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1939 European Championship


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#601 Vitesse2

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 12:54

Mattijs has kindly updated Unfinished Symphony to incorporate the above new finds. I've also taken the opportunity to correct a couple of minor errors, added some text which I originally omitted regarding Lang's German GP retirement and fine-tuned one or two other sections.

I'd also like to point out that I'm not the first to have suggested that Lang's memory could be "selective". Re-reading "Hitler's Grands Prix in England" a few months ago, I was reminded that Christopher Hilton reached the same conclusion regarding his recall of events in 1938.

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#602 Racer.Demon

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 13:33

Have now also added the missing notes... ;)

#603 scheivlak

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 23:29

Looking for something else I found this contemporary article in a Saturday, August 12 edition of Dutch newspaper ‘Het Vaderland’ - more or less in accordance with the August 4, 1939 report in Automobil-Revue:

http://kranten.kb.nl...ry=1&SeekPage=f

(see column three: ‘Flitsen uit de sportwereld’ – something like “Headlines from the world of sport”)

Translation:

Who is Europe’s best driver?

The struggle for the European drivers’ championship for participants in the Grand Prix that are convened according to the International Formula, which are those of Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, gets near its conclusion. As the Italian GP at Sept. 10 will not go ahead – officially because the improvements to the track will not be ready in time- the decision will fall in the Swiss GP which will be held August 20 in Berne. At this moment the strange thing occurs that it is not yet certain according to which formula the championship will be decided. To be more specific, there are two proposals that don’t make much difference at face value but nevertheless show important differences. The formula proposed by the French gives the winner of a race 10 points, number two 6, number three 5, number four 4, number five three and 1 point for all the other competitors. Contrary to this, the Germans want to see minimum points awarded, i.c. 1 point for the winner, 2 points for number two, 3 points for number three, 4 points for number four, while the other drivers will get between 4 and 7 points according to the distance run.
According to the French system the classification would be as follows: 1. Midler (sic) (Auto Union) 17 points; 2. Caracciola (Mercedes Benz) 12 pnts; 3. Lang (Mercedes Benz) 12 pnts; 4. Meier (Auto-Union) 8 pnts; 5. Sommer (Alfa Romeo) 8 pnts; 6. Hasse (Auto Union) 7 pnts and 7. von Brauchitsch (Mercedes Benz) 7 points.
The German system makes no difference as far as the leader is concerned. Here too Müller would lead, with 7 points. However, Meier would be second with 11 pnts, Lang third with 12 pnts, Caracciola and Von Brauchitsch fourth with 14 pnts and Sommer and Nuvolari (Auto Union) sixth with 15 points.

The article goes ahead with stories about English soccer players either or not being allowed to drive their own cars, and some news about tennis, cricket and the American track and field team.

#604 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 03:32

It's always nice to read what people found in their libraries. This time maybe nothing earth-shattering but certainly entertaining. I hope TNF members keep going to their libraries and tell us about the interesting articles they came across.

#605 Holger Merten

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 08:02

Sure Hans! :cool:

#606 Vitesse2

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 22:51

This minimum method points table was published as part of a race report on the German GP. It's not quite correct, but as Autombil-Revue were at pains to point out, all these tables were unofficial ...

Europameisterschaft für Rennwagen: 1 Müller, Auto-Union, 8 Punkte; 2 Lang, Mercedes-Benz, und Meier, Auto-Union, je 13 Punkte; 4 Caracciola, Mercedes-Benz, v Brauchitsch, Mercedes-Benz, Hasse, Auto Union, Nuvolari, Auto-Union, Sommer (Frankreich), je 15 Punkte.

As a bonus, here's the German Championship table ...

Deutsche Straßenmeisterschaft für Rennwagen: 1 Caracciola 6 Punkte, 2 Lang 5 Punkte 3 Müller 2 Punkte 4 Pietsch (Maserati) 1 Punkt.

Source: Freiburger Zeitung Sportblatt 24/7/39 p2

Despite a lot of searching, I can find no further references to the European Championship in the Freiburger Zeitung :

On the upside, they did manage to find space in their September 4th issue for a brief report on the Belgrade GP, including results of the bike and sports car races :up:

They also managed to publish a report on the 1940 Brescia GP (alias the Mille Miglia) :up:

#607 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 07:01

Originally posted by Vitesse2
This minimum method points table was published as part of a race report on the German GP. It's not quite correct, but as Autombil-Revue were at pains to point out, all these tables were unofficial ...

Europameisterschaft für Rennwagen:
1 Müller, Auto-Union, 8 Punkte;
2 Lang, Mercedes-Benz, und
2 Meier, Auto-Union, je 13 Punkte;
4 Caracciola, Mercedes-Benz,
4 v Brauchitsch, Mercedes-Benz,
4 Hasse, Auto Union,
4 Nuvolari, Auto-Union,
4 Sommer (Frankreich), je 15 Punkte.


As a bonus, here's the German Championship table ...

Deutsche Straßenmeisterschaft für Rennwagen:
1 Caracciola 6 Punkte,
2 Lang 5 Punkte
3 Müller 2 Punkte
4 Pietsch (Maserati) 1 Punkt.


Source: Freiburger Zeitung Sportblatt 24/7/39 p2

IIUTC You show the standings after the German GP. The minus system was applied for the European Championship but the German Championship used the plus system.

#608 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 19:48

I think that it has been mentioned already, but I could nothing in the 1939 AIACR CSI Sporting Code or the Appendices covering this championhsip. There is a copy of the CSI Sporting Code for 1939 in the Bill Milliken Collection at the IMRRC. There is also a copy of the 1950 edition. I have a copy of 1939, but ran out of time when it came to making a copy of the 1950 edition.

#609 Vitesse2

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 21:13

Thanks, Don. Hardly a surprise that there's nothing there, I suppose. What would be interesting to know would be:

1 Was the championship mentioned in the previous years' Sporting Codes? The general ignorance about the 'old' scoring system would seem to indicate not, but OTOH copies of these seem to be rarer than hens' teeth, so perhaps nobody's actually checked them?

2 Did the CSI get as far as publishing a 1940 Sporting Code? Probably not ....

#610 HDonaldCapps

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 13:19

From what I can gather, it seems unlikely that the European Championship was covered in the Sporting Code. It is not mentioned in the Appendices. Nor, interestingly enough, is the International Formula. The Sporting Code is exactly what its title says: a generic sporting code issued by the CSI of the AIACR. Its provisions, generally, are not all that different than those found in the AAA Contest Rules, for instance, basically guidance of a very generic sort. All the same, an interesting document to have around.

The Euro Championship and the International Formula were obviously dealt with through separate documents issued by the CSI, which, alas, are not in the Milliken Collection.

The Code is presented with English on the even-numbered pages and French on the odd-numbered pages. The Appendices are in a separate booklet, which was a surprise in a way. At some point in the next several days -- I am still sorting out the goodies I found from my visit to the IMRRC -- I will do a more detailed reading of The Code and see if I happened to overlook anything of interest.

#611 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 12:54

I've been doing a bit more digging on that final 1939 GP at Bern and am in the process of rewriting that section of "Unfinished Symphony".

Part of that rewrite was inspired by this photograph in Christian Moity's book "Les Précurseurs de la Formule 1". When I saw it, I thought "Well, yes, just another Bremgarten start picture ...."

Posted Image

Then, I spotted this, right at the back of the grid .....

Posted Image

Who's that getting a push start? Yes - it's Müller! That's why he was so slow away. That's Johnny Wakefield working his way past in the background BTW.

Hans then sent me this one, taken a few seconds later. By now Wakefield's Maserati has successfully negotiated the Auto Union and the only car behind Müller appears to be Evans' old Tipo B Alfa. And there now seem to be three people pushing!

Posted Image

AFAIK not one race report mentions a push start. Unless anyone knows better of course ....;)

#612 Ren de Boer

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 13:37

In Eberhard Reuß' book "Hitlers Rennschlachten", it is mentioned that after the preliminary races, rain set in and Auto Union didn't have sufficient 22 inch rain tyres available from Continental. Therefore, it was decided that only Stuck and Nuvolari would run the final race with rain tyres. About Müller's result in the race, the book reads: "Behind the leading trio of Mercedes drivers Lang-Caracciola-Brauchitsch, Müller has made his way up into fourth place. Although he had made an involuntary 360 degree pirouette at the start on the rain-soaked cobble stones and lost a lot of time as a result."

#613 Holger Merten

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 14:19

But why didn't they give the rain tyres to Müller? So stupid to given to Stuck.

#614 Ren de Boer

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 14:29

Reuß explains it by the fact that Stuck had official support from senior SS figures, whereas Nuvolari had the number 1 status in the team, allegedly even guaranteed in his contract. Obviously, it would have been far more logical to give the rain tyres to Müller as he was still in the race for the title.

Concerning the status of Stuck, Reuß refers to an internal document from Auto Union dated July 23th, 1939, where Dr. Feuereissen suggests that "in case only three cars can be ready in time for the Swiss Grand Prix, these should be given to Nuvolari - Müller - Hasse, whereas Dir. Werner replies that, considering the wishes expressed by the SS Reichsführer, which the Auto Union can't ignore, in such a case, Nuvolari - Stuck - Müller will be starting".

#615 fines

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 14:43

Originally posted by Vitesse2
AFAIK not one race report mentions a push start.

THAT, of course, means instant disqualification! Sorry chaps, but no title for Müller :(

"Herr Müller, bitte melden Sie sich bei der Rennleitung! Sie sind ab sofort vom Rennen ausgeschlossen!"

"Herr Müller, please gif in! Ve haf disqualified you!"

#616 uechtel

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 14:59

Abseits ist wenn der Schiedsrichter pfeift...


Means it depends on how the race direction has reacted and not on how we understand the rules.

If he was disqualified we should find that in any [official] result list.

There are areas where assistance is allowed (the pits for example). We don´t know whether this would have been also on the grid.

#617 fines

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 15:16

Originally posted by uechtel
If he was disqualified we should find that in any [official] result list.

;) I wasn't REALLY suggesting that - where's the irony smiley? :kiss:

#618 uechtel

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 16:30

here:

Posted Image

#619 Vitesse2

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 16:43

Originally posted by Holger Merten
But why didn't they give the rain tyres to Müller? So stupid to given to Stuck.

Well, yes and no, Holger.

Reuß says that AU took the decision to switch from 18-inch to 22-inch rims after the heat, which was run in dry conditions, as their smaller tyres had proved inadequate. But there is - AFAIK - no definite evidence that any of the Auto Unions was on dry tyres for the final. Therefore, Müller and Hasse almost certainly started on 18-inch wets.

Now, Reuß ignores Hasse completely when discussing the race - you'd almost think he wasn't there! But he was, and it was only after I'd looked at the race again that I realised that it was in fact Hasse who was the most aggressive of the AU drivers in the early stages. Despite starting from near the back, next to Müller on row 4, he passed Stuck and actually ran in sixth place behind the MBs, Farina's Alfetta and Nuvolari. So - he was initially outdriving all his team-mates: not an indication that he was on dry tyres I think. Müller was presumably on the same rubber and he was also able to work his way up the field quite rapidly: I don't think the 22-inch wets gave Nuvolari and Stuck any advantage at all. In fact, I think the 18-inch were superior.

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#620 taylov

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 15:10

Forgive me if this has been mentioned already in the context of the 1939 EC scoring system (I did a search and couldn't find it), but this method of scoring a season is alive and well and still used in the EuroBOSS championship.

For those outside of Europe who may not have come across it, EuroBOSS is a form of Formula Libre where 1990s Formula One cars (Benetton, Arrows, Ferrari, Minardi, Jordan, Simtek etc) race against Indycars, F3000, World Series etc, racing at Spa, Nurburgring, Zolder, Hockenheim and Jarama (Next Round Donington Park, August 30 and 31).

To be fair, it has to be noted that the Minimum Score method is not without some criticism from teams and fans on the EuroBOSS web forum.

After three events the top six in the championship are

1 Ingo Gerstl 3 3 4, 10 points

2 Joachim Ryschka 8 7 14, 29 points

3 Klaas Zwart 8 30 2, 40 points

4 Peter Milavec 9 22 11, 42 points

5 Jens Renstrup 10 17 19, 46 points

6 Carlos Tavares 23 10 16, 49 points


Tony

#621 fines

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 15:28

I think the scoring is absolutely PERFECT for Historic Racing, which BOSS is apparently turning into (they still race the same cars as ten years ago, don't they?) - emphasis is on reliability, and aggressive fights for position are not encouraged. :up:

#622 Racer.Demon

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 08:48

Good spot, V2! Will be happy to accommodate any changes to the article...

#623 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 10:42

Originally posted by Vitesse2


Reuß says that AU took the decision to switch from 18-inch to 22-inch rims after the heat, which was run in dry conditions, as their smaller tyres had proved inadequate. But there is - AFAIK - no definite evidence that any of the Auto Unions was on dry tyres for the final. Therefore, Müller and Hasse almost certainly started on 18-inch wets.

Now, Reuß ignores Hasse completely when discussing the race - you'd almost think he wasn't there! But he was, and it was only after I'd looked at the race again that I realised that it was in fact Hasse who was the most aggressive of the AU drivers in the early stages. Despite starting from near the back, next to Müller on row 4, he passed Stuck and actually ran in sixth place behind the MBs, Farina's Alfetta and Nuvolari. So - he was initially outdriving all his team-mates: not an indication that he was on dry tyres I think. Müller was presumably on the same rubber and he was also able to work his way up the field quite rapidly: I don't think the 22-inch wets gave Nuvolari and Stuck any advantage at all. In fact, I think the 18-inch were superior.

I think I've solved this enigma. The race report in the Journal de Genève says the following:

Toutefois, Nuvolari sur la machine duquel, comme sur toutes les Auto Union d'ailleurs, on a monté des pneus ne s'adaptant à la piste sèche ....


So, if the tyres were not suitable for a dry track, this must surely mean that in the heat Auto Union gambled on rain arriving and started all their cars on wets! As the heat was only 20 laps and the final 30 laps, they probably felt that they could - if necessary - run the tyres in both without incurring too much wear.

The Journal de Genève report gives more detail than I've seen anywhere else about the GP car heat. Nuvolari was apparently slow away but quickly made his way up to third. He then slipped back down the field as his tyres started to go off - they seem to have delaminated, indicating that they were running too hot: another clue that they were wets? Stuck also had tyre problems and pitted for new rubber, the AU mechanics changing both rears in 15 seconds. Nuvolari had a tyre delaminate as he crossed the line!

So: contrary to Reuß' interpretation, Nuvolari and Stuck were not being favoured by being given 22-inch tyres. The team had no choice, because they'd used up almost all their 18-inch wets! It also puts a new light on why Müller just cruised round in the heat - AU claimed he had engine trouble, but I'd always found that difficult to reconcile with his performance in the final. He was saving his tyres ...

#624 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 08:21

...Unfortunately it was that same Jewish name that would prevent Dreyfus from ever having a chance to drive for Auto Union or Mercedes...

So - did he or didn't he get a test wirh Mercedes?

Richard - I never heard that Dreyfus would get a test with Mercedes. What made you think of this absurd possibility?

#625 Roger Clark

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:05

Were these "wet" tyres that Vitesse2 refers to different in tread pattern or construction, or were they just a smaller diameter version of the larger tyres? It would make sense to use smaller tyres to reduce overall gearing if a race was to be run at a lower speed but I don't know whether Continental develop rain tyres in anything approaching the modern sense.

The development of racing tyres is terribly under-reported for such an important part of the car.

#626 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:12

Richard - I never heard that Dreyfus would get a test with Mercedes. What made you think of this absurd possibility?

With respect, Hans - I didn't remember ever saying that. And in fact, I didn't: it's a quote from Dennis David's site.

#627 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:16

Were these "wet" tyres that Vitesse2 refers to different in tread pattern or construction, or were they just a smaller diameter version of the larger tyres? It would make sense to use smaller tyres to reduce overall gearing if a race was to be run at a lower speed but I don't know whether Continental develop rain tyres in anything approaching the modern sense.

The development of racing tyres is terribly under-reported for such an important part of the car.

I have seen something technical somewhere - in German - about 1930s racing tyres: in the Austrian AAZ IIRC.

#628 Doug Nye

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 21:59

I have seen something technical somewhere - in German - about 1930s racing tyres: in the Austrian AAZ IIRC.


The absolute priority for racing tyre construction in that period was carcass/tread security - to avoid explosive deflations and/or high-speed tread separation. Tyre preparation to channel away more surface water than the basic moulded tread pattern could handle involved a procedure that was known here in the UK, and I believe in Francophone nations, as the 'Pneu-Grippa' process. This involved large hairy blokes with bulging biceps attaching a curved framework to a section of the tyre, the framework supporting a number of lateral saw blades, spaced about a half-inch apart. All five or six saw blades were joined to a single handle. The large hairy bloke then sawed away with all five or six blades at once, opening a series of lateral cuts or sipes across the moulded tread. Once one section had been treated, the frame would be moved on to the next section of tyre, then the next, and so on until all 360-degrees of the tread circumference had been 'Pneu-Grippad'. I believe in Italy this was known as 'ancorizazzione' (or somesuch - I don't guarantee the spelling). I don't recall having seen photos or film of this wet-weather preparation being applied to the German cars' Continental tyres, but neither do I recall photos of differently treaded Conti 'wets' from pre-war, nor do I recall reading of specially dedicated wet-weather tyre compounding in that era.

DCN

Edited by Doug Nye, 31 October 2011 - 23:44.


#629 Vitesse2

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 11:43

Automobil Revue, 22/8/39, page 6:

Ausgerechnet in der Pause zwischen dem zweiten Vorlauf und dem Endlauf rieselt feiner Regen nieder und zwingt die Leiter der Rennställe, mit blitzartiger Behendigkeit ihrer Dispositionen auf Schlechtwetter umzustellen, Regenreifen aufzuziehen und die Einstellungen zu ändern.

My translation of that:

"During the break between the second preliminary heat and the final, fine rain trickles down and makes the leaders of the racing stables change with lightning agility to their arrangements for bad weather, fit rain tyres and change the settings."

Somehow I don't associate Don Alfredo with "lightning agility"  ;) , but the meaning is clear - as is the reference to "Regenreifen".

#630 Doug Nye

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 23:36

Posted Image

This photograph was taken just after the finish of the 1938 Swiss GP, showing what passed for a 'wet' Continental tyre on Caracciola's winning Mercedes-Benz W154. As evident here, it has been subjected to the 'Pneu-Grippa' process, with extra lateral sipes cut into the tread as I described previously. I would be confident that the 1939 'wet' tyre would have been similarly prepared.

Posted Image

Here for comparison is a standard Conti 'dry' tyre from 1938-39. Note the shoulder sipes on the 'dry' do not extend laterally right across the tread. On the 'wet' - top, above - they have been cut clean across.

DCN

Edited by Doug Nye, 13 December 2011 - 15:49.


#631 Vitesse2

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 00:35

Thank you, Doug.

Just to be clear, I wasn't doubting you: my opinion is that because Stuck and Nuvolari (and possibly Müller?) had encountered tyre problems late in the heat that was the reason AU switched to 22-inch for the final. However, if - as seems probable - Conti had little or no warning of this, it seems unlikely they would have had enough 22-inch wheels pre-fitted with both dry and wet-pattern tyres: realistically AU would need at least 24 of each - 16 plus two spares per car. The race reports seem to indicate that the tyres were changed on the grid - were Conti suddenly overwhelmed, meaning they just didn't have enough Pneu-grippaed 22-inch to go round? "Sorry, Herr Doktor Feuereissen - we must give priority to Mercedes, so we can only let you have enough 22s for two cars: if you still want cut tyres you must fit the others with 18s ..."

#632 Doug Nye

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 12:11

My posting these pix wasn't at all triggered by any defensive reflex, simply interest in an interesting question accompanied by chance location of relevant evidence. I would be surprised if Conti had in fact been taken by surprise by the weather change, but my gut feeling is that you could indeed well be correct...and that maybe they had attempted to ride their luck, and dibbed out. If nothing else the fitters responsible for hand cutting all those darned tyres would certainly have developed a rosy glow...

DCN

#633 Vitesse2

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 00:21

73 years to the day after the final race of the 1939 European Championship, an article about the Mercedes Benz W154 appeared on Daimler's Global Media website. I believe this is the first time that Daimler have made a public acknowledgement that Lang was not officially declared champion by the AIACR.

In 1939, the last season of racing before the Second World War, Mercedes-Benz was able to build further on the successes of the previous year with the W 154. The first race of the season was the Pau Grand Prix, which Hermann Lang won in a W 154 ahead of Manfred von Brauchitsch, so taking his revenge for the defeat of the previous year. In addition, Lang took the chequered flag at the Eifel race in May of the same year, with Caracciola in third place and von Brauchitsch in fourth.

Second World War prevents Caracciola from taking fourth European Championship title

Hermann Lang continued to build on this impressive series of victories. He won the Höhenstrassen-Rennen (High Road Race) in Vienna in a hillclimb version of the W 154 (with von Brauchitsch in 3rd place), a result replicated at the Belgian Grand Prix in Spa. Caracciola then won the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring – for the fifth time. The Swiss Grand Prix was won by Lang ahead of Caracciola and von Brauchitsch. Lang also won the German Hillclimb Grand Prix on the Grossglockner pass, thereby securing the 1939 German Hillclimb title. He was clearly the season’s top driver, but with the outbreak of war the authorities responsible, the AIACR in Paris, were unable to award the title of European Champion.

The bolded sub-heading also leads me to believe that they may have some evidence that either Neubauer or Hühnlein intended that Caracciola was the preferred champion ...

Here's the original in German:

1939, in der letzten Rennsaison vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, knüpft Mercedes-Benz mit dem W 154 an die Erfolge des Vorjahres an. Das erste Rennen der Saison ist der Große Preis von Pau, den Hermann Lang auf W 154 vor Manfred von Brauchitsch für sich entscheidet und sich so für die Niederlage im vergangenen Jahr revanchieren kann. Auch beim Eifelrennen im Mai kommt Lang als erster Fahrer ins Ziel, Caracciola wird Dritter, von Brauchitsch Vierter.

Der Zweite Weltkrieg verhindert Carraciolas vierten Europameistertitel

Hermann Lang führt diese eindrucksvolle Siegesserie weiter. Beim Wiener Höhenstraßen-Rennen holt er sich den Sieg im W 154 Bergrennwagen (von Brauchitsch 3.), die Platzierung wiederholen die beiden Piloten auch beim Großen Preis von Belgien in Spa. Caracciola gewinnt – zum fünften Mal – den Großen Preis von Deutschland auf dem Nürburgring. Beim Grand Prix der Schweiz kommt Lang vor Caracciola und von Brauchitsch ins Ziel. Er gewinnt auch das Rennen um den Großen Bergpreis von Deutschland am Großglockner und wird dadurch Deutscher Bergmeister 1939. Er ist eindeutig der beste Fahrer des Jahres, aber den Titel eines Europameisters kann die zuständige Behörde, die AIACR in Paris, nach Kriegsausbruch nicht mehr vergeben.


http://media.daimler...S=1347062011697

#634 ensign14

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 08:09

The bolded sub-heading also leads me to believe that they may have some evidence that either Neubauer or Hühnlein intended that Caracciola was the preferred champion...

They probably had champagne for the end of year celebration (perhaps courtesy of Herr von Ribbentrop's contacts in the trade). Rather than beer. Wouldn't want to waste champers on the proletariat.

#635 ReWind

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 15:30

Second World War prevents Caracciola from taking fourth European Championship title


The bolded sub-heading also leads me to believe that they may have some evidence that either Neubauer or Hühnlein intended that Caracciola was the preferred champion ...

But isn't it rubbish to claim that the war prevented Caracciola from taking a fourth European title? His retirements from the Belgian and French Grands Prix long ago had put paid to any hopes he and others may have had.


#636 Vitesse2

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 16:22

But isn't it rubbish to claim that the war prevented Caracciola from taking a fourth European title? His retirements from the Belgian and French Grands Prix long ago had put paid to any hopes he and others may have had.

What strikes me as very odd is the fact that the bolded bit bears absolutely no resemblance to the text around it. You'd expect the text to explain the headline, wouldn't you? The most important thing which prevented Caracciola claiming a fourth title was actually that he hadn't won it! If anything, it should say "Second World War prevents Lang from taking first European Championship title".

But in one sense, it's not rubbish at all. Under Mercedes-Benz's preferred system (Langlois' proposal), a win for Caracciola in Berne would have given him the championship, with Lang third. Unless Müller finished second in the race of course. And why else would he have chased Lang down so hard at the end of the race? Hence my comment.  ;)

Under the minimum points system - yes he was pretty much irrelevant, unless Müller failed to finish fourth or better. Even then - a long shot, even if he won the race.



#637 Ray Bell

Ray Bell
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Posted 08 September 2012 - 17:43

Originally posted by Vitesse2
What strikes me as very odd is the fact that the bolded bit bears absolutely no resemblance to the text around it. You'd expect the text to explain the headline, wouldn't you?

.....If anything, it should say "Second World War prevents Lang from taking first European Championship title".....


It's almost as if it's some kind of Freudian slip, isn't it?