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April 7th 1968; Jim Clark remembered


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#1 Roger Clark

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Posted 06 April 2002 - 23:15

What can I or anyone else say, what is there to say, mere words can never express true feelings.


Denis Jenkinson, May 1968

To our human understanding for such a man to die so young must seem sheer waste, wanton, senseless, tragedy. But is it, if we believe that anything lies beyond death, and that this life, be it long or short, is only our testing ground for another life still fuller and more satisfying? Is it unrelieved tragedy to die doing what you love doing, and do better than anybody else? Is it only meaningless waste to go out when you are at the top? This, at least, Jim Clark has added to his many other outstanding achievements: dying when he did, and as he did, we shall never remember him as anything less than his splendid best.


The Very Reverend R Leonard Small, former Moderator of the Church of Scotland, quoted from "Jim Clark Remembered", by Graham Gauld.

I do not normally consider myself religious, but the Reverand Small came close to expressing my true feelings.

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#2 bkalb

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Posted 06 April 2002 - 23:35

I couldn't let the occasion go by without weighing in. Clark truly was a remarkable driver, my boyhood idol.

The quote about his being remembered as one of the best brings up an interesting points, which some of the other NF regulars might be able to comment on:

Senna and Schumacher, as everyone knows, have been very controversial drivers, despite their undoubted abilities. There was very little controversy about the men considered to rank alongside those two as the greatest of the post-war drivers: Fangio, Moss, Clark, Stewart.

In books I've read about the '50s, however, I've seen that some controversy occasionally surrounded Moss (not necessarily about his driving; I think just because he was the best, and the best always attract critics). And Fangio had his private spats, with Enzo Ferrari, for example. I don't remember it myself, but I've read that there was some criticism of Stewart for being too careful a driver (the same criticism that attached to Prost, I guess).

However, I don't ever recall a bad word being said about Jimmy Clark. Today, with exhaustive and instant communications, we all know if a driver so much as farted. Perhaps there were comments or discussions going on in the U.K. back then about Clark that we in the U.S. were not aware of.

Are my impressions correct, or were there any Clark-bashers out there in those days?

#3 Vicuna

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 01:11

34 years ago I balled my eyes out.

Not only was he special driver, he was a special bloke - I sometimes wonder how he would have coped with F1 had he born a decade or two later.

Moss would've handled it - I mean the PR and the politics - but I'm not sure Jimmy would have.

#4 Option1

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 07:19

Originally posted by bkalb
... However, I don't ever recall a bad word being said about Jimmy Clark. Today, with exhaustive and instant communications, we all know if a driver so much as farted. Perhaps there were comments or discussions going on in the U.K. back then about Clark that we in the U.S. were not aware of.

Could it simply be that there were things the media didn't print then that they pride themselves on printing and calling "news" today? I'm certain that it is so as far as the British media goes. Either way I don't think it's important (not to denigrate your question) but what is important is that there's been a gap in motorsport for 34 years now.

Neil

#5 Barry Boor

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 08:23

Once again, memories of that terrible day flood back.

My black tie is out again.

#6 Bernd

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 08:46

"The record speaks for itself. But even without it, Jimmy was in my opinion without equal. With a tremendous natural ability he combined craftsmanship with a mastery of race strategy. He was a complete gentleman to race with, so that in close racing one could build up an understanding of intentions with him during the race, in such matters as over-taking or slip-streaming on a high speed circuit. For me he was the driver's driver, for everybody he was the complete racing driver." - Jackie Stewart 1968

Sitting on Pole in Heaven. Go Jimmy!

#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 11:12

As soon as I saw the title of this thread, I knew instinctively what it was about ... an exact date which we all wish to forget and an anniversary which we must all remember.

This is the obituary of Jimmy Clark by Innes Ireland, published by Autocar the week after his death. Although I have posted this before, I am sure noone will object to it being repeated here. RIP.

JIM CLARK OBE

It all started as a subdued whisper – as if the whisperer was afraid to utter the words in case they were true: and even if they were, would be reluctant to believe them.

I was at Brands Hatch for the BOAC 500 race when I heard the rumour which finally contained such tragic truth – “Clark has had an accident at Hockenheim”. At first I thought it was just a motor racing incident: for even Clark has had those before: the possibility of anything more serious never entered my head. In the scramble for accurate information, the hope that it was all a mistake dwindled rapidly until only the stark, unreal and unbelievable fact was confirmed – Jim Clark was dead.

At first my mind refused to believe that this could be true. Drivers like Clark are indestructible, despite the fact that he may have had previous accidents. As confirmation piled upon confirmation, I reluctantly remembered having the same feelings about Alan Stacey, and slowly the finality of death impressed itself upon me. The inevitability of this realization shook, once more, the rules by which I have lived.

When the life of a young driver, so much in the public eye, is cut short at the height of a career, the man in the street begins to wonder “Why do they do it – what’s it all about – what are they thinking of?”

To begin with, all those who engage in the Sport, do so from the love of driving a fast car. This is something intangible, as is the feeling of conquering a mountain peak, or ski-ing down an Alpine slope over virgin snow, or jumping out of an aeroplane at 20000ft and pulling the ripcord at 1000ft, or sailing round the world singlehanded. It is a sensuous thing, and as such, is perhaps indefinable. The longer they do it, the more they realize the fact that there are risks involved, but without the risks there would be nothing. And so they adopt a fatalistic outlook on life, which is the only code by which one can live – or die.

I well remember a book which Peter Garnier wrote about the Monaco Grand Prix. In it he asked himself if a racing driver ever thought, as he closed his bedroom door on the morning of race day, “I wonder if I shall be alive to open it tonight?” Peter felt this was a question he could never, ever ask.

I can tell him the answer now: it is “Yes” – or certainly in my case. But it is a thought that lingers for but an instant, to be put aside with more important and realistic things, the belief in one’s own ability, the countless races that have gone before – the narrow squeaks, the accidents one has survived when all the indications were one shouldn’t have done, the raison d’etre as it were which brings us back to his fatalistic outlook.

I have known Jim Clark for perhaps longer than any of his contemporaries, for my father was a veterinary surgeon in the area of the Clark farms in Scotland – in fact I bought one of my first racing cars from his brother-in-law, another farmer nearby. We spent two good years together with Team Lotus in 1960 and 1961. But to my great regret, I did not know him as well as I might, for our early friendship was later clouded over by the circumstances surrounding my leaving Lotus.

His past performances need no recollection here – they are indelibly printed in the record book for posterity. He had a great love for his heritage, which was the basically simple, rustic life of farming and animal husbandry: but his dedication to motor racing was even greater, for he forced himself to leave all this behind to concentrate on his chosen profession. And it is in this light that we must regard him, for he died as he lived, giving his all in a racing car. I am sure that he would express no regrets at the violence of his passing, and surely this is answer enough for those of us who are left.

I know, from past experience of being with Colin Chapman during such a trial, how utterly futile life and effort must seem at this time. But to him, and to Jim’s parents, relatives and friends, I can only say to look at it as he would have done – otherwise his life has been in vain.

And to those who still question the wisdom of people who wish to risk their lives in racing carsI would say that motor racing, as a sport, is the most exacting, demanding, exhilarating and, above all, satisfying sport in which a man with red blood in his veins could indulge.

To Jim’s parents, his sisters and relatives, I, and the staff of Autocar, extend our most sincere condolences.


The following week, Autocar published Ireland’s report of Clark’s funeral:

On Wednesday, 10 April, great numbers of people from all walks of life and many parts of the country, even from abroad, journeyed to the little village of Chirnside in Berwickshire to pay their last respects to a quiet Scottish farmer and racing driver, Jim Clark. The significant thing about the mourners was not the famous, who were many in number, but the ordinary countryfolk who had known Jim, the farmer, from his schoolboy days, whose numbers were legion.

The service was held at Chirnside Old Church which was packed to capacity with 600 people. There were many more than this number standing outside, and the sincere but simple service was relayed to them by loud speakers. As it was carried into the church, so the coffin was carried to its last resting place by six farmworkers from Jim’s farm, Edington Mains. It was reverently laid to rest by eight cord-bearers with Jim’s father at the head, other close relatives, and Colin Chapman.

After the service many close friends went back to Jim’s house to meet the womenfolk, as is the Scottish custom, filled with a sense that the hosts of flowers, the numbers in attendance from far and near and the service itself had been a fitting tribute to this gallant driver.


I think Innes' thoughts, written almost immediately after the event, could be echoed by all of us old enough to remember that terrible day ... even now, reading this thread, I can feel the tears welling up :cry:

#8 Doug Nye

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 11:18

Well done everybody. He was an object lesson in how to combine talent, achievement, wealth and celebrity with humility, grace, fine manners and style. His sisters very much appreciate the manner in which he is remembered.

#9 ry6

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 11:34

Two references to Jim Clark come to mind -

In one of Graham Gauld's books, when Jim Clark was still alive, Ian Scott Watson wrote a piece and it went something like this
"He borrowed my crash helmet to drive a DKW in his first race. He can still wear that crash helmet today."

Graham Gauld wrote a story in the April 1998 issue of Classic Car Africa, on the 30 th anniversary
of Jim's death and ended it -

"Jim Clark will be remembered all the around the world this month, not only as one of the greatest racing drivers the world has ever known, but as a driver who was open, cheerful, respectful and an example of the perfect sportsman. Sadly few sportsman can claim this to-day, even fewer in Grand Prix racing."

I was lucky and privileged to watch Jim Clark race many times AND even met and spoke with him on a few occassions and these references bear out what my impression of him was.

#10 rdrcr

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Posted 07 April 2002 - 16:25

Even though I was only 10 when the Great Jimmy Clark met his end, and I was really only made aware of his talents later in life, by stories that were to become legend, I too shall revere the kind of talent and character that Clark was.

The standard, the benchmark, for which all other modern-day drivers will be judged.

Forever.




Some excellent previous passages about the man. Thank you.

One, that I like, appears in Dennis David's site.

With his permission I trust.

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#11 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 00:33

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Thirty five years ago today :cry:

#12 D-Type

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 00:40

Missed but not forgotten.
Age shall not etc.

#13 Gary C

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 00:48

yep, this anniversary seems to come round a good deal quicker than most. Godpseed, Jim.

#14 Newtown

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 01:09

:( :cry: Jim Clark, the greatest ever. I know some may not agree with that, but imagine how many DC's he would have won had Chunky had the common sense to build a car that would actually last till the end of an event, in 1 piece :mad: :down: and Clark not died in that stupid F2 race on piss poor tires. The loss to the racing world is absolutely immeasurable. :( :cry:

#15 Wolf

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 01:11

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:cry:

#16 mickj

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 04:26

Jim Clark, the best ever. 35 years have past, but you are not forgotten.

#17 Bernd

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 04:38

There are some that would say that Formula 1 Racing has never recovered since that bleak day in April.

#18 Roger Clark

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 06:49

It is difficult to say why the death of Jim Clark is so poignant after all these years. It is useless to speculate whether he was the best of all time, but he was certainly the best of his era. For many of us this was the time of our adolescence and the events of those times always have a greater influence than any other.

But there was more than that. Jim Clark drove in a non-commercial era, when you drove to win races, or even for the joy of driving, and not for the gathering of championship points, and when the risks were part of what made it worthwhile. Within a few years, perhaps even months, of his death these things were changed forever. I am sure that the changes would have happened anyway, but it is difficult not to feel that an era died with him.

In the early part of his career he could not understand why he was so much faster than everybody else. By the end of it he seemed secure in the knowledge that he was the best and to need no arrogance, or anything other than his performance in a car, to prove it.

And yes, of course, he was the best of all time.

#19 dbltop

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 06:53

He was my hero, my reason for following F1. I never got to see him race in person but I feel lucky to have been able to visit the Jim Clark room in Duns twice and to say a prayer at his grave. When he died I took the newspaper clippings to school for " show and tell". I was in grade 5 and nobody in my class had heard of him, but they understood how important he was when I was through. If only armco...

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#20 Pine

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 07:49

:(

RIP Jim.

#21 Tim Murray

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 08:07

They say that everyone who was around at the time remembers exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard of the deaths of such as John Kennedy or Princess Diana. Well, maybe. I can still remember as if it were yesterday exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard the news on the radio, and the devastating effect it had on me.

#22 Doug Nye

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 08:35

In my experience I am convinced of one thing regarding Jim Clark - no finer Man in motor racing history has attained the magical status of standard setter...he was truly exceptional...an unassuming, gentlemanly giant succeeded by pygmies.

DCN

#23 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:09

Spot on, Doug... spot on!

Whether he had a peer as a driver, as a tester, as a racing machine, as a public figure, or even fine men, that is of no moment.

He truly "attained the magical status of standard setter... he was truly exceptional... an unassuming, gentlemanly giant succeeded by pygmies."

That could not have been better put.

#24 rmhorton

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:24

Three years ago I started an identical thread with the post below. No matter how much time passes I don't think my opinion will ever change.


"It's strange. No matter how many years go past, but whenever I see the date come round to April 7th I think of that rainy day at Hockenheim, some 32 years ago today.

In all the years I have followed the sport of Motor Racing no death has personally effected me as much as the death of Jim Clark. Even now I am not sure why. Maybe it was just the end of innocence for me. Maybe it was time to listen to what Jackie Stewart (and a few others) were saying about the need for change. If you look at the photos taken of Clark around this time you can clearly see that the strain of driving those fast but fragile Lotus cars was beginning to show.

For me, he is still the driver that I judge others against. Not just for his skill in the cockpit, but for the way he conducted himself out it. In all the races I watched Clark race in, I saw others sometimes finish ahead of him, but I never saw him beaten"

Roger Horton

#25 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:39

I've posted this here before, but for those who've not read it (and those who have) this is Innes Ireland's moving tribute to Jimmy published in the Autocar i/d April 11th 1968.

JIM CLARK OBE
It all started as a subdued whisper – as if the whisperer was afraid to utter the words in case they were true: and even if they were, would be reluctant to believe them.
I was at Brands Hatch for the BOAC 500 race when I heard the rumour which finally contained such tragic truth – “Clark has had an accident at Hockenheim”. At first I thought it was just a motor racing incident: for even Clark has had those before: the possibility of anything more serious never entered my head. In the scramble for accurate information, the hope that it was all a mistake dwindled rapidly until only the stark, unreal and unbelievable fact was confirmed – Jim Clark was dead.
At first my mind refused to believe that this could be true. Drivers like Clark are indestructible, despite the fact that he may have had previous accidents. As confirmation piled upon confirmation, I reluctantly remembered having the same feelings about Alan Stacey, and slowly the finality of death impressed itself upon me. The inevitability of this realization shook, once more, the rules by which I have lived.
When the life of a young driver, so much in the public eye, is cut short at the height of a career, the man in the street begins to wonder “Why do they do it – what’s it all about – what are they thinking of?”
To begin with, all those who engage in the Sport, do so from the love of driving a fast car. This is something intangible, as is the feeling of conquering a mountain peak, or ski-ing down an Alpine slope over virgin snow, or jumping out of an aeroplane at 20000ft and pulling the ripcord at 1000ft, or sailing round the world singlehanded. It is a sensuous thing, and as such, is perhaps indefinable. The longer they do it, the more they realize the fact that there are risks involved, but without the risks there would be nothing. And so they adopt a fatalistic outlook on life, which is the only code by which one can live – or die.
I well remember a book which Peter Garnier wrote about the Monaco Grand Prix. In it he asked himself if a racing driver ever thought, as he closed his bedroom door on the morning of race day, “I wonder if I shall be alive to open it tonight?” Peter felt this was a question he could never, ever ask.
I can tell him the answer now: it is “Yes” – or certainly in my case. But it is a thought that lingers for but an instant, to be put aside with more important and realistic things, the belief in one’s own ability, the countless races that have gone before – the narrow squeaks, the accidents one has survived when all the indications were one shouldn’t have done, the raison d’etre as it were which brings us back to his fatalistic outlook.
I have known Jim Clark for perhaps longer than any of his contemporaries, for my father was a veterinary surgeon in the area of the Clark farms in Scotland – in fact I bought one of my first racing cars from his brother-in-law, another farmer nearby. We spent two good years together with Team Lotus in 1960 and 1961. But to my great regret, I did not know him as well as I might, for our early friendship was later clouded over by the circumstances surrounding my leaving Lotus.
His past performances need no recollection here – they are indelibly printed in the record book for posterity. He had a great love for his heritage, which was the basically simple, rustic life of farming and animal husbandry: but his dedication to motor racing was even greater, for he forced himself to leave all this behind to concentrate on his chosen profession. And it is in this light that we must regard him, for he died as he lived, giving his all in a racing car. I am sure that he would express no regrets at the violence of his passing, and surely this is answer enough for those of us who are left.
I know, from past experience of being with Colin Chapman during such a trial, how utterly futile life and effort must seem at this time. But to him, and to Jim’s parents, relatives and friends, I can only say to look at it as he would have done – otherwise his life has been in vain.
And to those who still question the wisdom of people who wish to risk their lives in racing carsI would say that motor racing, as a sport, is the most exacting, demanding, exhilarating and, above all, satisfying sport in which a man with red blood in his veins could indulge.
To Jim’s parents, his sisters and relatives, I, and the staff of Autocar, extend our most sincere condolences.


The following week, Autocar published Ireland’s report of Clark’s funeral:

On Wednesday, 10 April, great numbers of people from all walks of life and many parts of the country, even from abroad, journeyed to the little village of Chirnside in Berwickshire to pay their last respects to a quiet Scottish farmer and racing driver, Jim Clark. The significant thing about the mourners was not the famous, who were many in number, but the ordinary countryfolk who had known Jim, the farmer, from his schoolboy days, whose numbers were legion.
The service was held at Chirnside Old Church which was packed to capacity with 600 people. There were many more than this number standing outside, and the sincere but simple service was relayed to them by loud speakers. As it was carried into the church, so the coffin was carried to its last resting place by six farmworkers from Jim’s farm, Edington Mains. It was reverently laid to rest by eight cord-bearers with Jim’s father at the head, other close relatives, and Colin Chapman.
After the service many close friends went back to Jim’s house to meet the womenfolk, as is the Scottish custom, filled with a sense that the hosts of flowers, the numbers in attendance from far and near and the service itself had been a fitting tribute to this gallant driver.


#26 Kpy

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:43

Was it is really 35 years ago?
I remember being at Brands Hatch that day, watching such an exciting race – and yet a great cloud descended. How I wish he had been driving a sports car that day, or been anywhere else but Hockenheim ………
We lost the greatest of the great.

#27 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 09:54

Remember... one reason he wasn't at Brands was that he was trying to establish non-British (ie. Swiss) residency.

#28 DOHC

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:10

Jim Clark -- perhaps the finest driver ever.

R.I.P.

#29 ensign14

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:11

Originally posted by Ray Bell
Remember... one reason he wasn't at Brands was that he was trying to establish non-British (ie. Swiss) residency.

On the basis that he was risking his life for 3% of his income.

:cry:

Wasn't Innes Ireland concerned that he had never made peace with Jim over the 1961-2 sacking? I think he more than did with his obituary.

#30 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:11

Originally posted by Ray Bell
Remember... one reason he wasn't at Brands was that he was trying to establish non-British (ie. Swiss) residency.


Er, no, Ray. Jim had an apartment in Paris and a house in Bermuda. Nothing in Switzerland, although I think JYS was moving there at that time. Bonnier had lived there for some years, Rindt would soon follow.

Certainly residency/tax was part of the equation, but I think there were contract problems involved with the F3L too.

#31 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:21

I read Switzerland in the report I saw... I'm fairly sure of that... but it may have been wrong. Did Eoin Young write it? Sloniger? Or did Geoff Sykes tell me? I don't remember...

I'm sure I also read that he was only allowed into Britain for a very limited number of days to prove his foreign residency.

#32 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:35

Originally posted by Ray Bell
I read Switzerland in the report I saw... I'm fairly sure of that... but it may have been wrong. Did Eoin Young write it? Sloniger? Or did Geoff Sykes tell me? I don't remember...

I'm sure I also read that he was only allowed into Britain for a very limited number of days to prove his foreign residency.


He would probably have had his winnings etc paid into a Swiss bank, maybe even through a Swiss company set up for the purpose. But you don't need to be a Swiss resident to have a bank account. As to the number of days in the UK: yes, he could only return for a limited time each year. Any more and the Inland Revenue would have claimed UK tax on his earnings. But the Brands race was, I think, part of his racing plans for the year and at any rate would have been the first event of the new tax year, which starts on April 5th here. Quite how the residency laws work/worked I don't know, but if they used tax years, then I don't see that Brands would have been a problem.

#33 Vitesse2

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 10:39

Originally posted by ensign14
Wasn't Innes Ireland concerned that he had never made peace with Jim over the 1961-2 sacking? I think he more than did with his obituary.


But to my great regret, I did not know him as well as I might, for our early friendship was later clouded over by the circumstances surrounding my leaving Lotus.



#34 Arturo Pereira

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 12:46

:(

#35 bill moffat

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 13:36

I was busy completing some work-related forms this morning and suddenly realised that I had dated 3 of them as 7.4.68. It has never left me despite all of those long years, truly a great.

#36 Joe Fan

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 15:31

I was wondering why today just didn't seem like any other day. Then I visited this thread :( RIP Jimmy.

#37 Mike Argetsinger

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 16:13

Originally posted by Tim Murray
They say that everyone who was around at the time remembers exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard of the deaths of such as John Kennedy or Princess Diana. Well, maybe. I can still remember as if it were yesterday exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard the news on the radio, and the devastating effect it had on me.


Tim - great minds think alike I guess. Your post made me think of an article I wrote recently for the newsletter of the International Motor Racing Research Center at Watkins Glen.

The article will be published this week under the title: Archival Gift Provides Insight on One of Motor Racing’s Saddest Days


Jim Clark’s death, just 35 years ago this month, was a watershed event in motor sports history. Just as all Americans of that era remember exactly where they were when they learned of the death of John F. Kennedy, so too does the international racing community recall Clark’s fatal accident.

It was a time in the sport when the risks were great and racing deaths came with depressing regularity. But news of Jim Clark’s death transcended all others and universally was met with initial disbelief. How could this master of his sport – who had so captured the popular imagination with his talent, achievement and modesty have crashed to his death?

This unwillingness to believe he was gone may have been most keenly felt within the racing driver “fraternity.” Their loss of a much admired and loved friend and competitor was further tinged by the cold reality that ‘if it could happen to Jim it could happen to any of us.’

Randy Barnett, one of the best known and popular American racing journalists of the time, was at Hockenheim that cold and rainy April 7, 1968 day and his companion article on this page describes the circumstances of the accident. As Randy points out, the crash occurred on a section of the circuit where no spectators were present and Jim was not running in visual contact of any other drivers. This apparent lack of first hand evidence has prompted much speculation as to the cause of the accident.

But there was one witness.

Winfried Kolb was manning an outpost for race control and had a clear view of Clark’s Lotus as it approached him, passed by him and crashed in to the trees off the road. After the race he was interviewed by Race Director Leopold Baron von Zedlitz, the race director. Mr. Kolb then made an official statement that was transcribed on the spot by Werner Winter, a member of the organizing team for the Wiesbaden Automobile Club. The report was forwarded to the Automobile Club von Deutschland (AvD) and copies were sent to Colin Chapman and Graham Hill.

Mr. Winter has gifted to the Research Center, from his personal files, the original statement by Mr. Kolb. The gift also includes: the race program; the race poster; press materials from the event; the entry blank forms; the race regulations; the contract for the race between the Hockenheim circuit and the Wiesbaden Automobile Club; an original window sticker for track access; and, Mr. Winter’s official arm band for the event. There is also a letter to Clark’s teammate Graham Hill, forwarding copies of the accident report.

This gift provides an archival record of the tragic day Jim Clark died and provides unique perspective and insight for contemporary and future historians.

#38 Placebo

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 16:29

A very nice thread to read on this sad, snowy day. Jim Clark was a gentle man as well as a gentleman, a driver unparalleled, and apparently a quiet and loyal soul. That he left us as a champion in such an unexpected way will guarentee his status among the greats, but for me he is surely the best, ever. Class, yet humble. Dominant, yet kind.


If Jim is watching, I bet that he enjoyed that race yesterday!


Ron

#39 911

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 17:29

Originally posted by Gary C
yep, this anniversary seems to come round a good deal quicker than most. Godpseed, Jim.


Gary, you're not kidding! It doesn't seem that long ago I was watching a program in '93 that had the 25th anniversary of Jim's death. They showed Jackie Stewart and he said that it was the first time he had visited Clark's burial site in 25 years.

Thanks, vitesse2, for posting that transcript by Innes - that was great. We lost one of the best drivers, if not the purest, of all time.

911

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#40 oldtimer

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 18:11

I have never felt so empty at the loss of a driver as for the loss of Jimmy, if I may be so bold as to be so familiar. He had the magic of turning enormous respect into some sort of affection. I was just a Joe spectator and race follower, but his death brought real sadness. The lament they piped for him at Silverstone at the subsequent International Trophy meeting was very moving for me.

Thank you, Jimmy, for some great memories.

#41 Marc

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 19:43

Thanks Vitesse2 ;)

Jimmy , my favorite driver ....

Hockenheim 1968
Posted Image

#42 Doug Nye

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 20:10

Marc - that magnificent photograph tells those who never knew him all they need to know...

DCN

#43 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 21:13

Just imagine capturing that kid's thoughts later in the day...

What an introduction to life and death!

#44 Marc

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 22:21

legend of the photo said:

" Jimmy's last pics showed too much the disappointment that its car in the attempts had talked him. Before the start, he had this ultimate smile provoked by the interest which carried him this little girl... "

Sorry for my english ...

#45 Carlos Guerra

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Posted 07 April 2003 - 23:08

... and 35 years later you still remember what exactly you were doing at that precise moment you heard that sad news on the radio...

Carlos Guerra
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Portugal

#46 Newtown

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Posted 08 April 2003 - 00:09

Marc, can you post the french version of what was on the picture?

#47 D-Type

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Posted 08 April 2003 - 00:28

Vitesse2,
Thank you for posting the Innes Ireland tribute - i have been trying to track it down for ages.

Marc,
The Hockenheim photo and caption brought a tear to my eye (literally).

I think it was jackie stewart who when asked what he would remember about Jimmie said "His smile"?

#48 Gary C

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Posted 08 April 2003 - 01:19

go here to view a page from my website of my visit to the Jim Clark Memorial at Hockenheim last year : http://www.users.glo...orial/index.htm

#49 mickj

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Posted 08 April 2003 - 03:31

Marc
Thanks for sharing the photo with us.

#50 Marc

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Posted 08 April 2003 - 05:47

Originally posted by Newtown
Marc, can you post the french version of what was on the picture?


" Les dernières photos de Jim Clark montraient trop la déception que lui avait causé sa voiture aux essais. Avant le départ, il avait quand-même eu cet ultime sourire provoqué par l' intérêt que lui portait cette petite fille. "