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1923 European GP


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#1 Marcor

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 00:48

According the newspaper Neptune (from Anvers-Antwerpen, September 23, 1923) here is the official results of the first European GP, ratified by the AIACR.
1- Salamano, Fiat, 800 km, 5h 27m 38s 2/5 (146.502 km/h)
2- F. Nazzaro, Fiat, 800 km, 5h 28m 02" (146.326 km/h)
3- Murphy, Miller, 800 km, 5h 32m 51s (144.209 km/h)
4- Minoia, Benz, 760 km, 5h 34m 34s
5- Hörner, Benz, 710 km, 5h 31m 0s 3/5
6- De Alzaga, Miller, 700 km, 5h 34m 35s
7- Delalande, Rolland-Pilain, 580 km, 5h 52m 38s 3/5.

Do you agree the statement of this source ? Sheldon considers Hörner and De Alzaga as not-classified and Delalande as having retired on lap 30. I'm inclined to believe that Hörner and De Alzaga were officially classified but have a doubt about Delalande.

Was it the first time (in Europa) that some drivers were classified though they were flagged off before they had complete the full race distance ? Why didn't they complete the full distance ? was it because of the spectators ?

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#2 uechtel

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 07:55

Sheldon is always using today´s classification system (the 90% rule) for all his race statistics. I think he did that in order to keep the results comparable, but it is a deviation from the historical truth.

Officially this rule became standard only around the mid-sixties, while until that it seems, that it was up to the race organizers to set their own criteria about who was classified and who was not.

#3 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 09:27

Blue font added with information from Allgemeine Automobil Zeitung (Wien), dated October 1, 1923, #19, p 51-60.
1- Salamano, Fiat, 800 km, 5h 27m 38s 2/5 (146.502 km/h), 80 laps
2- F. Nazzaro, Fiat, 800 km, 5h 28m 02" (146.326 km/h), 80 laps
3- Murphy, Miller, 800 km, 5h 32m 51s (144.209 km/h), 80 laps
4- Minoia, Benz, 760 km, 5h 34m 34s 2/5, 76 laps
5- Hörner, Benz, 710 km, 5h 31m 00s 3/5, 71 laps
6- De Alzaga, Miller, 700 km, 5h 34m 35s, 70 laps
7- Guyot and De la Lande Delalande, Rolland-Pilain, 580 km, 5h 52m 38s 3/5. 4h 43m 38s 3/5. [This time given, here in blue font seems a bit odd but could be correct! This car had already retired. Only the first six cars should have been classified because the race was ended prematurely.]
De la Lande took over the Rolland-Pilain of Guyot, who had burned his right leg with simmering oil after he had already driven over 500 km. Because De la Lande then taking over and driving Guyot's car was protested, he only did a few laps before the car was retired. De la Lande supposedly started the race in the second Rolland-Pilain but had to retire within the first 100 km with a defective rod bearing.


Was it the first time (in Europa) that some drivers were classified though they were flagged off before they had complete the full race distance ? Why didn't they complete the full distance ? was it because of the spectators ? [/B][/QUOTE] The final battle between Nazzaro, Salamano and Murphy was very exciting, also for the many spectators. After Nazzaro burst a front tire two laps from the end, he lost his chance to win and victory went to Salamano. Nazzaro finished the race only 24 seconds behind and Murphy in third place came in after almost five minutes. With that the race was finished because the crowd, excited by Italian Salamano's victory, jumped over the barriers, flooded the circuit and the other three drivers had to be stopped immediately to prevent a big disaster. Mussolini in the meantime presented Salamano with the golden medal.

#4 Michael Müller

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 11:21

Originally posted by Hans Etzrodt
With that the race was finished because the crowd, excited by Italian Salamano's victory, jumped over the barriers, flooded the circuit and the other three drivers had to be stopped immediately to prevent a big disaster.

Monza - nothing had changed in 70 years ...!