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1968 Ferrari Tipo 166 Dino Formula II


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#1 WGD706

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Posted 18 January 2004 - 16:45

RM Auction's fifth annual Vintage Motor Cars auction January 23, 2004 offers a 1948 Tucker Torpedo, No. 43 of the 51 produced ($350,000-$450,000); a 1953 Rolls-Royce Silver Dawn drophead coupe ($90,000-$110,000); a 1930 Duesenberg Model J Tourster ($325,000-$375,000);a 1938 Bugatti T57C Atalante coupe, a two-tone black-and-blue two-seater, expected to fetch $400,000 to $600,000 ; and a 1968 Ferrari Tipo 166 Dino Formula II.....ESTIMATE:$ 395,000 -- $ 450,000

Engine: 1593 cc 65o V6 with 4 valve heads, twin overhead camshafts per bank of cyclinders, Lucas slide fuel injection. Compression ratio: 11.2:1, power output estimated at 225 bhp @ 11,000 rpm. Transmission: 5 speed + reverse in line with the final drive. Chassis: multi-tubular space frame with stressed skin to form semimonocoque. Suspension: Front double wish bones and inboard mounted coil springs, adjustable anti-sway bars; rear trailing arms, transverse A-arm an links and outboard mounted coil springs, adjustable anti-sway bar. Brakes: 4-wheel Girling disc, inboard mounted at the rear. Wheelbase: 88.5". Curb weight: 950 Pounds.

Today the production sporting cars built during Enzo Ferrari’s long reign are revered for their speed, styling and stamina but serious students of the marque know that the Commendatore’s real passion was reserved for motor racing. The series produced road cars which began to appear in the early 1950’s were at first merely a quick and convenient method of financing his beloved racing team. Besides fielding a Grand Prix team each year since 1948, Ferraris have won world sports car championships as well as grand touring, sports prototype and European hill climb titles. This diversity of competition even extended to the Indianapolis 500 which was enhanced no less than five times by Ferrari entries during the 1950’s.

One of the most interesting factory racing efforts involved the construction of seven Ferrari Formula II Monoposto machines in the 1967/1968 period to contest a special European driver’s championship. Formula Two was begun in order to develop future Formula One pilots who would race less powerful and expensive formula cars than their Grand Prix counterparts. During the 1967/68/69 seasons stiff opposition came from Matra-Cosworth, Lotus and other state of the art British chassis. The concept of a “training series” for Formula One was of course, not a new one, having its origins in the dawn of motor racing as early as 1898, when these cars entered the voiturette class. Over the years various Formula II engine displacements and types were mandated but without Ferrari participation. However, when the 1967 F2 rules were amended to allow the use of stock block engines of 1.3 to 1.6 liters displacement with no more than six cylinders, Enzo Ferrari mobilized his team to build a new mono posto model for the series.

The major reason of course was that the company already had a suitable production block in their jewel of a V-6 engine first used in the Dino Spyders and Coupes in late 1966, As developed for F-2 racing this engine displaced 1596 cc’s and developed 210 bhp @ 10,500 rpm. Later in 1968, when fitted with new front valve heads and revised fuel injection the quoted power output rose to 225 bhp @ 10,600 rpm.

Only seven 166 Formula 2 Dino’s were built in 1967 and 1968 with even chassis numbers ranging from # 0002 to # 00014. The Ferrari F2 car we are pleased to present here, chassis # 0004 is perhaps the single remaining example with the most illustrious racing history. Historian Alan Boe named S/N 0004 “The Little Giant” in a recent Cavallino Magazine feature article.

# 0004 THE RACING HISTORY
The 1967 F2 season saw limited Ferrari participation with only one event contested by Jonathan Williams in chassis # 0002 as the Scuderia concentrated on improving the cars for 1968. And what a 1968 it proved to be!

“DOWN UNDER” IN THE TASMAN SERIES
After the death of Lorenzo Bandini at Monaco and the injury to Mike Parkes in Belgium, New Zealander Chris Amon was elevated to Ferrari’s lead Grand Prix driver. A full fledged racing effort was now planned for the winter Tasman series where Amon would drive S/N # 0004 with the engine upgraded to Tasman Dino 246rpm, “T” spec of 2,404 cc which developed a strong 285 bhp @ 8900 with prodigious torque in the mid-range.

The series began on January 6 with the New Zealand Grand Prix at the Pukekohe circuit near Auckland, which was laid out around an established horse race track. Chris Amon qualified s/n 0004 second to Jim Clark’s Lotus 49T, and then drove to a win at an average speed of 102.5 mph when Clark’s engine dropped a valve on lap 46. A week later, Amon again brought s/n 0004 home first at the Levin Grand Prix at Levin, New Zealand, beating the Clark Lotus once more. On January 20, Amon qualified s/n 0004 second and finished second to Clark’s Lotus in the Lady Wigram Trophy race on an airfield circuit just outside Christchurch. The final New Zealand race in the Tasman Series was held January 27 at Invercargill – four races in four weeks. Amon outqualified Clark to take the pole position with a 96mph lap, but both Amon and Clark had spins in this race, allowing Bruce McLaren to win in his BRM V-12, Amon coming home fourth in s/n 0004.

111 Tino Brambilla in s/n 0004 won both heats at the Grand Prix of Rome October 27, 1968. (Credit: EA Singer Collection)
The Tasman Series resumed in Australia on February 11, with the Rothman’s 100 International race at the new Surfer’s Paradise course in Queensland. Amon, in s/n 0004, again posted the quickest qualifying time, but the car was now using a new, more powerful 24 valve single ignition V-6 engine with its injection stacks located in the engine vee instead of between the cams, but the effort came to naught as a head gasket blew in the race. A week later, Amon, returning to the three valve engine, qualified s/n 0004 third at the Warwick Farm circuit near Sydney, another course laid out around a horse race track, but overnight prior to the race, the 24 valve unit was reinstalled. Amon turned in a fourth place finish thanks, mainly to a spin to avoid a wayward Graham Hill. On February 25, the Tasman circus was at Melbourne’s Sandown Park, the third Tasman circuit located around a horse race track, for the Australian Grand Prix where Amon, using the 24 valve engine, qualified second and finished second in s/n 0004. The final Tasman race was held March 4 at a very wet Longford, Tasmania – again four races in four weeks. This circuit, which used public roads, featured challenging curves and a 150 mph straight. Amon, who needed a win while holding Clark to fifth or lower in order to win the Tasman Championship could do no better than seventh oerall on the slick circuit. Thus, Clark won the title for Lotus with 44 points to Amon’s 2nd for Ferrari with 36 points.

BACK TO 1.6 LITERS
With the conclusion of racing in the antipodes, Amon’s car was sent back to Maranello to be prepared for the 1968 European F2 season. This involved returning s/n 0004 to 166 configuration with some new twists. Four valve heads with single plug ignition were now ready, with the fuel injectors relocated in the engine vee. A smaller 79.5 mm bore was used with the stroke lengthened to 53.5 mm resulting in a displacement of 1,594 cc. Quoted output was 225 bhp at 10,600 rpm. Wheelbase was increased from 86.6 to 89.8 inches and the rear track was widened from 56.1 inches to 56.5.

S/N # 0004 IN THE 1968 EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP
By May of 1968 Ferrari had the last of the new F2 Dinos available, and these were the cars that were entered in the spring and summer European F2 events. 0004 had to wait in the wings for its chance to race again, but the wait was worth it. On October 13, an updated s/n 0004 was assigned to Ernesto “Tino” Brambilla for the Preis von Wurttemberg F2 race at Hockenheim. Brambilla could only place the car eighth on the grid, but nearing the end of the 35 lap race, he was able to close on the leaders by setting a new F2 lap record of 127.23 mph, faster than his qualifying time. Then, Brambilla uncorked a last lap charge, passing teammate Derek Bell and Matra’s Henri Pescarolo, and putting all four wheels on the grass verge as the three entered the stadium section of the track, thereby claiming Ferrari’s first European Formula Two win since Wolfgang von Trip’s victory on September 4, 1960, in the F2 class at the Italian GP at Monza. Interviewed later, Brambilla had this to say about his win in Germany: “My greatest moment? Naturally, the 13th of October when I raced at Hockenheim… An incredible joy”. The win also made an impression on Enzo Ferrari, who wrote in Pilote Che Gente: “He was the first to win with the Dino Formula Two, which I will not forget.” Then, on October 27, 1968, in the season finale at Vallelunga near Rome, Brambilla had an even more successful weekend in s/n 0004 by qualifying fastest, winning both 40 lap heats, setting fastest lap and leading all but one of the 80 laps.

THE FINAL 1968 RACES OF S/N 0004
After the Rome Grand Prix our Dino was shipped to the Argentinean Temporada Series for Formula Two cars. Tino Brambilla continued his winning form by defeating the field in the first race on December 1, 1968 in Buenos Aires at an average speed of 94.4 mph. His team mate de Adamich won the next three races in s/n 0012 and the championship for Ferrari, while Brambilla suffered mechanical problems. By the 1969 season, although improved with a 232 bhp engine and a hydraulically adjusted rear wing the faithful F2 Dino’s proved to be a little “long in the tooth”. Our s/n 0004, again in Tino Brambilla’s hands recorded 4th places at Thruxton, England and Madrid, Spain. After DNF’s at Nurburgring on April 27th and Monza, Italy on June 22nd the period racing career of s/n 0004 was over.

HONORABLE RETIREMENT AND A RETURN TO GLORY
The factory retained s/n 0004 for three years until it and F2 s/n 0014 went to Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti in New York City. The latter sold s/n 0004 to Larry Wilson of East Lyme, Connecticut who parked the little warrior on an oriental carpet next to his favorite reading chair in the den! In 1985, 14 years later, Wilson passed the car to Grand Prix SSR Motors on Long Island. In September of that year, it was purchased by E.A. Singer of Laurel Hollow, New York who, after a lengthy restoration, created a new career for s/n 0004 – that of a Concours Winner in such prestigious venues as Monterey, The Ferrari Club Nationals at Atlanta and Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta (1988- 1990) as well as Meadowbrook Hall and Concorso Italiano. Interestingly, when Singer restored the car he found that the back of the steering wheel was inscribed with the name “Amon”, the engine was stamped “0004”, the fuel bladder was original to the chassis as likely also the transmission. Both the fuel pump and the road wheels were correctly stamped with a period date code. In January, 1997 our Dino went to Bill Ziering and later to New Zealand where it was displayed in the small museum of David Lucas. The present owner, a well known American Historic Racing personality has now, rather appropriately ended s/n 0004’s Concours and museum careers, returning it to the Historic Racing circuit. In the period 2000 – 2003 the Dino competed with much promise of potential at Road America, Indianapolis Raceway Park and at the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic where it kept up with F333 Ferrari Sports Prototypes in the Speed Group! However little problems like water-pump leaks resulting from having been museum-stored in New Zealand without draining the fluids, resulted in the recent decision of rebuilding the entire engine from top to bottom. Carried out by a well respected marque specialist, in excess of $ 20,000 was spent, invoices for which can be found in the Dino’s extensive files. According to the owner this monoposto Dino is now ready for a second career in Historic racing.

This Tipo 166 Dino is very attractively priced compared to an F-1 car of the same era and yet is capable of turning similar lap times in the right hands, without the enormous maintenance costs associated with its 12 cylinder brethren.

One of only five cars remaining, and now likely the one in the best condition, this “little Giant” which scored 6 documented first places, 2 seconds and 2 thirds in international period races, provides a tempting purchase opportunity for a Ferrari enthusiast who wishes to add a rare Formula machine with impeccable provenance to their collection.

To view the entire auction catalog, go to
http://www.rmauction...Row=1&PageNum=1

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#2 cm50

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 07:38

Yes one of the loveliest cars of the era, but what has become of the other 5. I remember one of the cars being left in New Zealand for Graeme Lawrence to drive but cant recall how succesful it was, Im half a world away from my Bruce Sergents NZ Motor Racing books which cover this period.

#3 David McKinney

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 09:24

Graeme Lawrence won the 1970 Tasman Championship with his Dino, and the 1971 NZ Gold Star, with many wins and placings in NZ, Australia and Asia. The car spent the next ten years in Pierre Bardinon's Ferrari collection in France, and is now in another collection in Italy
The second 1969 Tasman Dino has appeared in UK sprint events from time to time over the past 25 years in the hands of long-term owners Dudley and Sally Mason-Styron

#4 Udo K.

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 22:45

Here is Tino Brambilla at the Nuerburgring in 1969:

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#5 Ray Bell

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 22:57

Originally posted by cm50
.....I'm half a world away from my Bruce Sergents NZ Motor Racing books which cover this period.


What about www.sergent.com.au ?

And there's some stuff on http://www.tasman-series.com/ ...though it only covers the 2.5 era in detail. Lawrence's racing of the Ferrari was mainly in the F5000/2.5 combined years.

#6 cm50

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 11:33

Thanks Ray, both those came to mind after I had sent the post. Just me being a little slow :confused:

#7 VAR1016

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 12:52

Originally posted by cm50
Yes one of the loveliest cars of the era, but what has become of the other 5. I remember one of the cars being left in New Zealand for Graeme Lawrence to drive but cant recall how succesful it was, Im half a world away from my Bruce Sergents NZ Motor Racing books which cover this period.

uThere was one at Shelsley Walsh last August. A lovely thing. Super noise too.

I especially like the beautifully executed linkage to the fuel cam on the Lucas metering unit with the lovely calibrated scale.

PdeRL

#8 vandem

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 09:45

Another source of information about the Ferrari 166 Dino is DCN's "Dino - the little Ferrari". There are several interesting photos, including one from the 1967 launch at the Turin show, where the car is without wings, and has a different exhaust layout.

Sorry, I can't scan photos, the copy I read came from the library.

#9 VAR1016

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 10:25

Originally posted by vandem
Another source of information about the Ferrari 166 Dino is DCN's "Dino - the little Ferrari". There are several interesting photos, including one from the 1967 launch at the Turin show, where the car is without wings, and has a different exhaust layout.

Sorry, I can't scan photos, the copy I read came from the library.


Yes the 1967 exhaust was different, very neat in appearance, but the primaries were not of equal length, so maximum power would not have been optimum. The 1968 version was an equal length design.

PdeRL

#10 vroomgt

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 02:49

Gentlemen,

There is the RM car which came from the Nelson Museum (0004)

The Violati Car in San Marino (0008)

Mason Styrron (0010)


Where are the others?

#11 arttidesco

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 21:02

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During the excitement of accompanying my guests from Russia round the Donington Collection earlier this year I forgot to get a snap of the Ferrari Dino info board accompanying this car.

Does anyone know which of the five remaining 166 Dino's this might be ?

Relevant answers maybe credit and used in a forthcoming blog.

Thanking you in anticipation of your responses.


#12 Alan Cox

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 21:31

Does anyone know which of the five remaining 166 Dino's this might be ?

It looks to me, Ralph, like Graham Adelman's 0004, driven at various recent Tasman Revivals by Rob Hall. The Hall & Hall connection might be why it was at Donington.

#13 arttidesco

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 21:39

It looks to me, Ralph, like Graham Adelman's 0004, driven at various recent Tasman Revivals by Rob Hall. The Hall & Hall connection might be why it was at Donington.


Thanks Alan I thought it might be either 0004 or 0010 the Rob Hall connection would certainly tie in with various other vehicles that have been seen at Donington over the years. :wave:


#14 launchpad

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 22:48

Thanks Alan I thought it might be either 0004 or 0010 the Rob Hall connection would certainly tie in with various other vehicles that have been seen at Donington over the years. :wave:


Here's a shot of Chris Amon in the (very) wet 1968 Tasman Series race at Longford Tasmania.

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and...a couple from the 2010 Tasman Revival

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images copyright Rod Mackenzie

#15 arttidesco

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 06:51

Thanks for posting these photo's launchpad :love:

#16 ellrosso

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:01

That would have been a long, cold and wet walk back from Newry Rod! Nice shot. Few more shots when the weather was a bit warmer and dry - on Saturday...
One of my favourite cars and drivers - was great to see it again at Eastern Creek in Rob Hall's hands. I've got one colour shot of it somewhere which I'll dig out tomorrow.
Geoff Harrisson's 3 shots were all taken on his Rollei twins lens reflex (2, 1/4 square format) so excellent quality.

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#17 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 12:55

That David Keep photo is very nice...

I'm sure it will be one for choosing for the Tasman collection.

#18 launchpad

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 13:32

[quote name='ellrosso' date='Jul 3 2012, 20:01' post='5800691']
That would have been a long, cold and wet walk back from Newry Rod! Nice shot. Few more shots when the weather was a bit warmer and dry - on Saturday...
Hi Ellrosso, Your'e right it was a cold and wet walk back, and long enouigh to almost miss the presentation!
Also, a shot coming out of Newry Corner. I should have changed the 55mm lens for the 200mm. Too late now!

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Copyright Rod Mackenzie

Cheers,
Rod

#19 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 12:44

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Does anyone know which of the five remaining 166 Dino's this might be ?

0004 Adelman USA
0008 Violati (Collezione Maranello Rosso) Italy
0010 Masson Styrron UK
0012 Parasiliti Italy
0014 Medlin USA

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#20 arttidesco

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 23:18

Thanks to Alan, Rod, Elrosso and Arjan for your contributions to today's blog :up:

#21 Terry Marshall

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 01:05

That would have been a long, cold and wet walk back from Newry Rod! Nice shot. Few more shots when the weather was a bit warmer and dry - on Saturday...
One of my favourite cars and drivers - was great to see it again at Eastern Creek in Rob Hall's hands. I've got one colour shot of it somewhere which I'll dig out tomorrow.
Geoff Harrisson's 3 shots were all taken on his Rollei twins lens reflex (2, 1/4 square format) so excellent quality.

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Beautifull shots from the lads Lindsay.

I still think the nose is wrong on the restoration car.

Cheers. Terry.




#22 arttidesco

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 06:41

Beautifull shots from the lads Lindsay.

I still think the nose is wrong on the restoration car.

Cheers. Terry.


I'd not noticed it until you pointed it out but the nose certainly does not look identical to the one Chris used in '68, appears to be lower in it's present state and the top air vents seem larger than the original.

#23 ellrosso

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 02:05

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Hi Terry, yes good shots from David and Geoff, both excellent motorsport shooters back in the day and Geoff is still doing some commercial work. You are right re the nose - it is more droopy in the modern version and the scoops are actually a different shape which you can see if you compare the pit lane Longford shot to the modern close-up - the original has an angled kink plus the whole scoop is smaller. Here are a few more + the colour shot I spoke of the other day - not a great colour shot but worth posting anyway. Plus a good atmosphere shot with the Dino in it too.......
I think.

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http://i980.photobuc...-Amon-68-lo.jpg[/img

http://i980.photobuc...7_E_Amon_68.jpg

http://i980.photobuc...Pit-68-lo-1.jpg

[img]http://i980.photobuc...-Amon-68-lo.jpg

#24 Terry Marshall

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 02:55

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Hi Terry, yes good shots from David and Geoff, both excellent motorsport shooters back in the day and Geoff is still doing some commercial work. You are right re the nose - it is more droopy in the modern version and the scoops are actually a different shape which you can see if you compare the pit lane Longford shot to the modern close-up - the original has an angled kink plus the whole scoop is smaller. Here are a few more + the colour shot I spoke of the other day - not a great colour shot but worth posting anyway. Plus a good atmosphere shot with the Dino in it too.......
I think.

Posted Image

http://i980.photobuc...-Amon-68-lo.jpg[/img

http://i980.photobuc...7_E_Amon_68.jpg

http://i980.photobuc...Pit-68-lo-1.jpg

[img]http://i980.photobuc...-Amon-68-lo.jpg






Lov'ly shots.

Yes, the restored nose is hideously wrong in my opinion if it is to be as the Tasman version of the car.

I never got to see it at Hampton Downs as I was crook, but hopefully it will be out here again.

T.