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Unraced non-F1 cars & engines


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#101 D-Type

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 22:51

Originally posted by Cal
What is that Ray?

Cal.

And Twinny, is that the Williams or the March?

Cal, what model is the Ferrari at Pebble Beach? It looks to my untrained eye like a 250LM or 275LM, albeit over-restored to Pebble Beach spec.

Can I take this opportunity to make a general plea for full captions to all pictures. I for one am not as knowledgeable as those posting pics.

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#102 Ray Bell

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 22:56

Originally posted by Cal
What is that Ray?


A car that might well have won the 1954 Australian GP had the battery not failed on the way to the starting line... the final rendition of Frank Kleinig's Hudson Special.

It had a very special custom made battery that had an internal fault. Three months they had toiled on turning it into a single seater and changing the front suspension. Fired it up along the road near Armidale on the way to Surfers...

I have another photo taken at Southport... I'll post it later...



That white 250LM seems to be a customised model... the rear window, and what's that below the rear window?

Twinny's pic is the March...

#103 Twin Window

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 22:58

Originally posted by D-Type

And Twinny, is that the Williams or the March? Can I take this opportunity to make a general plea for full captions to all pictures.

Done. Sorry, Duncan :wave: :up:

#104 GIGLEUX

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 23:18

Originally posted by D-Type
Cal, what model is the Ferrari at Pebble Beach? It looks to my untrained eye like a 250LM or 275LM, albeit over-restored to Pebble Beach spec

It is #6025GT one of the two cars bodied by Pininfarina (the first, #5149GT was the first 250 LM, on show at the 1963 Paris's car show). The thirty other cars were bodied by Scaglietti.
#6025GT was presented at the 1965 Geneve's show. The body had undergone alterations such as the large rear window with ventilation apertures and a different tail. It went in USA for Chinetti.

#105 Monstrobolaxa

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 00:04

1941 Mercedes W165 Streamliner Developed for 1940 Tripoli voiturette event but instead Mercedes-Benz chose to race the open-wheeled version.

1941 Alfa Romeo 512 Designed by Wilfredo Ricart along Auto Union Type D lines for the expected 1.5-litre s/c GP formula that would come into place from 1941. Rear-engined lay-out, using a flat-twelve DOHC with two-stage supercharging. Engine later reconsidered for 1954 2.5-litre F1. An unsupercharged magnesium alloy 2.5-litre development was made for the unraced Alfa 160.

1941 Auto Union Type E Design by Richard Eberan von Eberhorst that was supposed to counter Mercedes-Benz advance on the 1.5-litre s/c front. At least one chassis was built, with suspension and gearbox also finished and a one-cylinder test engine showing very promising figures on the dyno. Engine pioneered fuel injection. Shortage of supplies due to war caused project to be shelved, although development carried on into at least 1942.

1947 Cisitalia-Porsche 360 Abortive Porsche project (hence the Porsche type number) sponsored by Cisitalia's Piero Dusio. Used rear-mounted supercharged flat-twelve engine and independent suspension, and had a choice of RWD and 4WD. Raced once in Argentina as the Autoar.

1947-'48 Dommartin Part two of the disastrous pre-war French SEFAC project, which was created as a rival to the all-conquering Mercedes and Auto Union, except that the SEFAC conquered nothing but ridicule. The SEFAC ran once, at Pau in 1939, and resurfaced in 1947, when an engine company called Dommartin started rebuilding it. The company gave it a new body, bored the engine out to 3.6 litres and removed the supercharger. Then the money ran out and the car never ran.

1949 Mono JK-Lancia Entered for the Czechoslovakian GP but was a non-starter after a practice accident. However, it did race in some minor national hillclimbs and Libre races during the early fifties.

1951 Aston Martin DB3 GP First attempt at F1 by using a 2-litre version of the 6-cylinder 2.6-litre LB6 sportscar engine mounted in a modified DB3 sports-racing chassis. Project was overseen by ex-Auto Union designer Eberan von Eberhorst. Eberan did not like sports-racing derivative and scrapped it.

1951 Baird-Griffin Project by Ulster publishing heir Bobby Baird on the back of his first project: the ex-Emeryson-Lagonda Special fitted with ex-Whitney Straight 4.5-litre Duesenberg unit. Baird's proposed F1 car was based on Maserati parts, with the engine by Dennis Griffin also based on a Maserati 4CLT unit. Became obsolete when World Championship was converted to F2 for 1952. Ran in two minor events.

1951-'52 Clairmonte Special Colin Chapman's very first single-seater. Originally the Lotus Mk7. Commissioned from Lotus as an F2 car by Clairmonte brothers, suddenly became eligible for World Championship in 1952. Intended to be fitted with ERA 2-litre engine. Car never raced as engine was destroyed before completion. Eventually converted into sports racer with a modified Lea Francis engine. Still in existence.

1952 Nardi-Lancia Pre-war special builder Enrico Nardi created F2 car with rear-mounted Lancia Aurelia power. Project cancelled after test showed V6's lack of grunt.

1952 DB-Panhard "twin-engine" Amazing four-wheel drive, twin-engine project that saw front-ends of two cut-and-shut DB chassis mated to form a F2 car with 750cc Panhard engines and gearboxes powering each axle. Plans to substitute 750cc units with fully tuned 850cc engines. Great in theory, flawed in practice.

1952-'53 Sacha-Gordine Sequel to ill-fated Cisitalia-Porsche adventure, using much of its design characteristics. Almost completed and destined to race at the 1953 Pau GP but playboy owner Sacha Gordine ran out of money and scrapped the project. Tested once at Montlhéry by Jean Behra and possibly André Simon as well, either late 1952 or early 1953.

1953 MSM-Lancia German F2 car eligible for World Championship, built by Mauritz von Strachwitz, München. Car appeared twice at German F2 events, but wasn't allowed in as Strachwitz had his driver's license revoked due a traffic incident earlier in the year.

1953 EMW Monoposto Appeared in practice once in 1953, during the last German F2 race of the season at Bernau. Went on to race in the 1954 season, but by then F2 was no longer the World Championship category.

1953 GvB F2 Bobby Kohlrausch was planning to upgrade his excitingly shaped GvB F3 car to F2 spec - the then current World Championship category - by supercharging its 500cc engine. Sadly, the plan came to nought as Kohlrausch died from a heart attack before he could turn it into reality

1953-'54 Guidobaldi Car used revolutionary 8-cylinder two-cycle "radial" engine comparable to some aircraft engine lay-outs.

1953 Alfa Romeo 159 "Back-seater" Test hack for projected Alfa 160, intended to test intensely rearward driving position - behind the rear diff'. Driven by Alfa tester Sanesi.

1954 Alfa Romeo 160 Revolutionary cigar-shaped machine intended for new 2.5-litre F1. Flat-twelve engine would power all four wheels, with driver seated behind rear differential.

1954 Kieft-Climax Stillborn after Climax FPE "Godiva" V8 fell through upon hearing Mercedes engine output figures. Recently raced for the first time in historics.

1954 HWM-Climax Like the Kieft, stillborn after Climax FPE "Godiva" V8 fell through.

1954 Connaught-Climax Likewise to the Kieft and the HWM.

1954 VM Showed up in practice for the GP des Frontières at Chimay.

1954 Pegaso Z-105 Through the vision of ex-Alfa designer Wilfredo Ricart, truck manufacturer Pegaso made a genuine entry for the 1954 Spanish GP, being assigned starting number 32, but the car did not appear. In reality, the Z-105 did not go beyond the blueprint stage, as it failed to attract the support of Spanish industry. The concept of the car was based on Ricart's stillborn Alfa 512, which meant a mid-engined car, this time designed for the new 2.5-litre formula. The DOHC, 95x88mm, 4-cylinder engine featured hemispherical combustion chambers and mixed water/air cooling. The intended suspension system was all-independent, while the chassis was multitubular.
1955 Berkshire Special Club Special by Geoffrey Crossley, Bruce Adams and John Lloyd that happened to be eligible for F1. Practiced by Crossley for the Easter Monday Richmond Trophy at Goodwood, but niggling problems prevented car from racing. Crossley's work and family obligations kept the project from continuing.

1955 Milano-Franchini Revival of Scuderia Milano's chassis aspirations, next to Mario Alborghetti's ill-fated Arzani-Volpini effort. For this, the Ruggeri brothers teamed up with engine builder Enrico Franchini to create a car similarly shaped to the Milano '2' (now sold to Alborghetti), that would harbour Franchini's air-cooled flat-eight 2.5-litre engine, transversely mounted behind the driver. Lack of money prevented both chassis and engine from completion.

1955-'56 Aston Martin DB3S Second Aston Martin attempt at modifying a sportscar engine and chassis. Again found opposition from chief designer Eberan but was tested by Reg Parnell at Chalgrove in late 1955. Taken to New Zealand by Parnell. Original 3-litre s/c engine broke in testing and was replaced by 2.5-litre F1 unit. Withdrawn from NZGP, ran to fourth in Lady Wigram Trophy. Car became Geoff Richardson's RRA Special.

1958 Gleed-MG Constructed by Derbyshire enthusiast Peter Gleed on the basis of an old Cooper MkIV 500cc F3 chassis. Designed to take advantage of 750cc supercharger equivalency formula, using an MG 'R' engine. Entered once for a Goodwood event but never arrived.

1960 Jocko-Climax Brainchild of American midget and stock car racer Jocko Maggiacomo. Italian-style front-engined Formula Junior car with Fiat engine and transmission was built as a precursor to a Climax-powered F1 car that never materialized.

1960 Walker-Climax Designed by Alf Francis and Valerio Colotti. Intended for 1961 but team chose to go with Lotus 18. A regular in historic events these days.

1960 Laystall-Climax Front-engined FPF-powered F2 Vanwall-lookalike designed for UDT-Laystall team as a forerunner to new 1.5-litre Grand Prix formula. Tested by Henry Taylor but put aside in favour of rear-engined Coopers.

1961-'62 Ausper-Clisby Plans to enter F1 using Australian Clisby V6 engine came to nought.

1962 De Tomaso 801 Single qualifying effort by Nasif Estefano in De Tomaso-engined De Tomaso came to nought.

1963 Parnell-Climax Commissioned from Gemini and Heron designer Les Redmond. Design along Lotus 25 lines, just as BRP tried to do, but cancelled in an advanced stage after Reg Parnell's death and contract wranglings with engine supplier Climax. Son Tim instead acquired a trio of 25s for 1964. Original car turned into successful sports racer.

1963 Lotus-Honda Farcical story about Colin Chapman learning newcomers Honda a few lessons on their entry to F1: "Chunky" used Honda deal to force Coventry Climax into developing a new engine for next season. When Climax caved in to Lotus pressure, Chapman cancelled the Honda deal by phone. Honda then said they would go it alone, and asked a young in-house engineer to design their first F1 car.

1963-'64 Maserati Maserati project around a Giulio Marelli 1.5-litre V12 that would be transversely mounted in Honda style. This Tipo 8 engine did extensive dyno runs but never found its way into a car.

1964 BRM P67 4WD car designed to counter the power surge expected of the new-for-1966 3-litre formula. Tested by Dickie Attwood, entered for the 1964 British GP. Did not qualify, wasn't seen afterwards. Became a successful hillclimber as late as 1968, in the hands of Peter Westbury.

1965 Lotus-Climax 39 Designed for the unraced flat-sixteen Climax FWMV. Adapted by Maurice Philippe to accommodate for 2.5-litre FPF. Raced in this form by Clark in the 1966 Tasman series.

1967 Khadi-8 Streamlined Russian "F1" car conceived in Kharkov. It bore an 8-cylinder, 1974cc engine with an output of 340hp. Its wheelbase was 2600mm and it weighed 550 kg. With its maximum speed being 200 kph, Vladimir Kapsheyev established a national 500m record in the 5000cc class in this car, reaching a speed of 96.5 kph, but the car sustained serious damage in its competition use. In 1971-'72 it was restored, incorporating large design changes, and renamed Khadi-10.

1967 Pearce-Ferrari, Pierce-Martin Three cars - one with Ferrari V12, two with light-alloy Martin V8s - as a follow-up to 1966 Cooper-Ferrari effort by London motor trader Chris Pearce. Cooper ran in two non-championship races in hands of Chris Lawrence, but pukka Pearce machines never raced. One of the Martin-engined cars was damaged in a Brands testing accident, the other two were destroyed in a fire on the eve of practice for the 1967 International Trophy.

1967-'68 Abarth F1 Rare single-seater effort by Carlo Abarth's outfit, moving forward from 1964 232 F2 car. F1 project was widely reported in the late sixties. Car was to use a 3-litre version of Abarth's 2-litre V8 that appeared in a sports racer.

1968 Alpine A350 Unauthorized F1 study, powered by underpowered Renault-Gordini V8 sportscar engine. Tested by Mauro Bianchi at Zandvoort with disappointing results. Vetoed by Renault for having 100bhp less than the Cosworth DFV.

1968 Lotus-Cosworth DFW 58 Revised F2 chassis based on Lotus 57, with a Cosworth DFW engine and ZF gearbox. Promising tests might have led to F1 adaptation.

1968 Matra MS11 4WD Matra introduced a new model in the spring of 1968, a 4WD car designed by Jean-Louis Caussin. The hydrualic system used two curving tube axles to direct some of the power from the rear differential directly to the front wheels. The system caused great problems, not just because of its excess weight, but also because of the fact that the actuators driving the front wheels considerably increased the unsprung weight. After a brief test in May the project was deemed unviable.

1968-'69 Ginetta-BRM G20 Sportscar specialists' return to single-seaters was cut short when construction of the G19 F3 car and the BRM-powered G20 F1 car was abandoned half-way.

1969 Cooper-Alfa Romeo T86C Uncompleted when Cooper Cars faded away at the end of the 1968 season.

1969 Cooper-Cosworth T91 Awaited a similar fate to the T86C.

1969 Cooper-Alfa Romeo T91 Uncompleted successor to the uncompleted T86C.

1969 Eagle-Cosworth Tony Southgate was put to work on a lighter and sleeker DFV-powered second-generation Eagle for 1969, but project was cancelled when Eagle F1 effort tailed off after five races in 1968.

1969 Cosworth 4WD Boxy 4WD car built as a platform for new lightweight Cosworth engine. Tested by Trevor Taylor and Mike Costin. Withdrawn prior to British GP.

1969 Serenissima Chassis designed to match Serenissima V8 engine that briefly ran in the back of the McLaren M2B.

1969 Ferrari Sigma Space-age Pininfarina design showing the F1 car of the future. Never intended to race, it showed innovations such as a driver survival cell, multi-layer fuel tanks, a fire extinguisher system and sidepods protruding behind the rear wheels to prevent interlocking wheels. Uneligible for contemporary F1 and overweight at 590kg.

1970 Matra MS11/12 MS12 engine that was destined for the MS120, was fitted in an MS11 chassis and put on display at the 1970 Paris Motor Show. It also ran (and won!) in a 1970 hillclimb at Mont-Doré.

1971-'72 Khadi-10 In the mid-seventies the Soviet Khadi institute at Kharkov, led by Vladimir Nikitin, presented a Formula 1 car compliant with the 3-litre regulations of the time. This former racer had specialised in the fabrication of experimental prototypes such as a turbine-powered chassis destined to beat the Land Speed Record. The car was in fact a rebuilt Khadi-8 dating as far back as 1967, and was fitted with a 250hp engine - as opposed to the 500hp DFVs of the seventies - and so the project was abandoned.

1972 Brabham-Weslake BT39 Based on BT38 F2 monocoque but with larger fuel tanks and BT34-style twin-radiator nose. Experiment set up to house Weslake V12, a development of the original Gurney-Weslake that ran in the back of the Eagle F1. Tested in late summer of 1972 but showed disappointing power output.

1972-'74 GRD Collection of rumours surrounding GRD F1 car adapted from their F5000 design. News of customer entry in the 1972 Rothmans £50,000.

1972-'74 Arno-Tecno, Arno-Alfa Romeo Dutchman Arno van Dijk was a West-Brabant car dealer
with a dream that he first presented on the national sports TV programme, Studio Sport - a Dutch GP car. First plans were laid out as early as 1972. After the car was built it was demonstrated at the Trophy of the Dunes event at Zandvoort on August 30, 1973. Others say it wasn't demonstrated in the flesh but simply presented and kept under covers most of the time. At that moment it carried a F5000 engine taken from a Ford GT40. The plan was to replace that with a Tecno V8 or V12, but the Tecno engine never materialized, after which the car's final public appearance happened as part of a carnival parade... In December 1973, the Arno resurfaced at the Jochen Rindt exhibition, amidst rumours of a link-up with Alfa Romeo and an entry for the 1974 Spanish GP, with Dutch touring-car ace Peter van Zwan driving, but again these faded very quickly, as did the 1975 Le Mans entry for an Arno-Cosworth 2-litre sportscar to be driven by Manfred Mohr and Han Akersloot.

1972-'75 McNally-Hesketh Initial reports say this car was to use Hesketh V12 engine.

1973 Rondel-Cosworth RJ42 F1 car on the back of Rondel F2 effort. Became Token RJ42 after not
becoming the Motul, but it did become the Safir in '75. Did not race as a Rondel but did race as a Token and Safir.

1973 Ferrari 312B3 'Spazza Neve' Forghieri's peculiar SWB design with its snowplough-shaped wedge nose was briefly tested by Arturo Merzario but canned before it raced. Its replacement - the second incumbent of 312B3 - went on to become one of the worst Ferraris ever, before 312B3 v.3.0 became the car with which Lauda put Ferrari back on the Grand Prix map.

1973 Tecno E731 Amon-inspired design by Gordon Fowell's design bureau Goral, led by Fowell and Alan Phillips. Fowell was also responsible for the equally abysmal Amon AF101. Car distinguised itself by its exceptionally low construction and cramped cockpit. Quickly ditched after practice for British GP.

1973 Madi-01 Another Russian F1 project with an unbelievably underpowered engine, the Madi-01 designed by S. Gess-de-Kalve was obviously inspired by the Lotus 72. Its 2998cc GAZ-21-14 engine was based on a Volga stock block and produced a mere 125hp. The car had a 2280mm wheelbase, weighed 736kg and was capable of a maximum speed of 204kph.

1974 Hawke-Cosworth Shelved effort by small Formula Ford manufacturer backed by British Air Ferries boss Mike Keegan. Design study by Adrian Reynard.

1974 Bizzarrini-Cosworth At the 1974 Turin autoshow, renowned Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarini presented an F1 monocoque to the world. It was never finished.

1974 Dywa-Cosworth 1974 First Dydo Monguzzi effort to create a Cosworth/Hewland kit car for F1. Its build quality was praised by none other than ex-Ferrari team manager Romolo Tavoni. Originally developed for the premier formula, the Italian car was converted to F5000 spec in 1975, carrying a Chevy engine, when it was tested and raced at Zolder and Brands Hatch by Luigi Cevasco, sponsored by shoe manufacturer Rosetti. Autosprint article... Autosprint article...

1974-'75 Berta F1, Berta-Cosworth F1 Argentinian effort by national hero Oreste Berta. Tested by Nestor Garcia Veiga, withdrawn from 1975 Argentine GP. Was planned to have self-designed Berta engine, but this proved down on power. Late switch to ex-Fittipaldi DFVs fell through.

1975 Maki-Cosworth F101C Japanese kit-car proved much less effective than Kojima effort one year later. Five failed qualifying attempts by Fushida and Trimmer was all the F101C could garner.

1975 Hill-Cosworth GH2 First "real" Hill design by ex-Lola designer Andy Smallman, also responsible for Hill GH1-née-Lola T371. Intended for shooting star Tony Brise. Sadly, core Hill crew - including Hill himself, Smallman and Brise - were killed in an airplane crash in November '75. Car showed promise during tests at Paul Ricard.

1976 Surtees-Cosworth TS18 TS16 follow-up that never took shape. Design by Mike Pilbeam. Replaced by Ken Sears-penned TS19.

1976 Alpine-Renault A500 André de Cortanze-designed test hack for Renault's turbo effort. Nicknamed the Laboratoire.

1976 Maki-Cosworth F102A Unusually shaped design as a follow-up to unwieldy F101. Failed attempt by Tony Trimmer to qualify for the 1976 Japanese GP.

1977 March-Cosworth 2-4-0 Six-wheeler with two rear axles that was singlehandedly created by March engineer Wayne Eckersley to drum up sponsorship for the 1978 season. All in vain. Tested by Howden Ganley. First run with a regular gearbox casing caused embarrassment in front of assembled press. Second demonstration was done with a driveless most rearward axle.

1977 Ferrari 312T6 Six-wheeler with hillclimb-style twin-rear wheel configuration on single rear axle. Tested at Fiorano by Reutemann, who positively hated it.

1977 Apollon-Cosworth Fruitless attempt by Jolly Club-supported Loris Kessel to drain more life out of ageing Williams FW03-née-IR03 chassis going back to 1974. Failed to qualify for 1977 Italian GP after bad practice crash destroyed tub.

1978 Brabham-Alfa Romeo BT46 Original BT46 with "surface cooling".

1978 Brabham-Alfa Romeo BT47 Development of the BT46B "fan car".

1978 Tiga-Cosworth Unfinished project by Tiga founders Tim Schenken and Howden Ganley. Hand-built by Ganley.

1979 Dywa-Cosworth 08 Second Cosworth car by Dydo Monguzzi, presented at the start of 1979 at the Motor Sud Salerno, was meant to be a true wing car. Sponsored by Salernese company Petteruti the car was supposed to be raced by Alberto Colombo at the Belgian GP. It never happened.

1979 Kojima-Cosworth KE009B Originally projected F1 plan for Willi Kauhsen came to nought when Kauhsen decided to go on his own (see below). Japanese F1 constructor Kojima, which had entered cars in the 1976 and 1977 Japanese GPs, had sought out Kauhsen's F2 team and driver Gianfranco Brancatelli to race their new KE009B in the 1978 Grand Prix season. Keke Rosberg also tested the car at Fuji, but the project floundered.

1979 Kauhsen-Cosworth WK Ludicrous wing-car attempt by Klaus Kapitza on the back of disastrous F2 campaign with championship-winning ex-Elf cars. Lotus 79-lookalike (but not perform-alike) nibbed Gianfranco Brancatelli's F1 career in the bud. Sold on to Arturo Merzario, who turned car into Merzario A4. Actually managed to make one race as the A4: the 1979 GP Dino Ferrari at Imola.

1979 Merzario-Cosworth A2 Follow-up to A1B model, with which Merzario managed to qualify twice in 1979.

1979 BS-Cosworth Proposed entry by BS Fabrications entrant Bob Sparshott. Designed by David Polland, intended for Nelson Piquet. Also mention of a 1982 entry for Ricardo Zunino.

1979 BRM P230 Wing-car design by Aubrey Woods for the Aurora AFX championship. Built for Bourne by CTG Racing in Ferndown. Was to be raced as Jordan-BRM as ownership had passed to John Jordan. Briefly tested by Neil Bettridge on Donington's Melbourne loop. Bettridge went with Melchester Tyrrell 008 instead. Car was sold to USA and converted into Can-Am car.

1980 Shadow-Cosworth DN12 DN11 follow-up signalled premature end to Shadow team, Lees and Kennedy failing to qualify it on four occasions before new owner Teddy Yip withdrew the effort.
1980 Lotus-Cosworth 86 Experimental dual-chassis car based on Lotus 81. Completed in autumn of 1980. Was tested but never raced.

1980 Dywa-Cosworth 010 Third "home-made" Cosworth kit-car by Dydo Monguzzi made a brief appearance at the Monza Lotteria round of the 1980 Aurora championship, but only in practice, at the hands of Piercarlo Ghinzani and Maurizio Flammini. Tested by Peo Consonni. Much later, at the start of the inaugural F3000 season in 1985, the car appeared as the Monaco F3000 car and wasn't performing much better! What a surprise...

1981 Lotus-Cosworth 88, 88B Heavily protested controversial dual-chassis design that in 88B-spec was entered for the 1981 British GP. Accepted by race organizers RAC but ousted by FIA. Only
appeared in practice.

1981 Williams-Cosworth FW07E Six-wheeler with two rear axles tested in November 1981 at Paul Ricard and Croix-en-Ternois by Rosberg and Palmer. Alan Jones tested the car in October but kept to his decision to retire.

1981 Maurer-Cosworth Work started on this Gustav Brunner-penned car in late 1981 but was abandoned when Stefan Bellof put Maurer back at the front in F2 at the start of 1982.
1982 Williams-Cosworth FW08D Second Williams six-wheeler tested with overwhelming effect by Rosberg at Paul Ricard. Unable to show its real power after FIA ban on six-wheelers. More...

1982 Alfa Romeo 179T Converted Alfa 179 used for testing the 890T, the 1.5-litre 90-degree V8 turbo engine that was to make its public debut in practice for the 1982 Italian GP.

1982 Alfa Romeo 182T Single Alfa 182D adapted for 890T turbo engine. Practiced for the 1982 Italian GP but did not race. Was converted into one of five flat-bottom 183Ts for 1983.

1982 Brabham-BMW BT51 FIA president Balestre stuck to his guns for 1983 and outlawed skirts once and for all. This rendered Gordon Murray's BT49C-styled pit-stop car obsolete on the spot. BT51 was initially designed on the reassurance of Brabham and FOCA boss Ecclestone that grounds effects would still be permitted for 1983. Murray then started with a clean sheet to produce the rocket-shaped BT52 turbo missile.

1982-'83 Ligier-Matra JS19B Matra's V6 turbo engine never materialized, so the story goes, but the Matra museum at Romorantin has a Ligier monocoque on display that was especially created for fitting purposes, with the prototype V6 turbo in the back.

1983 McLaren-TAG Porsche MP4/1D TAG Porsche turbo test hack.

1984 Minardi-Alfa Romeo M184 Test car that ran before the Motori Moderni engine by ex-Alfa man Chiti was adopted.

1986 Ekström Swedish effort on the back of F3000 entry. Intended for Fulvio Ballabio.

1987 Ligier-Alfa Romeo JS29 Alfa deal quickly fell through after René Arnoux slammed brand-new straight-four twin-turbo engine designed by Gianni Tonti after testing. Piercarlo Ghinzani was part of the deal but he and Arnoux had to drive Megatron-engined JS29B as a replacement all year.

1987 Middlebridge Benetton-BMW B186 Privateer effort sponsored by Trussardi. Intended for Pirro but in breach of Concorde Agreement.

1987 Williams-Judd FW11C Unsightly stop-gap interim car with Judd V8 replacing original Honda V6.

1988 Ferrari 639 Test car ahead of the 640.

1988 Atmos Project by Jean-Pierre Mosnier - ex-IRTS and Lola Motorsport - that never got off the ground.

1988 McLaren-Honda MP4/4B McLaren's muletta for the new-for-1989 Honda 3.5-litre V10.

1988 Williams-Renault FW12B/FW12R Another Williams muletta created to test the first incarnation of Renault's 3.5-litre engine. A C version was raced during the early part of the 1989 season.

1989 Reynard 89M The second of Adrian Reynard's collection of unraced F1 cars. In fact an F3000 chassis with F1-size wheels and a Mugen 3.5-litre V8 engine used as a tyre test platform for Bridgestone. The 1056th Reynard to be produced.

1989 FIRST-Judd F189 F1 car on the back of FIRST F3000 effort. Intended for Tarquini. Became Life 190 but before that raced once in the 1989 Bologna sprint.

1989 Minardi-Subaru M189 Initial testing experiences for Carlo Chiti's rebadged Motori Moderni unit, before he found a berth at Coloni. The bulk of the testing was done by Paolo Barilla and Gianni Morbidelli, with Minardi regular Pierluigi Martini also making an appearance.

1989 AGS-MGN JH22 W12 engine by Guy Nègre briefly tested in the back of AGS hack. Engine later found its way into the Norma M6 sportscar.

1990 Life F190, Life-Judd F190 FIRST F189 in Life disguise, now with Ernesto Vita's own W12 engine in the back. Never ran more than a couple of laps in prequalifying, and always completely off the pace. Remained embarrassment with original Judd engine in place of Life power.

1990 Honda RC101/RC101B After-hours hobby project by Honda engineers. Both tested by Nakajima at Suzuka.

1990 Coloni-Subaru C3B Embarrassing engine effort by later rally gods Subaru. In reality, flat-engined concept which would make Japanese marque famous, was another Motori Moderni design by Carlo Chiti. Bertrand Gachot failed to prequalify the car on eight occasions, after which Coloni dumped it.

1990 Coloni-Subaru C3C C3B follow-up that was only tested.

1991 Il Barone Rampante Talk of the meteoric F3000 team becoming a Benetton Junior F1 team never materialized, even though Enrique Scalabroni was hired from Lotus to design their car. The Benetton Junior link-up would have entailed the rampant-baron team taking Ford's V8, with Benetton moving to Jaguar-badged V12s. For a brief time, there was also speculation of Il Barone Rampante taking over the Tyrrell team.

1991 Lotus-Isuzu 102C Brief flirtation with Japanese engine builders.

1991 GLAS-Lamborghini Mexican effort. GLAS stands for Gonzalez Luna Auto Scuderia. Intended for Giovanni Aloi, tested by Baldi. Became Modena Lamborghini 291 in 1992 and was raced as such by Nicola Larini and Eric van de Poele.

1991 BMW S192 BMW design study by Simtek. Later sold to shoe magnate Andrea Sassetti to become Andrea Moda S921.

1991 Coloni-Ford C4 Was entered for entire 1991 F1 season, but car managed new record of 15 consecutive failed prequalifying attempts. Destroyed F1 career of 1990 British F2 champion Pedro Chaves.

1991 AGS-Ford JH26 Little French team slipped away during 1991 season, soldiering on with 1990 model, as JH26 never left the drawing board.

1991 AGS-Ford JH27 New JH27 appeared as late as the Italian GP and failed to turn around the team's fortunes. Tarquini, Barbazza and Grouillard all failed to qualify the car.

1992 Reynard-Yamaha Yet another scrapped Reynard F1 project, with the parts bin going to Pacific, the engine to Jordan and most of the staff to Benetton. In the absence of forthcoming sponsorship the factory decided to concentrate on its highly successful Indycar business.

1992 Lotus-Ford 103 Design was ditched in favour of 102D when Horst Schubel took over Lotus team.

1992 McLaren-Lamborghini MP4/8B Serious intentions for 1993 but deal with Lambo owners Chrysler fell through at the last minute. Tested at Estoril by Senna and Häkkinen.

1993 Trebron-Judd Japanese effort by a Canadian engineer named Norbert, which reads Trebron backwards.

1993 Dhainault-Hart Ex-Andrea Moda designer wanted to set up own team with Rhône-Poulenc sponsorship.

1993 Bravo-Judd S931 Spanish effort by Team Bravo España. Another project by Jean-Pierre Mosnier but scrapped shortly after Mosnier died. Team manager was to be Adrian Campos, car was to be updated Andrea Moda S921 designed by Nick Wirth of Simtek. Intended drivers Nicola Larini and Jordi Gene but also mentioned as future drivers were Pedro de la Rosa and Ivan Arias. Design work later used for Simtek S941.

1993 Brabham Preliminary design study by Galmer Engineering for new Brabham owner Alan Randall.

1993 Williams-Renault VDT FW15C Experimental continuous variable transmission (CVT) set-up by Van Doorne Transmissie (VDT) on championship-winning car bridged gap to late-sixties F3 and FJ efforts by Van Doorne's Automobiel Fabriek, better known to the world as DAF. The CVT paired to a Renault V10 constantly revving at its peak led to spectacular test times by David Coulthard, after which CVT was quickly and silently banned from Grand Prix racing in 1994, much in the fashion as six-wheeled racers had been banned by the FIA after worryingly fast test times by a Williams...

1993-'94 TOM'S Renowned Toyota-aligned engine tuner and multiple Japanese F3 champions TOM'S showed mock-up of their projected F1 car. No Toyota involvement, never got past mock-up stage.

1994 Ikuzawa F1 project initiated by former sixties and seventies F2 and F3 driver Tetsu Ikuzawa. Peter Windsor was sought out as its team manager while Enrique Scalabroni joined as a designer, having left Peugeot Sport one year before. The effort failed to get off the ground, but that didn't stop Scalabroni from becoming involved in other failed F1 attempts like those of Durango and Asiatech.

1994-'95 Lotus 112 Lotus 109 successor was designed on paper but collapse of Lotus team nibbed production in the bud.

1995-'96 DAMS-Ford GD01 F1 effort by leading F3000 team. Designed by Reynard's gearbox specialist Barry Ward, tested by Erik Comas and Jan Lammers, using a borrowed DFR. It was enough to prove that it didn't just look slow, but was slow as well.

1996 Lola-Ford T95/30 Another failure after the Lola-Ferrari T94/30 disaster. Tested by Allan McNish.

1996 Dome-Mugen Honda F105 Serious project by Japanese single-seater experts. Intended for Apicella, tested by him at several Japanese tracks.

1997 Lola-Ford T97/30 Eric Broadley's idea to build a new F1 car from scratch in less than two months was just as farfetched as the MasterCard "club membership" sponsorship scheme that was to pay for it. Ex-Super Nova F3000 have-it-alls Vincenzo Sospiri and Ricardo Rosset were left empty-handed when car came nowhere near official qualifying in its single GP entry.

1998 Stefan Yugoslav effort by Zoran Stefanovic wanting to use the abandoned Lola T97/30s.

1999 Williams-BMW FW21B Test car for BMW V10 engine. Driven by Jörg Müller at Miramas.

1999 Honda RA99 Dallara-built test hack set up for oncoming works Honda F1 effort in 2000, led by Harvey Postlethwaite and Rupert Mainwaring. Tested to great effect by Jos Verstappen at Vairano and Jerez. Intended for Verstappen and Salo but scrapped after U-turn by Honda and Postlethwaite's untimely death.

2000-'01 Toyota TF101 Test car for Allan McNish in preparation for 2002 season.

2002 Prost-Ferrari AP05 Got up to the point of a 50% windtunnel model before the Prost team was declared insolvent. Picture...

2002 Phoenix-Hart Old Walkinshaw acquaintance Charles Nickerson bought left-over hardware of defunct Prost outfit, but vitally this didn't include Prost's FIA entry. Team showed up at several GPs but had no chance to compete because of strict FIA stance and lack of tyre contract.

2002 Asiatech F1 Design by the king of failed F1 projects, Enrique Scalabroni, as a demo platform for Asiatech F1 engine. Team intended to sell car to manufacturer and have its engine badged. Planned to run in 2004, but Asiatech was declared bankrupt at the end of 2002.

2003 McLaren-Mercedes MP4-18 Design by Adrian Newey as McLaren's highly innovative 2003 challenger. Team's intended race car at midpoint of 2003 season. Car failed crash tests and posted slower times than its predecessor.

Now on a personal level it seems that for the 1958 Portuguese GP there was a portuguese car on the grid.....well not quite....it seems that the chassis was bought to Cooper and the engine was portuguese built....though it never raced and was pulled out during the first free practice due to the lack of power the engine had.....the engine designer....my Grandfather....(well he wasn't that good with engines....seems that his best area was in designing buses!....)

#106 Rob Ryder

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 00:27

Originally posted by Monstrobolaxa

....1969 Cooper-Alfa Romeo T86C Uncompleted when Cooper Cars faded away at the end of the 1968 season.....

Is this the car raced by Ron Maydon in the Force series? If it is the same car it does not qualify as 'Stillborn';)

#107 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 00:36

Am I wrong or are the Cosworth and McLaren 4WDs missing from that (very comprehensive...) list?

I wouldn't say, by the way, that the Lotus 39 was 'unraced'... maybe in F1 terms, but if you kept rigidly to that the list would be absolutely endless. The chassis was put to good use and it had a long and very successful career with Clark and Leo Geoghegan as drivers... won the Japan GP too...

#108 Cal

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 02:21

Is that list from here?: http://8w.forix.com/...neverraced.html

Cal.

#109 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 02:31

Well, the Cosworth 4WD is on that list...

But still no McLaren.

#110 FrankB

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 02:47

Originally posted by Cal
Is that list from here?: http://8w.forix.com/...neverraced.html

Cal.


The similarities are, to say the least, striking.

#111 Cal

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 02:57

Just remembered this. Alfa 164 Procar.
Posted Image

#112 Rob Ryder

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 07:33

Originally posted by Ray Bell
Well, the Cosworth 4WD is on that list...
But still no McLaren.

Ray, the McLaren did race (once)... 1969 British GP : No.20: Derek Bell. He (it) started 15th on the grid but retired after only 5 laps with suspension failure.
Rob

#113 philippe7

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 08:44

Originally posted by FrankB


The similarities are, to say the least, striking.


That was exactly my first reaction, this is definitely the 8W/6th gear list, which can't be challenged as the primary source:

Hereunder the 6th gear credits :

Mainly based on information dug up through the collective efforts of the AtlasF1 Nostalgia Forum and the Foro Historia TheF1.com.
Special mentions go to Richard Armstrong, David Beard, François-Luc Beaudoin, Ray Bell, Miguel Bellod Lopez, Tom Berge, Jean-Michel Boileau,
Aaron Bradbury, Barry Boor, Allen Brown, Roger Clark, Pedro Dupont, 'Ensign14', Pete Fenelon, Michael Ferner, Jean-Maurice Gigleux, Chris Hall,
Paul Huis in 't Veld, Carlos Jalife, Andrzej Jakubaszek, Frank de Jong, Enoch Law, Jamie McGregor, Rainer Nyberg, Doug Nye, Jimmy Piget,
Philippe Roche, Marco Rooney, Stu Schaller, 'Uechtel', Roger Valentine, Han Vasmel, Frank Verplanken, Marcel Visbeen, Pieter de Vos.
Additional sources: Hodges, A-Z of Formula Racing Cars 1945-1990; Lawrence, Grand Prix Cars 1945-1965;
Norman Smith, Case History. Alan Henry, The 4-Wheel Drives.


Mattijs Diepraam/'Uechtel'/Rafael Reyna/Leo Breevoort, September 23, 2004

#114 Ray Bell

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 11:25

Originally posted by Rob Ryder
Ray, the McLaren did race (once)... 1969 British GP : No.20: Derek Bell. He (it) started 15th on the grid but retired after only 5 laps with suspension failure.


Thanks for that confirmation, Rob...

One of those rides 'cousin Derek' would probably forget he ever had.

#115 richardspringett

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 12:22

Hoo bit difficult to add to that list but the Abarth 2000 sport of 1974 better known as the SE027/ABC's seems to be missing. The car debut at Geneva?? with the 2liter six cylinder engine - a real screamer developing 320hp at 11,500 revs. Unfortunately the crankshaft torsional rubber dampers were unreliable....

Eventually the engine design production and parts were sold to Holbay and over the years a number of completed engines have emerged. The chassis was subsequently modified to accommodate the 4valve 2liter engine with some success.

It is believed the 027 never raced with the 6 cylinder engine but did practice for a Swiss hillclimb - any evidence to the contrary gratefully received!

I am no expert so open to correction...

Richard Springett

#116 VDP

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 12:47

Didn't took Osella all the Abarth components aka sports in 1972, I remember great drives in 1972 ?

Robert

#117 Peter Morley

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 13:01

Originally posted by Rob Ryder

Is this the car raced by Ron Maydon in the Force series? If it is the same car it does not qualify as 'Stillborn';)


There are a couple of cars on the list that did race but in other formulae from that which they were designed for.

Did the March 2-4-0 not run in some hillclimbs.

Was the Cooper Alfa also used in hillclimbs (I thought it was used for something prior to historic racing)?

Lotus 39 went Tasman racing

etc.

I'm surprised that the list does not include the McGuire BM1. Brian McGuire entered the slightly modified Williams FW-04 for the 77 British GP but failed to qualify. I think he then reverted to entering it as Williams FW-04 in Shellsport.

I feel the list should only really include cars that were actually built, not drawing board ideas (like Connaught & HWM Godivas etc), if you want to include those you should include every alternative design considered every year by the F1 teams.

Or at least include cars where they constructed some significant components - e.g. the Kieft or Bizzarini F1 (if it is anything like his sportscars I wonder how many 'he' has built by now!!).

#118 richardspringett

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 13:20

Robert re 027

Yes, I believe you are correct that almost all parts/cars went to Osella in 1972 - but I believe the 027 project was rejected by Osella - hence everything was dispersed.

I should have clarified that the three original 027 chassis were also sold off; I believe one was successfully converted to 4 cylinder engine and subsequently raced but never by the factory.

I note this is meant to be a picture thread but nothing to hand.... :|

Richard Springett

#119 Mark Beckman

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 14:34

Ford GT70
(It was run in a small French rally but that was during development testing).

Ford RS1700T

A bunch of mid 80's Group "S" rally cars - the Opel probably the most developed.

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#120 fausto

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 14:45

Abarth 027: was built after Osella was on his own, the engine was tested (or rumoured to be tested) on a Lola F.2 chassis, Holbay was involved, if I remember well...

Ford GT70: contested the 1971 Tour de France (Mazet-Todt) and other French rallyes (BP-liveried)

#121 VDP

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 14:46

Osella entered 2 liters championship
PA 1 1972
PA 2 1973
?? 1974

Pininfarina presented a ''show car'' 1974 looking similar to 1973 cars.

Question with engine or only static project like Modulo, Sigma ??

Robert

#122 richardspringett

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 14:57

Robert

Absolutely correct but all of the Osellas/Abarths you mention featured the 4 cylinder engine in various guises which had been seen/raced before. My understanding is that the 027 and it's 6 cylinder were unique....

Oh of course one of the 6 cylinder engines went to Wheatcroft so perhaps I shouldn't have mentioned it in the first place.... :rolleyes:

Richard Springett

#123 fausto

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 15:00

Originally posted by VDP
Osella entered 2 liters championship
PA 1 1972
PA 2 1973
?? 1974

Pininfarina presented a ''show car'' 1974 looking similar to 1973 cars.

Question with engine or only static project like Modulo, Sigma ??

Robert


For what I know:

PA2 1973
PA2 1974
PA3 1975

The Pininfarina 1974 "show car" is the Abarth SE 027

#124 dbw

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 21:38

miller gulf indy car...two built, finished, and actually ran but never raced...a few details...front engine rear drive.... magnesium twin cam 4 cyl dual ignition engine...4 speed full syncro transaxle[with dedicated full flow oil system]..4 wheel independent suspension...four wheel annular disc brakes...16" wheels... dual inverted airfoil pannier tanks to develop downforce....not too bad for 1936!

see dee's miller book for more details...

#125 Racer.Demon

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 23:50

In the interest of prevention of doing the same thing twice I suggest that we use this thread for non-GP cars-that-never-raced only and stick to this long-standing thread when proposing an unraced Grand Prix car that isn't on said list. :D

Oh, and thanks for spotting and acknowledging that the list was actually copied from 6thGear/8W - which in turn was the result of your collaborative efforts, so in fact it's thank you to yourselves... :lol:

#126 petefenelon

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 00:11

Originally posted by Racer.Demon
In the interest of prevention of doing the same thing twice I suggest that we use this thread for non-GP cars-that-never-raced only and stick to this long-standing thread when proposing an unraced Grand Prix car that isn't on said list. :D

Oh, and thanks for spotting and acknowledging that the list was actually copied from 6thGear/8W - which in turn was the result of your collaborative efforts, so in fact it's thank you to yourselves... :lol:


Suggestion to Stuart - can we merge in the "unraced F2 cars" thread here?

#127 Twin Window

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 06:46

:up:

#128 Mike Lawrence

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 04:34

There was the Lampredi-designed Ferrari 2.5-litre V-Twin which was actually build and tested.

In late 1969 Ferrari was rumoured to have proressed some way with a V16 and a W18.

The Kieft GP car was built in 1954 and first raced in 2002.

Didn't Talbot announce a four-cylinder turbocharged engine? I seem to recall seeing a photograph. around 1980

There was the Gleed, of course. This was a Cooper Mk IV fitted with a supercharged 750cc engine. It was entered in a race at Goodwood, but did not show.

Cyril Kieft had an AJB (Archie Butterworth) flat four fitted with Norton dohc 350cc barrels. Kieft hoped to build a sports car to take on Porsche and the engine was put into an early Kieft, not the Ray Martin car, but could not keep it cool. Eventually it was acquired by Graham Eden who fitted it to a Cooper, it was a 1.5-litre F1 car, and Graham ran it in a club race at Silverstone. He ran out of money and the engine was bought by Ian Richardson who fitted it to a sprint motorcycle, 'Moonraker' and it was hugely successful. Running on alcohol, it gave 210/220 bhp. I believe this engine still exists, it was last heard of in Ampthill, Beds.

A small point, coventry Climax did not make a V15, it made a 1,5-litre flat-16, which was builtbut never raced. The Brabham BT19, with which Jack won the 1966 World Championship, was designed for the flat-16 FWMW.

The Russian F1 car was the Kharkov Six which was really only a special built for record breaking (it was claimed to have reached 175 mph, which was not impressive for a 2.5-litre car in 1958. It was taken seriously by the British press and The Daily Express brought the President of the Moscow Automobile Club to the 1958 International Trophy Meeting. It was never extablished that the Kharkov had a 2.5-litre engine and was running on Av-gas which was mandatory from 1958.

#129 Nordic

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 09:59

Reading the program for the 72 race of champions, there is mention of the next new Kitchnier K8 to be Rolls Royce powered and over 550bhp is hoped for, I bet.

another one is the 'Plastic' Polimotor from the USA that cropped up in a LM review autosport sometime in the mid 80's. what happend to that?

#130 TheStranger

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 10:07

Originally posted by Nordic


another one is the 'Plastic' Polimotor from the USA that cropped up in a LM review autosport sometime in the mid 80's. what happend to that?


From the Crapwagon.com superthread on GTP history:

http://www.champcarf...otor#post367949

It was run as a Camel Lights motor, IIRC, but never won any events in its class.

#131 GIGLEUX

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 23:59

Originally posted by Mike Lawrence
There was the Lampredi-designed Ferrari 2.5-litre V-Twin which was actually build and tested.

Didn't Talbot announce a four-cylinder turbocharged engine? I seem to recall seeing a photograph. around 1980

The Ferrari engine was rather a 2-in line engine than a V-Twin. Lampredi also planed a 6 cylinder 2500 engine.
The Talbot was to be in fact a BMW engine, but Talbot (PSA) and BMW did'nt manage to conclued an agreement and after that the Talbot-Ligier turned again to Matra in 1981-1982.

#132 petefenelon

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 00:12

Originally posted by TheStranger


From the Crapwagon.com superthread on GTP history:

http://www.champcarf...otor#post367949

It was run as a Camel Lights motor, IIRC, but never won any events in its class.


Quite a few people in Britain apparently put down money for Polimotors to use in hillclimb and sprint cars - not sure that many of them ever saw engines.... Deryk Young had one in a Vision chassis that was pretty quick...


#133 richardspringett

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 04:13

[quote] For what I know:

PA2 1973
PA2 1974
PA3 1975

The Pininfarina 1974 "show car" is the Abarth SE 027 [/qoute]


Having some difficulty organising the quote and sender name!

From my understanding, IIRC, all PA prefixed cars were Abarth-Osella's whereas SE numbers denote Abarth originated.

PA1 from '73 was first Osella design, up till then using modified Abarth SE021 chassis. The PA1 seems to have had a series 1 and 11.

PA2 from '73/4 appeared with a body designed by pininfarina. But whether some early PA2's appeared with different body work is unclear to me.

PA3 from 1975 was very different body design, most PA2's seemed to have been converted into PA3s.

SE027 dates from 1974 developed in some secrecy by Carlo Abarth/Colucci though a prototype with aluminium body and 4 cylinder seems to have been running in '73. It was displayed at the Geneva motor show with the 6 cylinder engine installed :| My understanding is that all parties and particularly Osella rejected the SE027 when it was simply slower than the Osellas it was meant to replace. According to Cosentino Abarth developed the SE027 because the Osellas, PA1s and PA2s ( ): ) lost the '73 European championship.

There seems to be a blurring of PA1s and 2s but without reference books to hand this is mostly from memory....

Richard Springett

#134 fausto

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 08:04

oh, sorry to you all, I was meant to write:

1973 PA1
1974 PA2
1975 PA3

Thank you Richard, for correcting my mistake!

#135 Alexey Rogachev

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 09:28

Originally posted by Mike Lawrence
The Russian F1 car was the Kharkov Six which was really only a special built for record breaking (it was claimed to have reached 175 mph, which was not impressive for a 2.5-litre car in 1958. It was taken seriously by the British press and The Daily Express brought the President of the Moscow Automobile Club to the 1958 International Trophy Meeting. It was never extablished that the Kharkov had a 2.5-litre engine and was running on Av-gas which was mandatory from 1958.


Kharkov 6 had a 1974 cc engine with compressor and wasn't running on Av-gas. The highest reached speed was 280.156 km/h (December 1953, Vladimir Nikitin).

#136 Macca

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 16:03

Posted Image

This is Roy Salvadori testing the Cooper-Maserati T80 in early 1966 (apparently because Jochen Rindt said his salary was for racing only, not testing!). Jo Siffert was lent it to drive in the International Trophy at Silverstone when Rob Walker's T81 hit trouble in practise.

The Climax FWMW flat-16 1.5 litre is one engine I'd love to see in a car; but out of the three that were built for it, all raced with other engines (so they shouldn't be in this thread, strictly!) but I've heard that the surviving FWMWs are in circulation somewhere.

The Lotus 39, a 33 derivative, was fitted with a tubular engine-bay and a 2.5 Climax 4 for the Tasman series, and still belongs to Classic Team Lotus; and the Brabham BT19 became Jack's WDC winner and is now fairly priceless - so neither is likely to ever be run as designed.

But what of the Cooper..............anyone know where it is, and if it exists, whether it might yet run with the flat-16?



Paul M

#137 Bob Riebe

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 16:41

Originally posted by GunStar
Reynolds Aluminum punched out a 8.0 Chevy V-8 to 9.2L for McLaren M-12 in the Can-Am series. Monstorous thing designed to take on the Porsche Panzers (917-10K). Near the end of the season. Qualified 2nd, and ate itself alive on the race grid. Next year, they didn't even bother.

Chevy twinplug Corvette GS engine for the 63 Nassau race. Don't even think I got all the facts for this one.


The Reynolds Chevy was taken out to 565 in.cu. and was used only for qualifiying. At this point in time a big block Chevy still had a 6,800 rpm redline as used by McLaren. (and small blocks were technically supposed to not go out of the 7,000 rpm range)
It was removed before the race, because all knew it would not last very long.
It is amazing how far tech. on the basic push-rod engine advanced just six years later, not to mention now.

The alloy twin-plug GS hemi was killed when Chevrolet pulled the plug on the GS, it was only an act of God that Duntov managed to pull one off of the scrap pile.
Sadly he did not know that Chevrolet was going to destroy these engines and many other equally technically unique engines built for Duntov were destroyed, including a big-block SOHC hemi (Oddly Cosworth developed its own SOHC head for the Chevy Mk. IV big-block, but with the death of the Can-Am, and Chevy not homologating it for the Corvette, it had nowhere to run and was dropped.

#138 FLB

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 16:42

Originally posted by Mike Lawrence
In late 1969 Ferrari was rumoured to have proressed some way with a V16 and a W18.


There was an article about the W18 in an early 1990 edition of Sport Auto by Jabby Crombac (IIRC about the author). Apparently, that engine was designed in 1968 by... Franco Rocchi. Seems Signore Rocchi thought of it as one of his deepest regrets of his career that he wasn't able to push the project further.

To such an extent that he considered Ferrari's stillborn W18 to be the grandfather of Life's W12...

#139 Bob Riebe

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 16:58

the Ford Calliope, two-cam push-rod, Prototype/Can-Am engine.(If the FIA had not had a fit and killed the big-block proto engine, it would have run in 1968 in a Ford GT)

Some one is now restoring one of the G7A Ford Can-Am cars with a running Calliope.

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#140 Honza

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 06:55

1990 Life F190, Life-Judd F190 FIRST F189 in Life disguise, now with Ernesto Vita's own W12 engine in the back. Never ran more than a couple of laps in prequalifying, and always completely off the pace. Remained embarrassment with original Judd engine in place of Life power.




I found this picture of Life W12 engine.

[IMG]http://img92.exs.cx/...12dwg3lg.th.jpg[/IMG]

Have anybody detail picture of W12 AGS engine, were there any reasons between both engines or were they same enghines with another visual reasons as signs and only with reason equipment.

Thanks Honza

#141 Racer.Demon

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 09:17

Honza: there are two in Rainer's article here.

#142 Huw Jadvantich

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 12:12

Did the 1950s Bugatti actually race?
The Cisitalia?
Wasn't there a radial engined GP car built?
Jaguar designed and modelled an F1 car in the late 50s

#143 GIGLEUX

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 12:43

The Bugatti 251 raced in the 1956 ACF GP, driven by Maurice Trintignant.
The Cisitalia D360 was to race in the 1953 Buenos Aires GP under the name of Autoar, driven by Felice Bonetto. It didn't start.

#144 GIGLEUX

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 12:46

Radial engined GP car: I see the 1935 Monaco-Trossi which practiced before the Italian GP, same year, at Monza. Didn't officially practice and didn't start.

#145 gdecarli

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 13:35

Originally posted by GIGLEUX
Radial engined GP car: I see the 1935 Monaco-Trossi which practiced before the Italian GP, same year, at Monza. Didn't officially practice and didn't start.

I took following pics (click to enlarge them) last May at Museo dell'Automobile - Carlo Biscaretti di Ruffia at Torino (Italy) :

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
For more pics taken during that visit (but not about this car), see Carlo Biscaretti di Ruffia Museum - Torino (Italy) thread.

Ciao,
Guido

#146 bradbury west

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 11:41

Alfa 160 4wd see posts 44 and 47 above

I came across something on this the other day, so checked on BB etc. It appears to have been built up and tested on a main highway by Sanesi, who sadly died in the process. I have seen the sketches etc of the car, but did any photographs materialise? The finished, driveable, version must have been quite something to see .


Roger Lund.

#147 Doug Nye

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 11:56

Roger - you're not often mistaken but I doubt the 4WD Alfa 160 was ever completed to running condition - and Sanesi (just about) survived the experience of driving for Alfa Romeo, as I can attest since I interviewed him a couple of times during the early '80s when he was still exceedingly fit and well, though terribly scarred from the Sebring fire of '64 (?). It was his colleague Attilio Marinoni who was killed during the war years (1943 I think) while testing a modified GP Alfa on the public autostrada, having collided with a lorry.

DCN

#148 petefenelon

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 12:16

Could there be a mixup between the 160 and the "cockpit behind the rear axle" test car based on the Alfetta going on here?

#149 Macca

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 12:48

Originally posted by Richard Neale
Ah ! Balsa by name not by nature !


If he'd worn an aluminium flameproof suit, would that have made him mallite?

:rolleyes:

Did anyone mention the air-cooled straight-eight desmo 1.5-L Ferrari engine that was said in C&D to have been in development for 1962?

The article also answers a conundrum from an old Skullduggery column in C&S - a picture of Ginther at Modena in 1961 in a sharknose with a pendulum mounted ahead of the rad. This was apparently an early attempt to develop anti-lock braking by regulating the brake balance automatically depending on 'G'.


Paul M

#150 bradbury west

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 14:27

Doug, many thanks for the generous manner of your reply to my ineptitude...............

Sadly I cannot now find the source which prompted the post, but which provided sketches of the car.

Mea culpa;

Motor racing was/is dangerous enough without any attempt on my part to have imposed a premature demise on Signor Sanesi.

I have now done what I should have done first, viz check other sources.

In addition to your own tomes in which Alfa GP cars are covered I have now checked in Hodges, plus Dr Lawrence's book which mentions the project, and Venables' definitive Alfa volume which makes the situation very clear.

Just out of curiosity now I would welcome details of the car in whatever stage it reached. Perhaps Karl Ludvigsen might air some of the pictures which he mentioned. That reminds me; I must also look in KL's GP book.

Sorry for the storm in a teacup.

RL