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#1 Don Capps

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 21:42

Any ideas where I could find information such as the results and other related "stuff" for the Singapore GP from the 1960's until 1973? I think that a Lotus 23 won in 1963 and 1964, but after that it goes a bit thin on my part. Thanks!

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#2 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 21:50

There was a number of Australians attacked this race with gusto in the mid to late sixties, but even with that the reporting of the event was somewhat sparse.

From memory the race was held around April some time... just after the Easter Bathurst IIRC.

If a Lotus 23 won, that would be Albert Poon.

#3 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:06

Having posted that... and not being in a position to waste a lot of time churning through my Racing Car News binders, I simply turned to the one I had out for the 'This day in motorsport history' post I did a while ago and turned to the appropriate issue.

This carries the full story of Steve Harvey (Mini racer) and Greg Cusack and their trip to Singapore. This was surely the first Australian attack on the event? At least since the Double 8 went there with Sid Anderson driving it in 1953/54. I've got a photo of that somewhere... haven't I?

Anyway, Harvey was second to Poon in a Lotus Cortina in the 15-lap (45-mile) touring car race, while Cusack had a lead of one and a half laps in his Brabham 1.5 twin-cam when he stopped at 100 miles in the 180-mile GP. 8 laps later he spun in a rainstorm and put the car into a ditch and lost about five laps.

Results (60 laps - 180 miles):

1. Lee Han Seng (Lotus 22 pushrod Ford 1500) 2h 29:41.8 (2:20.4)
2. R Seow (Merlyn Mk VII) 59 laps (2:23.0)
3. S A Goodwin (Lotus 20b) 59 laps (2:25.5)
4. G Cusack (Brabham 1.5 t/c) 58 laps (2:15.3)
5. John Macdonald (Cooper FJr) 57 laps (2:24.0)
6. M Cook (Lotus Elan) 55 laps (2:35.8)
7. R Gray (Jaguar E-type) 52 laps (2:42.2)
8. B Stack (Lola) 52 laps (2:33.4)
9. T Asano (Mazda) 52 laps (2:47.3)
10. Tan ah bee (Ban Sing Special) 51 laps (2:45.8)

Fastest lap and outright record: Cusack, 2:15.3

Interesting to note... Asano ran a Mazda in the touring car race too, was lapped once and finished ninth.

#4 Jimmy Piget

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:12

That's what I have :

30 March 1964, GP of Malaysia — cancelled after practice
1965 — no information
11 April 1966, Singapore GP — 1st Lee Han Seng (own Lotus / Ford-Lotus 1600)
27 March 1967, Singapore GP — 1st Rodney Seow (own Merlyn / Ford-Lotus 1600)
15 April 1968, Singapore GP — 1st Garrie Cooper (works Elfin / Ford-Cosworth 1600)
6 April 1969, Singapore GP — 1st Graeme Lawrence (own McLaren / Ford-Cosworth F 2)
29 March 1970, Singapore GP — 1st Graeme Lawrence (own Ferrari 2400)
11 April 1971, Singapore GP — 1st Graeme Lawrence (own Brabham / Ford-Cosworth F 2)
26 March 1972, Singapore GP — 1st Max Stewart (works Mildren / Waggott)
22 April 1973, Singapore GP — 1st Vern Schuppan (Theodore March / Ford-Hart 1600)

From 1974, no more sign of Singapore while there were many 1600 races in this area of the world (Selangor, Penang, Macau, Manila, Jakarta...)

For 1964, remember that Singapore still was one of the states composing Malaysia, hence the race title. It became independance in (or circa) 1965 — to be checked.

The circuit was a street one, called "Old Thompson Road".
But one of my sources pretends that another one, called "Sembawang" (perhaps an airport ?) was once used.

It is likely there were previous issues of this race (before 1964), but if they were won by sportscars I did not register them in my own archives.

#5 David McKinney

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:22

The races in that region were always very confusing, with some being held one year and others the next, and their titles changing from time to time along the way.
AFAIK what had been called the Singapore GP was renamed Malayasian GP in 1962. Albert Poon did indeed win the 1963 race in his Lotus 23, and also the Johore GP.
I don't have a result for the 1964 race (whatever it was called). Although Ray doesn't say so, I guess that's what he supplied

#6 Magee

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:35

Don,
I noticed you mentioned a Lotus 23 in your inquiry. A few years ago John Donohoe at
http://www.simplesevens.com/sykaback/
was trying to trace a 23 once owned by Sy Kaback in NY and intended for a Sebring race. It changed hands and ended up on the West Coast. I was able to contribute some background to the car that once appeared at Westwood (near Vancouver BC). The current owner in Australia wanted to fill in the historical data for the car that, at one time, had raced in Singapore. Is this the car you were looking for?

#7 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:37

Jimmy, I think you might amend that engine listed for the Elfin that won in 1968...

Paul Hamilton would dearly love to be able to fit a 'Cosworth' engine in it, but Garrie only had a twin-cam Ford (as in Lotus Cortina, Lotus Elan) fitted. That was the second appearance, IIRC, of the Elfin 600.

Now I've got 1967...

Australian in the event was Brian Foley with a Mini, which shed 120lbs apparently with the fitting of alloy doors, bonnet and bootlid and perspex windows. It easily won the touring car race and took out the lap record in 2:26.3. Again it was the Thompson Road circuit.

For the Grand Prix, Foley fitted a new head gasket and filled the fuel tanks, having ascertained that he could do the 180-mile distance without a stop.

Seow led away from pole in his Merlyn twin-cam from Lee Han Seng, Poon in the 23B, Foley's Mini, Macdonald's 1500cc Cooper Ford, Chong Boon Sen (23B) and Bond in a Le Grand 1600 twin-cam. In the 36-car field 19 were openwheelers, nine were sports cars, seven sedans.

Around lap 15 the previous year's winner touched wheels with a slower car and was out. Heathcote then spun his 1600 Brabham in 'The Snakes' and Chong put his 23B into a ditch. At lap 20 Macdonald pitted low on oil and (I think) retired. Ten laps later Wyllie's 23 also dropped out, having been in the first four. Arsenio Laurel was at this time third in a Lotus 41 after starting 23rd on the grid.

Foley's planned non-stop run was interrupted by a flat tyre and both John Harwood (Lola Ford) and Phillip Seow (Elva BMW) went past him. A charge to the end by the Mini driver saw him alongside the Elva at the finish, but with the longer Elva nose getting it fifth place.

1. Rodney Seow (Merlyn twin-cam 1600) (2:13.4)
2. Albert Poon (Lotus 23B twin-cam)
3. Arsenio Laurel (Lotus 41)
4. John Harwood (Lola Ford)
5. Phillip Seow (Elva BMW)
6. Brian Foley (Mini Cooper S) (2:24.3)

Fastest lap and new lap record: Rodney Seow, 2:13.4

I would say that there were improvements to the circuit in the year since Cusack set his lap record, both Seow and Foley having such dramatic improvements over Cusack's and Harvey's times. Then again, it might have been tyres...

#8 Magee

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 22:58

Here are the factory details of the 23:
Model & Chassis No. -- 23/S/4
Engine Type and No. -- 1100F 462205
G.Box Type & No. -- VW 4 speed, H3868096
Carbs. Type & Nos. 40DCCE2, 10115, 9934
Long range tank and Red body

#9 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2003 - 23:36

Originally posted by Magee
Don,
I noticed you mentioned a Lotus 23 in your inquiry. A few years ago John Donohoe at
http://www.simplesevens.com/sykaback/
was trying to trace a 23 once owned by Sy Kaback in NY and intended for a Sebring race. It changed hands and ended up on the West Coast. I was able to contribute some background to the car that once appeared at Westwood (near Vancouver BC). The current owner in Australia wanted to fill in the historical data for the car that, at one time, had raced in Singapore. Is this the car you were looking for?


While Albert Poon's was the most successful and most-raced of the 23s in the region, the post I just made about the 1967 race indicates pretty well that it wasn't the only one.

Originally posted by David McKinney
The races in that region were always very confusing, with some being held one year and others the next, and their titles changing from time to time along the way.
AFAIK what had been called the Singapore GP was renamed Malayasian GP in 1962. Albert Poon did indeed win the 1963 race in his Lotus 23, and also the Johore GP.
I don't have a result for the 1964 race (whatever it was called). Although Ray doesn't say so, I guess that's what he supplied


Jimmy has already noted the change in title, but I think you'd have to say that the Singapore GP (by whatever name) was pretty much an established event. Others did come and go, sure...

My surmise was that Poon would have been the winner in 1964 if a 23 won, that's because he was probably the only one running such a car there at that time. If Jimmy's records show the race was rained off, I'm not going to dispute it, I have nothing on it that I know about.

Like I mentioned before, there was certainly a Singapore GP back in the early to mid-fifties. The Double 8 was leading the event but failed to finish IIRC, a Jaguar XK120 Special won the race.

Jimmy... it's clear enough that, at least until 1968, the race was an all-in thing. Touring Cars, Sports Cars, whatever you chose to race, it was in.

Also, in 1972 Stewart was already running his F5000 Elfin. The Alec Mildren Racing Team had disbanded the previous year and so the Mildren Waggott he was running was his own... he probably took it over there to try and sell it, but it eventually went to Allan Grice.

In 1968 the Easter weekend was April 14/15, and this was the date of the Singapore GP that year... so I was wrong with my statement earlier that it was 'after Bathurst'... that year the weekend of April 6/7 had seen the Selangor (Kuala Lumpur) Grand Prix as a prelude to the Singapore race and Allan Grice was the star. He had gone to Singapore to work for Newton Enterprises and taken his Elfin 1100 with him. They thought he needed something better to ensure a win and bought the Mildren team Brabham Climax (BT7?) that KB had been running.

Garrie Cooper turned up with the new 600 and there was a stack of Aussies in other cars... Denis Geary in the Lola T70 (probably needed to go out of the country for Customs purposes), and Minis for Foley, Harvey and Peter Manton.

Grice won the first 30 lap heat from Poon (Brabham Alfa) and Jan Bussell (BT14 twin-cam?) and Rodney Seow (1600 Brabham), but had a flat tyre in the second to hand the win to Lee Han Seng (BT16), with Poon again second and Rodney Seow third ahead of Bussell. Overall Poon won from Bussell and Grice, who had come in fifth in the second heat.

This race had seen Cooper reach a watershed in his career... he had until this time satisfied himself with Hewland conversions of VW boxes, but when he broke a CWP in the first heat he made up his mind that from now on he would only have FT200s.

Which raises the point of accuracy in Jimmy's post... Jimmy, the Elfin was powered by a twin-cam Ford (ie Lotus Cortina, Elan engine) and not a 'Cosworth' which might denote FVA.

On a week to Singapore and the Thompson Road circuit. Grice and Cooper were at it pretty well in the opening laps until Grice missed a gear going into the hairpin. He'd had a slow start, by the way, and stormed through to be challenging for the lead, and then retaking the lead, but the missed gear might have been the cause of... or it might have been because of... the gearbox case splitting in two. He was out. So was Poon with a broken wheel (was third...) on his Brabham.

Jan Bussell was the next challenger, but Cooper had him in check and was leading easily, with Rodney Seow a distant third.

Fourth was hotly contested by a great mixture... Foley's Mini, Geary in the Lola stuck in second gear and Steve Holland's Lotus 47... then came Manton and Harvey in their Minis.

But Bussell, Harvey and Manton all had to stop for fuel. Before he stopped, Bussell put in the fastest lap of the race trying to get in striking distance of Cooper, but the Elfin builder was probably taking it in his stride and not stressing the gearbox.

Foley blew a head gasket, Geary retired overheating, Harvey set a 2:22.0 catching up and then had to stop to retighten a front wheel... and again to do up a bonnet strap... and the race ran out.

Results (60 Laps - 180 Miles):

1. Elfin Sports Cars: Garrie Cooper (Elfin 600 1600 t/c) 2h 15:29.6 (2:10.3)
2. Jan Bussell (Brabham BT14 t/c) 59 laps (2:10.2)
3. Team Harper: Steve Holland (Lotus 47) 57 laps (2:20.6)
4. H Ooi (Brabham BT18 Ford) 56 laps (2:23.0)
5. Newton Enterprises: Steve Harvey (Mini Cooper S) 54 laps (2:22.0)
6. D Neal (Elva SCA) 53 laps (2:28.5)

Fastest lap and new outright lap record: Jan Bussell, 2:10.2.

#10 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 02:03

Originally posted by Magee
Here are the factory details of the 23:
Model & Chassis No. -- 23/S/4
Engine Type and No. -- 1100F 462205
G.Box Type & No. -- VW 4 speed, H3868096
Carbs. Type & Nos. 40DCCE2, 10115, 9934
Long range tank and Red body


Highly unlikely it would be the Poon car, unless that's a very early chassis number...

Poon had a 1500 twin-cam engine when he came to Australia about 1965 or 66. He and Holland both raced here, one in the 23, the other in the Lotus Cortina. Entered by Team Harper.

#11 Jim Thurman

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 05:48

Originally posted by Don Capps
Any ideas where I could find information such as the results and other related "stuff" for the Singapore GP from the 1960's until 1973? I think that a Lotus 23 won in 1963 and 1964, but after that it goes a bit thin on my part. Thanks!


Don,

Early years, I have no source...but I know Autoweek had a report on the 1973 race, which gave a good descriptive account of both the course and the ambiance.


Jim Thurman

#12 Jimmy Piget

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 05:59

Ray : thanks for the information on Garrie Cooper's engine — now amended in my files.

About the 1964 race, my source telling it was cancelled is likely Autosport.

#13 quintin cloud

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 06:06

Excellent :up: :smoking: Thanks for the results Ray :clap: :up: :smoking:

#14 David McKinney

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 07:02

I meant to say in my earlier post, Don, that Autosport usually (but not always) reported these races. My other principal source, especially for earlier years, is Australian Motor Sports

#15 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 10:37

1969... the Singapore race was April 5/6, Selangor the following week.

A much bigger contingent turned out, Kiwis interloped as well... Garrie Cooper was there with an Elfin 600 with 2.5 Repco V8 (billed as an F1 car by the locals!), his old car was sold to Tony Maw, who lived locally at the time, Malcolm Ramsay had a lovely Elfin 300 Sports Car with 1780cc twin-cam engine, Graeme Lawrence had the M4a FVA, Roly Levis a Brabham BT23C FVA, John Macdonald from Hong Kong had a new Brabham FVA and there was plenty of local entry.

With practice wet, Macdonald took pole without wings on his Brabham with a lap of 2:12.2, second quickest was Poon in the BT21 now fitted with with a Ford engine (probably FVA?). Cooper had problems, Lawrence did a 2:14.5 and Levis a 2:17.4.

Ramsay won a sports car race from Burmester's 23B (Hong Kong) and Neal's Elva Mk 7 (also Hong Kong). Poon retired on the first lap of this race but Holland in the 47 took fastest lap in 2:18.5 before striking electrical problems.

With rain falling intermittently at different parts of the circuit throughout the main race, Macdonald was unfortunate to miss out on the start due to wet ignition as they lined up for the start. Lawrence then shot away in the lead from Levis, Poon, Bussell, Maw, Holland and Kenkie Iriawan in the FVA-powered Elfin 600. Ramsay was charging through from the rear.

On lap 14 Bussell pitted without a clutch, this being changed so he could complete the last three laps! Maw meanwhile took off after Poon. Out in front, Lawrence was doing all right despite his clutch failing, but Levis was to run into ignition trouble and pitted at half distance to lose two laps. Levis got the bit between his teeth as we have seen him do at other times and set a new lap record of 1:59.6, no doubt relying heavily on the high wings his car had front and rear. This took him up to second again before the finish, just before Poon lost his throttle cable in fact, moving Maw into third. Ramsay, also without clutch, was fourth.

Results (60 laps - 180 Miles)

1. Air New Zealand: Graeme Lawrence (McLaren M4a FVA) 2h 9:16.9
2. Air New Zealand: Roly Levis (Brabham BT23c FVA) 59 laps in 2h 11:16.4 (1:59.6)
3. Tony Maw (Elfin 600 t/c) 58 laps in 2h 11:01.2
4. Malcolm Ramsay (Elfin 300 t/c0 53 laps

Fastest lap and new outright record: Ramsay, 1:59.6

Ex-World Champion motorcyclist Katayama won the touring car race in a Mazda rotary from Poon's 1880cc Alfa GTA after Steve Harvey retired from the lead.

The trip to Selangor saw customs problems that had to be solved, and the circuit is described as 2.14 miles round, with a 2600' straight that 'falls gently over a crest', being slightly abrasive in the surface and having some very tight corners at Rothmans and the esses. Grice held the record at 1:24.6 in the Brabham Climax. There were magnificent facilities, lockup garages, air conditioned VIP lounge, a four-storey control tower, multiple grandstands etc.

Selangor saw another Ramsay win in the sports cars, lapping in 1:32.6 to run away from Burmester and Richard Wong in the ex-Allan Hamilton Porsche (the 906?), G Hunt in a 1500 Ginetta being fourth.

With Levis on pole (1:25.8) from Lawrence (1:26.4), Cooper (1:27.3), Macdonald (1:28.7), Poon, Bussell, Iriawan and Maw, the race started under threatening skies. Macdonald had to borrow a battery before the start and the race was delayed to help him out... he must have been sweating after the previous week's debacle.

Cooper won the start and led away from Lawrence, Levis stalling on pole and Iriawan and Maw getting caught out behind him. There was a lot of shuffling in the early laps then, Heathcote's Brabham having benefitted by the start, along with Ramsay, and Levis storming through the field.

Levis was second by lap 12, Cooper having pitted with a misfire and Poon retiring along with Bussell (clutch). Cooper added to his problems with another pit stop and then spun on lap 26 and clobbered a marshal's telephone pole, slightly damaging the car and putting him out.

Levis set a new lap record on lap 39 in his chase after the leader, Maw was third and moving away from Ramsay, Tony Mitchell's Merlyn was fifth. and Lionel Chan's Mk 7 Merlyn sixth.

Results (50 laps - 100.7 miles)

1. Air New Zealand: Graeme Lawrence (Mclaren M4a FVA) 1h 12:08.5
2. Air New Zealand: Roly Levis (Brabham BT23C FVA) 1h 12:53.8 (124.2)
3. Tony Maw (Elfin 600) 47 laps in 1h 12:50.5
4. Malcolm Ramsay (Elfin 300 t/c) 45 laps in 1h 12:18.7
5. Tony Mitchell (Merlyn)
6. Lionel Chan (Merlyn Mk 7)

Katayama led the tintop race again, but Poon won after the Mazda gearbox played up. Harvey moved up to second place as the problems worsened.

#16 David McKinney

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 11:16

Originally posted by Ray Bell
At least since the Double 8 went there with Sid Anderson driving it in 1953/54

The race the Double V8 was in wasn't the Singapore GP, but the Johore GP
That race dates back to at least 1940, whereas the first record I have of an event named Singapore GP is 1961, though it may have started a couple of years before that

#17 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 12:11

Thanks, David... I haven't been able to look that up... I was told Singapore, I'm sure, but I guess people don't always know where these places are and what the names are.

By the way, I noted that in that 1969 report they said it was the fourth Singapore GP! So that's '66, '67, '68 and '69, those prior to that must have been called 'Malaysian' or someone there doesn't know how to count!

#18 Darren Galpin

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 12:32

Urm - sorry to be pedantic here. Wouldn't it have been called Malayan GP rather than Malaysian? The name of the country changed at some point (I'm desperately remembering back to when I collected stamps......), but I'm not sure exactly when.

#19 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 13:25

IIRC, Singapore was never part of Malaya...

It became part of Malaysia, which included Malaya and I think Borneo. Later Singapore withdrew, again, IIRC.

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#20 Vitesse2

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 13:40

Malaysia was formed in 1963 through a federation of the former British colonies of Malaya and Singapore, including the East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak on the northern coast of Borneo. The first several years of the country's history were marred by Indonesian efforts to control Malaysia, Philippine claims to Sabah, and Singapore's secession from the federation in 1965.


http://www.cia.gov/c...ok/geos/my.html

#21 Darren Galpin

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 13:43

OK, I checked my history (on http://www-singapore...rehistory3.html).... The following are direct quotes:

"After the war, the British grouped the peninsula Malay states and the British-controlled states of Sabah and Sarawak in Borneo under the Malayan Union. Singapore, which unlike the other states had a predominantly Chinese population, was left out of this union.

....

In 1963, the British declared Singapore, the Malay states and Sabah and Sarawak as one independent nation -- Malaysia. But Singapore's membership in this union lasted only two years. In 1965, it was booted out of the federation, owing to disagreements on several fronts including racial issues."

So 1963-1965 GP's would have been Malaysian GP's, and any before that Singapore GP's.

#22 David McKinney

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 13:50

Originally posted by Darren Galpin
So 1963-1965 GP's would have been Malaysian GP's, and any before that Singapore GP's.

Not necessarily
I'm away from my records at the moment but seem to remember there being a Malaysian GP and a Singapore GP the same year at least once during that period
But I might be getting confused with later years...

#23 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 14:09

There seems to be no conflict in the years I've given results for, David...

That mention of the 'fourth Singapore GP' is interesting, however. And that report was written by Tony Maw, who was living locally at the time.

#24 m23

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 17:14

Slightly OT from the Singapore GP:

Albert Poon, Winner of the 1964 Macau Grand Prix in a Lotus 23 , a regular competitor in the mid 60's returned to compete in the 50th Macau anniversary celebrations. The weekend prior to th F3 Grand Prix featured numerous historic and amateuer races. Albert, at the age of 69 (70?) qualified on pole and went on to win the "mini fans race". Albeit an amateur race, a fantastic achievement nonetheless, his opposition mainly under 30!. No cars featured traction control, power steering etc- level stakes!, well done Albert!

#25 m23

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 17:23

Macau 2003 results:

http://gp-2.macau.gr....php?cat=result

#26 Pete Stowe

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 20:16

Autosport had a report on the 1961 Singapore GP in the 27 October issue, although it didn't mention the actual date of the event.
Results:
1 Ian Barnwell - Aston Martin DB3S
2 Kim Thiat - Lotus 11 Mk2
3 Dick Clinkard - Austin Healey 3000
4 Bernard Arnold - Warrior-Jaguar
5 Tan Ah Bee - Zephyr Sports
6 Eric Cooper - Austin Healey Sprite
7 B. McRae-Smith - Austin Healey 3000
8 Housten - AC Ace

29 starters, leading runners who retired were:
LC Chan - Lola-Climax
Jan Brussel (sic) - Ferrari Monza
Peter Cowling - Cooper

#27 David McKinney

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 20:46

OK Jimmy, just for you ;)

- November 1940, Johore GP - race abandoned

2 October 1949, Johore GP - Mick Jennings (MG TC)

6 August 1950, Johore GP - J M Pattinson (MG TC s/c)

5 August 1951, Johore GP - Bill Ferguson (Cooper 500)

3 August 1952, Johore GP - Derek White (Jaguar XK120)

2 August 1953, Johore GP - Freddie Pope (stripped Jaguar XK120)
- - - 1953, Singapore GP (unconfirmed) - Dr S G McPherson (Aston Martin DB2)

1954-56 - probably nothing

9 June, 1957, “Singapore’s first-ever circuit-race” - Singapore GP?
- - - 1957, race on Changi airfield circuit, Singapore - Chan Lye Choon (Aston Martin DB3S) - possibly same as 9/6/57 event

1958 ???

1959 ???

21 February 1960, Johore Coronation GP - Bill Wyllie (Auto Union 1000S)

(June or July) 1961, Johore Coronation GP - Chan Lye Choon (Lola Mk1)
- - - 1961, Kuala Lumpur GP - Saw Kim Thiat (Lotus XI)
17 September 1961, Singapore GP - Ian Barnwell (Aston Martin DB3S)

23 April 1962, Malaysian GP - Yong Nam Kee (possibly Jaguar D-type)
- - - 1962, Johore GP - ??

15 April 1963, Malaysian GP - Albert Poon (Lotus 23)
- - - 1963, Johore GP - Albert Poon (Lotus 23)

- - - 1964, Malaysian GP - cancelled after practice
- - - 1964, Johore GP - ??
- July 1964, Kuala Lumpur GP - Mike Hunt (Cooper-Climax T45)

12 April 1965, “fourth Malaysian GP” - Albert Poon (Lotus 23)
- December 1965, Kuala Lumpur GP - ??

11 April 1966, “first international Singapore GP” - Lee Han Seng (Lotus 22)
4 September 1966, Rothmans Challenge Trophy (Kuala Lumpur) - Lee Han Seng (Lotus 22)

27 March 1967, Singapore GP - Rodney Seow (Merlyn)
3 September 1967, Tunkhu Abdul Rahman Trophy (Kuala Lumpur) - ??
10 September 1967, Johore GP- Lee Han Seng (Brabham BT16)

6 April 1968, Rothmans Trophy (Kuala Lumpur) - Albert Poon (Brabham-Alfa Romeo BT21)
15 April 1968, Singapore GP - Garrie Cooper (Elfin 600)
8 September 1968, “first Malaysian GP” - Hengkie Iriawan (Elfin 600)

7 April 1969, Singapore GP - Graeme Lawrence (McLaren M4A)
13 April 1969, Selangor GP - Graeme Lawrence (McLaren M4A)
26 October 1969, Malaysian GP - Tony Maw (Elfin 100)

30 March 1970, Singapore GP - Graeme Lawrence (Ferrari Dino 246)
5 April 1970, Selangor GP - Graeme Lawrence (Ferrari Dino 246)
31 August 1970, race at Ipoh - ??
18 October, 1970, Malaysian GP - ??

12 April 1971, Singapore GP - Graeme Lawrence (Brabham BT29)
18 April 1971, Kuala Lumpur (Selangor GP?) - Graeme Lawrence (Brabham BT29)
25 April 1971, Penang GP - Ken Smith (Lotus 59)
5 September 1971, Malaysian GP - John Macdonald (Brabham BT30)
12 September 1971, possible race at Johore Baru

#28 Ray Bell

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 22:25

1970 saw the race reduced to 40 laps of the Thompson Road circuit. A preliminary race of 20 laps was held on the Friday, but now the narrative tells us that the total is 186 miles... or is that a typo?

The entry was bigger still... Matich in the McLaren M10, the full strength of the Mildren team with Bartlett in the Submarine with an Alfa V8, Stewart with the Rennmax-Mildren Waggott, Malcolm Ramsay now with a Repco V8-powered Elfin 600, while Graeme Lawrence had that beautiful Ferrari Amon had used to win the Tasman Cup.

Poon had the ex-Piers Courage BT30, MacDonald and Iriawan the same cars as 1969.

Matich crashed at high speed in practice, but the car was repaired for the heat... but it was all between pole sitter (1:57.8) Lawrence and Bartlett, Stewart had some electrical problems, Matich trailed smoke from his engine after four laps and wasn't to be seen again, Ramsay had engine problems too.

Bartlett ran out the winner by nine seconds from Lawrence, they were a lap ahead of MacDonald and Poon, with just four seconds separating them. Bartlett set a new record of 1:55.8, two tenths better than Lawrence managed.

With the high rate of attrition in the preliminary, just twelve cars emerged from the pits for the main event. And two of them crashed on the warm-up lap! Bill Heinecke (Elva 7s) and Chang Bon Seng (Lotus 23) were out before it began and the start was delayed twenty minutes.

Bartlett led away again, with Stewart stirring the pot to come charging through to third, which turned into second on lap three when Lawrence ran off at the Range Hairpin. The Kiwi charged back, though, closing on Stewart who seemed to be allowing Bartlett to build up a lead, though he later said it was because it was overheating.

Lawrence got by the Rennmax on lap 12 and went after Bartlett while behind them the quartet of MacDonald, Poon, Ramsay and Iriawan were having a good race together, which quietened down with MacDonald going away from Poon and Ramsay and Iriawan pitting briefly.

On lap 32, with Lawrence still unable to bridge the gap to Bartlett, Stewart coasted to the pits with a hole in the block... the oil tank had cracked and he'd lost a bit too much oil. Next lap Bartlett came by on seven cylinders.

The report, written by an Alan Davis (unknown to me) then describes Bartlett's final laps... "...and at this point Bartlett showed what a tremendous driver he is, for Mildren did not call him in. He could see that Kevin was driving superbly to try to complete the 40-lap race and keep Lawrence at bay. In the next three laps Lawrence was only able to make back two of the five seconds gap as Bartlett gave it everything he could, clipping corners and really sliding through the bends. However it was to no avail, as the engine expired in a big way on Long Loop on the 37th lap, leaving Lawrence with a two lap lead over MacDonald in second place." An exhaust valve head had broken off in the Alfa engine.

Results (40 laps - 120 miles)

1. Air New Zealand: Graeme Lawrence (Ferrari Dino 2.4) 1h 18:42.6
2. John MacDonald (Brabham BT23C FVA) 38 laps
3. Albert Poon (Brabham BT30 FVA) 38 laps
4. Malcolm Ramsay (Elfin 600C Repco 2.5 V8) 36 laps

A week later it was Selangor again, the Batu Tiger circuit is described as much more car-friendly than Singapore. Lawrence quickly got down to 1:20.3 in Thursday's unofficial practice, but officially it was Stewart with the spare 2-litre engine (after the 1.8 split a bore) who got pole with a 1:24.8, then Lawrence on 1:25.4 and Ramsay on 1:33.1, with MacDonald, Iriawan and Poon next from Bussell. Bartlett had flown off to America.

18 cars faced the starter on the Sunday with heavy clouds overhead. Stewart led away and headed them into the rain that began the first time down the straight. With a 150-yard lead past the tower the first time, Stewart was looking good, but the third time out of the hairpin, while lapping a Lotus 7, wheels came into contact and Stewart spun, a rear upright was broken and he was out.

Lawrence inherited a wet lead and drove steadily away from the rest. Iriawan was delayed with a bent exhaust system, Ramsay lost his second place with a collapsed suspension, MacDonald survived to be second.

Results (60 laps - 126 miles)

1. Air New Zealand: Graeme Lawrence (Ferrari Dino 2.4) 1h 41:45.5
2. John MacDonald (Brabham BT23C FVA) 58 laps
3. Albert Poon (Brabham BT30 FVA) 57 laps
4. Jan Bussell (Brabham BT 14 t/c) 54 laps

No lap times given for this race at all.

#29 Jimmy Piget

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 23:22

Lot of thanks, David : I didn't yet know the one won by Mike Hunt...

#30 Ray Bell

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Posted 21 November 2003 - 01:04

Looks like the 1971 race was a bit of a good one... entries from Lawrence (BT29 FVA), Ken Smith (NZ - Lotus 69 FVA), Ken Goodwin (Rennmax t/c 1600), Bob Muir (Mildren Submarine Waggott TC4V), Carey Taylor (NZ - BT21), Max Stewart (Rennmax-Mildren Alfa GTaM), John Walker (Elfin 600 t/c 1600) and Malcolm Ramsay (Elfin 600 - and I'm not sure what power unit it had). Kiyoshi Misaki brought a BT15 from Japan with a twin-cam, Kinoshita had the KY Special which was a Brabham based car with a Honda 850 engine. Maw ran again in the Elfin, Poon in the BT21, MacDonald had the Brabham "that Mike Costin used when developing the FVA"... Bussell ran a BT15, Bob Birrell a FF Hawke, Sonny Rajah came on the scene with a Lotus 69, Edward Tan ran an Elfin Mono (Grice's old 1100?) and Lee Han Seng (remember him?) came out of retirement with his BT18.

Times in the 2:04s were seen by MacDonald and Lawrence in practice, but the preliminary 20-lapper saw Stewart do a 2:02.4 before the oil pump belt failed in his hastily-installed engine that I never knew went into that car! Maybe my memory is failing me, I must have read this report before?

Macdonald was going away in this race, with Lawrence and Walker trailling, Ramsay broke his gearbox on the line. Lawrence was having a problem with his engine, so Walker was troubling him greatly, while a good dice between ex-Vee man Goodwin and Lee ended when the latter ran into the back of the Rennmax and spun.

Lawrence struggled past Walker, but the future AGP winner got back ahead again to finish twelve seconds behind the surprisingly fast (he had a metal plate put in his arm after a motorcycle accident at Macao just months before) Macdonald. Smith was fourth, Muir fifth and Taylor sixth. Rajah, Ramsay, Stewart, Hunter (was that Jim, later to race a Torana? I think so), Maw, Misaki and Poon had cars to repair before the main race.

A sorting session was organised for race morning and Steward lapped in 2:02.1, so Alec was pretty hopeful for a better result at last. Ramsay, however, had come from the airport with the bits for his gearbox and they were the wrong ones. Jack Brabham was on hand to flag the field away when they formed up.

They made it hard for Jack... just as the start was due, some official started to stroll across in front of the grid.

When they got away, it didn't take long for Lawrence to take charge, with Walker and MacDonald in his wake ahead of Muir, Smith, Stewart, Taylor, Lee, Goodwin and Rajah... then a gap to the rest. Lee lasted only two laps before stopping at the Snakes with a dropped valve, and by that time Stewart had forged past Smith and Muir to be challenging Macdonald.

MacDonald responded by passing Walker, so Stewart followed through, then four laps later he passed Macdonald to be just 19.2 seconds behind the leader. But it all fell apart for the Mildren camp from that point... lap 13 the gap was 26.6 seconds, then a lap later Stewart spun lapping a tailender, falling to fifth. Walker had repassed Macdonald by this time as the latter's arm started to give him a hard time.

Lawrence wasn't getting it all his own way either, a nose wing got bent (lapping a tailender or what?) and after a lap or so he pitted to have it taped up and lost a minute. He rejoined in fourth spot and started a storming drive, reeling in Walker (now second) at four seconds a lap, going by MacDonald and Muir and then Walker and be second. I think. The report is somewhat disjointed.

On the same lap Stewart having suffered yet another oil leak! Smith had earlier pitted to have part of his exhaust system removed after it was damaged and was later to tangle with Kinoshita in the Snakes with unfortunate results for the Lotus, the KY and its driver, who was taken to hospital.

Rajah was fastest of the Singapore drivers, though he was in his first openwheeler race, but posted a time of 2:04.5 before retiring with a dead engine the same lap as Stewart went out.

So Lawrence was leading from lap 23 from Walker, Muir and Macdonald, Taylor, Goodwin, Misaki and Bussell. MacDonald tried to close on Muir again, but didn't make much impression before Muir got the message and opened the gap again.

Lawrence finished the race bathed in oil which was leaking throughout and left him perilously low over the closing laps.

Results (40 laps - 120 miles)

1. Air New Zealand: Graeme Lawrence (Brabham BT29 FVA) 1h 29:58.1 (1:59.8)
2. City-State Racing Team: John Walker (Elfin 600 t/c 1600) 1h 24:03.7 (2:02.8)
3. Judy Muir: Bob Muir (Mildren Waggott TC4V) 1h 24:18.3 (2:02.6)
4. John MacDonald (Brabham BT10 FVA) 1h 24:41.5 (2:03.2)
5. Cary Taylor (Brabham BT21) 37 laps
6. Ken Goodwin (Rennmax t/c 1600) 36 laps

Fastest Lap: Probably Lawrence, 1:59.8.

Edited to correct Macdonald's car model, previously erroneously noted as a BT23C.

#31 Ray Bell

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Posted 21 November 2003 - 03:48

1973, better entry than ever...

Grid:

V Schuppan (1:57.3)______G Lawrence (!:57.1)^
K Smith (1:59.1________L Geoghegan (1:57.8)
M Ramsay (1:59.5)______J Macdonald (1:59.1)
A Stewart (2:01.5)________M Stewart (2:01.3)
A Poon (2:04.0)____________S Rajah (2:02.6)
P Chain (2:07.5)_____________M Hall (2:04.0)
H Wiano (2:08.9)__________J Bussell (2:07.6)

... and there were more: Kiyoshi Misaka (BT36 Toyota), Steve Millen (Elden FF), Harvey Simon (Elfin 600B - Iriawan's old car?), John Green (Chevron B20), Dave Hayward (Hawke FF) and Chong Boon Seng (Brabham BT30) a very slow 2:49.1.

Schuppan had the good gear, a March 722, as did Kenny Smith and Sonny Rajah, and Lawrence had a Surtees TS15, which was overpowering alongside the Ramsay and Geoghegan Birrana 273 twin-cams. Macdonald was up to a Brabham BT40, so was Poon, Tony Stewart's Dolphin was really a BT30 or 36 twin-cam, Max Stewart's Rennmax was his regular car but I don't know which engine he was using, potentially the twin-cam too, though he was faster than he had been with the Alfa engine. Chain was in a Lotus 69 (ex-Rajah?), Bussell a Palliser WDB4, Wiano a GRD 272.

There was plenty of different cars there, and for the first time (that we can actually tell...) no sports cars.

The cars had, by the way, come from Selangor where they had run in the Malaysian Grand Prix. Macdonald had won this from Canadian Brian Robertson and Poon... all drove BT40s. The Selangor GP was held later in the year.

By the way, another name was given for the Thompson Road circuit, though it's clear it's the same circuit, in this report by Peter Collins... it's called the Sembawang Circuit.

Leo Geoghegan passed early leader Lawrence on the sixth lap, lapping up the handling of the new machine from the drawing board of Tony Alcock. Schuppan was third at this stage, but was under pressure from Ramsay, then came Macdonald, clear of Tony Stewart, Smith, Max Stewart and Rajah.

For fifteen laps Geoghegan stormed away, but then had to pit when the engine began to stutter... the master switch on the roll-over bar had failed and it was shorted out to enable him to continue. At the same time, Schuppan showered Ramsay's identical car with rocks when he ran wide on a fast corner. One rock punctured the fuel tank, Ramsay trailed flames for a couple of laps and then stopped.

And while Geoghegan was heading for the pits, Lawrence lost the use of his mechanical fuel pump, and whether this slowed him as he switched on the electric one or it meant the engine lost power I don't know, but the net result was that Schuppan swept into the lead.

Geoghegan's return saw the lap record (Bartlett's from 1970's preliminary race) under threat as he carved his way through the backmarkers trying to regain as much of the two laps he lost as possible. He had to pit again later, but the record was his and he completed 41 laps for ninth place.

Rajah was out at 25 laps with the battery dragging behind the car and Smith struck problems to lose contact with the Stewarts, big Max passing young Tony as this happened for fourth.

Both leaders had problems. Schuppan's airbox was falling off, but that wasn't as bad as the battery losing charge in Lawrence's car and causing his engine to run roughly. The race ran out like this.

Results (50 laps - 150 miles)

1. Singapore Airlines: Vern Schuppan (March Hart 722) 1h 38:58.3 (1:56.8)
2. Singapore Airlines: Graeme Lawrence (Surtees TS15) 1h 39:36.8
3. Cathay Pacific Air: John Macdonald (Brabham BT40 Hart) 49 laps
4. Singapore Airlines: Max Stewart (Rennmax England t/c) 49 laps
5. Paul England Engineering: Tony Stewart (Dolphin England t/c) 49 laps
6. Air New Zealand: Ken Smith (March 722 Hart) 47 laps
7. Team Rothmans: Jan Bussell (Palliser BRM t/c) 47 laps
8. Air New Zealand: Steve Millen (Elden Mk 8) 43 laps
9. Grace Bros Race Team: Leo Geoghegan (Birrana 273 Hart t/c) 41 laps
10. Camel Melinda: Harvey Simon (Elfin 600B) 40 laps

Fastest lap and new outright record: Geoghegan, 1:54.9.

As to the engines in the cars, those I know were twin-cams (1600s) I've denoted as such. The other Hart engines may have been twin-cams or they might have been F2 engines. But it does appear to me that there might have been a 1600cc limit on the race this year... in other words, for the first time it was run to a specific category. But the report mentions Geoghegan beating Levis' under 2-litre record too... so possibly the limit was 2-litres?

#32 Leo

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Posted 12 January 2004 - 15:28

I accidentally stumbled upon this 6-minute clip about the 1966 Singapore GP:

http://www.sg/flavou...media/NHB11.wmv

#33 Ray Bell

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Posted 13 January 2004 - 06:02

Well, that's a bit of a shame, Leo...

Could you try again with that url?

#34 Leo

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Posted 13 January 2004 - 16:49

Ray: the URL works fine with me, but if you experience problems, go to:
http://www.sg/flavou..._feast_back.asp and choose the clip from the list.

#35 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 April 2005 - 21:45

Thanks to a prompt e.mailed to me, I've corrected the 1971 entry of John MacDonald from BT23C to BT10... the Racing Car News report even having noted that the car was seven years old, which should have tipped me off!

But I now note that my 1970 summary shows him in a BT23C, which is obviously where I drew my surmise from about the 1971 entry... and then when I look at Racing Car News for the 1970 report I find that it's there described as such in the KL GP report, but as a BT20 in the Singapore GP report!

All reports from Allan or Alan Davis...

#36 Eli Solomon

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 06:05

Brabham-Ford of John MacDonald - this would have been an older car like a BT10 with an FVA engine. I found an obscure reference to the John Macdonald Brabham being some sort of prototype that Mike Costin apparently used when developing the FVA. The FVA was the Four Valve, Series A Cosworth engine and development work by Keith Duckworth began in July 1965 with the first engine running on a test bed in February 1966. Mike Costin tested it in a single-seater Brabham chassis in the summer of 1966. If true, then one could assume that it would have been something before the BT21 and 23. This would mean that the three photographs of Mike Costin testing the FVA in a Brabham in the Cosworth book by Graham Robson could have actually been the MacDonald BT10 car! The Mike Costin photos can be found in Robson's Cosworth p87 (from Phipps Photographic).
NB: Big Mac drove a BT10 at Macau in 1971 (#79 car) which would explain things. However, Macau 1971 rules meant max capacity of 1600 for the single seaters, with max 2 valve per cyl heads. No way he'd have had the FVA in that car in Macau. I'll have to check with him and Albert Poon on that.

#37 David McKinney

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 07:51

There has always been a lot of confusion over what model Brabham single-seaters raced in Asia.
For what it's worth, my own records have Macdonald in an FVA-powered BT23 in 1969 and 1970, a BT30 (with twincam engine) in 1971, a BT36 in 1972 and a BT40 in 1973-74

#38 ekwah

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 03:29

Have just found this BB.

I own the Elfin Mono Mk 2b that Alan Grice took to Singapore in early '68.
It was driven in '68 Singapore GP by Mike Cook, 6th on grid DNF.
'68 Malaysian GP again 6th on grid, DNF.
'68 Johore GP, Mike Cook took 3rd in it. He was leading when he pitted for fuel.
I think that then Tony Maw Drove it to 4th in the '68 Macau GP, and the 3rd in both
Singapore and Selangor Gps in '69.
Edward Tan drove it in at least the '71 Singapore GP with little success.

Can any give any further history of this car, or disprove any of the above.

#39 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:24

It raced at Oran Park... I remember that...

Nice cream colour with a green highlight of some kind. Very neat looking. 1100cc.

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#40 275 GTB-4

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 10:19

Originally posted by Leo
Ray: the URL works fine with me, but if you experience problems, go to:
http://www.sg/flavou..._feast_back.asp and choose the clip from the list.


Well at least the portal works http://www.sg/ you can probably navigate from there...

Yeah....this is probably where the clip resides http://www.smsa.org.sg/

#41 ekwah

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 06:54

A few more thoughts.

In '65 the race was billed as the Singapore GP, in Singapore. I was there, and attended it.

Ray Bell says that Tony Maw bought the Elfin 600 from Garrie Cooper, however I believe that
he only purchased the Twin Cam engine, and some spares. The engine was installed in his Elfin Mono.
Racing Car News shows in the results of Singapore and Selangor Gps that Tony Maw finished 3rd in both, driving an Elfin Mono Mk2b.

David McKinney shows that Tony Maw won the '69 Malaysian GP on 26 Oct '69 in an Elfin 100
(that is a Mono).

As to the engine that Garrie Cooper had in his Elfin 600, engines were often named after the outfit that tuned them, therefor a Ford t/c could be a Cosworth, or a BRM, or a Holbay etc.
Garrie had a Lotus-Ford Twin Cam tuned by Cosworth.

Alan Grice raced the Elfin Mono extensively in Australia from July '66 to early '68 when it was
taken to Singapore.
It was a pale yellow, witha green stripe on each side.

It would be nice to find out what colours it was when Tony Maw had it.

#42 Milan Fistonic

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 07:09

Welcome Ray.

Good to see another Kiwi on TNF.

#43 Ray Bell

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 07:42

Tony Maw bought the Garrie Cooper Elfin 600... but in this post:

http://forums.autosp...&postid=1923734

...I believe it could be shown that he didn't buy it directly from Garrie.

No question that he bought it, however. He brought it back to Australia with him, sold it to Paul Hamilton and it's still in Paul's garage.

It's the original Elfin 600... and probably the most original Elfin 600.

#44 Allen Brown

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 21:59

Here's something I bought at Beaulieu this year and had forgotten I'd got:

Posted Image

Come on then David, how many of these cars can you identify?

Posted Image

Allen

#45 Allen Brown

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 22:16

BTW, the program refers to past events as:

1st Malaysian GP - 1962
2nd Malaysian GP - 1963
3rd Malaysian GP - 1964
4th Malaysian GP - 1965
1st Singapore GP - 1966
2nd Singapore GP - 1967

Mike Cook (#75 1100cc Elfin-Holbay) was seventh at the end of the first lap but lost places quite quickly.

Allen

#46 275 GTB-4

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 23:32

Originally posted by Allen Brown
Here's something I bought at Beaulieu this year and had forgotten I'd got:

Allen


Allen, do you know if the Driver of the #32 Le Grand was a signwriter by trade??

and A.N. Other in the Brabham 1500...is he another one we may know ;) :)

#47 gdecarli

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 23:50

Originally posted by Allen Brown
Here's something I bought at Beaulieu this year and had forgotten I'd got

Have you got any info/map about track used?

Ciao,
Guido

#48 Ray Bell

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 00:03

Originally posted by gdecarli
Have you got any info/map about track used?


The Thompson Road circuit, wasn't it?

I have if he hasn't, but I'm fairly sure he has...

#49 ekwah

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 05:11

Can't ague with you about Tony Maw buying Garrie's Elfin 600, however he appears
to have continued to race a Mono for some time. The Mono (ex Alan Grice) originally had an
1100cc Holbay in it, and Tony installed a 1600cc Twin Cam.

In Racing Car News of Dec 68 Tony wrote an article on Macau GP and says that he was 4th
in a Mono.
The book 'Colour and Noise' (the history of Macau GP) shows that Tony was 4th in a Mono in '68.
Racing Car News May '69, story by Tony says that he drove a Mono to 3rd in both Singapore
and Selangor GPs in 69.
New Zealand Motorman magazine May and June '69 stories by Graeme Lawence olso says that Tony was 3rd in both races in a Mono.

#50 Ray Bell

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 08:12

Yes, apparently (as per the cited story) Hengke Iriawan used it for a while...

Did you read that story?