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Tommy Byrne, TNFer & award-winning author


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#451 kayemod

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 08:02

The sports award went to a rugby player... :|


Were the voting figures published? How close did Tommy get?


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#452 ensign14

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 08:18

The sports award went to a rugby player... :|

Anything based on popularity is going to help the egg-chasers, given that Ireland won the peanut-hugging championship this year.

#453 Twin Window

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 09:42

Were the voting figures published? How close did Tommy get?

I've not seen any figures nor have I spoken to TB as yet, but it appears Crashed and Byrned came second...


#454 zakeriath

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 18:12

Eventually managed to buy the book at Heathrow prior to flight to Istabul, the person sitting next to me must have been wondering what the hell I was reading, laughing one moment, feeling very sad the next. I enjoyed the book and found it to so very different from the clinical, corporate autobiographys reacently released, Coulthard, Hamilton etc more like Daly`s (golfer, another with demons) book, i.e. warts and all.

So whats the latest on the next future WC, TB nine year old son.

Any news of when TB is coming over to the UK as we still have our copies waiting to be signed.

#455 paulsenna1

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 22:59

Tommy has put a video of his McLaren test on his Youtube channel:-

Tommy Byrne McLaren test

#456 Alan Langton

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 21:11


Just happened to come across this thread . Fantastic reading.
I remember watching Tommy racing in mondello and the Pheonix park in the late seventies and early eighties. A very talanted driver,and reading this gives a greeat insight into the man. Cant wait to buy the book. Well done "Twin windows " for your contribution.
Alan. :D


#457 Formula Once

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 21:57

Tommy has put a video of his McLaren test on his Youtube channel:-

Tommy Byrne McLaren test


OK, so we knew about the rumoured lap times, but Tommy looks like going bloody quick too...

#458 Pink Snail

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 19:51

Hmmmm, white overalls and helmet. Maybe there is something we aren`t being told (Stig?). Footage of Tommy driving the Mclaren at Full tilt under the Daily Express bridge and jinking through the Woodcote chicane - awesome!!! Really liking this thread and great to see you contributing Tommy - good egg! :clap:

Edited by Pink Snail, 29 October 2009 - 22:05.


#459 TennisUK

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 21:56

An utterly brilliant read, I think I finished in a weekend, thanks for the effort!

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#460 ringers23q

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 23:00

Bought this book about 6 months ago after I saw a review of it on a website. At the time, I had not heard of Tommy, but after reading the review I was very intrigued. Previous to this book (a few weeks before), I had read Perry McCarthy's book and loved the tale of the struggles he overcame just to go racing. So I was also interested to see how different Tommy's story was to Perry's. I read the book from start to finish and did not regret being very sleep deprived at work the next day. What a fantastic read! It seems as though Tommy was one of the last F1 drivers or really any professional racing driver that really spoke his mind and did what he wanted. Even though it may have put him in the bad books of people at times, it was a refreshing insight into the world of F1 and how cruel it can be sometimes.

Much respect for you Tommy and revealing the truth about your story! All the best in the future, especially to your son who seems he may follow in your footsteps :)

#461 MoMurray

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 23:12

Just happened to come across this thread . Fantastic reading.
I remember watching Tommy racing in mondello and the Pheonix park in the late seventies and early eighties. A very talanted driver,and reading this gives a greeat insight into the man. Cant wait to buy the book. Well done "Twin windows " for your contribution.
Alan. :D

Is this Alan Langton who use to be a marshal at Mondello?

#462 Chezrome

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 00:00


I saw the video. Great speed into the first corner, interesting line. Very late entry. Very gutsy and I think very fast.



#463 Alan Langton

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 21:09

Yes Mo it is me. All those years ago too.Igot involved in sidecar racing for the past twenty seven years and now live on the Isle of Man. I see that you are living in the States, and working for Yamaha.
I was remenissing about the old days and googled formula Atlantic and came across this site and a few others and have been hooked since !. Nice to hear from you.
Al.

#464 -Jap-

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 12:14

I read Crashed and Byrned a couple of days ago and that made me got even more interested in Tommy's story, so I search here of course, and read this topic thru. The book I got had only 200 pages, but Amazon.co.uk says that it should have 228 pages? So, am I missing 28 pages about Tommy's story? Book was fantastic, but I have to admit that in my opinion on "similar book genre" maybe Perry McCarthy got somehow more in depth in his story (I don't know if it is cruel to ask from TB, has he read Perry's book, any opinions about his story?). I feel that Crashed and Byrned could easily have had another 200 pages with more stories/to go deeper? It seems some essential stories were cut off, like Japan trip which I read from here and so on..

After all I was little confused about Tommy's career. He was the most talented and the quickest, won FF1600x2, FF2000 and F3. I'm sure this kind of guy had lot of discussions going on with F2/F3000 and F1 teams. Other F1 teams knew Theodore was piece of .... so that couldn't have harmed too much Tommy's reputation. And with all the success it might be easier to get some sponsors too. There must have been something more to '83 than F3? I'd like to hear about Tommy's F1 prospects for '83 team by team. Almost similar situation in "Indy Lights", the most succesfull but still IndyCar teams not interested, how is that possible?

And about McLaren test. If Tommy knew before that Ron and him don't come along, he knew there is never McLaren seat for him. So, the great test result could work only/mainly as demonstration to other F1 teams that Tommy was quick also with F1 car, but that didn't bring anything out, how is that possible? I understood that he made a 3 year contract with Theodore, but after they got into a "fight" in Las Vegas in the end of '82, I thought that he was free from contract to discuss with other F1 teams for '83, was it so? If not, why he didn't drive for them in '83 then?

I'm sorry if this post sounds insulting, that is not my target.

Go Tommy :up:

#465 dank

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 18:59

Tommy gets a mention in Roebuck's questions section this month: http://www.motorspor...tton-and-byrne/

Now, Tommy Byrne. It’s a great book, and Byrne undoubtedly had enormous natural talent, which, as you say, we missed out on. Why? Well, as you’ve read the book, I think you’ve probably got some insight into that already. A very great deal of modern F1 is bound up in PR, image and all that stuff, and somehow it’s difficult to imagine Byrne talking the talk and walking the walk, isn’t it? Mention his name to F1 folk who were around at that time, and it’s cleared that Tommy got a lot of people’s backs up: sometimes talent alone is not enough.



#466 john winfield

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 22:07

I read Crashed and Byrned a couple of days ago and that made me got even more interested in Tommy's story, so I search here of course, and read this topic thru. The book I got had only 200 pages, but Amazon.co.uk says that it should have 228 pages? So, am I missing 28 pages about Tommy's story?


Jape,
Sorry, I've only just seen your post. The Corinthian paperback copies that I have, published in 2009, are 254 pages! Which edition do you have? If it's the Icon edition I'm not sure how many pages that has. The Corinthian has three parts to it, fifteen chapters in total.

#467 Tommy Byrne

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 03:23

I read Crashed and Byrned a couple of days ago and that made me got even more interested in Tommy's story, so I search here of course, and read this topic thru. The book I got had only 200 pages, but Amazon.co.uk says that it should have 228 pages? So, am I missing 28 pages about Tommy's story? Book was fantastic, but I have to admit that in my opinion on "similar book genre" maybe Perry McCarthy got somehow more in depth in his story (I don't know if it is cruel to ask from TB, has he read Perry's book, any opinions about his story?). I feel that Crashed and Byrned could easily have had another 200 pages with more stories/to go deeper? It seems some essential stories were cut off, like Japan trip which I read from here and so on..

After all I was little confused about Tommy's career. He was the most talented and the quickest, won FF1600x2, FF2000 and F3. I'm sure this kind of guy had lot of discussions going on with F2/F3000 and F1 teams. Other F1 teams knew Theodore was piece of .... so that couldn't have harmed too much Tommy's reputation. And with all the success it might be easier to get some sponsors too. There must have been something more to '83 than F3? I'd like to hear about Tommy's F1 prospects for '83 team by team. Almost similar situation in "Indy Lights", the most succesfull but still IndyCar teams not interested, how is that possible?

And about McLaren test. If Tommy knew before that Ron and him don't come along, he knew there is never McLaren seat for him. So, the great test result could work only/mainly as demonstration to other F1 teams that Tommy was quick also with F1 car, but that didn't bring anything out, how is that possible? I understood that he made a 3 year contract with Theodore, but after they got into a "fight" in Las Vegas in the end of '82, I thought that he was free from contract to discuss with other F1 teams for '83, was it so? If not, why he didn't drive for them in '83 then?

I'm sorry if this post sounds insulting, that is not my target.

Go Tommy :up:

I’m sorry Japé for taking so long to reply - my bad. As far as those other ‘missing’ 28 pages are concerned from your copy are concerned, I have no idea I’m afraid. But you are right that there were about 200 pages that did not make any editions of the book at all, which was probably just as well - Mark was trying to protect me I guess.

Yes I did read Perry’s book and I thought it was great, it inspired me in fact. I presume by ‘in depth’ you mean more racing stuff? Originally Crashed and Byrned was going to be a life story with some racing thrown in and sold in the main high street shops, but the publisher changed that, and we don’t know why. That is why there is not a lot about of race by race stuff.

Yes you are right nobody won more championships to get to Formula 1 as I did, but there were no discussions with any team other than Theodore. And that was only because Sid Taylor, who is Irish, wanted me in the car. As everybody else was having problems qualifying the thing - including Jan Lammers, who was fired so as I could drive it. Randles and Ramirez wanted to keep him, and they did not want me, but I did not find that out until I was writing the book. As far as the other teams go, they were all spoken for with drivers lined up for 1983. Years later in Indycars everybody that moved up brought money, and I never was a sponsor hunter.

Yes, I knew that there was no drive with McLaren after the test, nor with any of the other teams; as I mentioned - they all had their drivers lined up. All I really wanted to do at the test was show to the Formula 1 world that I could drive a Formula 1 car, and to be honest, show myself again that I could drive. After having had to listen to Julian Randles in particular telling me that I was not quick enough, I wanted to show him more than anybody else - which I did - and I called him afterwards to tell him, gloating. And he still would not admit that I was quick! His told me that the only reason I was quick in the McLaren was because all the experience that I got in the Theodore! And as we all know now, if McLaren had provided me with a competitive car like they did for all the other drivers who drove that day, and if Tyler Alexander had giving me my correct times then at least I would have walked out of there with a new track record. It also did not help when Alan Henry wrote a false report about the test for Motoring News saying that I was in over my head. Let’s face it, I’m not the only driver to be ****ed by Ron Dennis and McLaren - there is a long list. But that’s life.

You do not sound insulting at all, but this is the last time that I will talk about that test because nobody really gives a ****. Nowadays I try to make sure that any young driver that I am involved with gets a fair shot.

Anyhow, got to go and I hope that I answered your questions.

All the best,

Tommy

#468 Catalina Park

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 04:10

It is a great book Tommy. I enjoyed reading it.

I am a nobody in Australia but I was always a fan of yours way back then. :wave:

#469 Ibsey

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 00:57

Having read this thread from start to finish (including all the great articles / attachments from Autosport etc ... thanks for including them Twin Window) I am inspired to go out & buy Tommy's book immediately to learn more about his story & difficulties. Like a couple of other people here it seems - I had not really heard of Tommy Byrne before coming across this thread (I am "only" 22 years old). However since reading this thread, I'm starting to become a fan.

I wondered if someone would perhaps, be kind enough to help me understand Tommy's driving style when he was racing? (if the great man himself could explain his driving style, I would be extermely grateful & privilaged in having an ex F1 driver respond to a question of mine).

For instance, how would you define his driving style?
I have not seen him race yet, so I am PURELY guessing here but I assume being 'naturally gifted' he would be more of an 'instinctive' driver in the mould of say Gilles Villeneueve or Ronnie Peterson? Therefore prefering to drive over a car's problems / shortcomings. Rather than say an Alain Prost or Jackie Stewart type, who appeared to prefer to manipulate their car (through set up & preparation), rather than "ride" it.

Furthermore did he prefer an oversteery car or understeery car & what was he like in the wet? Finally is there any other F1 drivers who Tommy Byrne admires / would like to be compared with?

Sorry if it sound's like an intergation, I don't mean to be rude. I am just interested in learning more about Tommy's driving techinque. For the record, I did watch his Mclaren test video & the hot lap at Mid Ohio (In I think it was a Caterham?) on utube and his style seemed alot smoother than I was expecting. I had also search the net for a profile on Tommy driving style, but couldn't find anything to answer the above. So I was wondering if someone could help me out.

From the impression I get from here that these answers won't be found in his book, as I believe it was stated in a previous post that not much content is devoted to racing, because it is more about his life?

However I have always been interested to see what (if any) influence a driver's early years have had to shape their driving style (perhaps this could be a topic for another thread?). For example in a documentary I watched a few years ago (one about the rivalary between Senna & Prost, I think it was on the discovery channel?), it stated Alain Prost's father was a builder or maker of furniture of some sort. So his father was very careful in what he did & did not abuse his machinery. Needless to say the documentary agrues that this rubbed off on Prost in his driving.

It also argued a simliar thing with Senna. That as a 4 year old, Senna was already driving his dad's car in the family front garden. But he was too short to reach the pedals. So he honed his "unique feel for a car" by learning to moving the gear lever at preicisely the right moment to allow his to change gear without engaging the cluch pedal. Has anyone else seen this documentary?


#470 David Holland

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 18:45

I finally got the book for Christmas (couldn't find it anywhere last Xmas!) and read it straight away and couldn't put it down.
It certainly lives up to all the high praise mentioned so far and is extremely personal in places and Tommy says it how it is.

I also had the autobiography of the musician Jah Wobble (English bass player) for Xmas and read both books back to back. There were some surprising similarities between the two subjects. Both working class catholics born in 1958, both liked to indulge in the odd substances at times, both extremely gifted in their chosen fields and yet have suffered hard times despite being recognised as unique talents by their peers. (I bet nobody else on this forum has read both these books together like this!).

Well done Tommy - it's a fantastic book, it should be in everyone's library whether they're into motor racing or not. If you're interested in real people you will like this book.

#471 Tommy Byrne

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 17:34

For instance, how would you define his driving style?
I have not seen him race yet, so I am PURELY guessing here but I assume being 'naturally gifted' he would be more of an 'instinctive' driver in the mould of say Gilles Villeneueve or Ronnie Peterson? Therefore prefering to drive over a car's problems / shortcomings. Rather than say an Alain Prost or Jackie Stewart type, who appeared to prefer to manipulate their car (through set up & preparation), rather than "ride" it.

Hi Ibsey. I started off my career probably more in the Gilles Villeneuve/Ronnie Peterson style, but later when the ground-effect cars came along it was more a question of combining both styles. In the early '80s with those high-downforce cars, set-up started to become very important as you could not slide the car any more because it was the slow way - the days of 'riding it' were gone, especially if you were racing against a driver who was as good as you were.

Furthermore did he prefer an oversteery car or understeery car & what was he like in the wet? Finally is there any other F1 drivers who Tommy Byrne admires / would like to be compared with?

It was not so much what I preferred, it was more a question of what was fastest. Usually oversteer was not the fastest way and you could not drive out of it. However if the car had a little understeer, you could drive out of it by staying on the brakes a little harder to get the front of the car to grip a little more, plus you could always use an apex kerb to help you by hanging your wheel over it a little more than usual to try and get rid of the understeer. In a perfect world I would have always preferred my car to be neutral for the whole race, but that hardly ever happened, so I would start off with a touch of understeer and usually I would end the race fairly neutral and still fast.
I loved driving in the wet!

Sorry if it sound's like an intergation, I don't mean to be rude. I am just interested in learning more about Tommy's driving techinque. For the record, I did watch his Mclaren test video & the hot lap at Mid Ohio (In I think it was a Caterham?) on utube and his style seemed alot smoother than I was expecting. I had also search the net for a profile on Tommy driving style, but couldn't find anything to answer the above. So I was wondering if someone could help me out.

My driving style or technique was to use 100% of the car 100% of the time, without beating the shit out of it, and using the turn 100%. I would pick my first T.T. ('Tommy Target') which is my braking point, my second T.T. would be my turn in point. and my third T.T. which would be my apex. As far as I am concerned when I get to my apex then the turn is over, as all I have to do is track out (or exit) using all of the road and more if available.
As far as my driving you refer to in the in-car video (which is in a Cobra copy, not a Caterham) compared to my driving in the McLaren, remember I was 24 when I was driving the McLaren and 50 when I was driving the Cobra copy. I have nothing to prove any more.

From the impression I get from here that these answers won't be found in his book, as I believe it was stated in a previous post that not much con tent is devoted to racing, because it is more about his life?
However I have always been interested to see what (if any) influence a driver's early years have had to shape their driving style (perhaps this could be a topic for another thread?). For example in a documentary I watched a few years ago (one about the rivalary between Senna & Prost, I think it was on the discovery channel?), it stated Alain Prost's father was a builder or maker of furniture of some sort. So his father was very careful in what he did & did not abuse his machinery. Needless to say the documentary agrues that this rubbed off on Prost in his driving.
It also argued a simliar thing with Senna. That as a 4 year old, Senna was already driving his dad's car in the family front garden. But he was too short to reach the pedals. So he honed his "unique feel for a car" by learning to moving the gear lever at preicisely the right moment to allow his to change gear without engaging the cluch pedal. Has anyone else seen this documentary?

Well when I was growing up we did not have a car and my father never did drive. When my mother got her first car I was 14 and I taught her how to drive. I learned to change gear sitting beside a farmer who was either too busy coughing up a luggi with a cigarette in hand trying to open the window to spit - he would clutch it and I would stick it into gear, and then he would spit Sometimes the window was down enough, sometimes not... What can I say? Different strokes for different folks I suppose.

Well done Tommy - it's a fantastic book, it should be in everyone's library whether they're into motor racing or not. If you're interested in real people you will like this book.

Thanks, David - I appreciate it.

All the best everybody,

Tommy

#472 Alan Langton

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 20:22

In the process of reading this great book. I thought i knew a fair bit about racing but this really opens your eyes to what really goes on . It wasnt to be for Tommey in F1 , but boy was he a tryer, an absolute classic competitor who would give 100% every time he sat in a race car . Huge respect to the man from Dundalk. Hope your happy in your life now.

#473 Ibsey

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 21:35

Thanks so much for that great insight Tommy. Especially the part about how you "adapted" your driving style to suit the ground effect cars, that was very insightful indeed. In my VERY humble opinion that is a sign of a truely great driver - someone who can adapt their style when neccessary. I really appreicated your response & you have certainly made my day. :)

Not only am I getting your book, but I am defiently going to persuade all of my mates (who are not motorracing fans) to also buy your book aswell.


Tommy's on track F1 career may be long over, but it'll never be complete until Tommy is declared an official Formula 1 Reject! Let's get Tommy's story on the site!

I'm half way through the book, thoroughly enjoying it. :) Thanks for the entertainment, Tommy! :up:

Johnny


Further to what was said in the above post & I'm not sure this has already been asked of Tommy or is already being dealt with. However if Tommy is interested, there is a great website called www.f1rejects.com & i'm sure the authors of the site would love to do a profile on Tommy, and help Tommy promote his book aswell, especially to a younger crowd, perhaps?

Please don't be put off by the name of the website, as I would hate Tommy to think that profile would be written by some moron who knows nothing about motorsport who was out to criticise him. Far from it - I'm sure they would love to celebrate your career, and give you as much credit as possible. In fact there is currently a simliar thing going on with The story of Giovanni Lavaggi told by himself, which you can look at how this is progressing here...

http://www.f1rejects....php?f=4&t=1306

As a result of being enlightened by Giovanni's previously unknown story, many of the members appear to have become Giovanni Lavaggi fans.

I would like to think that this could also work with Tommy perhaps? Especially considering how kind Tommy has been in answering many questions on TNF. I will also like to point out, I have no involvement with this website - other than being a regular member (as I am in the TNF). Therefore I will not profit or benefit in anyway if you decided to get a profile done with them. I just think it would be nice to get your (very interesting) story out there & told to a wider crowd?

If you are interested in getting a profile done there (& perhaps promoting your book there in the process), you can either contact the site author directly, who is a guy called eytl - Site Author and Senior Grand Prix Analyst... who has posted on the Giovanni Lavaggi thread (so you should be able find his details & contact him directly).

Alternatively if you don't have the time to do this, I would be willing to contact him on your behalf, only with your approval of course. Needless to say, I won't contact him or the site without your permission.

Finally, I have a quick question for Twin Window (or Twinny if I may call him that?). I was just watching the 1986 Australian GP again & when Prost stopped & got out of the car (immediately after winning the title)...was that you in the white top with a camera running towards Prost's car? (to the right of the crash barriers in the background).

If so, do you have any interesting / funny stories of this moment?
If it is not you, I do apologise, it looked a little like you from some the photos of you I have seen here.

Edited by Ibsey, 04 March 2010 - 21:38.


#474 Twin Window

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 21:43

Finally, I have a quick question for Twin Window (or Twinny if I may call him that?). I was just watching the 1986 Australian GP again & when Prost stopped & got out of the car (immediately after winning the title)...was that you in the white top with a camera running towards Prost's car? (to the right of the crash barriers in the background).

Sorry Ibsey, but I've never even been to Australia! And I've never been much of a runner either, aside from on a cricket field... :D

#475 Tim Murray

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 22:20

If you are interested in getting a profile done there (& perhaps promoting your book there in the process), you can either contact the site author directly, who is a guy called eytl - Site Author and Senior Grand Prix Analyst... who has posted on the Giovanni Lavaggi thread (so you should be able find his details & contact him directly).

Enoch (eytl) and his F1 Rejects colleague Jamie are members of this forum (posting as Takahashi and Kuwashima respectively). We haven't seen Enoch for some years, but Jamie still checks in here from time to time, so they can be contacted via PM.

#476 -Jap-

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 08:11

Jape, Sorry, I've only just seen your post. The Corinthian paperback copies that I have, published in 2009, are 254 pages! Which edition do you have? If it's the Icon edition I'm not sure how many pages that has. The Corinthian has three parts to it, fifteen chapters in total.


You're right. I have the Icon version. Three parts and fifteen chapters, but only 200 pages. I'll buy the Corinthian version to get missing 54 pages. Although I think Icon version cover is better ;)

Or maybe I'll wait, if there will be a third version with missing 200 pages that Tommy spoke about ;)

And thanks to Tommy for answering to my questions. But I can't stop wondering how there wasn't more intrest from sponsors/ from teams to the driver who was fastest in formulae? And since people new Theodore's car wasn't good at all. Well, Tommy still managed to make long and successful professional career in America. Thing that only very few drivers can do.

Edited by -Japé-, 05 March 2010 - 08:13.


#477 Rob

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 09:23

Finished reading the book yesterday. Cracking read, really enjoyed it.

#478 funformula

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 20:22

Hi Ibsey. I started off my career probably more in the Gilles Villeneuve/Ronnie Peterson style, but later when the ground-effect cars came along it was more a question of combining both styles. In the early '80s with those high-downforce cars, set-up started to become very important as you could not slide the car any more because it was the slow way - the days of 'riding it' were gone, especially if you were racing against a driver who was as good as you were.


My driving style or technique was to use 100% of the car 100% of the time, without beating the shit out of it, and using the turn 100%. I would pick my first T.T. ('Tommy Target') which is my braking point, my second T.T. would be my turn in point. and my third T.T. which would be my apex. As far as I am concerned when I get to my apex then the turn is over, as all I have to do is track out (or exit) using all of the road and more if available.
As far as my driving you refer to in the in-car video (which is in a Cobra copy, not a Caterham) compared to my driving in the McLaren, remember I was 24 when I was driving the McLaren and 50 when I was driving the Cobra copy. I have nothing to prove any more.


WOW!!!
Tommy Byrne, thank you very much for this interesting insight in your driving style.

Once, Gerhard Berger said that he don´t need special marks and points at the track to fix his braking and turn in points, he just trust his feeling and the feedback from his butt.
Was your "wild" Villeneuve/Peterson style of the early days also a more butt than brain controlled thing or did you need your "T.T´s" right from the beginning?

I would have loved to see you at the GP-Masters series. Did you get an offer to drive there?
Could have been a (of cause a very late) chance to race in almost equal cars against the big names.

I enjoied very much, reading the book with your interesting, entertaining and sometimes suboptimal story of your life.

Kind regards from Germany

Harald



#479 Ibsey

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 22:05

Once, Gerhard Berger said that he don´t need special marks and points at the track to fix his braking and turn in points, he just trust his feeling and the feedback from his butt.


Just to add to this, a long time ago I heard a story about Jean Alesi using the shadow of a bridge, tree or something as his breaking point for a corner. Every lap, Jean would start his breaking at a certain point where his car would go into this particular shadow. However despite this, Jean evenually spun out at that very corner because he had braked too late.

Appartently Jean was confused as to why this should be, because he was sure that he was breaking at the same point in the shadow, as he had done for many laps before. However what Jean appartently failed to take into account was the shadow had moved because the sun was starting to set.

I'm not sure if this is story is true or not. But for what its worth I though I'd share it with you.

Edited by Ibsey, 05 March 2010 - 22:06.


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#480 ensign14

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 22:39

Louis Klemantaski told a similar story about Salvadori, apparently Roy was using Klem as a braking point, until Klem moved nearer to the apex for better shots...

#481 David McKinney

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 23:10

I have to confess that in the olden days, when I was taking photographs trackside, I once stayed in situ for the first three laps of a practice session, then moved a pace or two closer to the corner each lap thereafter. Didn't fool anyone :cool:

#482 Rob

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 00:35

Someone, can't remember who, once used a rock at the side of the road as a braking mark. He eventually spun because the rock was actually a tortoise that was gradually walking towards the corner.

#483 Ibsey

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 01:47

Someone, can't remember who, once used a rock at the side of the road as a braking mark. He eventually spun because the rock was actually a tortoise that was gradually walking towards the corner.


I believe I've heard Stirling Moss say that when he would walk around a track he would go & place rocks to indicate his breaking points to him. However, I'm not sure it was him that got caught out by the tortoise though.


In Lewis Hamilton's book, he mentions that in his karting days his dad used to watch where all the best karters would brake at a certain corner out on the track. Then his dad would go & stand at that point, to act as Lewis' braking marker. Then each lap Lewis' dad would take a small step closer to the corner to get Lewis to brake even later.

Furthermore I believe in that book, Lewis talks about one race, where he decided NOT to brake where his dad was standing (because he didn't think it was possible), and his dad got pretty mad with him about it afterwards.

#484 fan27

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 10:49

My Japanese F3000 trip.

I am sorry for not getting back to you sooner, but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to re-live my Japan trip, as I did not have such a great time out there, Anyhow here goes.

It was around 1990 give or take a year when Stuart got me the deal initially, then EJ got involved. I was to test a F3000 for Super Nova at Suzuka and my ARS sponsor Bill Boynton paid my expenses to get over there. I flew from America, it took forever, and when I got there Thomas Danielsson was there to test as well. He'd driven for the team the year before.

The team owner picked me up from the airport - he was very polite, Ralf Firman also made a phone call to him as they used to work together somewhere (I forget his name) He dropped me at the hotel, I went to a bar for a drink and was thrown out with the bar tender pointing at a sign ‘no foreigners allowed’. I met Thomas D and Johnny Herbert for the first time. What a great guy Johnny is - we got along as if we’d known each other all our lives!

To cut a long story short, I went to the track the next day and just waited around while Thomas tested the car, finally getting my chance at about 10 to 5 late afternoon. I set off around Suzuka for the first time in a 3000 and did one lap with cars passing me everywhere left and right as I had no idea where I was going. As I was going in to the 140R left hander two cars passed me on either side then the chequered flag came out and I missed the pits and had to endure another lap of torture.

I called Stuart that night believing that I had lost my talent. I was devastated. I had never felt this way before, but he made me feel a lot better, explaining that it is a really tough track and it would probably take me more than one lap to get used to the car and track, but I did not sleep much that night anyhow as Thomas Danielsson and I were invited out with the team that night to a traditional Japanese restaurant and the team owner insisted that we both try the ‘house special’ which was raw cow’s stomach on a stick. There were 3 or 4 pieces on a stick and I decided to get it over with quickly so I just swallowed them real quick trying not to vomit. Danielsson on the other hand was pacing himself. Then the team owner asked how was the food, It was great I replied him thinking that I loved it he give me another stick of 3 pieces Now I was really ****ed! Whenever he dropped Danielsson and myself back at the hotel I barely made it in the door before I started puking my guts up.

Stuart was right - after a few more laps I was feeling way better, the only problem was I had an old Bell XFM1 helmet on for the first 3 laps and it was if somebody was standing over me trying to rip the helmet off my head, and that was only in 3rd gear. By the time that I borrowed a Shoei from Johnny it was too late as my neck muscles were done. Twenty laps later the test was over and I was about I second slower than Thomas and I did not get the drive. I hated Japan and everything about it, except the track and the time that I spent with Johnny Herbert,

Thanks for asking, and thank you everybody for voting for me!

All the best,

Tommy


Hi Tommy,

Apologies for not saying "Thank You" sooner for the reply to my question. It's a real shame that Japan didn't work out as I guess that it could have been a) a good way to get back to F1 and b) make some decent cash. I agree about Suzuka though - a fantastic track which I'm lucky enough to have tested on. In fact I had a very similar experience to you, except in a much lower formula! Thanks for coming onto TNF to tell us your story.



#485 Gabrci

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 20:17

The weekend before last I had a very pleasant chat with Roberto Moreno and amongst others we were talking about motor racing books. I told him his ex-team mate, Perry McCarthy wrote a great, entertaining book. He said he doesn't care of his book as he has no respect for McCarthy, saying he was a dreamer, not a serious racing driver, but he would recommend Tommy Byrne's book as he was an exceptional driver. I will have to get a copy of that book sooner rather than later!

#486 Geza Sury

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 20:30

The weekend before last I had a very pleasant chat with Roberto Moreno and amongst others we were talking about motor racing books. I told him his ex-team mate, Perry McCarthy wrote a great, entertaining book. He said he doesn't care of his book as he has no respect for McCarthy, saying he was a dreamer, not a serious racing driver, but he would recommend Tommy Byrne's book as he was an exceptional driver. I will have to get a copy of that book sooner rather than later!

Well, then I recommend you to take a look at my short review in Hungarian, which would surely whet your appetite even more. Just click here: http://motorzaj.hu/mi-lett-volna-ha/

Edited by Geza Sury, 25 September 2012 - 20:32.


#487 kayemod

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 20:32

He said he doesn't care of his book as he has no respect for McCarthy, saying he was a dreamer, not a serious racing driver, but he would recommend Tommy Byrne's book as he was an exceptional driver. I will have to get a copy of that book sooner rather than later!


I'd agree with that summing-up, more or less anyway, but while McCarthy's book is pretty much an exercise in slightly sad self-delusion, it's an entertaining read all the same. I suspect that ghost writer Mark Hughes should take much of the credit, but Tommy Byrne's book is on a completely different level in every respect, all racing fans should read that one, if only to discover what we might, and that 'might' is important, have missed.


#488 MonzaDriver

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 17:12

Ciao to all,
I've just seen the Youtube footage about Tommy Byrne's test with Mclaren.

I've read on those years F1 were really nervous cars, and somewhat unpredictable,
but here we have Tommy driving it SMOOTHER and easily very first time out.

That Mclaren goes around the bends of the esse, BETTER than Lauda and Watson.
The exit......... just perfect everytime. It seems to me the reply not 4 different laps.

And he found no place in F1 ? That really says it all.

Plus this kind of cars, in my opinion, were an handicap to Tommy's talent.

Tommy Byrne an outstanding talent.
MonzaDriver.




#489 mfd

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 23:38

Tommy Byrne an outstanding talent.

Watch this !

#490 fer312t

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 10:34

I'd take Perry McCarthy any day over Tommy Bryne to be honest...both as a 'personality' and as a racing driver. While it had it's moments, and I did admire his honesty, I found Byrne's book for the most part, a dreary, bitter, exercise in self-importance.
While he may have acted the clown, I think to write-off McCarthy as some sort of joke is quite an insult - his commitment to being a racing driver was obviously deadly serious, and this proven time and time again...

Edited by fer312t, 30 September 2012 - 10:39.


#491 RobertE

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:23

McCarthy is an excellent fellow, as Hipperson will testify. He is just an absolute hoot...