Jump to content


Photo

What if Keke continued?


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 man

man
  • Member

  • 1,301 posts
  • Joined: October 01

Posted 12 December 2003 - 15:01

Much has been made of former champions continuing to race past their peaks or to the point of diminishing their former reputation. Names such as Piquet, Mansell, Hill and Jones spring to mind. What what about the timing of Keke Rosberg's retirement at the end of 1986?

Although his final season was a disappointment as he failed to win a race in the same car that Prost won the championship with, it was mostly due to the car not suiting Keke's style of driving. Keke often proved he was as quick if not quicker than Prost but didn't have the required consistency. He certainly would have made F1 more interesting through 1987 and 1988 if he had a top car and i'm sure he would have áged'better than Piquet did for instance.

They often say you should retire at the top, but I think Keke's retirement was a touch premature.

Advertisement

#2 KWSN - DSM

KWSN - DSM
  • Member

  • 8,176 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 12 December 2003 - 15:11

I think that the act (and art) of racing in F1 is extremely difficult, I think that must apply an inordinate amount of resources to do so competitively. Obvious (to me at least) all F1 drivers are imensely talented drivers, and any "dog" that we redicule for being "nothing" is MUCH better drivers than any of us can ever aspire to be.

We have seen a couple of seasons back, how WDC winners were not able to really race on, once they had decided to stop. I think that Damon Hill tarnished part of his legacy by his last season with Jordan, and I think that Hakkinen is already the forgotten two time WDC, due to how he let his last season be less than what we all knew that he was able to do.

Once a driver have decided that "this is it", they should stop racing immediately.

Keke Rosberg is my all time favorite driver in F1, however I will never argue that he was as talented as Prost, Lauda, Gilles Villeneuve, Senna, Piquet. However he was a VEY good F1 driver, and he was a driver who is not alwys given credit for how good he was, mostly due to the sad backdrop that helped him win his WDC.

Had he taken on Mansell, their internal battles would have created legendary races, and woefull non-finishes. I think that Rosberg was a better driver than Mansell ever was, and I think that he could have taken care of Mansel at Williams.

However he did decide to retire, and once that is done. Then you are done.

:cool:

#3 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 37,309 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 12 December 2003 - 15:33

Where would he have gone for 1987? Stayed at McLaren? Williams was all tied up, Senna would not have had him at Lotus and there were no other leading drives (although Keke at Benetton would have been interesting).

Had he stayed at McLaren, his 1987 would probably have been decent, maybe a win or 2, but not enough to keep him in the seat instead of Senna. Maybe he would then have gone to Lotus on a swap, which would have been a better move for the Hethel outfit than taking the demotivated (and at times frankly hopeless) Piquet. But I don't see F1 as being that much more different.

#4 man

man
  • Member

  • 1,301 posts
  • Joined: October 01

Posted 12 December 2003 - 15:45

With Berger going to Ferrari, Keke could have stayed at McLaren (where he would have been a lot more sucessfull than Johansson) or as Ensign said made a move to Benetton who were quite competitive at times with the Ford engine.

I just look at the list of drivers in 1988. After Senna and Prost, the only other true top drivers were Berger and Mansell.

Piquet and Alboreto were on a sharp decline, and then you had a group of drivers consisting of Boutsen, Nannini, Patrese, Capelli and Warwick. No disrespect to the last seven drivers I mentioned, but Keke was different class and with his forceful driving style would have provided more entertainment. He certainly wouldn't have been in a position to compete for championships, but i'm sure he was still capable of picking 1 or 2 wins per season for the next couple of years which is what Keke was used to after all!

#5 dmkerry

dmkerry
  • New Member

  • 27 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 12 December 2003 - 16:23

I seem to remember that Keke was tired of the fuel limitations in place at the time. Pacing a car was not his favorite thing to do. I believe that Keke mentioned once that if he had known about the upcoming switch to all atmo engines he would have re-considered. Doesn’t change where he would have gone, Mclaren in 1987 seems likely with a switch back to williams or to benetton being possible in 1988.

#6 Henri Greuter

Henri Greuter
  • Member

  • 4,802 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 12 December 2003 - 16:30

Not so sure if Keke had been very succesful if he had continued racing in '87 and 88.

At McLaren he was kind of wasted since Barnard wanted smooth cars (like Prost) and those cars didn't suit Keke that well. Those last years of the fuel consumption era, I have my doubt if Keke would have enjoyed racing in those years, particularly at McLaren, at that time still Prost's team.
It required him to adjust his drive style too much to really be successfull like in his best years. Johansson was less spectacular but it always appeared to me his drivestyle came closer to that of Prost that Keke's.

If Keke would have stayed on and got into the atmo era again, now that could have been interesting since by then there was fuel enough to burn again, which suited his drive style. His years at Peugeot and in touring cars indicated to me he had not lost the touch if the formula suited him.


Henri Greuter

#7 caneparo

caneparo
  • Member

  • 94 posts
  • Joined: October 03

Posted 12 December 2003 - 19:19

I think he understood everything then he retired, being remebered as a top driver. Keke Rosberg was a world chapmion, he was world champion for a lucky strike that year. He knew it.
Goodbye
Antonio

#8 mp4

mp4
  • Member

  • 584 posts
  • Joined: July 01

Posted 16 December 2003 - 00:17

I would have loved to see him continue.
In 1984, I recall reading that Patrick Head mumbled something about the chassis being a tad evil. He felt that the next year would be better.
If I were a Williams driver, at that point, I'd be a bit concerned...
Keke is a different breed. When he won the race in Dallas, the sports commentator asked him some sort of inane question and his response was not what any company executive would like to hear...
THAT'S why he was a great racer. He did what he did and told it like he saw... Kinda like Niki...
For the sake of argument, had he continued, I see him at Williams. He would have replaced Nige and given any team mate some serious head aches.

Cheers :wave: :wave:

#9 Vicuna

Vicuna
  • Member

  • 1,588 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 16 December 2003 - 18:32

The bigger question is 'Why did it take so long for F1 team managers to pick him up?'

Keke was fighting wheel to wheel with Gilles in Canada, dominated 2 NZ Championships and had done some F2 but was damn near 30 before he got near a F1 car.

Had Jones and Reutemann not both retired at the same time, he may never have got near a car capable of winning a F1 race let a lone a championship.

Makes me wonder how smart F1 team managers are sometimes.

#10 Manfred Cubenoggin

Manfred Cubenoggin
  • Member

  • 804 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 17 December 2003 - 03:13

Keke certainly was one of my favourites. Back in 1976, Gilles Villeneuve ruled in FA's here in North Armerica and he returned to defend his titles in '77. At the Mosport round early in the season, I was standing at the fence in corner one watching the warmup for the FA race when a mechanic from my race shop walked by just as Rosberg sifted by. He saw me standing there and said, 'That guy's going to win the race.' I'd never even heard of Keke at that point. From my vantage point in one, Keke and Gilles dueled and, IIRC, banged wheels there on lap one with Rosberg taking the lead and motoring off into the distance. A frustrated Gilles spun, a couple of times IIRC, in hot pursuit. Well, if I didn't know who he was til then, I certainly did after that performance!

Another fine memory is watching a telecast of Keke lay down rubber coming off the far chicane at Hockenheim late in the race in his final year. IIRC, he ran out of fuel. Bugger.

#11 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,887 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 17 December 2003 - 20:09

I can't resist mentioning something here...

Keke Rosberg born 6 Dec 1948
David Beard born 6 Dec 1948

And sometimes people ask me why I feel the need to wear a moustache....

#12 deangelis86

deangelis86
  • Member

  • 365 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 01 January 2004 - 15:26

Keke's retirement had nothing at all to do with being tired of fuel consumption racing, but everything to do with the death of his closest friend - Elio at a test session in May 1986, if Nigel Mansell and Nigel Roebuck are to be believed.

#13 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
  • Member

  • 53,952 posts
  • Joined: December 99

Posted 01 January 2004 - 21:27

Which makes me wonder why Brabham wasn't mentioned above as a possible venue for his continued career... they were still a potential force those days.

I think Manfred Cubenoggin has a good point... why wasn't he picked up sooner?

From memory, he did get a couple of drives with Teddy Yip, but he was obviously a serious contender in anything he drove for years... why no serious takers?

And I think caneparo is way off the mark. If ever there was a modern driver who showed the value of standing on the gas for the whole distance, not ever giving in, it was Keke... and I think you'll find that Nigel Mansell owes him greatly for what he learned from him.

#14 St.Hubbins

St.Hubbins
  • Member

  • 119 posts
  • Joined: December 03

Posted 02 January 2004 - 18:56

I'm not so sure that Brabham would have been a good option. They had begun their downhill slide after Piquet's 1983 championship. In 1984 they were terribly unreliable, and even a midseason pair of wins did little to add renewed hope, then by 1985 they had been well and truly overtaken by Williams and Lotus (to add to Ferrari and McLaren). 1986 was a bad year with the loss of Elio, and just two poinys in the season would harldy give Keke the incentive to carry on into 1987 with that team.

Rosberg once said of Prost "I know I am fast, but he [Alain] is faster, in a deceptive way". This was in 1986 as teammates, and it was possibly the realisation that he was pretty much a finished driver in F1.

Such a shame as it was Keke that hooked me on F1 in the early 1983 with his ragged style, so apparent at Long Beach, and his utterly dominant victory at Monaco. I was lucky enough to be stood on the outside of Club Corner at Silverstone in 1985 when he set 'that' qualifying lap, and Keke seemed to be able to defy the laws of physics.

Like KWSM - DSM earlier, Rosberg remains my favourite ever F1 driver, but sometimes I feel that he might just be built up to be something he never was. Sure, he was a great driver and a fantastic racer, but his flair and flamboyance, and tendancy to non-conformity can overshadow the fact that he certainly didn't have the entire package in the way that Prost, Piquet, Schumacher of Hakkinen did. He was more similar to, although hugely more lucky than Jean Alesi.

His last GP, at Adelaide in 1986 showed that he still had the talent if not the head for F1 racing. If I recall correctly he simply drove away from the field but disregarded his tyres to such an extent that he had a blow out 20 laps from the end (and this after Prost had already suffered a puncture earlier on). And as we all know, Adelaide, 1986 and tyre wear was rather critical.

#15 -Jap-

-Jap-
  • New Member

  • 22 posts
  • Joined: June 06

Posted 29 June 2006 - 09:08

I'd say Keke's retirement was a sum of these things:

1. As a 1982 WDC he had gain a reputation as he wanted it, as well as money to suit his lifestyle. So nothing to proof, nothing to gain..

2. He recognized immediately that the move to McLaren wasn't good. The car didn't suit for his driving style and partly because of the car he felt like he had become number 2 for Alain.

3. Turbo era rules in '86 with fuel consumption thing didn't suit Keke's racing spirit.

4. Death of Elio had a big effect on Keke's decision.

There is two big ifs.

1. If '82 would have gone to Ferraris, Renaults, Watson or somebody else?

Well, I'd say in that case Keke would have been racing in F1 longer, hungrily trying to catch WDC! On the other hand Keke was at the age of 37 in '86, so maybe just few more years longer but that might have done it to get the WDC, like in '87 or '88. In this point we come to the question about choosing team.

2. If Keke had stayed on Williams for '86 -> '87, '88?

It is easy to say that Keke's biggest error in his career was to leave Williams at the end of '85! If he would have stayed there, I could say that he would be the WDC at '86 maybe even '87 or '88 with magnificant Williams Honda. Maybe lost his appetite for racing '88, as being double WDC, and lost '88 title for his long time teammate Mansell, leaving himself to Ibiza with Lamborgihis and yachts.

In the previous case of "ifs", I see that Keke wanted WDC so bad that it overdrove his negative feelings for fuel regulations, feelings of Elios death and potentially threat of Frank's increasing support for his forthcoming "goldenboy" Mansell.

#16 Oho

Oho
  • Member

  • 7,589 posts
  • Joined: November 98

Posted 29 June 2006 - 09:35

Originally posted by deangelis86
Keke's retirement had nothing at all to do with being tired of fuel consumption racing, but everything to do with the death of his closest friend - Elio at a test session in May 1986, if Nigel Mansell and Nigel Roebuck are to be believed.


I have understood form number of sources one of them being Keke that he had his career largely mapped out in advance and he had more or less set his retirement date years in advance.

At least according to Gerhard Berger Keke retired too early, as Gerhard said regarding hiw own retirement something to the effect, that he wants to time his rertirement to perfection, not too early like Keke to end up with regrets and not too late like Piquet to and up as an also ran for lack of interest.

#17 eldougo

eldougo
  • Member

  • 6,248 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 29 June 2006 - 10:37

Originally posted by caneparo
I think he understood everything then he retired, being remebered as a top driver. Keke Rosberg was a world chapmion, he was world champion for a lucky strike that year. He knew it.
Goodbye
Antonio


_____________________________________________________

Thanks Antonio for putting my thoughts down,in short and simple terms instead of this waffle on about some thing that never happened. :up: ...This in NOSTALGIA forum not make believe......

#18 David M. Kane

David M. Kane
  • Member

  • 5,399 posts
  • Joined: December 00

Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:22

After all it is their lives, different people do different things for different reasons. Plus F1 is the craziest of all worlds, and it VERY, VERY dangerous...some guys actually want to live! Keke is and was a very, very smart guy!

Sometimes you can tell a lot about a guy by observing their children...NICO is a winner, a gentleman, very bright and has both feet firmly planted.

#19 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:43

Good thread, which I seem to have missed first time round :)

I think Keke would've had an absolutely miserable time on the 'economy runs' in '87-8. Really hated it. However, I think his ability to improvise and to help develop a car, and above all his love of driving the nuts off his vehicle whilst keeping it under very tight control, would've made him a good choice for 1989 and the new atmo formula -- I think those cars would've appealed to his way of going racing.

Can't see him sticking around through the 90s with traction/launch control and active, though -- I reckon he would've quit F1 by 90/91 at the latest.

I never quite felt Keke was quite "on it" in the Peugeot 905 - I don't think it suited his style and I don't feel he ever really fitted properly into the team, despite some excellent results.

Advertisement

#20 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,887 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 29 June 2006 - 21:12

Originally posted by petefenelon
I never quite felt Keke was quite "on it" in the Peugeot 905 - I don't think it suited his style


A sports car is the place for the has been or the never quite made it.
Not the place for Keke....I didn't take much notice, and I'm surprised he bothered at all.

#21 Twin Window

Twin Window
  • Nostalgia Host

  • 6,611 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 29 June 2006 - 21:16

Originally posted by David Beard

...and I'm surprised he bothered at all.

I can think of a few [hundred] thousand reasons!

#22 Vincenzo Lancia

Vincenzo Lancia
  • Member

  • 131 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 30 June 2006 - 00:39

Originally posted by David Beard
I can't resist mentioning something here...

Keke Rosberg born 6 Dec 1948
David Beard born 6 Dec 1948

And sometimes people ask me why I feel the need to wear a moustache....


Yeah - quite stupid I agree, off course that's a preference deriving directly from your surname.... :)

#23 cosworth bdg

cosworth bdg
  • Member

  • 1,350 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 30 June 2006 - 02:13

Originally posted by David M. Kane
After all it is their lives, different people do different things for different reasons. Plus F1 is the craziest of all worlds, and it VERY, VERY dangerous...some guys actually want to live! Keke is and was a very, very smart guy!

Sometimes you can tell a lot about a guy by observing their children...NICO is a winner, a gentleman, very bright and has both feet firmly planted.

Very well put ,he knew when enough was enough................................................

#24 Chris Bloom

Chris Bloom
  • Member

  • 626 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 30 June 2006 - 05:00

Keke was my favourite driver of the mid-eighties, what dissapointed me most was when he left Williams at the end of 1985 just when they were becoming a dominant team. I think Mansell and Rosberg would have made a better team for 86 and would have ensured the championship for Williams. Adelaide was bitterly dissapointing and I was just as sad to see Keke stop while leading as I was to see 'Our Nige' lose the championship ):

#25 Huw Jadvantich

Huw Jadvantich
  • Member

  • 602 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 30 June 2006 - 05:10

I think Keke was one of the closest a 'modern' F1 driver got to being a well rounded human being, a sportsman as opposed to the dedicated 'F1 champ or die' mentality. Whilst being a highly talented racing driver , I believe it wasn't the be all and end all for him, merely a great way to live and make a living. When he stopped enjoying F1 he stopped doing it and made a good living out of other less precious formulas. it wasn't a difficult decision for him.
As for comparing his talent with Villeneuve, Mansell and Prost, if the car suited him I reckon he was on equal terms with all of them, its just that F1 suited Prost's style better.
Villeneuve Rosberg and Mansell in can Am cars together - now that would have been worth seeing!
As for Sportscar racing being for hasbeens or notgoodenoughs, that is utter tosh.
Getting into F1 is the next best thing to a lottery, with twenty or so places available, there are probably fifty or so who would do as good a job at any one time than the current mob - top two or three excepted.

#26 Michael Clark

Michael Clark
  • Member

  • 269 posts
  • Joined: November 05

Posted 30 June 2006 - 05:33

Good post Huw

Agree with all of it

#27 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,887 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 30 June 2006 - 07:58

Originally posted by Huw Jadvantich

As for Sportscar racing being for hasbeens or notgoodenoughs, that is utter tosh.


Sorry Huw. I couldn't find a "tongue -in -cheek" smiley!

#28 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,887 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 30 June 2006 - 11:39

Originally posted by Huw Jadvantich

Getting into F1 is the next best thing to a lottery, with twenty or so places available, there are probably fifty or so who would do as good a job at any one time than the current mob - top two or three excepted.


I have often tried to make exactly the same point :)

#29 Mallory Dan

Mallory Dan
  • Member

  • 2,674 posts
  • Joined: September 03

Posted 30 June 2006 - 13:07

As regards Keke being the last 'properly rounded' person to excel in GP racing, I've always thought Damon H was a decent sort.

#30 Vicuna

Vicuna
  • Member

  • 1,588 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 30 June 2006 - 21:55

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
As regards Keke being the last 'properly rounded' person to excel in GP racing, I've always thought Damon H was a decent sort.


Agree.

Pretty wife too

#31 cosworth bdg

cosworth bdg
  • Member

  • 1,350 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 01 July 2006 - 06:19

Originally posted by Huw Jadvantich
I think Keke was one of the closest a 'modern' F1 driver got to being a well rounded human being, a sportsman as opposed to the dedicated 'F1 champ or die' mentality. Whilst being a highly talented racing driver , I believe it wasn't the be all and end all for him, merely a great way to live and make a living. When he stopped enjoying F1 he stopped doing it and made a good living out of other less precious formulas. it wasn't a difficult decision for him.
As for comparing his talent with Villeneuve, Mansell and Prost, if the car suited him I reckon he was on equal terms with all of them, its just that F1 suited Prost's style better.
Villeneuve Rosberg and Mansell in can Am cars together - now that would have been worth seeing!
As for Sportscar racing being for hasbeens or notgoodenoughs, that is utter tosh.
Getting into F1 is the next best thing to a lottery, with twenty or so places available, there are probably fifty or so who would do as good a job at any one time than the current mob - top two or three excepted.

Excellent post , i totally agree with what you have said.......................................................................................................................................................

#32 john aston

john aston
  • Member

  • 820 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 01 July 2006 - 06:20

I saw Keke win the very wet International Trophy in 78 and was a fan from then on.He was a hugely underrated driver, not as quick as Prost or Senna perhaps but at least as good as the rest of his peers.Including, I have to say ,the overhyped Villeneuve who was spectacular ,wonderful to watch but did make too many mistakes.Pause for outraged responses- what about Spain 81 ,French GP 79 etc?
I was watching at Woodcote when Keke did THAT lap and he was uttterly brillinat that day, a real hero. I loved the interview with him in Moor Sport recently- how refreshing to encounter an articulate and entertaining GP driver.Just like Damon Hill - as was noted above.

#33 Huw Jadvantich

Huw Jadvantich
  • Member

  • 602 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 01 July 2006 - 06:21

Those Smileys probably help immensly when we are writing this stuff - I obviously took you too seriously on the sports car jibe David! (Talking of Smileys have we had a decent thread on Gordon?)
I agree Damon Hill is similar to Keke in that way, a well rouded individual - Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi also came after Rosberg and fall into the 'almost normal human being' category.
Keke was pretty irreverant about some of the more precious aspects of F1, and still is, yet he still manages to remain a true enthusiast.

#34 cosworth bdg

cosworth bdg
  • Member

  • 1,350 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 01 July 2006 - 06:42

Originally posted by Mallory Dan
As regards Keke being the last 'properly rounded' person to excel in GP racing, I've always thought Damon H was a decent sort.

Yes i totally agree, in our local open wheeler racing [AF/1/2 ] we had a similar driver/ personality ,one Leo Geoghegan, one of natures gentlemen and a decent person.................................................................................................... :)

#35 ian senior

ian senior
  • Member

  • 2,140 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 03 July 2006 - 08:23

Originally posted by mp4
If I were a Williams driver, at that point, I'd be a bit concerned...
Keke is a different breed. When he won the race in Dallas, the sports commentator asked him some sort of inane question and his response was not what any company executive would like to hear...


I wonder if that kind of thing was one of the reasons why he didn't get into F1 any earlier. Keke is a very intelligent and outspoken guy and might have been seen as a bit too brash at a time when corporate-speak was beginning to become important. His rather lurid style of driving might have put some team managers off too.

#36 Patrick Fletcher

Patrick Fletcher
  • Member

  • 683 posts
  • Joined: February 04

Posted 03 July 2006 - 09:31

Originally posted by ian senior
His rather lurid style of driving might have put some team managers off too.

Keke's method of passing was great to watch - even though he had the exit speed from corners to get past in a straight line - he tracked the car in front, GRUIA got the extra advantage and shot by.
Fantastic to watch, he did pass and/or lap a lot of cars in his FPacific days in NZ

#37 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,549 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 03 July 2006 - 09:31

I have a great memory of Keke from the 1978 Formula Two meeting at Donington, where he won in the Fred Opert Chevron.

But it wasn't his driving on the Sunday I'm referring to.

It was his performance in the Donington canteen on Saturday lunchtime.

There were a group of us, about half a dozen in total and I was sat opposite Keke.
He demolished a plate of bacon, eggs, sausages, beans and God knows what else (there was no room on the plate for any more food when he started) in half the time everybody else took. And nobody had anywhere near the amount he had in the first place! At which point he then started to chain-smoke his cigarettes... :eek:

Amazing. Great bloke. Yes, they would be horrified in this day and age.

#38 KWSN - DSM

KWSN - DSM
  • Member

  • 8,176 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 03 July 2006 - 10:06

Originally posted by MCS
I have a great memory of Keke from the 1978 Formula Two meeting at Donington, where he won in the Fred Opert Chevron.

But it wasn't his driving on the Sunday I'm referring to.

It was his performance in the Donington canteen on Saturday lunchtime.

There were a group of us, about half a dozen in total and I was sat opposite Keke.
He demolished a plate of bacon, eggs, sausages, beans and God knows what else (there was no room on the plate for any more food when he started) in half the time everybody else took. And nobody had anywhere near the amount he had in the first place! At which point he then started to chain-smoke his cigarettes... :eek:

Amazing. Great bloke. Yes, they would be horrified in this day and age.


Story like this is part of what made me adore Keke. He is and will continue to be my alltime favorite F1 driver.

:cool:

#39 petefenelon

petefenelon
  • Member

  • 4,815 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 03 July 2006 - 11:15

Originally posted by Huw Jadvantich
Those Smileys probably help immensly when we are writing this stuff - I obviously took you too seriously on the sports car jibe David! (Talking of Smileys have we had a decent thread on Gordon?)
I agree Damon Hill is similar to Keke in that way, a well rouded individual - Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi also came after Rosberg and fall into the 'almost normal human being' category.
Keke was pretty irreverant about some of the more precious aspects of F1, and still is, yet he still manages to remain a true enthusiast.


Panis always came across as being fairly normal - probably the last of the breed. Then again, wasn't he managed by Keke at some point in his career?

Advertisement

#40 Montoya1

Montoya1
  • Member

  • 571 posts
  • Joined: September 05

Posted 03 July 2006 - 19:20

I have been lucky enough to go to a lot a races. I have followed a lot of drivers. But the only time I had the hairs on the back of my neck go up was when KR passed my vantage point during that great lap.

Whatever the X factor is, Keke had more of it than anybody....


dw

#41 KWSN - DSM

KWSN - DSM
  • Member

  • 8,176 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 03 July 2006 - 21:34

Originally posted by petefenelon


Panis always came across as being fairly normal - probably the last of the breed. Then again, wasn't he managed by Keke at some point in his career?


I agree on Panis.

Profusely disagree with anyone calling Alesi well rounded.

:cool: