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A couple questions about the 70's


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#1 GregY

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Posted 23 March 2004 - 19:57

I got Formula 1 in Camera 1970-1979 for my birthday, and it is a great book. My only disappointment is there are no pictures from Watkins Glen, the photographer must have never made it across the pond. Anyway, I have a couple questions:

1) What is the story of the 1975 race at Montjuich Park? It sounds like there was some controversy with the safety of the track, and then they ultimately had a bad accident (Stommelen).

2) I noticed the drivers are driving in a "knee up" postion (as opposed to having their legs flat). Was it always this way, or was this a change from the 60's? What position did they drive in during the 80's, 90's, and now?

3) What can you tell me about "Sachs Curve" at Osterreichring? It looks like a banked, sweeping right-hander, I bet it was pretty hairy back in the day!

4) This is more of an observation, but Barbro Peterson was hot! It's too bad her life (and Ronnie's) went down such a tragic path.

Thanks for the information everyone. I have only recently become interested in 70's F1 and have learned a lot from this site.

Greg

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#2 uechtel

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Posted 23 March 2004 - 20:21

Originally posted by GregY
1) What is the story of the 1975 race at Montjuich Park? It sounds like there was some controversy with the safety of the track, and then they ultimately had a bad accident (Stommelen).
Greg [/B]


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:(

#3 GregY

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Posted 23 March 2004 - 20:34

I was reading through the book again and answered my own question. Apparently Stommelen's wing came off and the car jumped the barrier killing 5 people and breaking both his legs. That's a scary looking picture and a sad day for sure.

#4 Eric McLoughlin

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 08:42

Stommelen's rear wing was attached to the car by a carbon fibre strut - one of the first uses of carbon fibre in motor racing. The strut failed causing the wing to fall off. The loss of rear downforce, plus the notorious bumps of Montjuich, did the rest.

The week-end had been difficult even before that. The organisers had placed Armco barriers around the circuit, in line with safety requirements, but had failed to ensure that all the Armco was securely bolted together. This was noticed by the teams and a boycott of the race was threatened. Pressure from the race organisers and the governing body (at that time the CSI) forced the teams to participate. Becuase the track officials were dragging their heels so much in fixing the barriers, some of the teams organised barrier repair work themselves. Ken Tyrrell was one of the team managers who was seen weilding a spanner that day.

A sad week-end and one that is almost incomprehensible in todays highly professional environment. Much as we slate Bernie Ecclestone and the changes he has wrought in F1, it was week-ends like this that helped forge the thought processes that helped standardise the whole organisation of F1 (after all, Stommelen WAS driving one of Bernie's cars).

#5 jph

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 09:46

Originally posted by Eric Mcloughlin:
(after all, Stommelen WAS driving one of Bernie's cars).



Surely it was one of Graham Hill's?

#6 Eric McLoughlin

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 10:23

Yep -an example of early morning bran fade. He was driving an Embassy Hill Lola wasn't he?

All the same, I think my point about the teams wanting to get some sort of grip on the organisation of GP week-ends following events such as these is still valid.

#7 2F-001

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 12:52

A "bran fade"? Eric, we emphatically do not need to know about the nutritional, digestive and waste functions of your morning ritual!  ;)

#8 Mohican

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 13:42

Stommelen was driving an Embassy Hill GH1 - and actually lead the race at one point. His being out of action laed to Tony Brise later being contracted for the drive.

The race was blackflagged after the accident, with Jochen Mass (in a works McLaren M23) being declared the winner - with half points awarded to the finishers.
This was in fact Mass' only GP win.

#9 Kekefan

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 15:53

Emerson Fittipaldi did a few laps to qualify last just to get the entry money and then withdrawn from the race for safety protest; other drivers were on Fittipaldi's side but the pressure by their teams and sponsors got them to put their protests aside.
After Stommelen's accident, the race was stopped and I am sure everybody had a big thought for Emmo. :(
That was the last GP at Montjuich Park. :o

#10 Eric McLoughlin

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 17:25

Not having a good morning was I? Maybe I could have done with some "bran" as my "brain" obviously wasn't in gear.

#11 Nanni Dietrich

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 17:44

Originally posted by Mohican

This was in fact Mass' only GP win.


And this was in fact Lella (and women) only (half) F.1 point.
:)

#12 RDV

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 19:56

Kekefan -

Emerson Fittipaldi did a few laps to qualify last just to get the entry money and then withdrawn from the race for safety protest; other drivers were on Fittipaldi's side but the pressure by their teams and sponsors got them to put their protests aside.



Actualy Emerson did not want to run, stating the track was too dangerous, but under pressure from the RACE (Real Automovil Club de Espania), who threatened to impound any cars that did not run for breach of contract, eventualy did three laps in 2nd gear with his hand up , and was not qualified under the 107 % rule (or 110% maybe..), his brother Wilson just took the start and came in after one lap.

It was a beautiful track, but the armco barriers were just placed haphazardly, badly bolted together (some rails had bolts only finger tight) , and support posts put into sloppy holes (you could move the entire thing by hand). After seeing the mess, all teams cooperated trying to make the barriers safer , but there was too much to do....

#13 Eric McLoughlin

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 08:37

I didn't think there was any sort of "107%" rule back in those days.

#14 Pedro 917

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 23:29

I will always remember Barbrö Peterson as a very nice and gentle person. I have a couple of autographs of her and I remember well how shy she was everytime I asked her.

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#15 Rob29

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Posted 27 March 2004 - 08:24

Originally posted by Eric McLoughlin
I didn't think there was any sort of "107%" rule back in those days.

Corrrect,but I think Montjuich only allowed the fastest 22 to start. Monaco had only 20,the rest 26. In those good old days each organizer made his own rules,the only comon ground being that the car must comply with F1.