hunting is 'Vizor' of The Autocar - again through the war years. Seems to be older (at least in his 40s or 50s) and definitely a sports car man.

But again thanks to Rivers' book, I've now found 'Vizor' :clap: It was HS Lindfield, who Rivers says was "in charge of road tests" in more normal times. I assume this is him - ex-RAF, ex-Royal Irish Constabulary:

http://theauxiliarie.../lindfield.html

Still with Rivers, 'Overdrive' appears to have been another portmanteau name: used by a combination of Laurence Pomeroy Junior and/or Bunny Tubbs at various points.

The short-lived successor to Hastings as 'The Blower' in Light Car was apparently Dennis May. Editor FJ 'Eric' Findon then took over what little sports news there was - so he was presumably 'The Scrutineer' (see post #37)

#59 Vitesse2

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 18:44

Just bumping this again in the hope that someone may have some clue on who 'Short Stroke' and/or 'Auslander' were!

 

The short-lived successor to Hastings as 'The Blower' in Light Car was apparently Dennis May. Editor FJ 'Eric' Findon then took over what little sports news there was - so he was presumably 'The Scrutineer' (see post #37)

Dennis May's tenure at Light Car was short because he went to work for Thomson & Taylor, who were making parts for Fairmile MTBs.

 

Source: Charles Mortimer - 'Brooklands and Beyond'.



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#60 Supersox

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 19:32

One Angus Wilson who wrote very occasionaly in Autosport years ago -and mostly contentiously- was Marcus Pye-his middle two names are indeed Angus Wilson hence MAWPs



#61 ReWind

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 06:42

I doubt that.

AFAIK MAWP is Marcus Alan Warren Pye.



#62 arttidesco

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 11:49

Wondering if any one knows who the "MJT" at MotorSport was ?

 

It appears he was a photographer, he also wrote a 50,000 mile road test report on a Porsche 911 in April 1970.



#63 Alan Cox

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:03

Wondering if any one knows who the "MJT" at MotorSport was ?

Michael Tee



#64 arttidesco

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:19

Muchos Gracias, Alan :up:  



#65 Vitesse2

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 15:18

I mentioned 'Cyclops' in an earlier post. He was Peter Chamberlain, author of the scurrilous 1937 motor racing novel Sing Holiday which, after several years of having it on my ABEbooks wants list, I have just finally managed to obtain a copy of. Rarer than rocking horse poo!

 

I'm still looking for 'Short Stroke' and 'Auslander' ...



#66 P.Dron

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 16:47

A few months before Rodney Walkerly died (late 1970s or early 1980s, I forget), on a Motor magazine group test to Wales, four staff members including me stopped in Tewkesbury and took him to lunch. He seemed very touched by that but was evidently already on his last legs. Maurice Rowe, Motor's Chief Photographer, persuaded me to attend the funeral. As the hearse pulled away to take Rodney to the crematorium, Maurice remarked, "Oh dear, Rodney wouldn't like that - far too fast." Grande Vitesse was a famously slow driver.


Edited by P.Dron, 02 April 2014 - 16:48.