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8W Christmas Quiz


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#1 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 21:04

The 8W Christmas Quiz has begun! First of all I'm glad to say that it's conducted under old good 8W rules! That means that you have 5W questions for each photo: Who? What? Where? When? & Why? So, your job is to identify the driver (Who? - 1 point), the car (What? - 1 point), the track (Where? - 1 point), the occasion (When? - 1 point), and the reason why this picture is so special (Why? - 3 points), adding up to a maximum score of 7 points per picture. Bonus scores are gained through recognizing other cars and drivers in the pictures.

You have to work hard for the full 3 Why? points! Two points are awarded to the wealth and depth of biographical, historical and technical background you are able to come up with, with the third point going to originality. As a consolation for those who tried hard and failed in the process, desperately wrong answers with a fun-to-read Why? (romping away like in a last-ditch qualifying attempt) will also receive some points.

In this edition of 8W game you have an opportunity to participate in the 8W Nostalgia Christmas Quiz itself, as well as in other Trophies. In all, there are 75 photos and I must say a big 'thank you' for all who have helped me to find the photos for this Quiz! What is different from original 8W game is that now you are not restricted to GP photos, as now there are many motorsport series to think about. Also I should mention that photos from 5 continents are incorporated here!

The Quiz will last for one month, so therefore the deadline for your answers is 20th of January, 2005. You must send the answers only to my e-mail: mrk_eg@yahoo.com - and NOT on this thread! Your letters should have '8W Christmas Quiz' in the title bar and contain the answers, plus your real name and/or you name on the Atlas F1 BB.

And now, with all the formalities over with, please have a fun time this Christmas and have a fun time with our 8W Christmas Quiz too!

Best regards,

Marko




8W Nostalgia Christmas Quiz:

1. Posted Image

2. Posted Image

3. Posted Image

4. Posted Image

5. Posted Image

6. Posted Image

7. Posted Image

8. Posted Image

9. Posted Image

10.Posted Image

11.Posted Image

12.Posted Image

13.Posted Image

14.Posted Image

15.Posted Image

16.Posted Image

17.Posted Image

18.Posted Image

19.Posted Image

20.Posted Image



Caracciola Trophy:

1.Posted Image

2.Posted Image

3.Posted Image

4.Posted Image

5.Posted Image

6.Posted Image

7.Posted Image

8.Posted Image

9.Posted Image



Wimille Trophy:

1.Posted Image

2.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04056nw.th.jpg

3.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04062dj.th.jpg

4.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04073fd.th.jpg

5.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04089ux.th.jpg



Fangio Trophy:

1.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04014jy.th.jpg

2.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04020dr.th.jpg

3.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04033qg.th.jpg

4.http://img93.exs.cx/...040304gv.th.jpg

5.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04043nc.th.jpg

6.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04057qz.th.jpg

7.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04074gs.th.jpg

8.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04085xe.th.jpg

9.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04105wb.th.jpg



Clark Trophy:

1. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04010wk.th.jpg

2. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04023xs.th.jpg

3. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04046mw.th.jpg

4. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04059dk.th.jpg

5. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04075xx.th.jpg

6. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04080uy.th.jpg

7. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04096gf.th.jpg

8. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04104mt.th.jpg

9. http://img96.exs.cx/...s04117fu.th.jpg

10.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04121qi.th.jpg

11.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04149ii.th.jpg



Fittipaldi Trophy:

1.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04015nn.th.jpg

2.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04036iw.th.jpg

3.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04049ry.th.jpg

4.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04055il.th.jpg

5.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04065nv.th.jpg

6.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04088cb.th.jpg

7.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04099ch.th.jpg



Prost Trophy:

1.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04029yb.th.jpg

2.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04032ec.th.jpg

3.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04044ay.th.jpg

4.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04053cz.th.jpg

5.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04066zp.th.jpg

6.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04083mw.th.jpg

7.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04099xe.th.jpg



Senna Trophy:

1.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04019hs.th.jpg

2.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04030wq.th.jpg

3.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04040ws.th.jpg

4.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04051xl.th.jpg

5.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04076zp.th.jpg

6.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04082rh.th.jpg

7.http://img96.exs.cx/...s04097au.th.jpg

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#2 ensign14

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 22:05

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle

You have to work hard for the full 3 Why? points! Two points are awarded to the wealth and depth of biographical, historical and technical background you are able to come up with, with the third point going to originality. As a consolation for those who tried hard and failed in the process, desperately wrong answers with a fun-to-read Why? (romping away like in a last-ditch qualifying attempt) also receive some points all the same."

Dang, can't we go for a bonus point for concision? :lol:

#3 Vitesse2

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 23:14

Originally posted by ensign14
Dang, can't we go for a bonus point for concision? :lol:


No :p

Definitely, positively, absolutely not. In no way, nohow, not at all, negatory ...

Ensign: that's actually a quote from the old 8W game .....

Marko: you're a bona fide 24-carat, gold-plated, copper-bottomed b******d! Out of all those pictures, I have seen precisely four before - and I know who you got three of those from! OTTOMH I can get a partial ID on another half dozen .....

YOU B******D! :lol:

#4 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 20 December 2004 - 02:33

Originally posted by Vitesse2
Out of all those pictures, I have seen precisely four before - and I know who you got three of those from! OTTOMH I can get a partial ID on another half dozen .....

That's nice, Richard!

Please note that 3 photos were added, therefore the order is now different.

#5 Falcadore

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Posted 21 December 2004 - 12:42

and photo five in the first phase appears to be missing.

#6 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 21 December 2004 - 20:41

Originally posted by Falcadore
and photo five in the first phase appears to be missing.


Don't know if this problem was, but the photo must works now...

#7 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 December 2004 - 14:56

Pic 9 in the Clark Trophy section has been used on this forum before, of course...

#8 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 22 December 2004 - 18:26

Originally posted by Ray Bell
Pic 9 in the Clark Trophy section has been used on this forum before, of course...

Well, maybe...

It is one of the greatest ever race I've heard about....

#9 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 18:37

Dear TNFers,

I should remember that only 9 days remain before the 20th of January - the deadline for your answers on 8W Nostalgia Christmas Quiz, which you must send to my e-mail (mrk_eg@yahoo.com).

Please, do not hesitate to send your answers. As you can see I incorporated the photos of all decades of Motor Sport history, so each of you can find your favourite era... And I am sure that you can easily answer on half of Christmas Quiz photos.

After all if you have no time to write Why answers you can send just Who, What, Where, When answers, but don't forget about the deadline. In any case I am glad to see your answers!

Kind regards,
Marko

#10 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 20:14

Today 5 days remain before the end of our 8W Christmas Quiz! Thank a lot for all who have already sent the answers!

Kind regards,
Marko

#11 Ray Bell

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 22:39

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
ell, maybe...

It is one of the greatest ever race I've heard about....


Not in the same league as the same race three years earlier...

#12 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 17:44

Dear fellows,

Today is 19th of January and that means that only ONE day remains for your answers! ONLY 3 TNFers have sent their answers to the Quiz questions! And nobody have tried himself in Fittipaldi Trophy (70s !!!); only a few questions have been answered in Clark Trophy... Please, don't let me feel disappointment....

Kind regards,

Marko :wave:

#13 Flash

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 22:32

Can't you give us a couple more days?

I was out of town due to holidays and right now I'm on them.... but time is not on my side :)

#14 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 23:32

Ok, but right now you need to send me the answers you've already write. And during the time before the overall results will be posted (I'm going to do it in the end of January, maybe during the first week of February) you will have an opportunity to send other answers.

#15 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 23:39

Now I have almost 10 entries for 8W, so I'm very grateful for all who've sent their answers! :up: And as I wrote in previous post, I give you an opportunity to send more answers but only before the overall results will be posted.

Kind regards,
Marko :wave:

#16 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:39

Overall results:

Alessandro Silva: 330 (participation in 43 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 259 (participation in 60 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 171 (participation in 43 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 147,5 (participation in 57 photos)
Rob Horton ('Ensign 14'): 110 (participation in 22 photos)
Riccardo Prosperi ('Teapot'): 75 (participation in 14 photos)
Robert Van der Plasken ('VDP'): 54 (participation in 8 photos)
Mihai Dumitru ('Mihai'): 40 (participation in 7 photos)
Fred Gallagher: 33 (participation in 10 photos)
David Shaw: 20 (participation in 4 photos)



It wasn't so easy task, was it? Well I tried to incorporate here very wide range of photos: and very difficult and very simple. But it seems that in general it was more a hard than an easy quiz. In some degree it was proved by the fact that one day before the deadline there were only three entries to the quiz. And at that moment all looks like this quiz was going to repeat a "three-entries record" for Autumn 2001 8W issue - the last ever original 8W quiz. Fortunately I received more entries on the last day to have a decent number of participants for the game - in fact 10.

I need to say that despite many of you had noticed or decided to take part in this quiz too late to work with qustions properly, almost everyone found his "piece of the history" and managed to win in at least one Trophy. Alessandro Silva, two times 8W winner, made an extremely good effort to win this quiz, taking almost every possible point in those 43 photos and 4 Trophies he decided to take part! The nearest of Alessandro's opposition was Vladimir Kovalenko, known on TNF as 'Kvadrat'. He managed to set an original record by participation in all Trophies and in as many as 60 photos. Also in all Trophies took part Patricia Valencia who became fourth overall.

The most participants took part in Clark Trophy - seven; there also was the closest battle for the victory. And as the results we receive three winners with the same number of points. Also I should notice that after Alessandro Silva two more participants managed to win all Trophies in which they took part - Rob Horton and Mihai Dumitru, who like Stuart Dent and Riccardo Prosperi were extremely well in the modern part of the quiz.

It was a great fun to read your answers and then to compile the results. Hope you all also had the same fun playing in 8W game. And until there will be another 8W Christmas Quiz on TNF you know that there is 8W Nostalgia thread in which you always can take part by answering or asking questions. So, thank you a lot for playing 8W Christmas Quiz and now you can read the answers for it!


#17 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:40

8W Nostalgia Christmas Quiz results:

Alessandro Silva: 133 (participation in all 20 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 60,5 (participation in 16 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 34,5 (participation in 13 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 31 (participation in 9 photos)



1. Posted Image

Who?
Frank Duryea (at the tiller), Arthur White, George Hewitt (at the right background)

What?
Duryea Motor Wagon

Where?
Chicago

When?
28/11/1895; Chicago-Evanston-Chicago

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Brothers Charles (1861/1938) and Frank (1869/1967) Duryea were, arguably at least, the first Americans to build a successful automobile, and there is less argument that they were the first to incorporate an American business for the expressed purpose of building automobiles for sale to the public. Further, Frank drove a car they designed and built to victory in the first automobile race ever held in America. The brothers hailed from the Midwest and they became intimately involved in the burgeoning bicycle business. While living in Peoria, Illinois, Charles designed an improved bicycle he called the Sylph, and business took the brothers to Springfield, Massachusetts, to begin volume production. By the early 1890s both Charles and Frank were in Massachusetts, and Charles invited his brother to join him in the pursuit of building a viable motor car. Frank, a machinist by trade, eagerly jumped into the task, and he continued to work on the project when Charles returned to Peoria in September 1892 to oversee production of one of his bicycle designs at the Rouse, Hazard company.

A year later, after a great deal of tinkering, Frank Duryea was ready to test the brothers' motor wagon. The test run took place on the outskirts of Springfield, Massachusetts, on September 20, 1893. This vehicle moved under its own power for about 200 feet until a pile of dirt in its path halted its progress. That first drive got the Duryeas some publicity, but Frank didn't believe the first car was ready to take to market. With his brother still in Illinois, Frank continued to tinker with the design and by 1895 he had built a car that he considered much superior to the original.

At the same time the Duryeas were toying with the idea of a horseless carriage, a Chicago newspaper publisher named Herman H. Kohlsaat became enamoured of the idea of staging an automobile race after reading about the 1894 road race between Paris and Rouen that had been sponsored by the French paper Le Petit Journal. He decided that his newspaper, the Chicago Times-Herald, would sponsor a similar race. While earlier unofficial races may well have occurred, the American first planned one took place in Chicago. Originally scheduled for early November 1895, only two vehicles made it to the starting line: the Duryea Motor Wagon Co., of Springfield, MA, entry, and a Mueller-Benz from Decatur, Illinois. The event was rescheduled for Thanksgiving Day. Amazingly, six vehicles appeared at the starting line on November 28, 1895: three cars built by the Benz works and imported from Germany, two electric vehicles and Frank Duryea's new car. It was better than his first version in virtually every way, but the biggest improvement was a significantly more powerful two-cylinder engine and pneumatic tyres. At 8:55 a.m. the six motorcars left Chicago's Jackson Park for a 54-mile race to Evanston, Illinois and back through the snow. Number 5, piloted by inventor J. Frank Duryea, won the race in 7 hours and 53 minutes at an average speed of about 7.3 miles per hour. The winner earned $2,000. This story had then an incredible development. While Frank was resting after the grueling race in the snowstorm, brother Charles was photographed on board the victorious car. Since then it was thought that Charles had been the victorious driver. The relationship between the two brothers went sour and they went their separate ways in business as well after 1898. Only after Charles’ death in 1938 investigation on early Duryea activities revealed that it was Frank the actual driver. A controversy started that went on for several years, but by 1945 the truth was more or less accepted by everyone and the AAA Contest Board handed Frank a testimonial resolution attesting to his feat.



2. Posted Image

Who?
Léon Théry

What?
Decauville Voiturelle

Where?
Paris-Rouen-Paris

When?
11/03/1900; Coupe des Voiturettes

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) While preceding Gordon Bennet winners Edge and Jenatzy were men and drivers very much belonging to their Edwardian era, Frenchman Léon Théry (1879/1909) was exquisitely modern. Théry was the first in a long line of drivers, among them some of the greatest ever, who had the gift of being consistently fast, but not faster than needed to win (such for instance Nazzaro, Varzi, Fangio, Stewart, Lauda, Prost). Théry used to study the circuit thoroughly, methodically recognizing its lesser particulars, then establishing a race log that would take into account the difficulties of the track, the quality of the tyres with respect to these, and the solidity of his car (which he knew perfectly, since he was an excellent mechanic and tuner). He would then follow scrupulously the speed he had calculated in his famous race log.

Before going down to posterity as the Gordon Bennett Champion, Théry had been the Voiturettes Champion. He had been faithful to the Decauville make since his beginnings in 1899 until the Paris-Madrid 1903. His first race, the 1899 Paris-Bordeaux, was nonetheless inauspicious: at the tiller of a Decauville, which maximum speed did not exceed 30 kph he arrived at Bordeaux, after 565 km, totally exhausted and struck by amnesia and was heard repeating: “Do not stop me, I have to arrive at Bordeaux!” Other bad moments in his career took place in 1902: a brake failure in the Arlberg downhill (!) during the Paris-Vienna, when his skills and cool blood saved both him and his mechanic Muller and he was able to resume racing, and the hit of a cow at full speed during the Ardennes race. His name will be forever linked with Gordon Bennett, for his two victories in the 1904 and 1905 Trophies and the corresponding two victories in the French Eliminating Trials that were true GPs in their own right. It is amazing to read how famous Théry suddenly became after his 1904 Taunus win. Back from Germany with Henri Brasier, they received an enthusiastic reception in the ACF premises. They appeared on the balcony and thousands of Parisian cheered at them. A series of banquets and other festivities would follow, where - during one of them - Fernand Charron announced that the subscription that he and other friends had started had raised 12,200 FF. He was given also the interests of a lifetime bond. Another subscription was opened for the three mechanics that had accompanied him, among them the faithful Muller, Théry’s shadow and riding mechanic. Brasier presented Théry with the winning car that he took to America, earning a big purse, but little racing success. After the two 1905 victories, his fame was such that Théry tried to bank on it, starting his own car factory and abandoning competition. It was a dismal failure and we find Théry as chauffeur for the La Vie au Grand Air reporter at the Bordeaux-Paris bycicle race in May 1908. He had to resume racing for Brasier at Dieppe in the 1908 GP. He was running fourth and first of the French cars, when a broken wheel obliged him to retire during the last lap. Théry was already suffering of a severe kidney ailment that was going to kill him on March 8th, 1909. Knowing that, it is sad to look at Théry’s photographs: he is much round, looking more inflated than fat; Henri Brasier called him “Pauvre Gros”, “Poor Fatty”. Théry was good-natured and simple. Some describe him as somewhat lazy. He certainly was phlegmatic and meticulous; his racing tactics, among the flamboyant drivers of the period, gave the impression of him going slow, of being too prudent, but his calm, his stamina, his cool blood, his assurance and his clever sense of the race always paid off.

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) In 1896, Leon Bollee built three wheel vehicle and called it Voiturette. Already in 1896 some people used it in races. In Paris - Marsielles - Paris race all vehicles were divided by ACF to cars, motorcycles and others. Bollee Voiturette was "others". In 1898 ACF adopted its regulations for car weight and used Voiturette name for under 400 kg class, although it was commercial name of a car. The idea of a light car inspired other designers to build their own "voiturettes". Cottereau called his car Voiturine, and Decauville's car was Voiturelle. But all they are in Voiturette ACF class. As road cars became more perfect, they became more light, and former cheaper light cars became almost equal to regular ones. So Voiturette class disappeared by around 1910, but it was replaced by more light and ultimately cheap cars called cyclecars. In racing, however, heavy cars remained, because larger and heavier engines could produce more power and speed for car. Thus Voiturette class also remained throughout many years until secondary formula class was introduced in 1947 known as Formula 2. Is far as I'm aware, no one called 1500 cc cars "Voiturettes" in the 30s, although nowdays everybody calls them not "light cars" or "1500cc cars" but always "voiturettes'. As for picture, Leon Thery won one of the first races only for light cars or "Voiturettes" (if not the very first one)



3. Posted Image

Who?
Barney Oldfield

What?
Blitzen-Benz

Where?
Ormond Beach, Daytona

When?
March, 1910

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Bern Eli Oldfield didn't mind that so much of his racing career was fact entangled with fiction. The consummate showman and master self-promoter was pleased. It suit his robust, outgoing personality and style.

He was born June 3, 1878 in Wauseon, Ohio. His first love was bicycling: in 1896, he was being paid handsomely by the Stearns bicycle factory to race on its team. Six years later, a man lent him a gasoline-powered bicycle to race in Salt Lake City, where Oldfield had emigrated. This association led to a meeting with Henry Ford, who had prepared two racecars in 1902. Oldfield was asked if he would like to drive one and he agreed, heading East on his own money. When he got to Grosse Point, Mich., to test the cars, neither would start. Ford sold both to Oldfield and Tom Cooper, his partner, for $800.

After much work, the car - "No.999" - was driven for the first time in the Manufacturer's Challenge Cup, where Oldfield beat defending champion Alexander Winton by a half mile. It was Oldfield's first-ever experience in auto racing. On Memorial Day in 1903 in New York, Oldfield drove a mile in a minute flat in another match-race victory. Two months later, he powered the car to a mile run in 0:55.8 and that was enough for Winton to hire Oldfield, complete with salary, expenses and free cars.

His showmanship came to the forefront. Oldfield delighted fair-goers with interminable record-breaking. He even appeared on stage in a play about racing in which he portrayed a poor mechanic who saves the day. In 1910, Oldfield bought the Blitzen Benz with which he broke all existing speed records for the mile, two miles and the kilometer in special runs at Ormond Beach, Fla. After that, he was able to charge $4,000 for personal appearances. Once suspended by the American Automobile Association, the sanctioning body, because of his "outlaw" racing activities, much of Oldfield's legitimate racing career was lost during his prime. However, he competed at Indianapolis after being reinstated and his best finishes were fifth in 1914 and 1916. Additionally, he ran the first 100 miles per hour lap in Indianapolis history. He retired in 1918.

The Blitzen-Benz, designed in 1909 by Max Wagner, had a 21.5L pushrod engine and 200 bhp at 1650 rpm and chain transmission, had evolved from the 1908 GP model. It set a series of speed records – driven by Héméry, Oldfield and Bob Burman - topped by 228.1 kph on the flying mile. A touring version was put into production in 1913, while three of the racing cars were built.

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) It's well known picture, but it's always describes as just Barney Oldfield in Blitzen Benz in Daytona in 1910. No more details. But there's well known fact that on March 16, 1910 Oldfield set world speed record in Blitzen Benz. But the car in the picture has starting number, which means that the event was race, not speed record attempt. But I found a couple of interesting articles in Massachusetts Institute of Technology dayly newspaper The Tech, which can be found at http://www-tech.mit.edu.

Daytona, Fla., March 24.-Barney Oldfield reeled off some fast performances in the second day's races at the present auto meet here yesterday afternoon and with his Benz car broke the world's kilometre record in a time trial by covering the distance in 17 4-100s. The previous world's record was 17 76-100s. A kilometre is 3280 feet It inches. He failed, however, to improve his avorld's record mile of last week, when hlie did 27 33-100s. His time for the mile today was 28 2-5s.

Daytonia, Fla., March 25.-A 300-mile race for a trophy valued at $5,000 was the feature scheduled for yesterday's automlobile speed carnival on Daytonia beach. The race is free for all and the contestants include Barney Oldfield, David Bruce Brown, George Robertson, Ben Kerscher, and other drivers with stock cars.

So that was more than a week long speed event in Daytona with trials, record attempts and finally 300 mile race. I suppose the picture was taken during 300 mile race on March 25.



4. Posted Image

Who?
Albert Guyot

What?
Guyot Spéciale 2L

Where?
Monthléry

When?
1925; Presentation

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Before WWI Albert Guyot (1881-1947) was a Delage works driver, but he also drove for Rolland-Pilain and Sunbeam. Guyot was a regular at Indianapolis where he finished 4th in 1913 (Sunbeam), 3rd in 1914 (Delage) and 4th in 1919 with Wagner (Ballot). Duesenberg works driver in 1921, he finished sixth at both Indianapolis and the GP de l’ACF. He moved then to Rolland-Pilain with which he won the 1923 GP de San Sebastian. Then he became a builder of Specials. His second car is the Grand Prix car in the photo. It was designed by the engineer Cozette with Burt Mac Callum 6-cyl sleeveless valve supercharged engine. Destined to the 2L Grand Prix formula it finished fourth at the GP de l’ACF then retired at Monza. It is still in existence today. The last Guyot’s racing cars are the four 1.5L 6-cyl. built for Indianapolis 1926.

Guyot committed suicide in a spectacular fashion in 1947, when, after a Gargantuesque dinner with René Thomas and other motoring personalities drank a vial of cyanide in the restaurant toilet.



5. Posted Image

Who?
Juan Zanelli

What?
Bugatti T35B

Where?
Pau

When?
21/09/1930; GP ACF

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) An expatriate from Chili, Zanelli lived in France Italy and Spain in the 1920s and 1930s. He was a typical Bugatti independent driver, one of the many from the late 1920s, but by no means a slow one. After a start with a Fiat in 1926, he won the 1929 and 1930 Bugatti GP at Le Mans, finished 2nd in Alessandria in 1930, 2nd at the 1929 Marne GP and 3rd in the 1930 French GP at Pau (in the photograph). He also won the 1930 Gometz-Le Chatel Hillclimb. In 1931 Zanelli raced an unusual but fast 2.8 litre 8C two ohc Nacional Pescara, made by the Spanish Fabrica Nacional de Automoviles, an enterprise backed by the Spanish royal family. Zanelli became the European Hill Climb Champion in this car, with a series of good performances including a victory at Kesselberg from Caracciola. In 1933-35 he raced his private Alfa Romeo Monza winning the 1933 Penya Rhin. He continued to race the Nacional Pescara now in Monoposto guise in hill climbs winning at Val de Guech in 1935. In 1936 he raced a V8-Ri Scuderia Torino and a Maserati 8CM for Scuderia Villapadierna, finishing third in La Turbie hill climb in the now ancient Nacional Pescara. Zanelli quit racing after this season. His trade and personal fate are somewhat mysterious. It seems that he died in 1942 in a German camp.



6. Posted Image

Who?
Mario Mazzacurati, Franco Cortese, Piero Taruffi

What?
Maserati 6CM

Where?
Capetown

When?
14/01/1939; Grosvenor Grand Prix

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Nine Maseratis were pitted against four ERAs and Fay Taylour’s Riley in the two international races, the Grosvenor Grand Prix at Capetown and the South African Grand Prix at East London in January 1939. Scuderia Ambrosiana had shipped five cars of the latest 6CM model for Taruffi, Villoresi, Cortese, and for expatriate Italian Mario Mazzacurati, while an older 6CM was destined to Steve Chiappini. Pietsch would also drive one the latest 6CM while Swiss Armand Hug in his usual fast 4CM, Buller Meyer and Frenchman Louis Gerard in older 6Cms were the other Trident drivers. The ERAs were driven by Howe, Aitken, Hesketh and Peter Whitehead. The South African organizers had abandoned the handicap format for their races, which had provoked some disconcerts among Continentals the previous years and opted for the voiturette formula. Maserati had attached some importance to these races so head tester Guerrino Bertocchi was dispatched to help Ambrosiana chief mechanic Piero Facetti. The well-prepared Maseratis easily won from the ageing ERAs both times, at East London – South African GP – with Villoresi, and at Capetown (picture) with Franco Cortese.



7. Posted Image

Who?
Chico Landi

What?
Alfa Romeo Tipo B

Where?
Retiro Circuit

When?
23/11/1941; Buenos Aires GP

Why? It was an interesting race between the local heros and the Brazilians at the short Retiro Circuit that was used for the 1941 and 1947 Buenos Aires GP at the time when in Europe had already started a bloody WW2.

Landi was one of the first Brazilians to try his luck in Europe, making the move in the late forties after building up a fine record with his Alfa Romeo. He won the Bari GP in a Ferrari in 1948, and raced spasmodically in Grands Prix and other events over the next few seasons. His best single-seater result was a second place in the Albi GP with a Ferrari 375 in 1952, a season which also saw him gain a string of fine placings at home. Landi raced on into the late fifties, before retiring to become a leading figure in the administration of Brazilian motor sport



8. Posted Image

Who?
PAT Garland

What?
Delage 3L

Where?
Lille, Circuit des Trois Villes

When?
25/08/1946; GP des Trois Villes

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) Garland was British living in France. He never raced in Britain although painted Union Jack on both sides of his blue Delage. In 1946 there was a proposal to switch from green to blue for British cars in international races painting Union Jack on both sides of the car. Garland sent a letter to The Motor noting that British flag on his Delage had exactly the same square as proposed.



9. Posted Image

Who?
Francesco Carena/Raymond De Saugé (Alberto Puig Palau)

What?
Cisitalia D46 GP (Maserati 6CM)

Where?
Barcelona, Pedralbes

When?
27/10/1946; Gran Premio de Penya Rhin

Why? The very first Spanish Grand Prix in 1913 that was not actually run to the Grand Prix formula of the day, but to touring car rules, taking place on a 300-kilometre road circuit at Guadarrama, near Madrid, on the road to Valladolid.

Motor racing events had taken place in Spain prior to that - the most notable among them being the Catalan Cup of 1908 and 1909, on roads around Sitges, near Barcelona. Both of these events were won by Jules Goux, establishing a strong racing tradition in Catalonia, which has continued to this day. This enthusiasm for racing led to the plan to build a permanent track at Sitges - a 2-kilometre oval which became known as Sitges-Terramar, and was the site of the 1923 Spanish Grand Prix.

After this first race, the track fell into financial difficulties, and the main race in Spain moved to the track at Lasarte on the northern coast. Following the 1936 race, Spain descended into civil war and racing stopped. And this 1946 Penya Rhin Grand Prix at Pedralbes became the first race on Spanish soil after the war.



10.Posted Image

Who?
Duke Nalon

What?
Don Lee Special (Mercedes-Benz W154)

Where?
Indianapolis

When?
30/05/1947; Indianapolis 500 Mile Race

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) It was to everybody’s amazement that a 1939 12V Mercedes-Benz W154 of the last generation of the Silver Arrows passed through London on its way to California in early 1947! It had been found in Czechoslovakia, claimed for war reparation and sold for hard dollars to Don Lee in Los Angeles. The American buyer had imported it “specifically to win the famous Memorial Day Sweepstakes at Indianapolis. The Mercedes never even looked like winning this great and grueling classic – it was much too complicated for the Americans to gaffer – and it was ultimately desecrated with the removal of its German engine and the installation of an American unit”. Its driver would be Dennis C. “Duke” Nalon, a 16-time veteran of the Indianapolis 500. He won the pole position as the fastest qualifier in 1949 and 1951. His best finish was 3rd in 1948. He also had a Top Ten finish at 10th in 1951. A popular ambassador for automobile racing, Nalon miraculously survived a fiery crash that resulted from a broken rear axle while he was leading early in the 1949 race. He died in February of 2001.



11.Posted Image

Who?
John Webb

What?
Turner-Lea Francis 'FII-007'

Where?
Crystal Palace

When?
30/05/1955; London Trophy

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) The picture shows the end – luckily bloodless - of the racing career of both driver and car. We do not know what Connaught’s Mike Oliver thought when he saw that one of the Lea Francis engines with cylinder blocks cast in aluminum specially made especially for his type A car was given to a rather obscure builder of specials. Jack Turner was his name. He got the engine through the connection that he had made by building a sports car for the son of Lea Francis chief designer Hugh Rose for the purpose of building a F2 car around it for the 1953 season.

But why? John Webb, after serving in the Royal Artillery during the war, had first explored the possibility of sheep farming in Australia until deciding, on the death of his father and elder brother, to rejoin the family business which made English lead crystal glass, had bought the ex-Reg Parnell MG K3 Magnette. Eventually he took his car to Turner for preparation, saw the first Turner sports car, liked it, and deciding that his MG chassis was too heavy to do justice to his 120 bhp engine, asked Jack to build him a single-seat version. He was impressed by Turner’s ability so he decided to put down an order for a new F2 car. Another thing that we ’ll never know is if the car was always at the back of the field because of its faults, or of those of its driver. Mainly used in local races, the car got an Alta engine for 1954 and, driven by Jack Fairman, fared just a little bit better in a more intense season. In the meanwhile Turner had designed a little sports car powered by the 850cc Austin engine. Mainly sold in kit form, it enjoyed moderate success and it is considered the forerunner of the Austin-Healey Sprite. After that Turner followed his only single seater into oblivion where apparently they are both still alive and well.

“The F2 Turner did not take racing by storm though when Webb entered the likes of Jack Fairman and Ron Flockhart in it, it picked up a few places. In 1955, at Crystal Palace, a locked brake caused the car to slew and roll, throwing Webb out (photo). John had had his fling, marriage was in prospect and although his fiancée encouraged his racing John thought it best not to continue, and he bowed out of active racing though he later served on the council of the Bugatti Owners' Club and is a member of the BRDC.”



12.Posted Image

Who?
Jean Behra (Maria Teresa de Filippis)

What?
Behra Porsche

Where?
Monaco

When?
8-10/05/1959; XVII Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Not surprisingly, Behra had left BRM in 1959 and joined the Ferrari team. He won the Aintree 200 with the Dino 256 Ferrari. By this time he had designed his own Formula 2 car, based on a Porsche sports car, and spent a great deal of time on this project; but he also drove an RSK Porsche sports car with success. The F2 car was made to Behra’s order by Valerio Colotti in Modena, but did not prove to be satisfactory. Only in Reims when driven by Hans Herrmann it showed enough speed. (see Fangio Trophy # 7 and #8)

Sassy Neapolitan noblewoman Maria Teresa de Filippis had elected the Frenchman as her pedagogue for the hard study required to become a Grand Prix driver. At Monaco she was four seconds slower than von Trips in the first Porsche 718 and did not qualify. Maria-Teresa had just failed to score Championship points in the Italian Grand Prix the previous year, when she steadily ran sixth in her Maserati before retiring, a few laps from the finish.

Soon after Behra quarreled with the Ferrari team manager Romolo Tavoni and left the team. He took an RSK to the German sports-car GP at the Avus track. On a wet track, he passed Jack Brabham at high speed going into the enormous high banking at the end of the long, fast straight. Instead of rounding the banking normally, the Porsche suddenly shot to the top, hitting the concrete barrier. Behra was flung from the car striking a flagpole as he was thrown out. The plucky, and often unlucky 38-year-old Frenchman died instantly. Maria Teresa immediately quit racing after Behra’s death.



13.Posted Image

Who?
Carel Godin de Beaufort

What?
Porsche 718

Where?
Modena

When?
1 or 2/9/1961 [race on the 3rd]; GP Modena (practice)

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) The last Grand Prix raced on the Aerautodromo track was dominated by Stirling Moss who had been the fastest in practice and led for almost the entire race from the Porsches of Bonnier and Gurney. Godin de Beaufort had not been able to qualify a similar car. A big number of entries had come to Modena in fact for this race held one week before Monza, but no Ferraris. Only fourteen cars qualified for the race, with the provision that three of them had to be Italian entries. Bandini qualified his Centro-Sud Cooper Maserati in its own right, whereas Bussinello in a De Tomaso-Conrero shove Innes Ireland’s works Lotus off the grid. Seidel, Trintignant, Godin de Beaufort and Mauro Bianchi’s Emeryson in this order were slower than Bussinello, so they did not qualify. Giorgio Scarlatti had been slower than them, but qualified his Lotus 18 as the third Italian.



14.Posted Image

Who?
Ludovico Scarfiotti

What?
BRM P578 ('5785') Centro-Sud

Where?
Brands Hatch

When?
13/3/1965; I Daily Mail Race of Champions

Why? One-off appearance of Ludovico in the over-raced Centro-Sud BRM (in its fourth season). He finished 16th in heat 1. Also it was the first ever Race of Championship.

Ludovico's racing career started with Fiat 1100 saloon. Winning his class in the Mille Miglia in 1956 and 1957, Scarfiotti originally raced just for fun - as he could afford to, being related to the wealthy Agnelli family who, of course, controlled the FIAT empire. He tested a works Ferrari sports car as early as 1958, but had to be content with campaigning a little 2-litre OSCA, taking second place in the Naples GP at Posillipo. Ludovico finally joined the Scuderia's sports car team in 1960, sharing the fourth-place car with Cabianca and Mairesse in the Targa Florio. His first real success came in 1962 when he took the European mountain-climb championship in Ferrari's 2-litre V6 car, and this confirmed his place in the works team for 1963 alongside Surtees and Mairesse, when the rest of the Scuderia's drivers were being shown the door. His early-season sports car outings were encouraging. Sharing the 250P with Surtees, he won at Sebring and he later won at Le Mans, this time with Bandini. Impressed with his efforts, Ferrari rewarded him with his Grand Prix debut at Zandvoort and after a steady drive he took sixth place, enough to earn another opportunity at Reims. Unfortunately a practice crash in which he hit a telegraph pole left him with leg injuries serious enough not only to keep him out for some while but also to prompt him to announce his retirement from F1. Scarfiotti was back in action in 1964, winning the Nurburgring 1000 Km with Vaccarella in the works Ferrari 275P and finishing second at Mosport in the 330P. Contrary to his earlier intentions, he was back in a Ferrari single-seater at Monza, but was mostly used by the Scuderia in sports cars the following year. Driving the lovely 1.6-litre Ferrari Dino, Ludovico took his second mountain-climb championship, and he was also second in the Monza 1000 Km. The 1966 season was his best, but only courtesy of his famous Italian GP victory, as little else was achieved bar a second place in the Nurburgring 1000 Km. Scarfiotti was one of four drivers (Bandini, Parkes and newcomer Amon were the others) representing Ferrari in 1967, and the season started well with second places with the Ferrari P4 sports car at Daytona and in the Monza 1000 Km. Then came a fifth place in the Race of Champions and a staged dead-heat with Parkes to win the Syracuse GP before the first disaster. Bandini was killed at Monaco and soon Parkes - with whom Scarfiotti had just taken a second place at Le Mans – was badly injured at Spa. 'Lulu' seemed to lose heart and after a dispute with the management took his leave, appearing in Dan Gurney's Eagle at Monza. For 1968 Scarfiotti found himself a berth at Cooper. The cars were slow but reliable, and he managed to pick up a couple of fourth-place finishes. Although he had forsaken Ferrari, his sports car talents were not about to be allowed to go to waste, and he signed for Porsche to race their prototypes. A second place in the BOAC 500 at Brands was to be his best placing for the Stuttgart firm, for while practising for the Rossfeld hill-climb in June 1968 he inexplicably ran straight on at a corner and crashed into a clump of trees with fatal consequences.



15.Posted Image

Who?
Roger McCaig

What?
McLaren M8C Chevrolet

Where?
Le Circuit St. Jovite, Mont Tremblant

When?
28/6/1970

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) McCaig (1934/1976) raced in the hottest seasons of the Can-Am series with the knowledge of having terminal cancer. He became a full-time racing driver in 1969, the same year he was diagnosed with the disease. He in no way disgraced himself in tough company, and was the top Canadian in the Can-Am series in 1970 as well as sharing successes with brother Maurice in major endurance races. Besides the Can Am he raced in the Continental 5000 series always with McLaren cars. McCaig and his brothers were the owners of the huge Trimac Trucking Company.

He died in 1976.



16.Posted Image

Who?
Jackie Stewart

What?
Lotus 78

Where?
Paul Ricard

When?
Winter testing, late 1977

Why? Stewart wrote a whole series of articles in "Autocar", track testing F1 cars. The tests were conducted during winter testing at Paul Ricard during late 1977 He tested Tyrrell P34, Renault RS10, Wolf WR1, Mclaren M26, Ligier JS7, Lotus 78. And he found the Lotus to be the best one.



17.Posted Image

Who?
Stefan Johansson

What?
March 802-BMW

Where?
Thruxton

When?
5 or 6 April 1980 [race on 07/04]; XXIV BARC 200 (practice)

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Teo Fabi had been temporarily impaired during practice for the first F2 race of the year, so Stefan Johansson took the wheel of the March. Stefan had been called to a F2 drive late in the 1979 season and then to F1 for the Argentine and Brazilian rounds of the 1980 GP season in the underdeveloped and slow Shadow DN11. But for 1980 he started out as the clear British F3 title favourite as he signed up with Ron Dennis' Project 4 team, which had led Chico Serra to the 1979 championship. An initial win was followed by a dismal series of races with the March 803. A switch to a Ralt salvaged his career by winning the British F3 title.



18.Posted Image

Who?
Satoru Nakajima

What?
Lotus Honda 99T

Where?
Detroit

When?
21/6/1987; United States Grand Prix (warm-up)

Why? You can remember Emmanuel de Graffenried at Spa in 1954, Phil Hill at Monaco and again at Spa in 1966, Manfred Winkelhock at Estoril in 1984 or Francois Hesnault at Imola and at Nurburgring in 1985... Then "in-car" footage has become usual thing for racing cars all over the world. But the first cameras were so huge that in 1950s or 1960s the drivers even had no possibility to find themselves in entry list if they want to race a "camera" car. In 1970s cameras became smaller and so thanks to Elf they started to use during some laps in practices. In the 1980s they became more smaller and so there were some cases of official starts of "camera" cars in F1 races. But these cases still were more or less accidental. It was until 1987 when the first "permanent" camera car became Satoru Nakajima's Lotus. And one of the first races of 1987 season (after Imola, Spa and Monaco) where camera on his Lotus was used, became the United States Grand Prix held at Detroit.

Senna's win at Monaco three weeks before had proven that Lotus' active suspension system worked, and on the bumpy Detroit circuit, it was even more of an advantage. On Friday, Nigel Mansell's Williams was fastest in both qualifying sessions, ahead of Senna's Lotus and Piquet, in the second Williams. It rained on Friday night, but the track was dry for the afternoon session on Saturday. In the final session, Senna briefly took the top spot, but Mansell took it right back and ended up almost a second quicker for his fourth pole in five races on the season. American Eddie Cheever was sixth for Arrows, just behind Alain Prost's McLaren. Unlike Senna Nakajima was one of the slowest during all weekend and in qualification he managed to record a time only for penultimate row on the starting grid with a time more than 8 seconds slower than his team mate Ayrton Senna...

It rained again on Saturday night and Sunday morning, but, after a soaked warm-up on race morning, the start was dry. The first three got away from the grid in order, while Cheever jumped up to fourth and Teo Fabi went from eighth to fifth in the Benetton, followed by Michele Alboreto, Prost, Thierry Boutsen and Stefan Johansson... In the meantime Nakajima had a bad start and trying to get back his positions managed to hit Campos' Minardi. And thanks to the camera on the Lotus this crash was possible to see right from Nakajima's view!

On lap three, Piquet went wide in a corner and picked up debris that punctured a tire. His pit stop moved Cheever into third, but just three laps later, Fabi hit Cheever's rear tire, puncturing it and breaking the nose of Fabi's Benetton. Fabi was out on the spot, while Cheever lost two laps and rejoined in 19th. By lap 10, Mansell was five seconds ahead of Senna, with Alboreto another 23 seconds back in third. Suddenly, Senna felt his brake pedal go soft entering a turn, and he narrowly avoided hitting the wall. He decided to back off and allow the brakes to cool, dropping three seconds per lap from his times. Primarily concerned about staying ahead of Alboreto, Senna got a break when the Ferrari's gearbox failed on lap 25, handing third place to Prost. On the next lap, Senna began to go after Mansell. On lap 26, Mansell's lead was 18.8 seconds over Senna, but he was beginning to experience cramps in his right leg. A stop for tires on lap 34 took a disastrous 18 seconds when the right rear wheel nut refused to seat properly. Holding the brakes on much longer than normal made the Englishman's cramp even worse. Prost, now in second, was struggling with brake and gearbox problems as he stopped for tires. Senna turned the race's fastest lap on lap 39 at 1:40.464, faster than his qualifying time! Realizing that he was faster on his original tires than the others were on new ones, he decided to finish the race without stopping to change tires. When the Lotus crew emerged in the pit lane for a time as if preparing for a stop, it wasn't until lap 50 of the 63 lap race that the rest of the field realized the Brazilian was not coming in. By that time, he was nearly a minute ahead. Mansell, by this time, was exhausted, his head rolling from side to side in the cockpit. He said after the race that every time he passed the pits, he thought of stopping. On lap 53, Piquet and Prost passed him, and on lap 56, Berger did as well. His perseverance gained him two points for fifth, a lap down, while Cheever took the final point. Senna eased up toward the end, and with just three laps to go, it began to rain lightly. It never became an issue, however, and he crossed the line thirty-three seconds ahead.

Ayrton Senna repeated his 1986 win in Detroit and won his second 1987 race in a row, the first wins for a car with active suspension. It was the sixth win of his career, but his last in 1987 and the last for the Lotus team, which eventually folded in 1994. Senna said that his tires were able to last the entire distance for two reasons: the laps he slowed to cool the brakes, and the smooth ride given by the active suspension...



19.Posted Image

Who?
Tiff Needell

What?
Williams FW14B-Renault

Where?
Paul Ricard (?)

When?
1992 (1991 ?)

Why? Tiff spent the formative years of his racing career in Formula Ford, winning the FF1600 championship in 1975 and finishing as runner-up in the FF2000 series the following year, when he won the premier Grovewood Award. After brief spells in Formula 2 and the Aurora F1/F2 championship, Needell's Grand Prix ambitions were thwarted in 1979, when he was refused a superlicence to drive the Ensign, although he was to get his opportunity in 1980. By then, Tiff had extended his repertoire to encompass Japanese Formula 2, touring cars, the Procar series and sports car racing, where he was to remain active throughout the eighties and nineties, latterly with the Lister Storm. In December 1991 he received an opportunity to test Williams FW14 at Estoril. He also was involved into commercial filming (on the photo) conducted by Elf that made excellent on-board footage in 1970s. However Tiff is now best known for his successful career as a journalist and broadcaster.



20.Posted Image

Who?
Michael Schumacher

What?
Sauber Petronas C16

Where?
Fiorano

When?
12/09/1997

Why? After Jordan, Benetton, Ligier and Ferrari Sauber became that day the 5th (6th if we remember Mercedes run at Norisring '93 and '92 with Fangio) F1 team which cars were driven, tested or raced by Michael.

Sauber team had three-day test session at Fiorano circuit. The first day of the testing was Thursday, September 11, 1997. To that point the fastest Fiorano test time in 1997 was set by Michael Schumacher in his Ferrari on 2nd of May and was equal to 0:59.01. On Thursday a driver of C16 was Johnny Herbert who drove 80 laps and set a fastest lap of 1.00.95. But on the next there was a big surprise. Peter Sauber wanted to know what the car was able to do in comparison to the Ferrari and how Schumacher would estimate the Sauber C16. Also Peter Sauber especially was interested in Schumacher's opinion about the car's behaviour when running with low fuel, because it had some balance problems then. Schumacher said he always finds it interesting to drive another car and because Sauber uses the Ferrari engine it was okay. Michael drove 84 laps and clocked a fastest time of 1.00.10. During the 3rd and the last day of testing Herbert managet to beat Michael's time setting the best lap of 0:59.96 after 76-lap session.

#18 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 926 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:46

Caracciola Trophy results:

Alessandro Silva: 77 (participation in all 9 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 15 (participation in 5 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 3,5 (participation in 4 photos)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Achille Varzi

What?
Auto Union B

Where?
Monza

When?
08/09/1935; XIII Gran Premio d'Italia

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) There is nothing memorable about Varzi’s participation in the Italian Grand Prix in 1935. Mercedes-Benz had dominated the season, but the Auto-Union looked very fast at Monza. Varzi had taken the early lead, but a piston burst after a bit more than 10 laps. Stuck went on to win for the Zwickau team. Varzi had just begun his stormy relationship with Ilse Pietsch, one of the most talked about episodes in Grand Prix history.

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) I think there's nothing special with Varzi in the race. But the circuit's layout is very interesting. This is left turn from the middle of the back straight to link to oval track's back straight. In 1935, Monza's layout was mainly very similar to present one's having chicanes at what we now know as Curva Grande (to be exact, just before main straight's end), Curva della Roggia and Variante Ascari. The only fundamental difference is that oval track was partly used.



2.Posted Image

Who?
Francesco Severi

What?
Maserati 6CM

Where?
Targa Florio, Parco della Favorita, Palermo

When?
23/05/1937; XXVIII Targa Florio

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Driver from Modena Francesco Severi drove the typical mounts of the Italian privateer of the era: Alfa Romeo 6Cs and 8Cs and 1500cc Maserati voiturettes. An early Scuderia Ferrari associate, he became very close with Enzo, getting in return the wheel of an Alfetta for Alfa Corse in 1938/1939. A competent, although not particularly fast driver, Severi quit racing in 1940 when he married a rich noblewoman who, among others, had extensive land interests near… Maranello! For some reason Francesco acquired several different first names in foreign motoring literature, thus leading to the belief of the existence of several Severis, a family name which is quite common around Modena. Only two Severis, though, appear to be connected with Enzo and motor racing, Francesco and Martino, Ferrari head tester in the second half of the 1950s.

In the photo Severi is racing the first Targa Florio run on the featureless circuit drawn in the Favorita Park, which he won. The Automobile Club di Palermo had moved the Targa, which was no longer connected with Vincenzo Florio, from the Madonie to downtown Palermo. Most of the immense holdings of the Florio family had been nationalized by the Fascist government, which only paid a few pennies in return. Vincenzo had resigned from the board of the local Auto Club and moved to Rome. He would return to Sicily only after the fall of the regime.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Mechanics Bortolini, Bertocchi and Facetti with Steve Chiappini’s Scuderia Ambrosiana Maserati 6CM

What?
Maserati 6CM

Where?
In a South African port

When?
January 1939

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Nine Maseratis were pitted against four ERAs and Fay Taylour’s Riley in the two international races, the Grosvenor Grand Prix at Capetown and the South African Grand Prix at East London in January 1939. Scuderia Ambrosiana had shipped five cars of the 6CM model for Taruffi, Villoresi and Cortese, for Briton/South African of Italian origin Steve Chiappini and for expatriate Italian Mario Mazzacurati, all with works assistance represented by “Guerrino” Bertocchi and Bortolini. (see Xmas game # 6). Chiappini (1908/1976) finished eighth at East London and third at Capetown. He had raced the ex-Oates Maserati 2.5L the previous year.



4.Posted Image

Who?
Maurice Gatsonides and Lex Beels

What?
GATSO Kwik

Where?
Liege-Rome-Liege

When?
1939

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Maurice Gatsonides, a well-known Dutch motoring journalist, did not disdain to take part in international rallies. His participations at the Monte Carlo Rallye, for instance, are innumerable in the period straddling WWII. He finally won this race in 1953. He never won, instead, the Liege-Rome-Liege, a rally, which had different features from the others since it was run practically no-stop with a given minimum average that made this race the toughest of its kind, and no acrobatic test such as in MonteCarlo was ever needed to sort out a winner. Gatsonides became famous – though – for a totally different feat. He was the inventor of the first Gatsometer, a speed trap. The Gatsometer is still the most common device of its kind in Europe.

Dutchman Lex Beels was to become well known as a driver-constructor in the forthcoming 500cc FIII. This formula picked up in the Netherlands after a race at Zandvoort on July 31, 1949, where Beels set fastest lap driving a Cooper owned by Hans Holdtrust. He soon repeated the same exercise at Goodwood. The contemporary British press kept asking how a Dutch national came to be racing in British club events of non-international status! Restriction on imports to Holland soon led Beels to build some cars which were honest-to-God copies of the Cooper rather than “inspired by” as bashfully said in various contemporary sources. He later raced various Cooper-Nortons, notably the ex-Whitehouse MkVI.

Gatsonides also was the builder of a small series of Ford-powered sports cars after WWII. The car in the picture is the “Forerunner of the postwar Gatford and Gatso sportscar. Two-seater, with luxurious red Connolly leather interior. Detachable fabric top. Bodywork custom-built to Gatsonides' requirements by Schutter & Van Bakel, Amsterdam. Built on the first Ford Mercury chassis imported into Holland, and therefore featured the enlarged, 3.9 litre 95 b.h.p. V8 engine fitted with high-compression aluminium cylinderheads and two double barrel carburettors. The engine was exclusive to the Mercury line, rather than the regular 3.6 litre 85 b.h.p. Ford V8. With only the "Kwik" (the Dutch word for "mercury") legend on the body being visible”.

The Kwik was entered in the Liège-Rome- Liège Rally in 1939 with number 28 and finished in 14th place. This car disappeared during the war after an accident.



5.Posted Image

Who?
Franco Cortese

What?
Maserati 6CM 1565

Where?
Targa Florio, Parco della Favorita, Palermo

When?
14/05/1939; XXX Targa Florio

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Journeyman driver Franco Cortese's (1903-1966) career started in 1926 and lasted until 1958. Cortese was a driver of great stamina, quick and reliable, who drove one of the widest varieties of racing cars in history. Ever smiling, elegant and "sympathique" he was a first class driver, though he was always considered to be merely a semi-professional. He has the distinction of having been the first Ferrari works driver and the first winner in a Ferrari in 1947. Ferrari asserts that he was the best suited for driving a new car because of his style and technical skills. Cortese was Italian sports car Champion in ‘37 and ‘38 (Alfa Romeo 2300B) and later the Italian F2 Champion in 1951. He was still capable of winning the Italian 2L sports car Championship in 1956 driving a Ferrari 500 TR. A specialist of the Pescara track, he scored five consecutive victories there between 1934 and 1939 in sports car races. He also won four international voiturette/F2 races in 1938, 1948 and 1950, the Grosvenor Grand Prix in South Africa in 1939 and the Targa Florio in 1951. Cortese finished in more Mille Miglia than any other driver: 14 between ’27 and ’56.



6.Posted Image

Who?
Raymond Sommer

What?
Alfa Romeo 308

Where?
Circuit d’Angouleme

When?
1939

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) The very first race in this interesting circuit. In fact it's the only photo from it I ever seen. It's hard to make a mistake in identification of this turns in Angouleme. There's some information on Angouleme races in 40-s, but I failed to find even date for 1939 race...

Why? (an excerpt from "Sommer and Alfa-Romeo 308" thread) In 1939 Sommer drove for Alfa Corse in sports car events while a 308 was avalaible for him in grand prix, which if not a works entry still had a lot of factory infuence. Sommer made quite a lot of apparitions with that car: Pau (4th) La Turbie hillclimb (3rd and first in 2000-3000cc class), Angouleme (1st), Coupes de Paris (2nd), Belgium GP (4th with the 308 and not a 312 as oftenly written), ACF GP (5th), German GP (retired) and he took an entry in the Swiss GP but did'nt arrived. After all not a too bad season.



7.Posted Image

Who?
Maurice Mestivier, Georges Brunot, Amedee Gordini, Rene Bonnet, Angelo Molinari etc.

What?
Amilcar, Riley, SIMCA Spl Gordini, DB-Citroën, Fiat Balilla etc.

Where?
Monthlery

When?
07/05/1939; Coupe de Paris (1100cc s/c 2L u/s class) (start)

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Voiturette racing restarted in France in 1946 with a Formula (1100cc s/c 2L u/s) which took into account the existing racing materiel. It was a very sensible choice dictated by the organizers and by the drivers’ associations. The ACF gave their sanction so that it is sometimes called the ACF Formula. It picked up in the UK too, where it lasted until 1951! After lively 1946 and 1947 racing seasons, this formula was superseded in France by the introduction of Formule II in 1948. It is therefore interesting to see that a preview of the first post-war voiturette formula was raced in 1939. Mestivier took the early lead under a drizzle while Gordini – in the 1938 “tank” – climbed up to second closely followed by Brunot’s fast ex-Eudel Riley. When the Amilcar broke down, Gordini won by just one second from Brunot. It was a good day for Amédée’s stable, since Molinari finished 7th in the old Balilla and Plantivaux won the 750cc in one of the SIMCA 5 Spls Gordini.



8.Posted Image

Who?
Emmanuel de Graffenried

What?
Maserati 6C-34

Where?
Pau

When?
02/04/1939; Grand Prix de Pau

Why? Although the dapper, trim profile of 'Toulo' de Graffenried continued to be a familiar sight in the European Grand Prix paddocks more than forty years since he won the second post-war British Grand Prix at Silverstone in 1949, his racing activities began well before the Second World War in his native Switzerland, with both a 3-litre Alfa Romeo and a Type 6C Maserati. In the early 1930s he raced his own private 1.5-litres Maserati in national events at Berne's Bremgarten circuit, striking out to take in overseas events in partnership with an old school friend, John de Puy. But it was the immediate post-war years that saw ‘Toulo' - as he was popularly known - at his zenith. In 1946 he formed Team Autosport with former Mercedes driver Christian Kautz, the pair acquiring a new four-cylinder Maserati which de Graffenried brought into fifth place in the Prix de Geneva. He finished third in the car at Lausanne the following year, and drove splendidly to finish second to Farina in Geneva, and third in the Monaco GP behind Farina and Chiron in 1948, before his season was overshadowed by the death of Kautz in the Grand Prix de I'Europe at Bremgarten. 'Toulo' enjoyed his greatest triumph in 1949, winning the British Grand Prix in his latest San Remo-type 4CLT/48 Maserati, backing this up with second places in the Pau, Zandvoort and Swedish GPs and the Jersey Road Race in St Helier, as well as many other placings. He continued to race the car into the 1950 season but it was now a little long in the tooth. However, his performances were such that Alfa Romeo invited him to race for the team in the Grand Prix des Nations at Geneva, where he performed creditably to finish second to Fangio but only two seconds ahead of Taruffi after more than two hours' racing on this demanding street circuit. Although de Graffenried was forced to continue racing his faithful Maserati in 1951, Alfa invited him to join their all-conquering team for three Grands Prix that year, where he again acquitted himself more than respectably. With the new Formula 2 rules in force for 1952, he drove Enrico Plate's Maseratis without achieving much success in the championship races, but picked up third places at Cadours and Aix-les-Bains. Things were very different in 1953, however. Now at the wheel of the latest Maserati A6GCM model, he enjoyed some memorable races, winning the Syracuse GP, the Eifelrennen F2 race and the Lavant Cup at Goodwood. That year he scored his best placing in a World Championship Grand Prix with fourth place at Spa. Installing a 2.5-litre engine in the car, de Graffenried raced it briefly in 1954, as well as competing in a Maserati sports car which he took to South America early in the season, winning the Circuit of Gavea race at Rio and the Sao Paulo GP. He raced little after this, having a few sports car outings in Ferraris and Maseratis before making a final Grand Prix appearance at Monza in 1956, after which his career petered out, but not before coming out of semi-retirement in order to double for Kirk Douglas in action scenes during the making of the film The Racers. In retirement, Baron de Graffenried continued his successful Lausanne-based garage which had sold Alfa Romeo's since 1950 as well as selling Rolls- Royce's and, between 1959 and 1967, was also a Ferrari dealership. In the early 1970s he started attending races as an ambassador for the Lausanne-based Philip Morris tobacco concern who have become the biggest commercial sponsor in Grand Prix racing over the last two decades through their Marlboro brand. De Graffenried was a major force in the 'retrospective' staged at the 1974 French Grand Prix at Dijon-Prenois, which brought together many racing stars of the past for a memorable reunion. ‘Toulo' was not lost to the Grand Prix world, however, for he was closely involved with the sport and seen regularly at the circuits over the next three decades.



9.Posted Image

Who?
Ettore Bianco

What?
Maserati 4CM 1559

Where?
Targa Florio, Parco della Favorita, Palermo

When?
14/05/1939; XXX Targa Florio

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Gentleman-driver Ettore Bianco, from Genoa, owned four different Maserati voiturettes in the years 1935/1939, after racing a Balilla in the early 1930s. These cars were 4CS 1126 (1935) 4CM 1526 (1935) 4CM 1559 (1938) and 4CL 1571 (1939). Owing to Chula’s fortunate series of books on Bira’s racing seasons, Bianco became (in)-famous mainly for having blocked during half of the race a much faster Bira while leading at Turin in 1937. This is very unfair if we look at his record, which is exemplary for this kind of driver:
1935 Mille Miglia 7th and 1st in class, 2nd Leghorn 2nd Pescara
1936 4th Lucca 4th Milan 10th Bern
1937 5th Naples 2nd Pescara 4th Torino 3rd TF 3rd Florence
1938 2nd Peronne 6th Monza 4th Naples 4th Tripoli 2nd Bern
1939 5th Naples
1940 4th TF
Bianco should instead be remembered for his impeccable drive at the awesome Bremgarten in 1938, where he finished second only to Hug, a driver of a higher class.
The car in the photo resurfaced after the war in a blue livery in a Concours d’Elegance at the Bois de Boulogne with a rather plump unknown lady at the wheel and at Reims in 1947 driven by Louveau.

#19 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:48

Wimille Trophy results:

Alessandro Silva: 42 (participation in all 5 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 21,5 (participation in all 5 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 3,5 (participation in 4 photos)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Raymond Sommer

[/b]What?[/b]
Maserati 6CM/4CL

Where?
Albi

When?
14/07/1946; GP Albi (also known as GP de l’Albigeois)

Why? The son of a wealthy carpet manufacturer from Pont-a-Mousson in the Ardennes, Sommer (1906-1950) was from a family of aviation pioneers, his father Roger having been an early pilot and constructor. Sommer started out as a successful boxer and then went to college in Manchester in England before returning to work in the family factory. He then decided that he wanted to be a racing driver and his father bought him a Chrysler Imperial and in March 1931 he took part in his first race, a road race between Paris and Nice. An ambitious young man he then competed in both the Le Mans 24 Hours and the Spa 24 Hours. The following year he bought an Alfa Romeo 8C roadster and because his team mate Luigi Chinetti was unwell, drove 20 of the 24 hours at Le Mans and won the race. This propelled him into the racing limelight and three weeks later he finished third to Louis Chiron and Rene Dreyfus in the Nice Grand Prix. A week after that he won the GP de Marseilles at Miramas. In 1933 he joined the Maserati factory team while continuing to race his Alfa in sportscar events and, sharing with Tazio Nuvolari, he won the Le Mans 24 Hours for a second time. In 1935 he bought an ex-works Alfa Romeo P3 and won races at Comminges and Montlhery but in 1936 the car was no longer competitive, although that year he shared victory in the Grand Prix de l'ACF at Montlhery with Jean-Pierre Wimille in a Bugatti. That year he also won the Spa 24 Hours with Francesco Severi and finished fourth in the Vanderbilt Cup. In 1937 he raced internationally for Enzo Ferrari and competed in France with a Talbot sportscar, winning the Marseilles Three Hours at Miramas and the Grand Prix de Tunisie. He was French Champion that year. There was little success in 1938 although he led at Le Mans before his car failed. He was French Champion again in 1939, racing as variety of different machines. During the war Sommer was an active member of the French Resistance, but at the end of hostilities he brought out the Alfa Romeo 308 he had campaigned as a works-backed privateer just before the war and found immediate success, beating the 158 Alfettas at St Cloud, before joining Maserati, unsuccessfully, in 1947. After suffering from ill health and an involvement with the ill-fated CTA-Arsenal, Sommer joined Ferrari in 1948 but left midway through the following season to run his own Lago-Talbot, winning at Montlhery and leading the 1950 Belgian Grand Prix. He was signed by BRM for the marque's debut at the 1950 BRDC International Trophy, but the car was incapable to start in the final. Only a fortnight later the man they nicknamed "Coeur de Lion" was killed when the steering failed on the Cooper he had borrowed from Harry Schell for the Haute Garonne GP at Cadours. There is a memorial to him at the scene of the accident...



2.Posted Image

Who?
Duke Nalon, Achille Varzi, Gigi Villoresi

What?
Scuderia Milan Maseratis 4CL 1573 & 1568 Maserati 8CL 3035

Where?
Indianapolis

When?
May, 1946; Indianapolis 500 (practice)

Why? It was the first Indy 500 after the war. During the war Indianapolis remained closed, until one day racing star Wilbur Shaw went there to make a promotional film. The Indy 500 winner of 1939-40 found that the track was becoming overgrown and the wooden grandstands were falling down. He vowed to do something about it and sought out Eddie Rickenbacker to worry about the Speedway. Shaw organized the sale of the track in November 1945 to Tony Hulman for US$700,000 and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway remains in the Hulman family to this day. A hard work was done to have Indy 500 on 30th of May 1946 .Thousands of old boards were replaced and thousands of gallons of paint were applied to give the old place a new face. A new grandstand was built where the Tower Terrace seats are today. This time for Indy 500 many European cars were entered, approximately 10 of them were Maseratis. Scuderia Milan had three of them. Two 4CL were given to Nalon and Varzi while a potential winner 8CL was entrusted to Villoresi. During one of the qualifications that were held over 8 days the engine on Varzi's car blew up. So only two Milan's car remained. And they had poor qualifications too - Nalon was only 32th and the best that Villoresi managed to show was 28th average speed. In the race Nalon had to retire after 45 laps while Villoresi had to do too many pit stops which probably costed him a victory as all fastest cars suffered from various problems and the race was won by outsider George Robson, who had never won a major auto race. And inspite of all his troubles Villoresi finished the five-hour race in 7th position that wasn't bad result after all.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Dioscoride Lanza

What?
Maserati 4CL 1564

Where?
Circuito di Torino

When?
01/09/1946; III Gran Premio del Valentino (also known as Gran Premio di Torino)

Why? Dioscoride Lanza was a little-known pre-war Italian voiturette driver who had some links with Naphtra Course. In the time of that race he was the owner of a 4CL (chassis 1564). The race itself was very interesting as it was the first of three 1946 races (the others were races in Milan and Bois de Boulogne) that were run under the Formule Internationale rules (1.5L s/c and 4.5L u/s) which officially came into force in 1947 and later (since 1948) would be known as Formule Internationale I or simply Formula 1. In the race Dioscoride started from the last row and managed to finish in the last, 9th, position, 10 laps behind the Achille Varzi in Alfa Romeo 158 who won that Grand Prix in a struggle with Jean-Pierre Wimille in the same car.



4.Posted Image

Who?
Louis Rosier

What?
Talbot T150SS 90111

Where?
Circuit de St. Just-Andrezieux, Forez

When?
19/05/1946; Grand Prix du Forez (official name "Cup of the Metallurgical Industries of the Loire")

Why? A former motor cycle racer and hill-climb specialist, Rosier had just started to develop his racing career when the war intervened, and it was 1947 before this garage owner from Clermont Ferrand could compete on a wider stage. Equipped with his self-prepared Talbot, Rosier won the 1947 Albi GP after more speedy opponents had dropped out and this win obviously set the tone for the rest of his career, for he usually raced well within his limits and placed great store by strategy and reliability as a route to success. In 1948, as a member of the Ecurie France team, he took delivery of a single-seater Lago-Talbot, winning the Grand Prix du Salon and finishing fourth at the Comminges, Pau and British GPs. The following season, with the Talbot probably at its peak relative to the opposition, Rosier won the Belgian GP and, with a succession of steady finishes, was crowned champion of France, a title he was to hold for four years. Alfa Romeo ruled the roost in 1950, the year of the inaugural World Championship, but the crafty Rosier was always well placed to pick up the pieces, and he took some good points-scoring finishes in championship Grands Prix, as well as winning the Albi and Dutch GPs. Adapting his Talbot to sports car specification, he also won that season's Le Mans 24-hour race with his son Jean-Louis, though it was the father who was the pillar of the achievement, driving for more than 23 hours. By 1951 the Talbot was no longer a competitive proposition, but Louis still managed to coax the elderly car to the finish with astonishing consistency, winning the non-championship Dutch and Bordeaux GPs. The 1952 season brought a change of regulations, and Rosier lost no time in getting his hands on a Ferrari 375 and a state-of-the-art Ferrari 500 F2 car. The Italian machines were naturally painted French blue, and Rosier quickly put one of them to good use, winning the Albi GP in the big-engined model. For 1953 he continued with the same equipment, taking yet another win in the Albi GP and a victory in the Sables d'Olonne GP with the T500, while his old Talbot was brought out for the Reims 12 Hours, in which he took second place with Giraud-Cabantous.
By now Rosier was well past his best as a driver, but he pushed ahead undaunted the following season, and after racing a Ferrari 625 he bought a Maserati 250F which he continued to campaign in Grands Prix and non-championship events in a steady and reliable fashion, as well as handling his own Ferrari 3-litre sports car. Ironically, Rosier shared a Maserati 300S with Behra to win the 1956 Paris 1000 Km, his last win, before returning to the Montlhery circuit he knew so well in this Ferrari for the Coupe du Salon. In pouring rain, Rosier overturned his car and suffered severe head injuries from which he died three weeks later. He was posthumously awarded the French Order of the Nation.

1946 GP of Forez became his first Grand Prix race ever. In front of a numerous public Raymond Sommer and Ciro Bassadona were at the first row confirming that Maserati is the vavorite car for a victory. Nevertheless, from the first meters after the start Bassadona suffered from mechanical problems and he was overtook by the majority of competitors before he retired on the first lap with broken suspension. It was Louveau who took an advantage of the circumstance to feel himself comfortable in the second position followed by the troop of Delahaye. On the third lap the positions were changed when Serve became the second pilot who had to retire - also with mechanical problems in his Bugatti. At that point Sommer began to have a comfortable leadership. Behind, in middle of the peleton Maurice Trintignant started an epic duel with his obsolete Bugatti 35 supporting the rhythm of the Delahaye. The Delahaye, nevertheless, also couldn't be considered to be "the last models", and that was surprisingly a lot when Chaboud could continue a struggle for the second position with Louveau's Maserati and being even ahead of de Graffenried. Moreover both drivers drove away of the rest and Chaboud seemed making a really difficulties for Maserati driver being behind it like a shadow; but on the 10th lap Louveau increased the speed and was able to drive away, annoying fellow partner of "the trip". And this not only assured his second position but even helped to close the distance to the leader, Sommer, who drove with confidence and without any allusion to misfortune. Meanwhile Grignard had to retire with broken engine when it was only 9 laps before the finish. Trintignant won his own battle against the Delahaye and he needed to say "thanks" to Rosier for his advantage over them. Delahaye drivers had big problems with the Rosier's Sport Talbot while Louis drove it through the peleton to the leaders. He passed Trillaud without problems but received a hard time with Grignard. While passing the latter Rosier hit Delahaye and Grignard had to retire. To the 20 lap mark the race already lost de Graffenried with magneto problems and Marcel Balsa retired after the accident; but it was the last episode worthy to remember since at that time the gaps stabilized, the positions were very clear and the competitors simply trid to stay in race until the finish. After 1 hour and 18 minutes of the race, Raymond Sommer registered his name as the winner of the Grand Prix at d'Andrezieux circuit. And as it had already clarified, Louveau and Chaboud accompanied him on the podium. In the fourth position we found Bugatti that was driven by Maurice Trintignant while Rosier was able to take his Talbot to the fifth position, two laps behind the winner, but in front of the Delahaye of Trillaud and Pozzi.



5.Posted Image

Who?
“B Bira”

What?
SIMCA-Gordini T11

Where?
Lausanne

When?
05/10/1947; I Prix de Leman

Why? Amedee Gordini raced and tuned cars in the late 1930s, enjoying some success with his Fiat-engined sportscars and after the war kept the embers of French motor racing alive despite a continual lack of funding. The first Gordini single-seaters came in 1946 when "Le Sorcier" ran Fiat-engined cars for himself and Jose Scaron. Gordini won races in Marseilles, Forez, Dijon and Nantes and Scaron won in Nice and St. Cloud. In the late 1940s the company expanded into workshops in the Boulevard Victor in Paris and while Scaron and former Le Mans winner Pierre Veyron concentrated on sportscar events Gordini used new aces like Robert Manzon and Maurice Trintignant, in addition to the established French star of the day Jean-Pierre Wimille. All three won victories for the company with Wimille winning at Nimes and Longchamps in 1947 and Trintignant winning the Grand Prix de Roussillon. In 1948 Wimille won an impressive victory at Rosario and Raymond Sommer won in Geneva. At the start of 1949 Wimille was killed in one of the cars in practice for a race in Buenos Aires. Trintignant took up the fight, winning races that year in France. For 1950 Gordini supercharged a Simca engine for the World Championship and Trintignant, Manzon and new boy Andre Simon regularly appeared in F1 races. There were no major victories and the cars proved to be more successful in F2 form, in which Gordini's son Aldo occasionally participated. Simon won a poorly-attended French event at Lesparre in the Medoc but in most domestic races Raymond Sommer had the advantage in his Ferrari. When the Ferraris failed there were wins for Trintignant in Geneva and for Manzon at Mettet in Belgium and again at Perigueux. In the course of 1951 Simca provided less assistance, and although Trintignant won at the F1 race at Albi (when no Ferraris appeared) Gordini struggled to beat Ferrari in the better supported F2. Johnny Claes won the GP des Frontieres that year for Gordini but as usual Ferrari was hard to beat with the works team in international races and Rudolf Fischer in French events. Manzon won at Mettet, Simon at Sables d'Olonne and Trintignant at Cadours. Aldo entered the World Championship French GP at Reims but retired. That year also saw the first appearances of Jean Behra in the little French cars. The 1952 season saw Manzon and Behra joined by Prince Bira, and Behra won Gordini's most famous victory, beating Ferrari at Reims. Manzon was also ahead of the Italian cars at Montlhery but his car broke down. Most of the time the Gordinis were humbled by the Ferraris. In 1953 there were minor wins for Trintignant at Chimay and Cadours and Harry Schell at Rouen but the Ferraris were again too strong to beat. At the end of the year Trintignant departed to drive for Ferrari and Behra and Simon were joined by a string of others including Jacques Pollet, Andre Pilette, Clemar Bucci, Paul Frere, Andre Guelfi and Fred Wacker. The only major win was Behra at Cadours. In 1955 Behra went off to race for Maserati and Gordini struggled more and more despite the return of Manzon who gave the team its last major win in Naples the following year. The team reappeared only briefly in 1957 but then Gordini joined Renault as a consultant engineer and disbanded the F1 operation. He worked on the design of the Renault Dauphine which enjoyed much success in rallying in the late 1950s. In 1963 the premises in the Boulevard Victor were closed and the operation moved to Noisy-le-Roi and Gordini developed the Renault 8 for racing and rallying, including the influential Coupe Gordini series in 1966 where many of the top French drivers of the 1970s learned their trade. At the end of 1968 the Gordini company was merged into Renault and in February 1969 was moved to the Usine Amedee Gordini at Viry-Chatillon. This became the headquarters of Renault Sport and many of Gordini's young engineers went on to play important roles in the Renault Le Mans project and the Formula 1 turbo program.

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#20 AAA-Eagle

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  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:51

Fangio Trophy results:

Alessandro Silva: 78 (participation in all 9 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 56 (participation in 8 photos)
Robert Van der Plasken ('VDP'): 31 (participation in 4 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 25 (participation in 4 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 21 (participation in 8 photos)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Alberto Ascari

What?
Ferrari 166/50

Where?
Modena

When?
07/05/1950; I Gran Premio di Modena

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) There were three major F2 races on May 7th, 1950: Erlen, Roubaix and this one at Modena. Ferrari managed to win all three. The photo shows Ascari on his way to win the first Grand Prix of Modena held on the new Aerautodromo track. It supposedly was going to be a duel between Ascari and Fangio with Ascari driving a new works 166 type with De Dion rear axle and rounded nose-cowl, while the Argentinean had the older model at disposal. But at the start it is Serafini taking the lead, soon passed by Ascari and then by Fangio. The battle did not last for long since a piston broke in Fangio’s engine on the 17th of the 80 laps of the race. Ascari then cruised to victory from Tadini, also in a Ferrari, and Carini in a OSCA after a long battle with Sighinolfi’s Stanguellini for third place.



2.Posted Image

Who?
Gigi Villoresi and Toni Ulmen

What
Ferrari 166 and Veritas RS Spezial - BMW

Where?
Erlen, Near Bodensee, Switzerland

When?
07/05/1950; II Preis von Ostschweiz-Erlen

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Between 1948 and 1951, the village of Erlen, in Thurgau, Switzerland, not far from the Bodensee, hosted four meetings with races for cars and motorcycles. The motorcycle races started with international status, but the car races would not achieve this distinction until 1950. The initiators were the village head and the local druggist. They had planned to do something for 1949, but the cancellation of some other meeting prompted them to start one year earlier. Three motorcycle and three car races were held on August 8th, 1948. The organizing committee invested 5000 SF to prepare a short – less than 3 km-long - triangular circuit with vertices at Erlen Village, Riedt and Erlen Station. Two 45° right-handers and a 90° curve connected the three sides of the triangle each containing an all-out swerve. Start and finish were set on the main straight between Erlen Village and Riedt, which was very narrow at about 7.5 meters of width. The amateurish organization and the atmosphere of a provincial country fete might remind the onlooker of Chimay. In fact the Erlen meetings also soon became a darling of the international commentators, way above their technical significance, again very much like the Chimay races. All the local craftsmen were involved in preparing the circuit, while the shopkeepers, dealing mainly in food, were keen to see flocks of hungry spectators buying their merchandise. As a consequence, the organizing committee never lost popular support expressed by a kind of “very provincial enthusiasm” as Cimarosti noted rather sarcastically. In fact the whole idea of these meetings looks a bit preposterous today, “ausgefallen” as Cimarosti again puts it. Over fifty years later, the circuit is intact and a stroll around it gives a pleasant sight of the rolling Eastern Swiss countryside. As with many others improvised post WWII tracks one wonders today how it was possible to race on it without shedding the blood of the drivers and of the good Thurgovian spectators alike.
Villoresi passed Ulmen on lap 4 and his tream mate Vallone on lap 9, cruising home to an easy victory. Vallone finished second at Gigi’s tail from driver from Dusseldorf Toni Ulmen who drove really well in a rather old Veritas sports car transformed in single-seater. It was called the “Großmutter” (Grandmother in English), and it was the first “official” Veritas car built in 1947/48. The conversion was made by the Rappold company at Wülfrath and it turned out that it was by far the most competitive German car of the season 1950.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Louis Chiron and David Murray

What?
Maserati 4CLT/48 ('1606' and '1595')

Where?
Silverstone

When?
26/8/1950; II BRDC International Trophy

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) The 1950 International Trophy would go down to history for the long awaited racing debut of the 16V BRM. It is well known motoring history how keen expectation turned in to deep embarrassment.

The photo shows popular veteran Louis Chiron in a works-entered Maserati 4CLT San Remo in front of Scot David Murray in a similar car, during heat 2, probably, raced in treacherous track condition. David Murray (1909/1973) was a chartered accountant from Edinburgh. He bought Parnell’s Maserati 4CL 1569 in late 1948. He was shrewd enough to outsmart Reg in the purchase of the spare parts of the Maserati. Moreover, he convinced Wilkie Wilkinson to leave Parnell and to follow him in Scotland where he would open a garage called Merchiston Motors, 12/13 Merchiston Mews, Edinburgh. In 1952 Murray – who had meanwhile raced a Maserati 4CLT and a F2 Ferrari also in Continental events – founded the Ecurie Ecosse. This team gained ever-lasting fame in sports car racing under Murray’s management and Wilkinson’s technical direction. Murray died in a car crash in the Canary Isles, where he had moved to escape tax and financial problems in Britain.



4.Posted Image

Who?
François-Joseph Escalle (on the photo)/Louis Eggen

What?
Escalle-Peugeot 402 Spl.

Where?
Monthléry

When?
23/07/1950; 12 hours of Paris

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Not many Specials based on the Peugeot 402 were built in the period straddling WWII, with the notable exception of the highly successful Peugeot-Darl’Mat. The car in the photo was built in 1946 by François-Joseph Escalle. It was based on a 402B Légère mechanicals with a Cotal gearbox and two Zénith carburettors. It had 4 cyl 2000cc ehgine. This car is still in existence.

In this race, the pair Escalle-Eggen finished 17th overall and 4th in 2L class. Escalle was a garagiste from Alsace/Lorraine while Eggen was Belgian.



5.Posted Image

Who?
Juan-Manuel Fangio, Karl Kling, Hans Herrmann, Jean Behra, André Pilette, Helmut Nidermayr, Fred Wacker

What?
Mercedes-Benz W196 (ch. 4/5/2), Gordini T16 (ch. 32/31), Klenk Meteor, Gordini T16 (ch. 34)

Where?
AVUS

When?
19/9/1954; I Grosser Preis von Berlin

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) A racing fete was organized at the AVUS at the end of the 1954 to celebrate the all-conquering Mercedes team. No other works team showed up, though, with the exception of Equipe Gordini with three cars for Behra, Pilette and the American Wacker. The Mercedes parade was disrupted for a while by Jean Behra. The 90,000 spectators watched first in amazement and then in wild enthusiasm the plucky Frenchman inserted between the streamlined silver cars behind that of Fangio. Behra had been able to slipstream and to gain a few hundred revs. The engine could stand this torture for about 15 laps and then a piston blew and the block totally split in two parts. The W196 cars resumed their procession to the finish three laps ahead of the first of the others, Pilette in another Gordini.

Why? (by Robert Van der Plasken) First victory for a german in a german car in F1, the Gordini from Jean Behra was the only car to maintain the contact.



6.Posted Image

Who?
Kenneth McAlpine, Ken Wharton

What?
Connaught B-Type 'B2', Vanwall VW2

Where?
Silverstone

When?
07/05/1955; VII BRDC International Trophy

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Not a particular why for this photo, unless for the flames, which for many decades brought death and pain on the racing tracks. The streamlined B-series Connaught is driven by Ken McAlpine. He and Fairman in a sister car ran third and fourth but were side-lined by mechanical problems. The streamliner body worked well but was dropped for a practical reason. It was made in one piece causing serious space problems in the paddock and it was so light that a gust of wind would throw it around. Vandervell had tried to sign Collins alongside Hawthorn for the season 1955, but he couldn’t so he had to resort to Ken Wharton, a great all-rounder but not as fast as Peter. During this race Ken was coming from behind after a pit-stop when he was forced off-line at Copse corner. His car hit one of the marker drums, breaking its fuel tank. Flames immediately burst and Wharton, who had been able to jump off, was seriously burned, nonetheless.



7.Posted Image

Who?
Jean Behra

What?
Porsche RSK (central seat)

Where?
Circuit de Reims

When?
06/07/1958; II Coupe Internationale de Vitesse

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) Jean Behra fitted only too well, the popular conception of a racing driver of the 1950s. He was short, stocky, muscular, and completely fearless and covered with the scars from the numerous crashes which he miraculously survived-all except the last.

Behra, born in Nice in 1921, soon fell for the lure of speed on wheels: first he took up cycling, then motor cycling, his prowess on two wheels earning him the French motor-cycle-racing championship, three years in succession after the war. Like so many motor-cycle racers before and since, Behra hankered after four-wheel racing and it was at the wheel of a Talbot which he drove to sixth place in the Coupe du Salon meeting at Montlhéry, in 1949. In the following year he drove a Simca 1100 in the Monte Carlo Rally, showing his versatility by finishing third overall; he drove another Simca in the Le Mans 24-Hour race, but was forced to retire. Later on in 1950 he won his class at the Mont Ventoux hill-climb in a Maserati, and his exploits brought him to the notice of Amédée Gordini. He was the only man seriously to attempt to uphold French prestige in single-seater racing and he gave Behra a seat in his Formula Two team for 1951. He finished third in his first race with the Gordini, but the firm was perpetually short of finance and the cars seldom had the power to become competitive. All the same, Behra managed the occasional win, including a memorable victory over the Ferrari works team at Reims. Despite a very bad crash at the Pau circuit in southern France during 1953, when he suffered severe back injuries, he was soon back in racing and continued with Gordini until 1954, which was his best year with the French marque as he won at Montlhéry, Pau and Cadours. For 1955, he was signed by the Maserati factory team for Formula One and sports-car racing and was immediately successful, winning the Formula One Pau and Bordeaux GPs, as well as several sports car races, with the Maserati 300S. He suffered another crash while driving on the dangerous Dundrod TT circuit in 1955 and he lost an ear when the lens of his spare goggles cut it off. He was given a plastic substitute, with which he would often horrify the ladies by removing it at opportune moments. He stayed with Maserati in 1956, but had no success in Formula One, although he shared the winning sports car in the Nurburgring and Paris 1000 km races. Although he again drove for Maserati in 1957, he was always driving in the shadow of men like Moss and Fangio, and early in 1957 he approached Raymond Mays of BRM to ask if BRM would provide him with a car for the Caen Grand Prix in western France. Mays jumped at the chance, for the team was short of drivers. Two cars were taken, one for Behra and one for the Franco-American Harry Schell and, despite a lack of practice, Behra won the race with ease, admittedly against modest opposition. Behra followed this up by leading a BRM 1, 2, 3 victory in the International Trophy race in front of a 100.000 crowd. He was contracted to Maserati for the rest of 1957 and managed to win the Moroccan and Modena GPs as well as sharing victory in the Swedish GP and Sebring 12 hours, driving the monster 450S Maserati. He would move to BRM in 1958, not unexpectedly, but he would face a bitter disappointment. During 1958 Jean Behra raced with more success for the Porsche team in sports car races. He had been given a works RSK with central seat to race in the F2 curtain raiser of the GP de l’ACF. He left the grid leading and finished unchallenged from Peter Collins’ Ferrari Dino, 20 seconds behind.



8.Posted Image

Who?
Stirling Moss, Cliff Allison, Hans Herrmann, Ivor Bueb

What?
Cooper T45 - Borgward, Ferrari Dino 156, Behra - Porsche, Cooper T51 - Borgward

Where?
Circuit de Reims

When?
05/07/1959; III Coupe Internationale de Vitesse

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) BRP and the teams of Rob Walker and Jack Brabham used the fuel inject. 175bhp Borgward engine with considerable success in F2 racing during 1959. This race was the only one in which the Behra-Porsche showed that it could be a true contender, Herrmann finishing second by twelve seconds to Moss, who led from the start, after dicing with him for almost 20 laps. Despite Allison’s strong efforts the front-engined Dino proved hopeless even on the fast Reims track.



9.Posted Image

Who?
Sergey Tenichev/Boris Konev

What?
Moskvich 407

Where?
Finland

When?
1959; 1000 Lakes Rally

Why? The foundations of Neste Rally Finland were laid in the summer of 1951, after a competition called the Hanko Run in the seaside resort Hanko, southern Finland.

The number of Finnish crews willing to tackle Rallye Monte Carlo in the 50’s was greater than the country’s allocation of entries. The Hanko Run used to be viewed as a qualifying event of sorts, with the best finishers getting acceptance for their Monte entry. The regulations of Hanko Run did not always find favour with the competitors. They differed notably from those of Rallye Monte Carlo. The competitors were complaining that the basis for selection of Monte Carlo entries was not valid, as no Monte-type competition existed in the country.

At a dinner after the Hanko Run in 1951 a group of seasoned Monte Carlo competitors sat together discussing about how important it was to have a relevant qualifying system for Finnish entries to Rallye Monte Carlo. They decided at the proposal of Pentti Barck to organise an annual competition in Jyväskylä, which to quite some extent - including its regulations - would be a copy of Monte. The first rally would be held that same year in September. The decision was made in July.

To canvass a prize fund of 100 000 Finnmarks, it was suggested each participant of the meeting would chip in 10 000. This raised 80 000 and the balance was donated by the first “sponsor” - Hotel Jyväshovi of Jyväskylä.

The first organiser was the Central Finland district organisation of Finland’s Automobile Club. Rally was named “Jyväskylän Suurajot”, in english “Jyväskylä Grand Prix”. The regulations were largely based on those of Rallye Monte Carlo. The rally was 1 666 kilometres in length with two special stages. A total of 26 competitors started the rally, 3 of which retired. The route took the participants all the way up to the Arctic Circle and back. The first special stage was a 1400-metre hillclimb in Puijo, Kuopio and the other one was an acceleration and braking test in Harju, Jyväskylä. The declared winners of the first rally were Arvo Carlsson - Vilho Mattila. The seeds had been sewn for a Finnish legend.

The rally has been based in Jyväskylä ever since. In the year 1954 the international name “Rally of the Thousand Lakes” appeared in the event’s logo for the first time. 1959 was the first year for the event to become a qualifying round of the European Championship. Next step for the event was its inclusion in the Championship for Manufacturers in its first year in 1973. The drivers’ championship started in 1979 and “Rally of the Thousand Lakes” immediately became a regular qualifying round. Year 1980 was exeptional, as the event was a qualifying round in the drivers’ series only. During the 80’s the rally’s international name was gradually shaped in to “1000 Lakes Rally”, although the original logo always held the longer version.

The event signed its first title sponsorship deal and became “Neste 1000 Lakes Rally” in 1994. The alternation system of World Championship rallies in 1995 caused the event to be a qualifying round in the 2-litre championship only.

Big change in the organising of the event occured in 1997, as Finnish Automobile Sport Federation took over the event. AKK Sports Ltd, the marketing company of the Finnish ASN, took responsibility of organising the event. This entailed the changing of its name into Neste Rally Finland. The company set out to develop Neste Rally Finland into a clearly defined brand. It was essential to make the public understand that a fundamental change had taken place.

The new organisation put effort to the safety and promotional aspects, and raised the standard of the event. This was also noted by the customers. Year 1997 the event won the “Award of Excellence: Outstanding Safety Effort”, which is an award voted by the FIA registered teams.

Year 1998 Neste Rally Finland was voted as the “Rally of the Year” again by the teams. Year 1999 the event received acknowledgement for the promotional efforts with the “Award of Excellence: Promotion”, mainly for the top of the class corporate hospitality VIP Village at Hippos Super Special Stage.

The event was the “Rally of the Year” again in 2003. The teams opinion was that Neste Rally Finland took “the sporting, commercial and organisational aspects of World Championship rallying to a new level”. The teams also considered that the Finnish organisers had a thorough and complete understanding of what spectators and competitors wanted in a modern rally.

Neste Rally Finland still is worth its legend, the “Grand Prix on gravel”. It has proven to be one of the best rallies in all aspects, not just because of lakes and “yumping”.

Why? (by Alessandro Silva) For many years Moskvich took part in selected rallies in the West. The sturdy type 407 was employed in the late 1950s. The reason was for advertise the car for export, mainly in Nordic countries. The artificially lowered prize helped the sales, which were by no means small for the next 20 years or so, as the writer of these lines could directly see in Iceland in 1975. The top of the Moskvich racing activities were probably the three British championships for the Class D in a row won in the years 1972/74, by the type 412.

#21 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 926 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:56

Clark Trophy results:

Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 34 (participation in 9 out of 11 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 34 (participation in 7 photos)
Rob Horton ('Ensign 14'): 34 (participation in 8 photos)
Fred Gallagher: 33 (participation in 10 photos)
David Shaw: 20 (participation in 4 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 20 (participation in 8 photos)
Robert Van der Plasken ('VDP'): 18 (participation in 3 photos)



1. Posted Image

Who?
Briggs Cunningham/Dick Thompson

What?
B. S. Cunningham Chevrolet Corvette

Where?
Le Mans

When?
09/04/1960; Le Mans Test Day

Why? Cunningham (1907-2003) was the son of a wealthy Cincinnati financier who made several fortunes in business, including being the initial backer of Proctor & Gamble. Briggs Jr inherited the fortune when he was seven and as a result enjoyed a highly privileged upbringing at Yale, where he developed a passion for sailing which would result in his later career as an owner and captain in the America's Cup yacht racing competitions. In 1930 he married Lucie Bedford, the grand-daughter of a co-founder of Standard Oil. On honeymoon in Europe they attended regattas and Cunningham saw his first motor race, the 1930 Monaco Grand Prix. For the next 32 years the couple lived on Long Island Sound. Cunningham sailed competitively at Cowes Week, but in 1941 he was rejected by the US Navy due to an asthmatic condition and because of his age. He therefore joined the Civil Air Patrol, flying aircraft he bought himself. "I was lucky," he said, "because I could stay at our home in Palm Beach when we patrolled the coastline down there." After marrying his second wife, Laura Cramer Elmer, Cunningham moved to Rancho Santa Fe, California.

He became interested in automobile racing in the 1930s and formed the Automobile Racing Club of America which promoted events. Cunningham did not himself drive as his mother did not wish to do so but in 1940 he began building his own cars, the first being a Buick fitted with a Mercedes body. He was a founding member of the Sports Car Club of America and in the post-war era began racing himself. And as an experienced and capable endurance racing driver, Briggs Cunningham competed internationally from 1950, finally retiring in 1966, at the age of 59.

After linkming up with Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti he mounted his first bid to win Le Mans in 1950 with the unlikely Healy-Cadillac. Then the team resumed the American season with Briggs having successes in his Healy Cadillac and Sam Collier campaigning the Ferrari 166. Tragedy struck at Watkins Glen when Collier was killed in the Ferrari in a race in which Briggs finished second in the Healy-Cadillac. In the end Cunningham decided that he had to build his own cars if he wanted to make any impact in Europe and he acquired a company to develop the first Cunningham racers. Although success in Europe eluded the team the cars did begin winning in America and in 1952 the company introduced the Cunningham C4R which led at Le Mans. Cunningham drove 20 of the 24 hours without relief when his co-driver Bill Spear was unwell and he was fourth overall in that Le Mans in 1952. Briggs Cunningham was above all a patriot. His Cunningham cars were designed with one purpose - To win Le Mans for America. His Cunningham team cars won the Sebring classic in 1953, and his Italian OSCA won there again in 1954, co-driven by Stirling Moss.

Cunningham Cars continued to be raced at Le Mans until 1955 when the company was closed down for tax reasons. His team later campaigned Jaguar, Lister-Jaguar, and Maserati GT and sports-racing cars. When he became a Jaguar importer he ran a US factory team with a trio of D-Types and enjoyed much success with driver Walt Hansgen. In the late 1950s Cunningham embarked on the task of winning the America's Cup for America and in 1958 defeated the British entry to win the Cup for the United States with his yacht Columbia.

Cunningham continued to run cars in both Europe and America, including running F1 drivers Jack Brabham and Bruce McLaren in his Jaguars at Laguna Seca and Riverside in 1960. He became a Formula 1 entrant the following year when he entered a Cooper-Climax in the United States Grand Prix. The chassis was later sold to Roger Penske and it became the Zerex Special and ultimately was sold on to Bruce McLaren and was the first car raced by the McLaren team.

Cunningham's Jaguars continued to appear at Le Mans until 1963. As late as 1964 he had won his class in the Sebring 12-hour race, driving a Porsche 904; but his personal best as a driver remeined fourth place overall in 1952 Le Mans. He raced a few more times, his last race being at Sebring in 1966. Then he opened the Cunningham Automotive Museum in Costa Mesa, California, to display his personal collection of automobiles. The museum closed remained open until 1985.

Briggs Swift Cunningham died on July 2, 2003 at the age of 95 at his home in Las Vegas from complications of Alzheimer's disease.

Why? (by WINO) Dick Thompson was one of the very best amateur sportscar drivers in the US in the 50s and 60s. A Washington, DC, dentist by profession, he started racing at the relatively late age of 31. He stopped 16 years later. First race: Sebring 1952 with a MG-TD. Then he raced a Porsche, a Jaguar XK-120, a big Healey, Bill Mitchell's Sting Ray and Grady Davis' production Corvette in SCCA races. He wrote a Corvette book in 1958 called Corvette Guide.

In 1959 he joined the Cunningham team, with a Lister/Jag at Sebring that year and a Corvette at Le Mans in 1960, then numerous Maseratis until 1963. Apart from Mustangs in the TransAm, he drove Shelby's Cobra Daytona, NART's Ferrari GTO, the Essex Wire 427 Cobra, Corvette Grand Sport, 7 liter Ford GT Mk2, Gulf Mirage Ford and the turbine-powered Howmets.

Nicknamed "the flying dentist", he is retired now and lives in Florida, practicing his golf game and riding horses.

Why? (by Jean-Maurice Gigleux) Le Mans 1960 was the first time Corvettes raced at Le Mans (in fact the first time an american GT car raced at Le Mans). And it was the return of B.S.Cunningham after 1955 last appearance.



2. Posted Image

Who?
Gerhard Mitter

What?
Lotus 18 - DKW

Where?
Solitude

When?
24/07/1960; X Internationales Solituderennen (Rd 6 of 1960 German FJ championship)

Why? An outstanding driver, Mitter was an infrequent Grand Prix competitor who surely deserved more opportunities at the highest level, as he showed with his fourth place in de Beaufort's old Porsche in the 1963 German GP. As it was, he had to be content with just the annual outing at the Nurburgring, mainly in the Formula 2 class.

Gerhard Mitter began his career with motor-cycles in 1952 and graduated by way of Germany's Formula Junior. Gerhard was a top Formula Junior driver in the early sixties with his DKW-engined Lotus. In 1960 he became the champion of German FJ championship driving Lotus 18 and and his own built front-engined front-wheel-drive car that had an ugly design but wasn't unsuccessful (it won 3 races in that championship). In the race on the photo Team Lotus decided to enter three their factory Lotus 18. And they easily won the race with help of Jim Clark while Trevor Taylor and Peter Arundell took 3rd and 4th places accordingly. That day Gerhard drove Lotus 18 and finished 6th. In 1962 Mitter had the same quantity of points as Kurt Ahrens Jr (both - 71pts) but the latter was declared as the champion while Mitter became vice-champion.

Mitter also was known as hill-climb king. Then he joined Porsche in 1964. He was to become a mainstay of the German company's endurance racing programme, winning the Austrian GP in 1966 and the Targa Florio in 1969 and gaining many other fine placings, also becoming three-times European mountain-climb champion between 1966 and 1968. He started to drive regularly in Formula 2 in 1969 where his technical knowledge and experience helped him out racing the BMW's. He was also involved in the development of the Dornier-built BMW F2 contender, but he crashed fatally during practice for that year's German GP. His car came off the road in practice at the Nurburgring at a point where even novices would have had no problems, leaving no tyre marks. It remains a mysterious accident, though there was some suggestion that the steering had either blocked or worked loose. Also, it was thought, a wheel may have come off the car.



3. Posted Image

Who?
Jan Fritzner

What?
Focus Mk 3 - Peugeot

Where?
Falkenberg, Sweden

When?
05-06/08/1961; X Västkustloppet FJ race

Why? (by Rainer Nyberg) The Focus was a brief Swedish Formula Junior effort. It was produced by Lennart Sundin’s AB Sportscars in Stockholm. Here the car is seen during the 1961 Västkustloppet held at Falkenberg. Fritzner used a Sportscars tuned linered down 1098 cc Peugeot engine in his Focus. He finished third in the first heat and sixth in the second. Yngve Rosqvist won both heats in a Lotus 18. Five Mk3 were built.



4. Posted Image

Who?
John Surtees

What?
Ferrari 158 '0005'

Where?
Aspern Aerodrome, Zeltweg

When?
23/08/1964; II Großer Preis von Osterreich

Why? The organizers of races at the Zeltweg airfield had been trying to get a World Championship Grand Prix since the late 1950s and after two non-championship races in 1961 (won by Innes Ireland in a Lotus) and 1963 (won by Jack Brabham) they finally got what they wanted. The teams arrived having heard that the track was extremely bumpy and practice confirmed that this was the case with various drivers suffering suspension failures as a result. After practice Graham Hill was fastest in his BRM and shared the front row of the 4-3-4 grid with John Surtees in his Ferrari, Jim Clark's Lotus and Dan Gurney's Brabham. Ritchie Ginther (BRM), Jack Brabham (Brabham) and Lorenzo Bandini in the second Ferrari shared the second row. There was one notable addition to the field, local rising star Jochen Rindt making his WDC debut in a Rob Walker Brabham at the age of 22.

At the start of the race both Clark and Graham Hill were left behind, Clark because of a gear selection problem and Hill with excessive wheelspin. Also in trouble was Jack Brabham who pitted with a fuel-feed problem. As a result Gurney was in the lead until Surtees got ahead on the second lap. Bandini was third and there was a lively battle for fourth. Clark joined this as he fought back but Graham Hill's race ended with an electrical problem soon afterwards. The next casualty was Surtees who rear suspension collapsed after receiving a pounding from the atrocious concrete-sectioned surface. It looked like his involvement in the race was over but he calmly walked back to the pits, collected a jack and some spanners before strolling back to the car to fix his suspension. By the time Surtees finally arrived back in the pits the leaders, Gurney and Bandini, were on lap 35, some 28 laps ahead of him. In the meantime Gurney was left alone in the lead a long way clear of Bandini with Clark soon up into third place. Clark chased after Bandini and took second on the ninth lap but he was unable to close the gap to Gurney by more than a tenth here and there. Mike Spence in the second Lotus made a good impression as he worked his way up to fifth but at almost the same time both he and Clark went out with broken driveshafts, leaving Gurney in a solid lead with Bandini second and Ginther third. On lap 47 Gurney suddenly slowed with a front suspension failure and so Bandini was left in the lead with only Ginther and Jo Bonnier (in his Rob Walker Brabham) on the same lap. Although Ginther pressed Bandini hard and so Surtees went back out to provide some rear-gunner action for his team-mate but soon he drove back in pits. And now Innes Ireland fourth in the BRP but then he was passed by Tony Maggs in BRM

There was a dramatic moment when Phil Hill crashed his Cooper on lap 59. The car caught fire and burned out. Bonnier's engine began to suffer from a misfire and he dropped back and so third place was inherited by Bob Anderson's private Brabham which was three laps behind the leaders. Bandini duly won his first (and only) World Championship victory with Ginther second and Anderson third.

Why? (by Rob Horton) The airport course for the first WC Austrian GP was a little bumpy and wrecked suspensions. At least more than 3 finished, unlike the trial run which came within one last retirement of a Scirocco winning a GP. The race saw the only WC win for Lorenzo Bandini, helped by team-mate Surtees’ retirement, seen here. Bandini had a number of 2nds, before his tragic death in the Monaco GP 1967…



5. Posted Image

Who?
David Preston

What?
Lotus 47 Ford

Where?
Le Mans

When?
08-09/04/1967; Le Mans testdays

Why? When the Lotus Europa was introduced in 1966, it was obvious that its chassis could accept far more power than the Renault engine could produce. With a well-proven twincam racing engine, a formula 2 gearbox, revised rear suspension, and a lightweight bodyshell, the Lotus 47 GT was born. David Preston drove it in at least three events: here during Le Mans testdays, in 1967 in BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch (in pair with Trevor Taylor; 19th overall) and in 1967 Le Mans itself.

Why? (by Rainer Nyberg) This Lotus Mk47 is seen at Le Mans during 1967, it is driven by Britons David Preston and John Wagstaff. This picture however is not taken at the race, but at the test weekend where it sported number 46, which changed to 44 for the proper race. The Lotus 47 was the competition version of the Lotus Europa. They used Ford engines and a Hewland FT200 gearbox, whilst the roadcar used Renault components. This Lotus 47 expired during the fifth hour during the 1967 Le Mans due to overheating.



6. Posted Image

Who?
Dan Gurney

What?
Brabham BT24-Repco

Where?
Zandvoort

When?
20-23/06/1968; XVII Grote Prijs van Nederland (practice)

Why? The first time when the full face helmet was used in Grand Prix. But it was in practice since in the race Gurney wore an open-face helmet. So in the F1 race the full face helmet was used for the first time at Nurburgring that year - and again by Dan.

The field was much as normal when the F1 circus gathered in Zandvoort. The Brabham team had its new Repco V8 engine ready and was running a third car for Dan Gurney who had no Weslake engines available for his Eagle. Cooper ran only one car for Lucien Bianchi following the death of Scarfiotti and Brian Redman's accident at Spa a fortnight earlier.

In qualifying Chris Amon was fastest in his Ferrari with Jochen Rindt's Brabham and Graham Hill's Lotus sharing the front row. Jack Brabham was on the second row with Jackie Stewart (Matra-Ford) while the third row featured Jacky Ickx (Ferrari), Denny Hulme (McLaren) and Bruce McLaren (McLaren), the last-named having won the team's first GP a fortnight earlier in Belgium.

The weather was bad all weekend and it was raining lightly at the start. Rindt took the lead but he was in third place by the end of the first lap, behind Hill and Stewart. The rain intensified and on lap four Stewart moved into the lead. He quickly built up a big lead while Hill came under pressure from Beltoise who had moved quickly through the midfield. On lap 23 Beltoise went off and had to pit to clear his throttle of sand and so he dropped back to seventh. When he rejoined he quickly moved up the field, passing Gurney, Ickx, Amon and Rodriguez to get to third place. On lap 50 he overtook Hill for second place. On lap 61 Hill had a spin and dropped to fourth behind Rodriguez. On lap 82 he did it again but this time had to retire.

Stewart led home Beltoise to give Matra chassis a 1-2 result with Rodriguez third for BRM. Ickx was fourth for Ferrari while Silvio Moser survived to finish fifth in his private Brabham, although he was three laps behind the winner. Gurney retired on 63th lap because of problem with throttle.

Why? (by Rob Horton) First appearance of a full-face helmet in F1. Dan was always at the forefront of developments, and team-mate and protégé, Swede Savage, had used a full-face helmet – a legacy of his motorcycling days.

Dan was winding down his F1 career at this time in favour of the Eagle operation, which was forced to miss this GP through a lack of cars. The last GP for AAR was at Italy that year – he bought a McLaren to race at the last 3 races, which should have seen his F1 farewell, but he temporarily drove for the Macs after Bruce died and Denny Hulme suffered burns at Indy.

Why? (by Stuart Dent) It was the first use of a Bell full face helmet in a GP. Only drive for Brabham that year.



7. Posted Image

Who?
Sam Tingle

What?
Brabham-Repco BT24-2

Where?
Kyalami

When?
1968; South African Formula 1 Championship (probably Republic Trophy race on 01/06/1968)

Why? A great enthusiast, this Rhodesian began racing in his homeland in 1947, at the wheel of an old Bentley. This was replaced with a succession of cars, mainly MGs, before he acquired the ex-Claes, ex-Gibson Connaught which brought him the Rhodesian championship.

Sam contested the South African championship with great verve throughout the 1960s in one of Doug Serrurier's Cooper-based LDS-Alfas, scoring his first big win in the 1966 Border Trophy at East London, although he took many other good placings. In 1966, 1967, 1969 he became vice-champion of SA F1 championship (in 1966 and 1967 behind John Love and in 1969 behind John McNicol)

By 1968 Sam was perhaps past his prime, but still managed to stay competitive in his final seasons in the sport by getting his hands on an ex-works Brabham BT24-Repco entered by Team Gunston. In 1968 he was third overall (behind Love and Jackie Pretorius). In his last ever full season in South African championship he became 2nd again but only 2 points behind John McNicol. But he could become a champion that year. Before the last round of 1969 season - 1969 Rand Spring Trophy held at Kyalami Sam had 34 points while McNicol had 42. Sam almost have no chanses to win the championship. But suddenly on the 31th lap of the race, only 9 laps before the finish, the suspension on McNicol's Lola T142 broke, he spun off the track and crashed his car. Now the leader was John Love while Sam, his team partner, was second. To become a champion Tingle need to win this race, and as they both were on the same lap it seemed quite real. But... Love didn't let Tingle to overtake him and so John McNicol became the champion.

In the next season Sam drove his old Brabham for the last time. He raced only in the first race of 1970 season held at Killarney, but after DNF because of an accident he decided to finish his career.

Another interesting point is Gunston sponsorship. When Team Gunston entered LDS 3 chassis for Sam Tingle and Brabham BT20 for John Love in 1968 year South African Grand Prix, the first round of that year World Drivers Championship, they were painted in orange and brown Gunston colours, and so they became the first ever tobacco painted cars in WDC preceded the Lotus Gold Leaf livery by five months.

Why? (by Rob Horton) Gunston hedged their bets in ’68, Tingle’s team-mate and dominant driver John Love having a Lotus 49. His fellow Mancunian-born Rhodesian Tingle was competent enough although at this time he was pushing 48; his best result in a WC round was still to come, 8th (out of 8) in 1969 at the SA GP. Maybe if he had had a chance earlier???



8. Posted Image

Who?
Jim Clark

What?
Lotus 49

Where?
Kyalami

When?
01/01/1968; XIVth South African Grand Prix

Why? At Kyalami New Year's Day and the 1968 season began with Team Lotus favorite for success following two end of season victories in 1967. In qualifying Jim Clark was fastest by a second with his Lotus teammate Graham Hill alongside him with Stewart in the Matra completing the front row. On the second row there were the two Brabham-Repcos of Rindt and Brabham while the third row featured Surtees in the Honda and the Ferraris of Andrea de Adamich (in a third car) and Amon. The race began with Stewart taking the lead from Clark while Hill dropped back to seventh behind Rindt, Surtees, Brabham and Amon. On the second lap Clark took the lead while Brabham overtook Surtees and Hill passed both Amon and Surtees to run fifth. Further back there was drama when Scarfiotti's Cooper suffered a water leak and the driver was scalded by the escaping hot water. He was taken to hospital with first degree burns. On the seventh lap Brabham overtook Rindt for third place but soon afterwards he ran into engine trouble and dropped back, leaving Rindt third again. He came under threat from Hill and on lap 13 the Englishman moved to third place. Amon moved into fifth place having overtaken Surtees on the same lap. The order remained stable as Hill chased and caught Stewart and on lap 27 he moved ahead. Stewart stayed with him until lap 43 when the Matra retired with a connecting rod failure. This moved Rindt to third once again and the order then remained unchanged all the way to the finish with Lotus scoring a dominant 1-2 finish with Rindt third.

This race became the last ever F1 race for Jimmy... It was for the last time Jimmy raised his hand winning in F1... But then, in January 1968, it was impossible to think about it... Lotus and Jimmy was in great form... It seemed that Lotus and Jimmy would win all championships in which they took part... And it would be so unreal, so unimaginable when everybody heard the nightmare news from the April F2 race at Hockenheimring...

Why? (by Rob Horton) The 1968 season was Jim’s greatest to date, a win at the first race followed by win after win after win as he decided to skip other formulae for once. After destroying the field to take a 3rd title, he took a 4th in 1969, and with the new 72 really suiting him a 5th (and 3rd on the trot) in 1970.

Fortunately he avoided being tainted by the disaster that was the Pratt & Whitney turbine, leaving it to young Brazilian Fittipaldi, and stuck with the 72. The combo was still the class of the field in 1971 and 1972, as the farmer from Edington Mains made it 7 titles in all and 57 Grand Prix wins.

It was getting a bit long in the tooth for 1973, but Chapman’s inventive mind had worked overtime for his greatest driver and the 76 developed ground effect for the first time. There was no stopping Clark once the car was in full use; he won every race in 1974 to rattle off his 7th consecutive title. 1975 saw the rise of Niki Lauda but Clark was good enough to see him off as ground effects overcame the Ferrari’s chassis limitations. After mopping up the ’76 and ’77 titles without breaking a sweat, and winning his 100th Grand Prix at Monaco in 1978, Jim decided to retire, leaving the Lotus – with new Cossie turbo coming along nicely – to Tom Pryce, a similarly unassuming character, who took Lotus into the 80s as the most successful team ever. A trait that is still continuing with the exciting combo of Button and Sato, 1st and 2nd in the 2004 title race.

Sorry - the Fantasy Thread came back to mind there…



9. Posted Image

Who?
Jim Clark and Chris Amon

What?
Lotus 49T and Ferrari 246T

Where?
Sandown Park

When?
25/02/1968; 33rd Australian Grand Prix

Why? (by M.G.P.A for Motoring News) After an incredible race long duel, Jim Clark beat Chris Amon in the sprint to the line to win the 33rd Australian Grand Prix by half a length. Amon was unrelenting in his pursuit of Clark, the gap only getting as large as one second at the start and later when Amon was held up while lapping Piers Courage. Clark and Amon thrilled the crowd after the disappointing early retirement of Jack Brabham, who after making a bad start chased the leaders for 21 laps.

The meeting was run in above century heat, giving the international teams a chance to apply lessons learned at Kyalami in January. During the week-end cars sprouted fuel radiators, open sides and external tubular water pipes.

Sandown Park was very hot for the opening of practice on Friday but the session was cut short when the stewards stopped practice to allow the promoters time to complete repairs to the circuit. The session proved little apart from the fact that the surface had deteriorated markedly since last year and that the high temperatures were going to cause overheating troubles to both cars and drivers.

After one-two's at Surfers Paradise and Warwick Farm the Lotus team were well pleased with the form of the Lotus 49s. The cars were brought to Sandown exactly as they had run at the Farm, and Clark and Hill's only task was to select the right gear ratios for the circuit.

Similarly Amon's Ferrari was in "Farm Trim". The 4-valve motor had performed satisfactorily at Warwick Farm after its post Surfers overhaul and Amon was most keen to use it on the fast Sandown Circuit. He now had two spares as the second 3-valve motor arrived from its factory rebuild in Italy.

Jack Brabham was all set to win his fourth Australian Grand Prix. Since Warwick Farm his new tyres and new motor had arrived. The motor was still the single overhead-cam type but the block was 11.4 inches shorter and was cast in magnesium. It made the Brabham look much neater as the exhaust system was of the "old fashioned" type, coming out low on the outside of the Vee.

Goodyear had finally got their latest rubber out of Australian Customs so Brabham was welcomed back to the fold after his defection to Firestone. The tyres were those used in the South African Grand Prix but were not quite as wide as the Lotus Firestones.

Pedro Rodriguez was another 'Goodyear man' to return to the fold. The BRM team brought three cars, two V12s and one V8 but Pedro very quickly proved the V8 was not competitive. The V12s were unchanged, Attwood's gearbox had been overhauled but the fuel system troubles seemed to be solved.

When Frank Gardner's Alfa V8 motor was examined after Warwick Farm it was found to be severely damaged so the replacement was fitted during the week.

Denny Hulme had continued his programme of chassis development in an effort to make the 1600cc Brabham as quick as Piers Courage's similarly powered McLaren. He had not been outstandingly successful as his equal slowest on Saturday morning showed.

Amon was quickest in the shortened Friday practice session. His best was 1m 6.9s, well outside the 1m 5.7s. record of Jack Brabham. After Amon were Clark, Harvey, Rodriguez and Frank Gardner. The condition of the circuit prevented fast laps and eventually practice.

On Saturday morning Clark improved to 1m 6.9s. but Amon was slower with 1m 7.2s. Despite not having run on Friday, Brabham got down to 1m 7.4s very quickly. Leo Geoghegan was far quicker than his local rivals with 1m 7.6s. Behind Geoghegan were Gardner, 1m 8.2s.; Rodriguez, 1m 8.8s.; Hill, 1m 9.2s.; Attwood, 1m 9.4s.; Courage, 1m 9.5s.; Harvey, 1m 9.6s.; and Hulme, Cusack and Bartlett with 1m 10.2s.

Brabham and Amon got going very quickly in the second session. Pole position was obviously going to be disputed between these two and Clark, but before the latter could get down to his morning times he had a tyre go down. Although Brabham could not equal his lap record of 1m 5.7s. he was quickest with 1m 6.7s. Amon was one-tenth slower but by the time Clark got going again the circuit was very slippery and he could not reply. Courage was able to knock one second off his previous best, getting down to 1m 8.5s.

Brabham did not go out during the last session, but Amon, Clark and Hill were all determined to bump him from pole.

The two Lotus Ford drivers attempted to tow each other around but the condition of the circuit beat them. All they could do was improve Graham Hill's best time to 1m 7.3s. Clark's best in this session was 1m 7.2s. while Amon's was 1m 7.4s.

Leo Geoghegan was surprisingly quickest during the last session. His most competitive 1m 7.0s put him ahead of Graham Hill on the pole side of the second row. When practice closed 0.3 seconds covered Brabham, Amon, Clark and Geoghegan.

As the start-finish line at Sandown is half-way along the main straight, the first quarter mile of the race becomes a drag race into Shell Corner. It is doubtful whether the man on pole has the better position, having the shorter ; run to the left-hander, or whether the man on the outside has the advantage, being closer to the right line.

After a briefing on the dummy grid the 13 drivers completed three-quarters of a lap to the grid proper. From the start Clark was marginally ahead of Amon, Hill overwhelmed Brabham. Amon followed Clark through Shell and was himself followed by Hill, Brabham, Gardner and Geoghegan.

Amon immediately gave warning to Clark that if he was going to win the 33rd Australian Grand Prix he would have to fight for it. As Clark led around the kink, called Mobil Corner, for the first time Amon put the Ferrari in the Lotus' slipstream. The cars roared up long hill at the back of the circuit nose to tail and as they neared the crest Amon pulled out to overhaul the Lotus. The cars were level at the top but Jim kept his foot down and forced Amon to drop back as they raced down toward Dandenong Road. Brabham was overtaken by Gardner on the first lap. Across the line for the first time the order was Clark, Amon, Hill, Gardner, Brabham, Geoghegan, Rodriguez, Cusack, Courage, Bartlett, Attwood, Hulme and Harvey.

Clark and Amon quickly detached themselves from Graham Hill, the gap between the Lotus-Ford and the Ferrari being almost non-existent as they completed lap two.

Frank Gardner pulled out of Hill's slipstream at the end of the straight for the second time and grabbed third. Graham replied immediately by using Gardner's slipstream to snatch back third as they raced up the hill.

After two laps Denny Hulme dropped to last when he pitted to have a loose spark plug refitted in the FVA Ford motor.

On the completion of two laps Clark's Lotus-Ford led by two cars' lengths from Chris Amon's Ferrari. Graham Hill's Lotus was five seconds behind Amon and was leading Gardner by one second and Brabham by two. Brabham really got going on the third lap and moved past Gardner and set out after Hill. He caught the Londoner and slipped by on the straight after four laps.

Cusack had moved by Rodriguez and got by Geoghegan into sixth on lap six. When Brabham took third he was five seconds behind Clark, by lap nine he was four seconds down. Amon was still in Clark's slipstream but the Lotus and Ferrari could not hold their lead on the Brabham-Repco. Brabham continued his chase and got to within 0.6 seconds of Amon on lap 16. He was unable to close this gap any further.

As Clark drove down the straight Amon followed directly behind but Brabham elected to keep to the inside of the circuit. He found that his motor was overheating and the trouble was aggravated by following Amon closely.

Much to the disappointment of the spectators it was the gap between Amon and Clark which began to close, not the gap between Brabham and the leaders.

Brabham began to lose ground on the 20th lap and pulled into the pits after 21. He decided it was not worth risking the motor to continue so the crowd saw yet another Brabham retirement.

By this stage the gap between Amon and Hill was half a minute. Clark and Amon were still in close company while Hill and Gardner were actively disputing the place vacated by Brabham.

Hill's Lotus-Ford led Gardner's yellow Alec Mildren Brabham Alfa from laps 5 to 18. Gardner got through but led only three laps until Hill went down the straight.

Amon became more daring with Brabham's retirement, and began to examine all the places on the circuit where he might get by. The Ferrari had more mid-range acceleration on the uphill back straight so Amon was repeatedly able to rush up in Clark's slipstream and pull out alongside as they neared the top. Each time the Lotus' top end power came in just soon enough to allow Clark to outspeed Amon over the crest.

The pattern was similar on the main straight. Amon's approach from behind was so rapid he gave the appearance Clark could not keep him behind. Each time the Ferrari would be alongside the Lotus, either a little ahead or a little behind, when the V8 Ford was able to take the Lotus ahead.

Amon tried to pull out early, as they crossed the start-finish line and as they approached the braking area but each time Clark was able to precariously hold his position.

On lap 33 the officials credited Amon with leading across the start-finish line but as ever, it was Clark who led into Peters.

The gap between Clark and Amon was not more than 0.3 seconds at any point of the circuit. Graham Hill's Lotus Ford trailed the Ferrari by 46 seconds while Gardner's Brabham Alfa was one second behind Hill. Piers Courage in the McLaren FVA was six seconds further behind and was leading Leo Geoghegan's Lotus Repco, by 11 seconds.

In very nearly heart-stopping performance, Chris Amon maintained this incredible pressure on Clark. Lap charts showed Clark's No. 6 monotonously holding first place, but they were of course incapable of telling the true story of the race.

Gardner got by Hill again on the back straight on lap 52 but Graham only followed him for one lap before retaking third.

As Clark led on to the straight for the last time, Amon was a few lengths behind. As they raced towards the line the Ferrari rushed up in the Lotus' slipstream. Amon pulled out and made his final bid for the race. He was alongside, about two feet behind and gaining rapidly when Clark was five lengths from the line.

In the last few yards the power from the Ford motor was able to check the advance of the Ferrari and open the lead of the Lotus to half a length. The officials gave Clark's margin as one-tenth of a second. Hill and Gardner were 50.2 behind, the Brabham being 0.2 behind the Lotus.

Piers Courage drove a lonely race into fifth place one lap behind Clark. Leo Geoghegan lost his sixth place to Dickie Attwood late in the race when he was slowed by his misfiring and a lack of fuel.

Why? (by David Shaw) Amon chasing Clark at the 1968 Australian Grand Prix at Sandown. Amon, in the Dino powered 246T was out powered by the Lotus 49T at this 'power' track, and went on to run second to Clark by about half a car length. It was probably Australia's closest motor race. Clark went on to win the Tasman Series, and the AGP was Clark's last Grand Prix win.



10.Posted Image

Who?
Ulf Norinder and David Piper

What?
Lola T70 Mk.3 Chevrolet SL73/132 and Ferrari 330P3/4 0854

Where?
Karlskoga

When?
11/08/1968; Swedish GP

Why? (by Rainer Nyberg) Here we are at the Gälleråsen circuit at Karlskoga, Sweden. It is the Kanonloppet weekend and the sportscar race. Ulf Norinder in a five litre Chevy powered Lola T70 Mk3 is leading leading, eventual winner David Piper in his V12 powered Ferrari 330 P3/P4. Norinder ultimately failed to finish this race. Big and bearded Swede Ulf Norinder was a larger-than-life character, who raced big engined sportscars and F5000 as well. Aged 44 he died of cancer in 1978. David Piper is a well-known British sportscar driver. His career nearly came to an end when he lost his foot in an accident at Le Mans in 1970. He was doing film sequences for the upcoming Steve McQueen movie “Le Mans”. This did not stop him however and he is still racing today, aged 74.



11.Posted Image

Who?
Jacky Ickx/Jackie Oliver

What?
Mirage M3/300 Ford 001/301

Where?
Osterreichring

When?
10/08/1969; Austrian GP, 1000 km Zeltweg

Why? It's hard to believe that Oliver was involved in motor sport for nearly forty years, having started with a Mini way back in 1961. He really came to prominence, however, driving a Lotus Elan, with which he embarrassed many a more powerful GT car in 1965, before moving into single-seaters the following year, when he showed much promise but achieved little success in Formula 3.

Jack's breakthrough year was 1967 when he drove the Lotus Components F2 car, doing himself a power of good in the eyes of Colin Chapman by taking fifth overall and the F2 class win in the German GP. With the death of Jim Clark at Hockenheim, Oliver was promoted into the Lotus team as number two to Graham Hill, but had something of a torrid baptism, crashing in both the Monaco and French GPs before redeeming himself with a splendid performance at Brands Hatch, where he led the British GP until engine failure. Seen as nothing more than a stop-gap by Chapman, who had set his heart on having Jochen Rindt in the team, Oliver bowed out with a fine third place in Mexico to take up a two-year contract with BRM.

The following season was a miserable one for BRM, but Oliver salvaged his year by racing for John Wyer's Gulf team. Paired with Ickx, he won at Sebring in Ford GT40, one of the beautiful car ever built, and they then scored a famous victory at Le Mans, Jack's contribution to which is often overlooked. In other races of 1969 WSCC season they drove Mirage chassis: Mirage M2 BRM (at Brands Hatch and at Spa - DNF); Mirage M2 Ford (at Nurburgring - DNF); Mirage M3 Ford (at Watkins Glen and at Osterreichring - DNF). The second year of his BRM deal brought scarcely more joy than the first, even though he had the excellent P153 to drive. Apart from a fifth place in Austria and a third in the Gold Cup at Oulton Park, the catalogue of retirements made depressing reading. Jack's sharp, young, Essex personality didn't sit well with Louis Stanley, who preferred drivers typical of a different era, so a parting of the ways was probably inevitable. The season was not completely lost, for Oliver ventured into Can-Am with the Autocast project and took three second places. He also raced at Brands Hatch WSCC race again with Icks but this time in Ferrari (they finished 8th overall and 6th in 5L class). Meanwhile in 1971 he returned to sports cars once more with Wyer, winning the Daytona 24 Hours and Monza 1000 Km, but was released after he preferred to take up an invitation to race Don Nichols' Shadow in Can-Am. Keen to keep his Formula 1 career afloat, Oliver arranged some drives in a third McLaren, and his versatility was proven when he stood in for Mark Donohue in Penske's Trans-Am Javelin to take third place at Riverside.

With the 1972 British GP being held at Brands Hatch (one of Jack's favourite circuits), he drove for BRM, but he spent most of the season testing Shadow's latest Can-Am car. He got on well with Don Nichols, and when Shadow entered Grand Prix racing the following year Oliver had one of the drives. It was a perplexing season, with the DN1 chassis proving difficult to sort, but a wet race in Canada saw Jack take third place - although many insist that in fact he won, as the lap charts were thrown into confusion by the use of a pace car. Oliver concentrated on Can-Am alone in 1974 and it paid off handsomely with him winning the series at the fourth attempt in Nichols' machines. Although increasingly involved in the management side of things, Oliver contested the 1975 and 1976 US F5000 series, before a Formula 1 swansong as a driver in 1977. He took the Shadow DN8 into fifth place at the Race of Champions, and later in the year raced in his final Grand Prix in Sweden, finishing ninth.

Along with Alan Rees and Tony Southgate, Oliver quit Shadow at the end of the year and unveiled the 1978 Arrows Formula 1 car, which was subsequently the subject of legal action from Nichols over design copyright. Jack then spent the next decade keeping Arrows on the F1 grid but in 1990 he sold out to the Japanese Footwork concern, whose name the team took. Oliver remained at the helm as a director, and regained control of the team at the end of 1993 when the parent company hit financial difficulties in Japan. The Arrows name was back soon.

In 1996 Oliver sold a major portion of the team to Tom Walkinshaw and was content to take a back-seat role as the new incumbent set about trying to end Arrows' winless streak, which has now lasted for more than two decades. At the start of 1999 Jack finally disposed of his remaining interest in the team he founded, walking away an exceedingly wealthy man after the reportedly massive buyout.

Why? (Robert Van der Plasken) At Zeltweg '69 it was for the first time that they led the field and took pole in Mirage.

#22 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 926 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 02:58

Fittipaldi Trophy results:

Rob Horton ('Ensign 14'): 27 (participation in all 7 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 24 (participation in all 7 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 20 (participation in 6 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 17 (participation in all 7 photos)
Robert Van der Plasken ('VDP'): 5 (participation in 1 photo)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Gerard Larrousse/Mike Wood

What?
2.2 Porsche 911S

Where?
Great Britain

When?
1970; 19nd RAC rally

Why? From Lyons, Larrousse studied business management at the Ecole Superieure de Commerce in Paris but his plans were interrupted by a passion for rally driving and competed enthusiastically in the early 1960s on the French national rallying scene in a Renault Dauphine. His career was then disrupted by military service and his studies and by an accident during his military service when he broke both ankles in a parachute jump.

He then decided to concentrate on his competition career and became a professional racing driver in 1966 and by 1969 was hired by the Porsche factory sportscar team. His major success with Porsche was victory in the 1971 Sebring 12 Hours, sharing a 917 with Vic Elford. That year he also won the Tour de France, driving a Matra MS660. And took part in some more rallies as well. He was a Ford factory driver in touring cars in 1972 and in 1973 moved to Matra Sports to be one of the factory sportscar drivers. He won at Vallelunga, Dijon, Zeltweg and Watkins Glen to help Matra to win the World Championship but, most importantly, he shared victory in the Le Mans 24 Hours with Henri Pescarolo. That success was repeated in 1974 and that year he drove a Bretscher Team Brabham BT42 in the Belgian Grand Prix at Nivelles. It was his only Grand Prix start. At the end of the year Matra withdrew from racing and Larrousse moved to Alpine for 1975, sharing victory at Mugello with Jean-Pierre Jabouille. That year he established the Elf Switzerland Formula 2 team and with Jabouille driving won the European F2 Championship. Larrousse won the Hockenheim Formula 2 race, driving one of his own cars.

At the end of 1976 he was appointed competition manager of the new Renault Sport, which was formed by a merger of Alpine and Renault-Gordini and he masterminded the company's entry into Formula 1 racing, its victory in the Le Mans 24 Hours and victory on the Monte Carlo Rally.

The Renault Sport Formula 1 team won 15 Grands Prix but failed to win a World Championship and at the end of 1985 it was closed down. Larrousse went to work with the Ligier team for a year and then set up his own Formula 1 team in partnership with Didier Calmels. They organized a deal for chassis with Lola Cars and the team entered F1 in the normally-aspirated class in 1987. The team achieved brief success with Lamborghini engines in 1990 but financial troubles were a constant problem and Larrousse had a string of unsuccessful partnerships in the early 1990s before the team was forced to give up F1 in 1995 because it could not pay for its chassis.

Larrousse continued to run sportscar teams but without much success.

Why? (by Rainer Nyberg) Versatile French driver Gerard Larrousse is seen here during the 1970 RAC Rally. He is driving one of the most classic sportscars ever, the Porsche 911. Together with Mike Wood they took the 911S to a fine sixth place after completion of no less than 82 Special Stages. Three factory 911S were entered, with the other cars driven by Björn Waldegård and Åke Andersson. Claude Haldi drove a 914/6. Larrousse was at the time a Porsche factory driver, but had far more success on the race circuits. Winning the 1971 Sebring 12 Hours in a Porsche 917. He later moved to Matra Sports and he won the classic Le Mans twice during 1973 and 1974. He also tried his feet in Formula 1 in 1974, when he got his only GP start in the Belgian Grand Prix, driving a rented Brabham. Late 1976 he moved into management at took up a role as competition manager for Renault Sport. Between 1987 and 1995 Larrousse entered Lola built chassis in Formula 1 with limited success.



2.Posted Image

Who?
Bill Brack

What?
BRM P180

Where?
Mosport Park

When?
24/09/1972; XIIth Canadian Grand Prix

Why? Brack was a leading light on the Canadian motor racing scene from the late sixties through to the late seventies, and also made occasional racing forays abroad. Initially concentrating on the Formula A and B series which were popular at the time, Brack raced mainly in Lotus cars, later switching to Chevron and March (with major STP backing) to contest Formula Atlantic events before stepping aside for the younger Jacques Villeneuve in 1979. His Grand Prix appearances at the wheel of 'third' works cars yielded little in terms of results but added local interest for the spectators nevertheless. In 1968 at Mont-Tremblant he made his debut in WDC in Lotus 49B, started 20th and had to retire only after 18 laps of the race. His second WDC race was at Mosport following year in a BRM P138, started 18th and finish 8th but wasn't classified. And the race on the photo became his third and the last appearance in WDC, he started 23th, but retired on 20th lap after spun.

Why? (by Rob Horton) The last GP for Brack, a F5000 exponent (well, Formula A) who had 3 GP appearances, all in Canada. BRM were in their mad phase of having local favourites and 4-5 cars entered in every GP and, except Beltoise's win in Monaco, they only did manage a 4th place once.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Bob Evans

What?
Trojan-Chevrolet T101

Where?
Mallory Park

When?
1973

Why? Evans was one of many British drivers of the period who, having worked tremendously hard to reach Formula 1, had neither the machinery nor the opportunity to show what they could really do. He had begun his racing career in a Sprite before moving into Formula Ford and then F3 in 1971, but only after he had fortunately recovered from a broken neck sustained when he crashed while testing at Castle Combe.

It was F5000 that was to provide Bob with his big breakthrough. With a solid season in a Trojan under his belt, long-time supporter Alan McKechnie bought him a Lola T332 for 1974 and he duly swept to the Rothmans championship, picking up the first-place Grovewood Award in the process.

This led to an offer to drive for BRM in 1975. The car was well past its best and it was to Evans' credit that he plugged away so valiantly in the face of adversity. Things looked better for 1976 when Colin Chapman, impressed with his performances, gave Bob a testing contract - and three races, the best of which was the Race of Champions, when the car ran out fuel and fourth place was lost.

Apart from a RAM drive in the British GP later that year, and a one-off outing to 11th place in the Hexagon Penske in the 1977 Race of Champions, that was that for Evans, who returned to the relative obscurity of the Aurora championship in a Surtees TS19 in 1978.

Why? (by Rob Horton) Bob Evans spent much of his pre-F1 career with the Alan McKechnie team, as here.

Evans was a classic wrong place, wrong time. He got a BRM works drive for his F1 debut which would have been a dream come true had it not been in 1975 and BRM had had its last point long before. He got a Lotus drive for 1976 but was the fall guy for Andretti and so dropped out of F1 for a couple of years. Came back in the Aurora series in 1978 and won at Zandvoort, but the series proved to be a dead end and the remainder of his career was spent in sportscars – mainly Nimrod/EMKA Astons or Domes. Last race for him I have is in 1986.

Unusual for being the only driver with a purple helmet. Well, you know what I mean.



4.Posted Image

Who?
Ian Scheckter

What?
Tyrrell 007

Where?
Kyalami

When?
06/03/1976; XXIInd The Citizen Grand Prix of South Africa

Why? Ian, the elder brother of World Champion Jody, followed his brother to Europe in mid-1972 after winning the domestic Formula Ford series with a Merlyn. After a brief stay, during which he proved his competitiveness, Scheckter returned to South Africa to contest the national championship in a Team Gunston Chevron and attempt to break Dave Charlton's long-held stranglehold on the title. Ian made his Grand Prix debut at Kyalami in 1974 and had a handful of Formula 1 outings over the next couple of years, but it was only after he had finally clinched the South African championship (by now for Formula Atlantic cars) in 1976 that he took up the offer of a full-time Grand Prix drive with March in 1977. The season was an utter shambles for the bewildered Scheckter, who managed just two finishes from 13 starts, and his Formula 1 career was buried. He returned home to renew his successful association with Lexington Racing, winning the Atlantic tiles in 1977-78 and 1978-79, before switching to saloon car racing with BMW South Africa's 535L. His son Jaki now follows in the family footsteps racing in junior single-seaters.

1976 South African Grand Prix was his only F1 race that year. After having a bad start from 16th place he collided with Leclere (pic) on the first lap and had to retire. While Michel managed to continue the race and finished 13th.

Why? (by Rob Horton) The end of a long line. For years, South Africans had had their own F1 series and when the Europeans came down for their GP the locals would also enter, with varying levels of success. This was the last time a local team (Lexington Racing) entered the SA GP. And Ian did not last long…

Jody’s elder brother, he was generally one step behind in career terms, coming to Europe in 1972 for some rides but generally remaining based at home until he won the SA crown in 1976. He then became a March works driver but the season was a disaster, so he went back home. Son Jaki showed talent in British F3 but his cousin Tomas has been the one carrying the Scheckter name across the generations.



5.Posted Image

Who?
Hermann Lang

What?
Mercedes Benz W125

Where?
Nurburgring

When?
1977

Why? In 1970s there were some interesting historic races when former Grand Prix stars again drove their legendary cars. I can remember historic race at Dijon in 1974, at Nurburgring in 1976 and again at Nordschleife in 1977 as on the photo. Inspite of a wet wether Fangio, Kling and Lang raced their famous Mercedes cars around not less famous 14-mile circuit that lost German GP to Hockenheim after terrible Lauda's accident on the second lap of 1976 German Grand Prix.



6.Posted Image

Who?
Guy Edwards

What?
Fittipaldi F5A

Where?
Brands Hatch

When?
15/04/1979; Race of Champions

Why? Though not a front-rank driver, Edwards, intelligent and personable, had a talent for securing funding from sponsorship sources previously unconnected with motor sport, and with this backing he was able to rise from 2-litre sports cars via F5000 into Formula 1.

His first taste of Grands Prix ended bitterly, Guy losing his drive after a wrist injury had sidelined him from the Embassy Hill team. He then arranged substantial sponsorship to drive for Hesketh in 1976, but the team was in decline, and results were poor, while one last stab in the hopeless Stanley-BRM is best forgotten.

Perhaps realising his limitations, Edwards settled for a satisfying few seasons competing at national level and occasionally beyond, mainly racing Grand Prix machinery in the popular Aurora F1 series. In the 1979 Aurora Formula One Series he became 5th overall (1 win at Brands Hatch in RoC), that wasn't very much success after 4th place in 1978 (2 wins: at Oulton Park and Thruxton). In 1980 he was 3rd (2 wins: at Oulton Park and Snetterton). Nevertheless his best results in British championships for F1 cars was in 1977 in Shellsport Group 8 British Championship when he became vice-champion with 3 wins (at Snetterton, Thruxton and Brands Hatch). In the early 1980s he retired from driving to become a successful sponsorship consultant, a role which has made him a millionaire.

In the austere financial climate of the early nineties, Edwards was employed by Team Lotus to find a major sponsor for the once great marque, but despite his best efforts none was forthcoming and their relationship ended somewhat acrimoniously in 1994.



7.Posted Image

Who?
Gordon Smiley

What?
McLaren M23/14

Where?
Zandvoort

When?
4/06/1979; International Whitsuntide, Aurora F1

Why? Gordon Smiley was a good American guy born on 20 April 1949. In 1979 he raced in Aurora F1 championship. He didn't start in the first race of the season held at Zolder. In the second round, held at Oulton Park, he finished 9th in Tyrrell 008. Next race was the Race of Champions at Brands. There he finished 10th overall but 4th in Aurora F1 class and received his first three points. On 7th of May at Mallory Park Smiley didn't finished because of an accident. Two weeks later at Snetterton he changed his car to McLaren M23 that raced its last races, there he was 7th. In the next race held at Thruxton he was 4th and received three more points again. Seventh round of the championship was at Zandvoort and Gordon was 5th. He missed next race at Donington. But took part in the race at Oulton Park, where he again changed his car - this time to Surtees TS20 and was 10th in the race. Smiley didn't start in 10th round held at Nogaro the same as at Mallory Park. But in the 12th race held at Brands Hatch Gordon finished in 6th position. At Thruxton, 13th round of the championship, he didn't finished as his engine blew up. The same problem awaited for him at Snetterton. But the last, 15th, race of the season held at Silverstone he won! After this great race Smiley received 9th position overall and decided to return to USA.

Smiley debuted in Champ Car on 13th of April 1980 at Ontario, and in his debut race he was 13th in qualification and 6th in the race. Smiley qualified the Valvoline Phoenix/Cosworth for the Patrick Racing team in 20th position for the 1980 Indy 500. His turbocharger blew on lap 47 to finish in 25th. That year he raced in 1 more race - at Michigan (DNF - accident) while at Mexico City he crashed in qualification and didn't start.

For the 1981 Indy 500 he qualified the Intermedics Wildcat VIII/Cosworth for the Patrick Racing team in 8th position. But crashed out on lap 141 to finish in 22nd. In 1981 Gordon also drove at Riverside (DNF - accident), Watkins Glen (DNF - engine), and Phoenix where he finished 10th.

First race of 1982 season was for Smiley at Atlanta where he again didn't finished because of problems with radiator. The next race was Indy 500...

Saturday, May 15, 1982: Cogan is first to qualify and shatters both the single and four-lap records. His fastest circuit is 204.638 mph and he averages 204.082. While Cogan accepts congratulations over the public-address system, Rick Mears boosts the single-lap record to 207.612 and averages 207.004. Several cars are still in line, but Mears appears to have his second pole in the bag. About an hour later, two-time starter Gordon Smiley gets loose on his second warm up lap and slams head-on into the outside wall of Turn 3, his car disintegrates and Smiley had no chances to survive. As Buford recently wrote in a "Never seen a crash like this" thread "Gordon Smiley crash was the worst single car crash of all time. Nothing of the car left bigger than a bread box other than the engine that seperated and Smiley's body flattened and dragged along the track. They showed that time and time again and did for years on ABC. I also have it from several other angles than the two ABC had from the local Indy stations who all had cameras around the track in those days. That is an accident they would never replay today. It was like a plane crash with a debris field all the way from turn 3 to turn 4, and the reactions of the crash crew who arrived in seconds and the way they threw their hands into the air in hopelessness when they saw what they saw." It was the first fatality at the Speedway since 1973.

The track was reopened about two hours later, and no one matched Cogan's speed, let alone Mear's. A.J. Foyt came closest at 203.3 to join the Penske drivers on the front row, while Patrick temamates Mario Andretti was Gordon Johncock are fourth and fifth fastest...

#23 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 926 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 03:00

Prost Trophy results:

Rob Horton ('Ensign 14'): 49 (participation in all 7 photos)
Riccardo Prosperi ('Teapot'): 40 (participation in all 7 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 30 (participation in all 7 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 28 (participation in all 7 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 26 (participation in 6 photos)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Alain Prost and Nelson Piquet

What?
Renault RE40 and Brabham BT52B

Where?
Zandvoort

When?
28/08/1983; 32e Grote Prijs van Nederland

Why? In the fortnight between the Austrian and Dutch GPs, Keke Rosberg and Jacques Laffite agreed to re-sign for Williams in 1984 while there were suggestions that Prost had had an offer to join Ferrari. During qualifying the BMW engined Brabhams had around 800bhp available for the first time and Paul Rosche's 4-cylinder engine was also enjoying greater reliability. The big news in the Zandvoort paddock, however, was that the first McLaren-TAG MP4/1E was ready and it was driven for the weekend by Niki Lauda. And despite the power output of the BMW the media attention was firmly fixed on the brand-new McLaren equipped with a Porsche-built TAG V6 unit. The new car was much admired by all and over the coming months was soon copied by other teams. But it was not an immediate challenger with Lauda having to be content with 19th on the grid while Nelson Piquet was on pole position in his Brabham-BMW with Patrick Tambay (Ferrari) alongside on the front row. Then came Elio de Angelis (Lotus-Renault) and World Championship leader Alain Prost (Renault) ahead of Nigel Mansell (Lotus-Renault), Riccardo Patrese (Brabham-BMW), Derek Warwick (Toleman-Hart), Andrea de Cesaris (Alfa Romeo), Manfred Winkelhock (ATS-BMW) and Prost's title challenger Rene Arnoux, the Frenchman having had engine trouble in qualifying.

Tambay's race almost ended before it had begun when he almost stalled the car as the lights went green. Luckily for the rest of the field he had the presence of mind to pull over and left the pack through while he sorted himself out. When he finally got things together he was running 21st and last.

Piquet got an excellent start and was soon putting some air between himself and the chasing pack led by Cheever who had come - almost brushing the pitwall on the way - up from 11th on the grid to be running second into the first corner. Inspite of Tambay's slow moving Ferrari the drivers on the outside of the grid including Prost and Patreses made reasonable starts. De Cesaris was fourth ahead of Arnoux and de Angelis (who had been banging wheels with his teammate Mansell). Four laps into the race Alain Prost got past Cheever and started to close the gap to Piquet. De Cesaris did not last long, going out with a blown engine but apart from that the order did not change until the eighth lap when Patrese overtook Cheever. Eddie soon dropped behind Arnoux as well and on lap 22 the Ferrari driver went ahead of Patrese. Riccardo dropped back and was later passed by Cheever. The pit stops began on lap 38.

At the start of lap 42 Prost took a major gamble during the race which didn't pay off and would ultimately cost him the championship. Braking for the Tarzan bend he tried to force Piquet's Brabham off-line. The cars collided. Piquet was punted of and Prost rejoined but his front wing was damaged and he soon retired.

That left Arnoux clear to take the lead - a position he held until the flag despite stopping for tyres. Amazingly Tambay had spent the entire race working his way towards the front and as his team-mate took the lead he had reached third with Patrese ahead of him. On lap 67 Patrese got into trouble when his turbo lost power. It was all Tambay had been waiting for and he stormed through to score a valuable second place for Ferrari. Patrese finished back in ninth while Watson joined the Scuderia boys on the podium. Warwick was fourth, Mauro Baldi (Alfa Romeo) and Michele Alboreto sixth in the Tyrrell 012.

Why? (by Rob Horton) Alain Prost has just failed with an almighty overtaking manoeuvre. Well, he succeeded, as he locked up into Piquet’s car and sent it off…however the Renault was damaged & Prost lasted a couple more corners before losing it completely.

Significant because:
-this was probably where Prost lost the 1983 World Title – from here on in the Brabham was the car to beat;
-this was probably where Arnoux, who won, got the Ferrari drive for the next season. Had he come 2nd, like team-mate Tambay, he would probably not have had it and Patrick would not have gone to Renault, which in retrospect was not the right move;
-it was the first GP where Toleman got points, thanks to Derek Warwick’s 4th;
-I saw the result on Spanish television whilst on holiday and thought it was a joke.

Why? (by Riccardo Prosperi) Nelson Piquet (Brabham BT 52B) hit the barriers at Zandvoort 1983 on lap 41, after being punted off by Alain Prost (Renault RE 40) in a battle for the lead. Prost would retire too, few yards later, with damaged front end and Arnoux (Ferrari) would collect his last GP victory.



2.Posted Image

Who?
Jan Lammers

What?
Renault 5 Turbo

Where?
Spa-Francorchamps

When?
1983

Why? In a career stretching back more than thirty years, Lammers has tried his hand at most forms of racing since his early success as the Dutch Group 1 saloon car champion. Progressing through the single-seater formulae, the pint-sized Dutchman took the 1978 European F3 championship by the narrowest of margins with a Ralt, earning a chance with the restructured Shadow team alongside Elio de Angelis for 1979. The cars were not competitive, and Lammers found little more joy during his associations with ATS, Ensign and Theodore over the next two seasons, although he startled the Formula 1 fraternity at Long Beach in 1980 by qualifying his car fourth on the grid.In 1982, apart from his disastrous time at Theodore, he had also committed himself to a season in the Renault 5 Turbo Europa Cup. Competing for Renault Nederland in this one-make series, Lammers demonstrated that he had what it took to be competitive in this unique class, scoring a win at the Norisring plus a second and two thirds. By 1983, he had won the Cup with 4 wins, three 2nds and a 3rd to his name, taking victory at Paul Ricard, Imola, Monaco and Zandvoort.
In 1984 he did better still, routing the opposition in scoring an incredible 8 wins to take out the title for the second year running. Then, in 1985, when the Renault 5 Turbo Europa Cup became the Renault Alpine Turbo Europa Cup, Renault Nederland kept Lammers on for another year, and Jan responded by winning three more times, at Monaco, Monza and Vallelunga. In 1985 Jan also enjoyed a productive spell in the Richard Lloyd Porsche sports car team before having a crack at Indy Car racing late that year . However, he found his greatest success and truly left his mark on the international motor racing scene in the TWR Jaguar team, partnering John Watson to three wins (Jarama, Monza and Mount Fuji) in 1987, and winning Le Mans in 1988 with Dumfries and Wallace. He also won the Daytona 24-hour race for Jaguar twice (1988 and '90). After racing in Japanese F3000 in 1991, Lammers joined the Toyota sports car team for 1992, and made an unexpected return to F1 at the end of the year with March. But plans for a full Grand Prix season in 1993 came to nought when the financially bereft Bicester team was finally forced to close its doors, leaving him to take in a limited programme of European F3000. Jan was a somewhat surprising choice to race the TWR Volvo estate alongside Rickard Rydell in the 1994 BTCC, and though excellent progress was made in the car's debut year Lammers still hankered after a single-seater career. The Dutchman kicked off 1995 with a win in the F3000/F2 invitation race at Kyalami, and then took second place in the Sebring 12 Hours in a Ferrari with Bell and Wallace before he lined up with Vortex for a projected full season in F3000. Unfortunately, Jan rarely rose above the midfield positions and quit in frustration after just three races. Since 1996 Lammers has concentrated on sports car and GT racing, initially with the factory Lotus team and with the Konrad Motorsports Lola before he formed the Racing for Holland team in 2001.

Why? (by Rob Horton) It had been a year since his last F1 appearance. Lammers set an unusual record in F1, the longest gap between GPs – he had 10 years between his Dutch GP appearance in 1982 and his return at Japan in 1992.

Why? (by Riccardo Prosperi) A year later he would win the race here in the same car few hours after his victorious ride in the 1000 km of Brands Hatch in a Porsche 956 Canon, paired with Jonathan Palmer.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Gabriele Tarquini

What?
March 85B

Where?
Spa-Francorchamps

When?
01-02/06/1985

Why? This pleasant and underrated Italian caused quite a stir back in 1985 when, as reigning world karting champion and with almost no Formula 3 experience to speak of, he became an instant front-runner in F3000. He finished his first year a very creditable sixth in the standings, but his 1986 season was less startling as the newly formed Coloni team struggled to find its feet, though he did score third places at Enna and the Osterreichring. Joining Lamberto Leoni's FIRST racing ream for 1987, Gabriele was once again a 'nearly-man' in terms of ultimate success, but he made his Formula 1 debut for Osella at Imola, and then rejoined Enzo Coloni for a testing first Grand Prix season in 1988. With poor Philippe Streiff gravely injured in a Brazilian testing accident, Tarquini came into the AGS line-up for the 1989 San Marino GP, soon gaining a priceless point for the little team in Mexico. Over the next three seasons, the ever-cheerful Italian plugged away against insurmountable odds as the debt-ridden team headed towards extinction, but before the end came he had been allowed to sign for Fondmetal (formerly Osella). With Ford HB engines at his disposal for 1992, Tarquini had easily his best opportunity to shine but the team was hampered by a lack of adequate funding - the Italian was under strict instructions to conserve the car at all costs -and any promise it had possessed soon evaporated, resulting in the outfit's withdrawal before the season was out. Tarquini then joined the horde of famous names in the Italian touring car championship in 1993, taking third place in the series with a works Alfa Romeo. He was chosen to spearhead the Italian manufacturer's move into the BTCC series in 1994 and enjoyed a highly successful season, winning eight of the 21 rounds to take the championship crown. Gabriele also gained well-earned plaudits from all for his off-track demeanour and was a credit to the series and his sport. It was going to be tough to follow this success in 1995, and so it proved as Alfa lost their advantage. Gabriele was initially racing in Italy, but the company's sudden decision to withdraw from their domestic championship saw him back in Britain for the balance of the year. The sudden transition from being the dominant force to midfield strugglers was quite a shock but Tarquini always gave of his best. Partly due to his links with Fondmetal, he had been an occasional test driver for Tyrrell, and was drafted in to deputise for the indisposed Katayama at the Nurburgring, though his one-off F1 return was not a particularly distinguished one. In 1996 Gabriele stepped up to the high-profile International Touring Car series as a works driver alongside the experienced Larini and Nannini in the Alfa 155 V6 Tl and scored a big win at Silverstone, but endured a thin time otherwise. So it was back to the Super Touring category in 1997, the Italian switching his allegiance to Honda. Although Gabriele's three seasons driving the Accord in both the BTCC and the German Super Touring series have produced no more than the occasional win. For 2000 he was again in BTCC driving Honda Accord. In the following year he became 3rd overall in FIA ETCC, driving Honda for the last time. And since 2002 he has raced Alfa Romeo 156, became ETCC champion in 2003 and was 3rd in 2004.

In the race on the photo Gabriele was 9th on the starting grid, 2 seconds behind Michel Ferté's pole time. While in the race under rain and with bad asphalt surface he finished 4 of only 6 cars at the finish. The Formula 1 race was sheduled on the same day, 2nd of June, but the circuit had recently been resurfaced and during practise the asphalt started to lift off under F1 powerful turbo cars, making the track even more dangerous than usual. The team discussed the situation with the race organisers and decided to postpone the event until the 15 of September. But in many ways the F1 race was eclpsed by Stefan Bellof's tragedy on the 1 of September during 1000km sports car race when he crashed his Porsche 956 at Eau Rouge trying to wrest the race lead from Jacky Ickx's similar car.

Why? (by Rob Horton) The only significant race I can think of is the Eifelrennen which did not take place because of snow…but the people in the background do not look dressed for that… Other than Spa, where the F1 boys did not race but the F3000 chaps were allowed to go at it. So I’ll go for Spa. Gabriele got a 4th place and 3 points in the unusually numbered 13.



4.Posted Image

Who?
Christian Danner, Jonathan Palmer and Huub Rothengatter

What?
Osella FA1G and two Zakspeed 861

Where?
Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal

When?
15/06/1986; Grand Prix Labatt du Canada

Why? Christian got involved in motor sport by racing (and regularly crashing) a Renault 5 in Germany, and soon came to the attention of Manfred Cassani, who was looking for a young driver to promote. Danner was given a BMW M1 to race in the German G4 championship and a couple of Procar GP support races, and did so well in these that BMW signed him on a three-year contract to race in the works March F2 team. With no single-seater experience, Christian struggled in 1981 - his first season -and he was usually overshadowed by the team's lead drivers, Boutsen, Corrado Fabi, Cecotto and Gabbiani, but by the end of 1983 he was not far off the pace, as witnessed by his pole position at the Nurburgring. Unfortunately for Christian, BMW then pulled the plug on their F2 programme and at first he was left without a drive for 1984, eventually joining the Bob Sparshott team. That season was dominated by the Ralt-Hondas, but Danner was up there with the rest, and with a minimal budget he tackled the inaugural F3000 season in 1985 with the same team. This was to be the breakthrough year for Christian. Not the quickest driver but certainly the most consistent, he became the formula's first champion. This brought him a Grand Prix chance at Zakspeed, and then a contract with Osella for 1986, which was bought out after Montreal race when Arrows needed a replacement for the badly injured Marc Surer. Christian rejoined Zakspeed in 1987 and, paired with Martin Brundle, performed quite well given the equipment available. He was on the sidelines in 1988, but could have had the dubious privilege of a EuroBrun drive from mid-season had he not been too tall to fit into the car. The following season saw his final shot at F1, driving the Rial for Gunther Schmid. He scored a distant fourth at Phoenix, but finally quit as the team slid into oblivion. Christian then spent the next few years as a real globetrotter, competing in Japanese F3000, Indy cars and the GTCC, driving a BMW in 1991. Landing a works-backed Alfa in the DTM/ITC run by Schubel, Danner put in some very strong performances, and was rewarded with outright wins in 1995 at Helsinki and Norisring. Christian is a co-owner with Andreas Leberle of the Project Indy CART team, which has always competed on very limited resources. Danner managed to drive in a couple of Indy Car races himself in 1995, the first of which, in Miami, brought the team a remarkable seventh place, despite his having to resort to an elderly '93 Lola. It is a testament to his racing abilities that, in 1997, even two years away from CART proved to be no barrier to Christian. At short notice, he hopped into the Payton/Coyne Lola at Detroit and picked up the team's first point of the year with a solid 12th-place finish. Lack of finance has since kept Project Indy's plans on the back burner and therefore his racing activities have been centred on the German Super Touring series with an Alfa Romeo. In 2002 he raced in German V8-Star, being 5th Salzburgring. Now he works as a commentator on RTL.

The death of Elio de Angelis a month earlier before 1986 Canadian Grand Prix had created an opening at Brabham and the team hired Derek Warwick who had been left out of work after Ayrton Senna refused to have him as his Lotus team mate. Marc Surer was also missing having been very seriously injured while competing on the Hessen Rally in a Ford RS200. Christian Danner was hired by Arrows but because of contractual problems had to race in Canada for Osella and so there was only one Arrows.

Qualifying had suggested that it could have been very different with a wet Friday hinting that Piquet was the front-runner. A dry session on Saturday stablised things and it was Mansell who bagged pole with Senna in the Lotus alongside him. Nelson Piquet was third in the second Williams while Alain Prost was fourth for McLaren ahead of Rene Arnoux (Ligier), Keke Rosberg (McLaren), Gerhard Berger (Benetton), Jacques Laffite (Ligier), Riccardo Patrese (Brabham) and Warwick. Michele Alboreto was 11th in his Ferrari.

In the morning warm-up Patrick Tambay suffered a suspension failure on his Lola-Ford and injured his feet in the resulting accident and so he did not start. While Jonathan Palmer had to start the race from pit-lane (pic).

Montreal has never been a circuit for easy passing and Senna was determined to make the most of his front row start. It didn’t work out that way and it was the Williams of Mansell that led into the first corner. Behind Senna were Prost, Piquet, Rosberg, Arnoux and the rest. Rosberg soon overtook Piquet. Coming into lap five Prost made a move on the Brazilian and was able to secure the racing line. That left Senna with no option but to lift off and allow the Frenchman through. The loss of traction sent the Brazilian scudding across the kerbs and as a result Rosberg, Piquet and Arnoux all passed the stricken Lotus. On lap 13 Rosberg overtook Prost for second and four laps later the Finn took the lead. His fuel consumption was too much, however, and so Rosberg had to back off which enabled Mansell and Prost to close up. As they came up to lap Jones on lap 22 Rosberg left a small gap and Mansell took the lead again. He pulled away to win the race.

As the race wore on Montreal’s combination of high-speed straights and hairpins wrought havoc on the gearboxes of the competitors and they began dropping out. Warwick in the Brabham, followed the Zakspeed of Palmer before the next major incident of the day snatched the attention of the TV crews. While Dumfries (Lotus) and Johansson in the Ferrari clashed sending both in retirement.

Prost retook Rosberg for second place but he then had a slow pit stop caused by a sticking wheelnut and dropped back to fifth. He spent the rest of the race charging back to take second by the finish. Up at the front very little happened although Senna did snatch fifth place back from Arnoux and then spent the rest of the afternoon trying to hang on to the position. As the flag fell it was Mansell from Prost and Piquet with Rosberg fourth having had to slow to conserve fuel in the closing laps while the troubled Senna was fifth and Arnoux sixth.

Christian Danner showed in qualification the 24th and the last time, 17 seconds behind Mansell's polestarted from the last 24th position on the grid, and had to retire after only 6 laps of the race because of the problems with Alfa Romeo turbo engine.

Huub Rothengatter who debuted in WDC at this circuit two years ago with Spirit, but missed a last year race started this time right before Danner and managed to finish the race in 12th position - for the first time driving Zakspeed.

There would be no Canadian GP in 1987 because of a dispute over the sponsorship of the race. In the period new pits would be built at the bottom end of the track and some of the corners would be reprofiled.

Why? (by Rob Horton) Danner had sealed a deal to move to Arrows, effective from the Canadian GP onwards – but there was a problem; he got as far as sitting in the Arrows before a contractual wrangle meant he stayed with Osella for one last race. This is therefore one of the last few times that someone had a GP weekend with 2 different teams.

Why? (by Riccardo Prosperi) Christian Danner raced with Osella instead of Arrows (he was hired as a substitute for Marc Surer, injured in a rally crash) because of a contractual issues. He would retire on lap 6.



5.Posted Image

Who?
Roberto Moreno

What?
AGS JH22

Where?
Suzuka

When?
01/11/1987; Fuji Television Japan Grand Prix

Why? A childhood friend and karting companion of Nelson Piquet, Roberto Moreno followed the future World Champion to Europe in 1979; he soon made a big impact in a Royale, and then in 1980 won 15 races and the British FF1600 championship in a Van Diemen, A testing contract with Lotus gave Moreno the lifeline to sustain a Formula 3 career, while a victory in the Australian GP with a Ralt (beating Piquet and Jones) at the end of 1981 raised his profile greatly. He started 1982 winning in Formula Atlantic in the USA before having a disastrous outing for Lotus at Zandvoort, where he failed to qualify, which handicapped his career for a number of years. In 1984 he finished second to team-mate Thackwell in the Formula 2 championship, but a chance of a Formula 1 return with Toleman foundered when the team failed to tie up a tyre deal. This led Roberto to try his hand at Indy Car racing with Rick Galles, and while results were disappointing the little Brazilian certainly impressed.

Returning to Europe in 1987, Moreno was back with Ralt in F3000, but his luck was out. Leading round after round, his car always seemed to hit trouble and he only managed to win one race, at Enna. He managed to return in F1 in 1987 Japanese Grand Prix with the little AGS team. Fortune did smile with his new team which yielded a point in the Australian GP, but with no chance of racing with them in 1988 due to a lack of funds Moreno was forced to stay in F3000, and showed his talent by clinching the championship with a virtually unsponsored Reynard, winning four rounds.

Buoyed by a testing contract with Ferrari, Roberto took up a drive with Coloni, then joined EuroBrun, only for the team to fold. Dramatically, after a run of non-qualifications, he was then given the Benetton seat in place of the injured Nannini, and a sensational debut in Japan saw him finish second to team-mate Piquet and gain a well-earned contract for 1991. His big season was something of an anti-climax, however, and when Michael Schumacher was snatched from Jordan, Roberto found himself turfed out of the team, ironically after his best race of the year at Spa. After seeing out the season with Jordan and Minardi, Moreno was back at square one in 1992, with the hapless Andrea Moda outfit, though he did brilliantly to qualify the car at Monaco. When the team were finally thrown out of the championship Roberto was left with no option but to find a ride in Italian touring cars, but in 1993 he was enjoying his racing again with an Alfa in the French Supertourisme championship.

It was quite a surprise when it was announced that Roberto would partner Pedro Diniz in the new Forti Corse F1 team in 1995, but the all-Brazilian driver pairing were forced to spend most of their races looking in their mirrors as the leaders lapped them with monotonous regularity. In 1996, after a ten-year absence, Roberto returned to Indy Car racing with the underfinanced Payton-Coyne Racing. Predictably his professionalism brought its reward with a superb third place in the US 500 at Michigan, the team's best-ever finish. Initially without a ride for 1997, Roberto was soon in action as a replacement for the injured Christian Fittipaldi at Newman-Haas. The fact that he outqualified team-mate Michael Andretti three times in six races raised a few eyebrows, but no one else, it seemed, shared the Brazilian's innate self-confidence.

The following season began with two races for Project Indy before Moreno quit, and it seemed that his only future lay in the Indy Racing League. Indeed he started 1999 in that category with a sixth place at Phoenix before another call into CART action as a substitute for Mark Blundell at PacWest. Roberto immediately established a great rapport with the team and helped to refocus their efforts before taking on an even more rewarding stand-in role at Newman-Haas. In 2000 he joined for two years to Patrick Racing, and won in a fantastic stile the qualification and the race at Cleveland that helped him become 3rd overall in 2000. In 2001 he also won race at Vancouver. After missing the following season he returned in Champ Car in 2003 with Herdez Competition and managed to finish second at Miami.

1987 Japanese Grand Prix promised to be interesting. Formula 1 returned to Japan for the first time in 10 years with an exciting World Championship showdown between Williams-Honda team mates Nelson Piquet and Nigel Mansell. The Brazilian was 12 points ahead on points so Mansell was the man under pressure. Mansell had alredy won six races from eight pole starts while Piquet had scored three race wins but had finished second no less than seen times. Everybody expected the title to be decided at Suzuka and it was - but no in the way most people hoped. But all decided in qualifying when Mansell cracked and crashed heavily the fast sweepers behind the paddock. The accident left Mansell with severe bruising to his backbone and it was decided that he should not be allowed to race. Having spent Friday night in hospital Mansell flew back to Europe on Saturday evening. As a result even though he retired from the race Piquet was declared the 1987 World Champion for the third time.

The entry was much as it had been in Mexico although AGS decided to replace Pascal Fabre, who wasn't qualified in three of four last races, with Roberto Moreno. And Moreno wouldn't be qualifed at Suzuka too, if Mansell's accident hadn't happened. But forunately for Brazilian after friday only 25 contenders remained and so he would be at starting grid in any case.

With Piquet having nothing to prove and Mansell out of the way Gerhard Berger took pole position in his Ferrari ahead of Alain Prost's McLaren, Thierry Boutsen's Benetton-Ford and Michele Alboreto in the second Ferrari. Then came Piquet and Teo Fabi (Benetton) with the top 10 completed by Ayrton Senna (Lotus), Riccardo Patrese (Brabham-BMW), Stefan Johansson's McLaren and the second Brabham of Andrea de Cesaris.

In the race Berger took the lead at the start and was never threatened, winning a dominant victory for the Scuderia who had not won a race since Alboreto's victory at the Nurburgring in August 1985. Boutsen chased him early on but dropped behind Senna, Piquet and Johansson. Piquet's race ended with an engine failure in the closing laps and so fourth place went to Alboreto with Boutsen fifth and Satoru Nakajima sixth. The Jim Clark Trophy for the top driver of a normally aspirated car was awarded to Jonathan Palmer in the Tyrrell-Cosworth, who finished in 8th position.

While Moreno had to retire only 12 laps before the finish because of fuel injection problems. In the next race held at Adelaida Roberto would receive first point for the AGS team – by finishing 7th they had just missed out, but Senna was DQ’d for oversize brakes and both Roberto and the team got onto the scoreboard.

Why? (by Vladimir Kovalenko) Only second Moreno's F1 race and first one after his debut 5 years before. Being 38 years old he only started his F1 career, which would end only in 1995!



6.Posted Image

Who?
Philippe Streiff

What?
AGS JH23

Where?
Detroit

When?
19/06/1988; Enichem Detroit Grand Prix

Why? At the end of 1977 Streiff won the Volant Motul competition at the Nogaro racing school and began racing in Formula Renault the following season. That year Philippe Alliot won the title but Streiff won his first victory at the French GP support event at Paul Ricard. He later decided to launch himself into European F3 series in 1979 with a privateer Martini-Renault. The series was dominated by Alain Prost in a similar car but a switch to Toyota engines made Streiff competitive, indicating that Prost's engines were a little better than those supplied to customers. Philippe came to the fore in 1980, when an acrimonious Formula 3 season ended with a splendid win at the final European round at Zolder. The following year he concentrated on winning the French F3 championship in his Martini, and took fourth in the European series, joining the two-car AGS Formula 2 team for 1982. Streiff's season was up and down, due in part to the arguments that raged over the technical regulations, but he finished the year strongly to take sixth place in the final standings.

In 1983, AGS and Streiff really got to work, despite the team's chronic shortage of funds, and the Frenchman carried the fight to the dominant Ralts, though he had to wait until the very end of the 1984 season before scoring a long overdue and well earned win. He did, however, have the fillip of a Grand Prix outing for Renault in the 1984 Portuguese GP. His F3000 campaign with AGS in 1985 was well funded yet strewn with mechanical failures, but by now he had been elevated to the Grand Prix ranks, taking over the Ligier of de Cesaris in mid-season and scoring a fine third place in the end-of-year Australian GP. With Ligier missing the South African GP because of the political situation, Philippe drove for Tyrrell, and he joined the Ockham team full time in 1986 to handle their Renault-engined cars. He drove well enough on occasions during the next two seasons, but was generally outpaced by his team-mates Brundle and Palmer, the latter claiming the non-turbo honours after a switch to Cosworth power in 1987.

Streiff was taking a gamble when he joined the tiny AGS GP team for 1988, but at least it was an environment with which the Frenchman was familiar, and early in the season he caught the eye with some spirited performances, most notably at Imola, where he qualified and raced superbly, only for engine problems to intervene. Philippe was looking forward to another season with the team in 1989, but in a pre-season test at Rio poor Philippe crashed heavily, sustaining serious back injuries which, possibly due to a lack of prompt medical assistance, resulted in him being left totally paralysed. In the 1990s, still in a wheelchair, Philippe organized motorsport events, notably the successful annual Elf-sponsored karting at Bercy.

Ayrton Senna's third win in the 1988 season and third win in Detroit Grand Prix made it six out of six for McLaren in 1988, on the way to an unprecedented 15 wins and ten 1-2 finishes in 16 races. Senna's victory matched the season total of teammate Alain Prost, who finished 38 seconds behind the Brazilian in second place, and still had never won in North America. Thierry Boutsen took third for Benetton, as he had a week before in Canada, and Andrea de Cesaris scored the first points ever for the Rial team by finishing fourth. Minardi and Pierluigi Martini also scored their first point with sixth place. With turbocharged engines scheduled to be eliminated prior to 1989, and their effectiveness intended to be curtailed by two rule changes for 1988, few teams opted to develop totally new equipment that would only be used for one season. Only Honda, who defected to McLaren from defending Constructor's Champion Williams, and Ferrari developed new engines to meet the revised turbo rules -- boost reduced from 4 bars to 2.5, and fuel capacity reduced from 195 liters to 150 (refueling was banned from 1984 through 1993), and only McLaren developed a completely new chassis. Though the new rules were intended to narrow or eliminate the performance gap between the turbos and the normally-aspirated engines, Honda and Ferrari were able to display a 100-horsepower advantage over the best 3.5-liter equipment of the opposition. With that kind of power differential, the only new chassis in the field, and Senna and Prost behind the wheel, McLaren quickly turned the season into a two-man show.

Detroit's tight 90-degree turns and short straight sections had given the underpowered "atmo" cars a chance at several times during the turbo era, and some teams were hoping the quirky circuit might give them a bit of a chance. Senna took the twenty-second pole of his career by more than eight-tenths, but the Ferraris of Gerhard Berger and Michele Alboreto both lined up ahead of Prost, who was fourth. The teams were all hoping for cooler temperatures for the race on Sunday, after the track had begun to break up during qualifying (expedited by a TransAm race on Saturday). Hasty concrete repairs made the surface extremely abrasive for the soft compound tires most teams had brought, and teams were forced to reconsider their plans for a non-stop race. On Sunday morning, Berger said, "Really, I think today is a lottery...." Then, recalling how the first five races had gone, added, "...which probably gives us our best chance of the season." In front of 61,000 fans on race day, Senna took the lead off the grid and was uncontested into the first corner. The Ferraris followed, with Prost beginning to challenge them already. He took a look around the outside of Alboreto in Turn 2, but had no room. For the first three laps, the four leaders hung quite close together, but by the end of lap four, Senna's lead was more than two seconds. Prost got by Alboreto on lap five, and Berger on lap six, but by that time, Senna was over six seconds ahead.

It didn't take long for the Ferrari challenge to dissipate. On lap seven, having already passed Alboreto, Boutsen tried to get by Berger as well, but his Benetton hit the left rear wheel of the Ferrari, puncturing the tire and putting the front-row starter out of the race. Two laps later, Alessandro Nannini tried to get the second Benetton past Alboreto. Nannini dove inside, but when Alboreto tried to shut the door, the cars touched and the Ferrari jumped into the air and then spun. Alboreto made it around to the pits to change tires and check things over, then put in some terrific laps and worked his way back up to seventh before spinning again on lap 46. It seemed, at first, as if Nannini had escaped the contact unharmed, but on lap 15, he pitted with a damaged right front suspension and failing brakes. The brake problem "was really the cause of the problem with Michele," he explained. "Almost from the start, I was having to pump the pedal. If the brakes had been okay, I think I could have avoided him."

Instead, any hope of a threat to the McLarens was gone with the race one-quarter over. The red and white cars, with Senna eight seconds ahead, seemed to be carefree. In fact, Prost had been struggling the entire race with an uncooperative gearchange. "It was strange -- the gearbox felt as though it was seizing up. The worst change was from fourth to fifth, which I think I missed at least once a lap right the way through."

With the Ferraris and Nannini out, Nigel Mansell took up fourth spot for Williams. The Judd had suffered all season with overheating problems, and with the temperature in the mid-90s, he didn't like his chances of finishing the race. Sure enough, on lap 19, "the red light came on, and that was the end -- the engine just cut." Teammate Riccardo Patrese assumed fourth position until lap 27, when the same thing happened to him. He pulled off and parked alongside the barrier, right behind Mansell.

Pierluigi Martini, driving in his first Grand Prix in almost three years, was running extremely well for Minardi and got up to fifth place on lap 35 when Mauricio Gugelmin's March retired. He would likely have finished there, if not for the relentless and resilient performance of Jonathan Palmer for Tyrrell. Palmer had come together with Oscar Larrauri on the first lap, requiring a stop to replace the nosecone, and leaving him dead last by a sizable margin. By lap 47, he had worked his way into the points, and in the closing laps, he was the fastest car on the circuit. Palmer's two points for fifth place were his reward for what was probably the most impressive performance of the race. Senna and Prost both had time to make leisurely stops for new tires, and Senna went on to lead all 63 laps. Prost had set the race's fastest lap on Lap four, but he could never really challenge the Brazilian for the lead, and knew he would have to settle for second place, finishing 38.7 seconds behind. Prost said, "Over the years I've developed a style of driving which involves braking into the apex of a corner. I don't think most of the guys do that, but it works for me. On this surface today, though, it was impossible to do it without simply sliding straight on. So I had to change my whole way of driving, brake carefully in a straight line, then turn in. No excuse, you understand, but it meant adapting, doing something which isn't my natural style." None of the other seven finishers was on the lead lap at the end.

In this race Philippe Streiff started from very good as for AGS 11th place on the starting grid, but retired because of suspension failure on lap 15, right after Nannini's retire with the same problem. Also 1988 race has become the last F1 race in Detroit. For 1989 the organisers switched allegiance to Indycar racing, which used the downtown circuit until 1992 when they moved on to the nearby Belle Isle circuit.



7.Posted Image

Who?
Pierre-Alain Lombardi/Bruno Sotty

What?
Rondeau M379-Cosworth (ch. 006)

Where?
Circuit de la Sarthe

When?
12/06/1988; 24 h Le Mans

Why? (by Rob Horton) This was the last appearance of a Rondeau ‘au Mans’… Given that it’s in daylight and the car looks clean I'd say that it is Lombardi driving the car, since he started the race.

Their combined total of 271 laps was not enough to have them classified as finishers in their antediluvian Rondeau; winners Lammers/Dumfries/Wallace in the Jag covered 394 laps.

The car had first raced there in 1979, with Darniche and Ragnotti; 3rd in 1980 with Spice and the Martin brothers and 2nd in 1981 with Jacky Haran, Philippe Streiff and J-L Schlesser. Alas the pattern did not continue in 1982 – it finished 10th for Pierre Yver, Lucien Huitteny and Sotty.

It had also raced in ’83-86, when driven on the latter occasion by Noel del Bello, who bought Lombardi’s Sauber and Lombardi purchased the Rondeau in turn.

Car was entered at Le Mans with the Vaglio brothers (Silvio and Rolando) as team-mates to Lombardi, but the politician Sotty who brought sponsorship from Christian Laure (clothing manufacturer) and he bumped them…

#24 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 926 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 07 February 2005 - 03:00

Senna Trophy results:

Mihai Dumitru ('Mihai'): 40 (participation in all 7 photos)
Riccardo Prosperi ('Teapot'): 35 (participation in all 7 photos)
Stuart Dent ('Twin Window'): 29 (participation in all 7 photos)
Vladimir Kovalenko ('Kvadrat'): 22 (participation in 6 photos)
Patricia Valencia ('Flash'): 22 (participation in all 7 photos)



1.Posted Image

Who?
Andrea de Cesaris

What?
Jordan 191

Where?
Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez, Mexico City

When?
16/06/1991; Gran Premio de Mexico

Why? De Cesaris spent more than a decade trying to live down a reputation as a wild and erratic performer, who was only competing in the top echelon by virtue of his powerful sponsorship connections. As is usually the case, there was certainly more than a grain of truth in the snipings, though by the early nineties the enfant terrible had matured into a very professional performer.

A former world karting champion, Andrea was campaigning a Ralt run by Tiga's Tim Schenken in the 1978 British BP F3 championship at the age of 18. He continued in the formula the following year with Team Tiga's March, and though he won six rounds of the Vandervell series the silly mistakes which were to become a feature of his Formula 1 career were already apparent, spoiling his championship chances, and he finished second to Chico Serra at the season's end. Joining Ron Dennis's Project Four outfit for the 1980 season, de Cesaris enjoyed a successful debut in the New Zealand Pacific series, winning both races at Pukekohe, before racing a March 802 in Formula 2. Though paired with Serra, it was the Italian who soon gained the upper hand and number one treatment in the team. His vast potential was there to be seen, and once a problematical tyre situation was eradicated Andrea looked a real prospect, winning the final race at Misano and a well-earned promotion to the McLaren team newly acquired by Dennis for 1981.

The season began badly when he crashed into Prost on the first lap at Long Beach, and roller-coastered downhill as the number of accidents mounted alarmingly. In most cases it would have been 'goodbye and thank you very much', but luckily for Andrea he was welcomed back by Alfa Romeo, for whom he had made his Grand Prix debut at the end of 1980. Although there were still many moments of desperation, in his two seasons with the team de Cesaris came up with some excellent performances, including a great drive at Spa in 1983, when he comfortably led the first half of the race before trouble hit. With the Alfa operation siphoned off to Pavanello's Euroracing in 1984, Andrea was found a place in the Ligier team, where all the bad traits and indiscipline which had been largely eradicated the previous year were soon to return. He was extremely lucky to emerge unharmed from a huge barrel-rolling crash in Austria in 1985, and after one more race Guy Ligier replaced him with Philippe Streiff.

Nothing if not a survivor, de Cesaris was back once more in 1986, this time leading the Minardi team, but it was to be an uncomfortable year in which he was overshadowed by team-mate Nannini despite first call on equipment. Team-hopping was an art at which de Cesaris was to become well-practiced. Fetching up at Brabham in 1987, he proved the talent was still there, with excellent performances at Spa, Estoril, Jerez and Mexico, but so were the equally lacklustre displays. It was the same sweet and sour cocktail at Rial in 1988, with an impressive drive at Detroit, where he showed remarkable restraint to finish fourth. Andrea then had a two-year tenure at Dallara, where the Jekyll and Hyde character was ever more in evidence, with Mr Hyde playing the dominant role.

Just when it seemed that the game was up and de Cesaris' chequered Grand Prix career could go no further, he was a shock choice for Jordan for 1991. If the new team was a revelation then so was Andrea, who drove better than ever before, coming very close to a second place at Spa before his engine failed at the death. Though not retained by Jordan, his performances brought him to Tyrrell for 1992, where his racecraft and new-found maturity helped bring the team much-needed points on four occasions. Sadly, 1993 found Tyrrell in deep trouble despite the promise shown by a new Yamaha engine, and there was little sign of the de Cesaris we had seen in the previous two years. After 14 seasons and close on 200 starts he began the 1994 season without a drive but, with Jordan's Eddie Irvine suspended, Andrea was soon back in business, albeit for just two races. At Monaco he drove sensibly to take fourth place, which must have helped his cause no end as Sauber searched for a replacement for the injured Wendlinger. Apart from a sixth place in France, however, it was hardly an auspicious Grand Prix swansong, for there were to be no more Formula 1 comebacks.

In 1991 Mexican Grand Prix, the next race after Nigel Mansell's embarrassing last lap disaster in Canada, the Williams-Renault team was looking for a better result. In qualifying Riccardo Patrese again overshadowed Mansell while Ayrton Senna flipped his McLaren on Friday but still managed to stay third on the grid. He was not having a good time as he had also had stitches that week following a jet-ski accident. Jean Alesi was fourth in his Ferrari ahead of Gerhard Berger (McLaren), Nelson Piquet (Benetton-Ford), Alain Prost (Ferrari) and Stefano Modena (Tyrrell). The top 10 was completed by Roberto Moreno (Benetton) and the remarkable Olivier Grouillard (Fondmetal). De Cesaris was 10th, 2 seconds behind Patrese's pole time.

At the start the race had to be aborted when a fire marshal got carried away and jumped over the wall to put out a fire that he though he had seen in the back of JJ Lehto's Dallara. In fact Lehto had no real problem and used the same car for the second attempt at starting. This time Grouillard saw yellow flags being waved, signaling danger, and switched off his engine. This was credited as having been a stall and so he was forced to start from the back of the grid.

At the third attempt the field got away with Mansell getting into the lead with Alesi second ahead of Senna and Patrese fourth ahead of Berger, Piquet, Modena and de Cesaris. Senna quickly overtook Alesi and Modena was quickly ahead of Piquet, while Patrese closed up on Alesi and, having overtaken him, went after Senna. Berger's Honda V12 blew on lap 5.

Mansell was also having engine trouble and after Patrese got through to second place he set off after his team mate. Two laps later Riccardo was battling for the lead. Several times Mansell blocked his team mate but then Patrese outfoxed the Englishman and went ahead. Mansell fell back towards Senna and Piquet. De Cesaris was close behind in his Jordan, ahead of Moreno and a fast-closing Alesi who was recovering from a spin. Gradually Senna began to fade and Mansell went faster and faster as the cooling problems faded. Further back Alesi went past both Moreno and de Cesaris but his race ended soon afterwards with a clutch failure while Piquet went out with a broken wheelbearing. Moreno and the Benetton team failed to communicate on a pit stop and Roberto lost valuable time and so the two Jordans were running fourth and fifth until Bertrand Gachot spun off.

Patrese allowed Mansell to close right up on him but then responded and was able to hold off Mansell by a couple of car lengths. De Cesaris was fourth behind Senna, despite the fact that the Jordan stopped on the last lap, after throttle on his car broke. Andrea climbed from the car and pushed it. It was against the rules but the stewards later decided that he did not begin pushing until the race had ended and so Andrea retained the position. Moreno finished fifth and Eric Bernard took the final point in his Larrousse-Ford.

"It was good for the spectators today," Patrese said after the race. "My car was running perfectly from the start but it turned out to be a very demanding race," the 37-year-old Italian added, who has driven in more Formula One races than anyone else on the circuit. "I thought I had big trouble when Nigel closed in at the end but I had enough left to hold him off," he said.

Nigel Mansell said that "My engine was overheating at the start and I couldn't get going. But later on the temperature came back down and I pushed as hard as I could and nearly caught Riccardo in the end."

"It was a good result for us today," Mansell said. "But all the problems came early on for me and it cost me." When asked if he was under team orders to allow Patrese victory, Mansell said: "I was going as fast as I could. I did a 1:16.6 for the fastest lap." He broke the old lap record by over 2 seconds. World champion Ayrton Senna extended his championship lead with third place in his McLaren but afterwards declared: "It has been Williams' day."

"I think to be honest the Williams team dominated the weekend," Senna said. "It was tough for anyone to match Riccardo and Nigel here today. I tried very hard but I could not overtake them," Senna added. "We performed very similar in the race, I tried my best but realised it was just not possible."

For de Cesaris this fourth place became second in a row after Montreal, and was the best result in the season.

Why? (by Riccardo Prosperi) Andrea De Cesaris pushes his Jordan 191 Ford to the 4th place after a throttle failure in the 1991 Mexican GP, while someone very similar to Ezio Zermiani give his advice. Since pushing was forbidden with a threat of exclusion from the event, De Cesaris was convinced to stop his efforts, thus retiring and nevertheless achieving the 4th place (he was the last car in the leader's lap). Actually he was disqualified and later reinstated after a protest.

Why? (by Mihai Dumitru) With the new Jordan team, 1991 proved to be Andrea’s best season in years, gathering 9 points and 9th in the World Championship. The highlight of his season was his fabulous drive in Belgium, running 2nd before his Ford engine expired. In qualifying on Saturday, Ayrton Senna took pole in his McLaren-Honda while the remarkable Michael Schumacher made it to 7th on the grid on his first presence in GP racing with Jordan. Andrea de Cesaris was 11th in the second Jordan. Schumacher’s race lasted as far as the first corner where his clutch failed. After a dozen of laps, de Cesaris entered the points awarding zone. Ten laps later, the battle for third place became very lively with Patrese, Piquet and de Cesaris scrapping. On lap 31 the leader’s (Alesi) engine failed and so Senna was in the lead while de Cesaris had got ahead of Piquet to take second place. De Cesaris was able to attack Senna but every time he did his temperature gauges rose and he had to back off. On lap 41 the engine blew... So his best results in the season remained two 4th place, one of which was received here at Mexico. For a hugely popular F1 racer like Andrea de Cesaris, this is a sickening-looking image for the fans, showing him as he pushes his car to the finish line with his muscles and not with the use of throttle like God and Eddie Jordan intended to. Later in that race at Spa Andrea would show what he could do, but it was Schumacher who moved to front runners Benetton, while his one time team-mare de Cesaris continued to struggle with off the pace equipment. What if Andrea was the man picked by Tom Walkinshaw to strengthen big cash spenders Benetton alongside Nelson Piquet for the rest of the 1991 season ? One can only dream what if…



2.Posted Image

Who?
Olivier Beretta

What?
Reynard 93D Cosworth DFV

Where?
Donington

When?
03/05/1993; Tom Wheatcroft Cup, F3000 race

Why? Olivier Beretta began karting in 1983, scoring many wins before graduating to French F3 in 1989. The following year he stayed in French F3 and collected one win at Pau in his Ravarotto Dallara 390 Alfa Romeo, coming 3rd overall with 76 points, as well as placing 3rd in the Monaco F3 race. His 1991 campaign was less successful: a broken wrist in the Monaco F3 race hindered his progress, and he also attempted to race his Ralt in both the French and British F3 series.

A move into F3000 in 1992 with Nelson Piquet's well-funded team saw disappointment for all concerned with Beretta making too many mistakes for comfort. His best results were three 9th places at Silverstone, Nurburgring and Nogaro, but there were also 4 accidents, including 3 in a row at Pau, Barcelona and Enna.
But a move to Forti Corse brought immediate reward as he won the 1993 season-opener from pole at Donington, but thereafter he dropped back in the title chase. Three 4th places at Pau, Hockenheim and Nogaro, plus a 5th at the Nurburgring, were not enough to see him slip to 6th. There was very close struggle for th title: Olivier Panis won it on 32 points, from Pedro Lamy on 31, David Coulthard on 25, Gil de Ferran and Franck Lagorce on 21, and then Beretta on 20. By this stage Olivier had already had a taste of F1, having tested for Lotus in 1992, and also for Larrousse in 1993.

Beretta's ties with Larrousse held him in good stead, though, such that Gerard Larrousse signed him up for 1994, to drive the new LH94s with Cosworth V8 engine as team-mate to Erik Comas. At Hockenheim he came tantalisingly close to scoring a precious championship point, but one race on his money ran out and a succession of rent-a-drivers were taken on to help the team see out the season.

Since 1996 Beretta has campaigned an ORECA Chrysler Viper with spectacular success. After the heartbreak of losing the GT2 title at the final round in 1997, he made no mistake the following year paired with Pedro Lamy.

The 1999 season saw Olivier and Karl Wendlinger crowned FIA GT champions as the Viper crushed the opposition. That year he also was 1st in GTS class of ALMS. In 2000 he won Daytona 24hrs in an ORECA Chrysler Viper GTS-R with Wendlinger and Dupuy and was 1st in his class in Sebring 12hrs. In Le Mans 24hrs he was 7th overall. And he again became a champion in ALMS in GTS class. In 2001 he became 4th in Le Mans 24hrs in a Team Playstation Chrysler LMP with Wendlinger and Lamy. In 2002 he drove ORECA Dallara-Judd in two race of FIA Sportscar Championship and won at Estoril paired with Minassian. At Le Mans 24 Hrs he was 5th driving ORECA Dallara-Judd LMP with Lamy and Comas. The following season saw him again in ALMS where he took 5th overall. At Le Mans he was again 5th driving Panoz with Jeanette and Papis. In 2004 he became 2nd in GTS class of ALMS without any victory, while in Le Mans 24 Hrs he became 6th overall and won in GTS class driving Corvette C5-R with Gavin and Magnussen. Also during the last few years it was possibly to see him testing a Williams F1 car.



3.Posted Image

Who?
Carlos Guerrero

What?
Reynard F3

Where?
Puebla

When?
1994; Mexican F3 championship race

Why? Carlos Guerrero was the leading driver in Mexican motorsport in early 1990s. He was triple Mexican F3 champion in 1990, 1993 and 1994, and won the champion title in Mexican F2 in 1991-92. On his way to the win he beat the first class drivers like Mario Domínguez, Allen Berg and Tommy Byrne. He also received an opportunity to test a March F1 car at that time.



4.Posted Image

Who?
Johnny Herbert

What?
Ligier JS39B

Where?
Jerez de la Frontera

When?
16/10/1994; Gran Premio de Europa

Why? Perhaps Britain's most talented young prospect of the eighties, Johnny Herbert has built a successful career for himself in the world of Grand Prix racing - indeed 1999 has just seen him take an unlikely but well-deserved win in the European Grand Prix to add to his emotional and hugely popular victories at Silverstone and Monza in 1995 - yet one wonders if the horrific crash at Brands Hatch in 1988 which interrupted his meteoric rise somehow robbed his career of an impetus which might have seen him be a true contender for the World Championship itself.

Racing in karts from the age of ten, Herbert worked his way through the classes, taking numerous championships on the way, before graduating to FF1600 and winning the prestigious Brands Hatch Formula Ford Festival in 1985. Johnny's path then crossed that of Eddie Jordan, who took him into Formula 3 in 1987. Herbert won the title and a Benetton test, which led to an option to drive for the team in 1989, so it was a season of F3000 next, which started brilliantly with a win at Jerez, followed by a number of highly competitive drives before that fateful Brands accident.

Johnny had the goal of reaching the grid in Brazil to make his debut for Benetton, and after months of painful rehabilitation he not only drove in Rio, but brought the car into fourth place. But as the year progressed it became clear that he was still handicapped by his injuries, and he was summarily replaced by the less talented Pirro. Now came a period when Johnny had to step down into Japanese F3000, take the occasional F1 ride and wait for another chance (an unexpected victory at Le Mans with Mazda in 1991 providing a highlight).

Luckily his old mentor at Benetton, Peter Collins, was now busy reviving the fortunes of Lotus, and Herbert was very much the man he wanted for the job. Brought back into the team full-time early in 1991, Herbert repeatedly showed he had the talent to win but, unfortunately, not the car. Locked into a contract at Lotus, Herbert was left trapped and frustrated as the team struggled on against overwhelming odds during the 1994 season. Johnny lost heart and, despite a morale-boosting fourth place on the grid at Monza, his relationship with team boss and father figure Peter Collins soured to the point that a split was inevitable.

Both parties must have been relieved when Flavio Briatore bought out his contract in September that year, for not only did Collins have some much-needed finance to stagger on at Lotus, but Johnny had a contract which saw him through to the end of 1995. Initially he was placed at Ligier instead of Eric Bernard, but after a fine performance at Jerez (7th in qualification, only 1 second behind Schumacher's pole and much faster than his team partner Panis; and 8th in the race, again ahead of Panis) he was whisked into the Benetton team in the hope that he might assist Schumacher's title bid.

As mentioned before, 1995 was the year that Johnny found tangible success; indeed, apart from his two wins, his consistency brought him within a whisker of taking third place in the World Championship. Unfortunately his status at Benetton was very much that of the number two to Schumacher, and his gripes to the press after a disappointing showing in the Belgian GP could not have helped his cause.

Not retained at season's end, Herbert found a ride at Sauber and, after a somewhat frosty start when his experience was underutilised in testing, he gradually won the team's confidence, especially after team-mate Frentzen seemed to lose his motivation. Third place at Monaco was the best result in a year littered with retirements, but despite the loss of the Ford engine deal to Stewart Herbert had done enough to earn a new two-year contract with the Swiss constructor. Johnny was now the team's mainstay and was charged with the task of developing the new Sauber C16 with its Petronas engine largely on his own.

The car was a capable points scorer but never a likely winner, and the ever-jovial Herbert made the best of his situation. Things changed for the worse in 1998 with the arrival of Jean Alesi. Simply, the two drivers failed to gel and Herbert appeared to be worn down as much by the Frenchman's histrionics as by his undeniable edge in speed on the track.

He was considered a touch fortunate to secure a two-year deal with Stewart Grand Prix beginning in 1999, but after a quiet first half to the season Johnny picked up the pace and duly supplied the team's aforementioned maiden Grand Prix win. Another superb drive in Malaysia gave Herbert a further boost to his confidence as he prepared to welcome Eddie Irvine on board as his new team-mate in the restructured Jaguar team for 2000. But Jaguar showed only disapointment results and Johnny Herbert's long F1 career came to a close at the 2000 Malaysian Grand Prix. Unfortunately for Johnny, it wasn't the glorious exit that he might have hoped for when he crashed spectacularly on lap 49 because of suspension failure. He went off the track at high speed eight laps before the finish, pitching the R1 into the barriers. Clearly shaken after the impact, Johnny climbed out of the car unaided but was carried away from his Jaguar R1 on a stretcher and taken to the circuit's medical centre complaining of leg pains. Fortunately, an X-ray revealed nothing more serious than severe bruising. "I guess it was inevitable that because I began my career being carried to the car, I would end it being carried out of it," said Johnny. "I’m pretty disappointed to have a good race ruined by a failure such as that. I was running well early on until the problem at the pitstop. I braked for the line in the pit lane and the engine cut so I had to coast into the box. I’m okay. I have a bit of pain from the left knee but nothing too serious. There’s nothing like ending your career with a bang. When the car pitched, I was trying to work out which way I was going in so I could position my legs for the impact but I lost my sense of direction."

In the next season Johnny raced in Audi R8 in ALMS with Andy Wallace and took 8th place overall. He drove in Le Mans 24 Hrs, but retired with clutch problems. And also he did some test for Arrows F1 team. In 2002 he won Sebring 12 Hrs driving Audi R8 with Capello and Pescatori, and with the same partners finished second in 2002 Le Mans 24 Hrs race. He was 4th overall in ALMS that year. In the following year he again became 4th in ALMS but driving Bentley EXP Speed 8. On his way to that position he won at Road Atlanta, Road America, Miami and again at Road Atlanta. While with David Brabham and Mark Blundell he again was second at Le Mans. In 2004 he became a champion in Le Mans Endurance Series, driving again Audi R8 and won at Monza and Spa. Was again second in Le Mans 24 Hrs with Davies and Smith. Drove Audi R8 in three ALMS races and won at Laguna Seca. And tried himself in FIA GT Championship at the wheel of Maserati MC12; Johnny took one third (at Imola) and two second places (at Dubai and Zhuhai).

Why? (by Mihai Dumitru) Tom Walkinshaw had bought Johnny Herbert's contract from the Team Lotus receivers and put the Englishman into Ligier, replacing Eric Bernard. In qualifying, Herbie claimed a solid 7th spot on the grid and finished the race 8th, one lap down to the race winner (Michael Schumacher), but just ahead of Ligier regular Olivier Panis. The track around his car could be almost anywhere in the World (well, except North Corea, North Pole, Afghanistan, Albania and definitely Vatican), but there’s no doubt that we’re talking about Herbert’s sole Ligier entry in the 1994 European Grand Prix in Jerez. No sir, the helmet design is so distinctive that the common F1 junkey can only wonder what on Earth was he doing in the Gauloises/Gitanes sponsored Ligier. In fact, Johnny Herbert left Ligier after just one race and was already alongside Schumacher at Benetton for the final two Grands Prix of the season (Japan & Australia).



5.Posted Image

Who?
Esteban Tuero and Toranosuke Takagi

What?
Minardi M198 and Tyrrell 026

Where?
Suzuka

When?
01/11/1998; Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix

Why? Esteban Tuero started to race karts when he was 7, in 1985, and continued with them until 1992. Moving up to car racing in 1993, he spent a year in Formula Renault for the Crespi team in his native Argentina, and then switched to Formula Honda in 1994 with the Kissling team, where he became champion. After an apprenticeship in the Sud-Am F3 series, Esteban travelled to Italy in 1996 to race in the national F3 championship but before long he had been elevated to F3000 with Draco. Plans had already been laid for his graduation to F1 with Minardi and the following season he headed off to Japan to compete in Formula Nippon alongside Norberto Fontana. Precious little was achieved in the way of results, but it did not stop the still inexperienced Tuero from gaining the superlicence required to take up a Grand Prix drive with the Italian team in 1998. His one season in the big time went well enough. He was the 3rd youngest driver ever to race in F1 at just under 20 years of age, with only Mike Thackwell and Ricardo Rodriguez having started younger. Proving a quick learner, he was evenly matched with team-mate Nakano, but in the last race of the year in Japan he tangled with Takagi's Tyrrell and injured vertebrae in his neck. It turned out later that he had accidentally put his foot on the wrong pedal! In any case Esteban went home to convalesce and never returned. He later announced his retirement from Formula 1 on 'irrevocable personal grounds', mysteriously adding that he was sworn to secrecy on his reasons for taking such a decision ("You can ask me 60 times and I won't tell you")... It was a surprise for everyone. In 1999 Tuero linked up with the Argentine TC2000 touring car championship. Tuero joined the works Volkswagen Elaion team run by Maldonado Competition to drive a VW Polo. In his first year in the championship he was 2nd at Parana and won the first race at San Jorge in the rain, but out top ten in the overall season results. In 2000 he continued to race VW Polo, was 1st Obera, 3rd Rafaela, 3rd San Jorge, and became 8th overall. In the following season, still with VW, he took four fourth places (Rafaela, Rio Cuarto, San Juan, Obera) and looked better than other former F1 drivers - Norberto Fontana and Oscar Larrauri. In 2002 he switched to Honda Civic, was 2nd at Rio Cuarto, 2nd San Juan, 3rd Salta and became 7th overall with 73 points. After disapointing 2003 season (only 4th at Obera) Esteban decided to return to VW Polo in 2004, and he was 4th at Viedma, 4th at San Juan, 6th at San Luis, 3rd at Concordia, 4th at San Rafael, but overall was placed worse than Fontana in Toyota Corolla.

Toranosuke Takagi, a protege of Satoru Nakajima, has an apt forename since, in part, it means 'tiger' in Japanese, which fits this aggressive hard-charger's racing style. Conversely, off the track he is low-key, and is of a retiring and shy disposition. After a brilliant karting career and a season in Formula Toyota (2 wins), Takagi was picked by TOM'S to succeed Jacques Villeneuve in their F3 squad when he was aged just 18 back in 1993. There he caught the eye of Nakajima, who gave him a chance to race in his F3000 team late the following year. Three seasons were then spent in Formula Nippon (6 wins; 2nd overall in 1995), where he was a regular top-six runner and an occasional winner. In 1997 he raced in some Porsche Supercup races to learn GP circuits. The 1997 campaign also saw the Japanese driver clock up over 2000 km of testing in preparation for his inclusion in the Tyrrell line-up the following year. In 1998 his best results were two 9th places at Silverstone and Monza. Unfortunately he stepped into a team that was going through the motions, having been purchased by British American Racing. However, the year gave him a useful opportunity to learn the circuits and provided a good platform to build on when he took his sponsorship to Arrows for 1999. As at Tyrrell, Takagi impressed with a fair turn of speed (even Sauber was at one stage interested in employing him for 1999 - but he struggled to stay on the track at times) but as often as not was found wanting when it came to putting everything together in the races. His best result was 7th place at Melbourne in the same lap as the winner and ahead of Michael Schumacher, inspite of starting from the last row after his Arrows stalled. For 2000 season he retuned to Formula Nippon and won all but two races in the season, and easily won the champion title. In 2001 he moved to Indycars to Walker Racing. His best result was 4th place at Houston, but with 29 points he became only 21th overall. Things were better in 2002 when he became 15th overall with 53 points and the best finish - fourth - at Chicago. In the following season he switched to IRL where became with Mo Nunn Racing 10th overall (317 points; best finish in 3rd position at Texas Motor Speedway). For 2004 he remained in Nunn's team but only managed to achieve 15th overall with 263 points and best finish in fourth position in season-opener round at Homestead. Unfortunately Mo Nunn and his wife Kathryn decided to close down their teams in IRL and Infiniti Pro Series and already sold their Dallara chassis to Hemelgarn team because no funding could be found to run cars in 2005. Nevertheless Mo is going to have his car for Indy 500: "That would be a good way to go out." And it is possible that Takagi will drive his car at Brickyard...

1998 GP of Japan was the final round of that year battle between Hakkinen and Schumacher. With five weeks between the Luxembourg and Japanese Grands Prix Ferrari and McLaren spent their time testing and playing psychological games in preparation for the World Championship showdown here at Suzuka. In qualifying Michael Schumacher beat Mika Hakkinen to pole by a tenth of a second. This was an astounding performance by Schumacher as his Ferrari team mate Eddie Irvine was almost two complete seconds slower. Irvine could not explain what had happened because he had no problems with his car and felt that fourth place was the best he could do. The feeling in the paddock was that Michael's result was a little fishy but the FIA said the car was legal.

David Coulthard was third on the grid a second slower than Hakkinen. Behind the top two teams everyone else was in team order with Williams on the third row (Heinz-Harald Frentzen ahead of Jacques Villeneuve), Jordan on the fourth (Ralf Schumacher again outpacing Damon Hill), Benetton on the fifth (Alexander Wurz ahead of Giancarlo Fisichella), Sauber on the sixth (Johnny Herbert outgunning Jean Alesi on this occasion) and Prost on the seventh (Olivier Panis beating Jarno Trulli).

Everyone was very edgy at the start with Trulli stalling as they waited for the lights to go out. The start was aborted. At the second attempt Michael Schumacher's Ferrari stalled. He would have to start at the back. Suddenly the pressure was off Hakkinen. He was on pole and there were 20 cars between him and Schumacher.

At the third attempted start, all got away well, and Hakkinen was leading into the first corner. Irvine moved through to second, with Frentzen getting the jump on Coulthard also. Behind Coulthard were Villeneuve and Hill. Schumacher, now starting from 21st, took 4 cars by the first corner, and 9 by the end of the first lap moving up to 12th. Maybe the championship wasn't over after all...

Schumacher was scything his way through the field, making places everywhere, as everyone seemed to want to make sure they were not responsible for deciding the championship. His pace only slowed down once he came across Wurz who was harder to pass, but soon let him by. Likewise he - unsurprisingly - made short work of his brother Ralf.

By lap 5, Schumacher had a problem. Or rather 2 problems, namely Villeneuve and Hill - neither of whom have a great deal of time for the German. The three were running nose to tail in a fantastic battle. Hill would have a go at Villeneuve, Schumacher would have a go at Hill. Villeneuve would keep them all behind. It was a fantastic battle with lots going on.

A little further foward, Coulthard was battling hard with Frentzen. The only place where there was little action was 1st and 2nd, with Hakkinen and Irvine serenely going around with Irvine unable to launch any realistic attack.

The Villeneuve-Hill-Schumacher-Ralf train was now coming up on the Frentzen-Coulthard train, making a 6 way battle. Something special to see, but unfortunately pit stops were now on the way... Hill was the first to pit, whilst Ralf made an impact on the race with his engine letting go in the biggest possible way on the pit straight. Ferrari were now ready for Irvine, while Schumacher got by Villeneuve. Irvine was turned around in 7.7 seconds. Frentzen was now being assaulted by Coulthard, while Coulthard was being attacked by Schumacher. A truly remarkable turnaround for the race.

On lap 16, Schumacher pitted and rejoined the race in 7th place. Coulthard was still pushing Frentzen hard for 3rd, and one had to wonder why McLaren didn't pull the Scot in a little early to make track position. Hakkinen was next to pit and rejoined still in the lead, with Irvine a few seconds behind.

The leaders were now into the traffic, and Hakkinen had a few problems getting by the Minardi of Nakano. Irvine was having problems of his own a little while later, with Takagi, Nakano and Tuero who were involved in their own battles. McLaren were now ready for Coulthard, who was turned around in 7.8 seconds. Meanwhile, Schumacher was having a little cross-country excursion. Not what the German wanted...

The Ferrari's were clearly having problems, close ups of the car showed massive blisters on the right-front tyre. Irvine soon pitted and was turned around in 6.5 seconds, and rejoined the race just ahead of Schumacher. A little further back in the race a crash between Takagi and Tuero occurred at the chicane. A few seconds later on lap 31, Schumacher came upon the site. A few seconds after that the right rear of the Ferrari let go, and ripped off a chunk of the car. Schumacher had no choice other than to pull off and retire. The championship charge was over.

Back in the race Hill and Villeneuve pitted together from 5th and 6th, and rejoined again in the same order. Frentzen also did the same a lap later. Things now settled down and little happened. The race went serenely on, with Hakkinen controlling the race with no clear challenge.

The final bit of drama happened on the last lap, with Hill taking Frentzen on the last lap to claim 4th place. The championship was won by Hakkinen with an impressive controlled race, who won deservedly and with great style. Schumacher also was mightily impressive to have fought back from 21st to contender. If either had won on the strength of the race, justice would have been done, but at the end of the day Hakkinen did it. And deservedly so.

1.Hakkinen 2.Irvine 3.Coulthard 4.Hill 5.Frentzen 6.Villeneuve

World champion for 1998, Mika Hakkinen and West McLaren Mercedes

Why? (by Mihai Dumitru) Backmarkers like Minardi can decide an F1 World Championship. In 1998, the title fight was between Michael Schumacher and Mika Hakkinen, with the Finn just ahead. A clutch problem forced the German to start from the back of the grid, despite being the pole-position holder in Saturday’s qualifying session. His job was a helluva more difficult now, with other 19 drivers unnecessary in the title showdown, but fighting for position like maniacs. Starting 17th and 21st respectively, local hero Tora Takagi (Tyrrell) and Esteban Tuero (Minardi) weren’t much of a threat to MS’s bid to clinch the F1 World driver’s title for Ferrari as a justification for his astronomical salary. Takagi had a booming season, especially in qualifying, albeit finishing at all in Sunday’s F1 races while the youngster Esteban Tuero from Argentina, little known in Europe before testing for Minardi in late 1997, performed normally in the under-powered Italian car. On lap 28, the pair collided in spectacular fashion. The World Championship was settled Moments later when Schumacher suffered a right rear tyre explosion after running over debris from that crash. After injuring his neck as a result of the collision, Esteban Tuero vanished back to Argentina, never to return. He reportedly settled down and launched his own wine brand. One year later, another Minardi decided the F1 champ as Marc Gene interfered in the title battle at Nurburgring, depriving Ferrari’s Eddie Irvine of the single point, while McLaren’s Mika Hakkinen got two. The exact two points that made the difference between the champion (Hakkinen) and the runner-up (Irvine).



6.Posted Image

Who?
Mario Haberfeld

What?
Stewart SF2

Where?
Silverstone

When?
06/10/1998 (morning); private testing

Why? (by Mihai Dumitru) Stewart Grand Prix's sister team, Paul Stewart Racing offered his young drivers the chance to test an F1 car at Silverstone’s international circuit. With the helmet being a Brazilian trademark, the circle of suspects restrains to three Stewart GP team drivers: Barrichello, Burti and Haberfeld. But the design however is indicating that the driver behind the wheel is no other than Mario Haberfeld. And the fact that he is driving the no18 car makes me think about a private testing session for Stewart’s junior drivers in October 1998. Two days after the season finale in the British Formula 3 Championship, newly crowned Brazilian hotshoes Mario Haberfeld drove on Tuesday morning on wet tyres while team-mate Luciano Burti took over in the afternoon when improving weather conditions at least allowed him to try intermediate rubber. No times were released by the team "as it was their first outing at the international circuit and our aim was to get mileage on the engine, the hydraulic differential and electronics as well as evaluating some rain tyres," explained a team member. Also they continued the development programme for the series 6 version of the Ford Zetec-R V10 engine and components for the Stewart SF3 for 1999. More often, Haberfeld got the chance to drive the no19 car (driven in official races by Jan Magnussen, later replaced by Jos Verstappen). Former 3-times F1 champion Jackie Stewart was prophetic as told Autocar, referring to his pair of Brazilian talents: 'The problem with youngsters is you don't know when their peak may arrive. Take Martin Brundle. In 1983, he raced wheel-to-wheel with Ayrton Senna in their British F3 Championship. But how many Grands Prix did he win?' Haberfeld left Stewart’s family outfit as drove for McLaren in F3000 in 1999. And the results were zero, null, nada.



7.Posted Image

Who?
Max Biaggi

What?
Ferrari F300

Where?
Fiorano, Italy

When?
18/01/1999

Why? (by Mihai Dumitru) Motorcycling ace Max Biaggi was at that time the latest motorcycle legend to test a GP car. Parallels to Surtees (the only man to have won world titles on both two wheels and four), Agostini (drove an obsolete Williams FW06 in the secondary Aurora AFX F1 series for 2 years during 1979-80), Hailwood (pretty damn close to win that Italian GP conquered by Peter Gethin), Cecotto (responsible for team Theodore’s only points scorer in Long Beach 1983), Wayne Gardner (tested a Lotus 109 on several occasions in 1992 and 1993) and Doohan (got the chance to sample F1 machinery in April 1998 at Barcelona when Williams let him behind the wheel of a FW19D) were instantaneously made.

Ferrari gave him a test at Fiorano in January 1999, doing 57 laps in a '98 Ferrari F300. Despite him being concerned not to stall the engine on the pit lane, the Roman had five outings in the F300, getting progressively quicker as the day went on. In cool, sunny conditions, Biaggi’s fastest time of 1m 06.5s stunned Ferrari race personnel, since Schumacher's '98 lap record stands at 1m 0.08s, and Biaggi tested with '99 F1-spec tyres, which are more heavily grooved than '98 tyres. He was only four seconds away from the pace test driver Luca Badoer usually ran at. "When I first climbed into the car I felt a total prisoner. On a bike you feel really free but it's very claustrophobic inside the cockpit. It was different once I was out on the track though - I felt very safe and quickly felt at ease with the car. Of course, the speed and acceleration are incredible and you get a huge amount of vibration from the track. The biggest difference is braking - in the car you can brake much, much later than on a bike”, the 4-times 250 cc motorcycle world champion said. Ferrari supremo Luca di Montezemolo indicated that Biaggi may get another chance to test a Ferrari. "I don't think this will be the only test we will do together," he said. "Maybe we'll do this again." Later that year, during the 1999 Marlboro Masters at Zandvoort, the annual unofficial F3 World Championship event, Mad Max made some remarks about being on the pace within one season if he is to step into the Ferrari F1 car as the Scuderia's new number two for the year 2000. "When John Surtees told me I should get into Formula One, I didn't believe it was possible," he added. "But now I don't think it's so improbable, it could happen." Unfortunately his lack of success in the 500 cc class and later on the MotoGP four-strokes prototypes made him ineligible for another media event like the one in January 1999. Now that Biaggi is 34 we may never know if he was gifted enough to establish him on the Grands Prix on four wheels (nevetheless until now Biaggi says that testing the Ferrari F1 car is his favourite memory). On the other hand, his main rival on the motorcycling top scene, flamboyant young Italian Valentino Rossi got the chance to test for Ferrari early last year. Again, John Surtees was on pole position to make explosive comments on Rossi having big chances to actually drive in official F1 races. Probably young gun Nicky Hayden is a future MotoGP champion and he will consequently get his chance to test an F1 car. I wouldn’t hold my breath but I’m open for a long-shot bet.

#25 Kvadrat

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 07:09

Congratulations to Alessandro and trophies winners! I was unlucky not winning a single trophy. But it was very interesting game.

Most exciting pictures for me were ones of Garland in Lille and 1939 Angouleme race.

#26 David McKinney

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 08:25

Congratulations to all participants and especially Alessandro
I should have made time to have a go at some of the questions at least, but will enjoy reading through the answers more thoroughly than I have so far.
A couple of points from the Christmas Quiz however: I'm sure Manuel de Teffe would be interested to learn that Landi was the first Brazilian to race in Europe :lol:
And, a minor point, Don Lee acquired the Mercedes from an English dealer, who had brought it from Czechoslovakia (presumably for pounds, not dollars)

#27 ensign14

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 08:53

:clap:
[Homer] I am the smart. I am the smart. S-M-R-T.[/Homer]

There goes another ambition, to win an 8W quiz, thought I'd missed the chance before I even got started.

I am shocked at how ignorant I am pre-1970. If I had not been away for loads I would have had a good go, but I doubt I would have got any of the answers.

Under Bernie rules, surely Kvadrat wins, on the basis that he entered everything? No points deductions of $500k fines for missing events.

Congrats to Alessandro and many thanks AAA, some great stuff there.

#28 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 12:49

Originally posted by David McKinney
I'm sure Manuel de Teffe would be interested to learn that Landi was the first Brazilian to race in Europe


David, thank you for the correction, I missed that one... So let's say 'Landi was one of the first';)

#29 Teapot

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 13:33

Congratulations to Alessandro and to all the others participants! :clap: :clap: :clap:

And many, many thanks to AAA for the great fun he provided for us all! :up:

#30 Pavel Lifintsev

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 05:36

Sorry for being over-pedantic, but here is a couple of minor remarks in order to make given answers a little bit more correct.

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
20.Posted Image

Who?
Michael Schumacher

What?
Sauber Petronas C16
...

Why? After Jordan, Benetton, Ligier and Ferrari Sauber became that day the 5th (6th if we remember Mercedes run at Hockenheim '93 with Fangio) F1 team which car was tested or race by Michael.


IIRC, this occured in 1994, not 1993. Second, it was not at Hockenheim, but at the Norisring. Then, it wasn't even F1 car – Michael happened to ride the '39 W154/M163 3.0-litre GP car, although in the '51 specification (Fangio drove the '55 W196). And, of course, neither he tested nor raced it – that was just a low-speed demo run.

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
5.Posted Image

Who?
Hermann Lang

What?
Mercedes Benz W154


It's a W125 on the photo, not W154.

#31 Ruairidh

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 05:58

Just an amazing effort Marko :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Because of work projects I wasn't able to participate this year, but will get a huge amount of enjoyment from reading the answers once I finish this g*d-d*mned thing I'm working on!!! :up: :up:

#32 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 16:00

Originally posted by .ru
Sorry for being over-pedantic...

All is Ok, any corrections and additions are welcome here! I printed all this stuff by myself, when I was free from my work, and unfortunately I didn't have more time to check it for sure...


Originally posted by .ru
IIRC, this occured in 1994, not 1993. Second, it was not at Hockenheim, but at the Norisring.

Well, the information about Schumacher and Mercedes history show I printed from my memory since I saw a story about it on German TV more than 10 years ago...

And yes it wasn't Hockenheim, but Norisring. But what about the year? I think it was in 1993 and 1992 when Schumacher was there. Fangio drove at Norisring in 1992 for sure, and as I can remember in 1993 he was there too (but after all these years I'm not 100% sure)...

Originally posted by .ru
It's a W125 on the photo, not W154.

Of course it is! I even don't know why I put W154 instead of W125??? Maybe because at the moment when I printed it I looked into Kvadrat's answers and it was too late in the night!



BTW, here are some shots from 1992/93 Mercedes history show at Norisring:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#33 Pavel Lifintsev

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 19:22

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
But what about the year? I think it was in 1993 and 1992 when Schumacher was there.

Heh, I posted that correction only from my memory too, so now I think 1994 is probably wrong and the most likely version is 1992. I vaguely remember that show well covered in a German classic car magazine (Oldtimer Markt probably?), but at the moment I'm not able to check the details.

#34 RAP

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 15:44

7. Who?
John Webb

What?
Turner-Lea Francis 'FII-007'

Where?
Crystal Palace

When?
30/07/1955; London Trophy

This is not quite right. The photo is indeed the London Trophy where the Turner raced as #16 as can be seen in the picture, but this was held on 30th May 1955. It was not the end of Webb's career as he did race at Crystal Palace on 30/7/55 but this was in the International Trophy as #24 where he was 7th in Heat 2, failing to qualify for the final. As a result he ran in the Club Trophy for non-qualifiers where he was 3rd. This confusion probably arises from the "black book" wrongly calling the 30/7/55 race the London Trophy but I have the two programmes in front of me as I write.

Also, Alessandro says
"the car got an Alta engine for 1954 "
The programme for 30/5/55 gives the engine as Lea Francis, as does the Crystal Palace programme for 18/9/54

RAP

#35 Pavel Lifintsev

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 23:11

Originally posted by AAA-Eagle
But what about the year?

OK, finally I found it! Eberhard Reuss in the ''50 Jahre Formel 1'' (p. 79) says it was on June 28, 1992.

#36 AAA-Eagle

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 21:22

Since today this thread was unstuck, I want to say for the last time that I'm very grateful to all of you for helping to orginize this quiz! I hope that I'll start 8W Christmas Quiz this year again!

Kind regards,
Marko