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Recommendations for good authoritative books...


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#51 D82

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 19:31

Just wanted to remind everyone that these books can be found in university libraries. For example most of these titles are avaliable in Istanbul Technical University Library, which means i'm going to have a look at 'em tomorrow. :D

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#52 gruntguru

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 02:10

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#53 venator

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 21:00

Racing and Sports Car Chassis Design - Costin and Phipps
The Sports Car, Its Design and Performance - Campbell
Racing Car Design and Development - Terry and Baker
Tuning for Speed - Irving

The books above all contained useful information I utilised at one time or another. They are somewhat dated now, mind you, so is the man recommending them...

#54 Ben

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 17:19

Racing and Sports Car Chassis Design - Costin and Phipps


Wins the prize for actually having a free body diagram of a swing axle suspension with asymmetric lateral force distribution to explain jacking forces.

Ben

#55 mariner

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 10:07

This is not an engineering book per se but rather a general racing book

Team Lotus the Indianapolis years by Andrew Ferguson ISBN 1 85260 491 3

It is about an era of long ago when Lotus went to Indy and won at the 3rd attempt.

What makes it remarkable is that the author was the racing manager of Lotus and all his notes and memories went into the book. So it is a detailed account of the sheer effort and activity that it takes to win big time. Given the succes of Lotus and all its engineering innovation at that time it is in a way a sort of "textbook" on how to run a racing team.

Lest anybody think that life was so simple then that nobody could learn from it, the Team Lotus racing budget for 1964 that Ferguson was responsible for covered building 16 new cars across five categoies including F1 and Indy plus rebuilding 8 other cars. There were six seperate race sections and 23 different drivers were used. Accounts were delivered covering 21 categeries for each of the six race sections one week in arrears!

The workload was clearly crazy but the book does show just what it tkes to succeed in top flight competition and I suspect it is stil useful today as background as well as being a great read.

Sadly Andew Ferguson died of cancer just after completing the manuscript but Doug Nye, one of the top racing historians finished the book to ensure its publication.

#56 Doug Nye

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 20:41

Andrew Ferguson died suddenly from a massive stroke - not cancer - but thanks for the mention...

DCN

#57 TheArmchairCritic

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 15:57

With wanting to do Aeronautical Eng at Uni, with a view to a future career in F1, could anyone point me towards any books which would show an appreciable interest in Aeronautical Eng/future career in F1, which I can then put on my Personal Statement for Uni. The Imperial website wasn't very helpful in regards to reading lists. Thanks.

#58 Greg Locock

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 22:36

With wanting to do Aeronautical Eng at Uni, with a view to a future career in F1, could anyone point me towards any books which would show an appreciable interest in Aeronautical Eng/future career in F1, which I can then put on my Personal Statement for Uni. The Imperial website wasn't very helpful in regards to reading lists. Thanks.


Katz, then read the references he mentions, then read the references those mention. etc.

#59 TheArmchairCritic

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 16:04

Katz, then read the references he mentions, then read the references those mention. etc.

Any others? Thanks.

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#60 TheArmchairCritic

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 20:06

Guys... <Insert echo>

#61 Greg Locock

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 21:59

So did you read Katz and follow my advice or are you just a troll?

#62 skuty

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 18:47

Please tell me about SAE or FISITA books. Are they similar to academic books(papers) ? I must say I have bought a lot of books which you spoukd about and I wasn´t happy. I suppose in the Czech Republic we have better books than in England because we had one great writer in 1990s. His name was Mr.Vlk and his books are unapproachable with books as e.g. Engineer to Win or The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics. It´s crazy because we don´t have any big experience with motorsport or automotive, but now I can´t be excited about this books.
Thanks for all replies which will help me.

Edited by skuty, 06 January 2010 - 18:50.


#63 Greg Locock

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:11

I like Bruhn, but wouldn't recommend it for designing cars, unless you want a car that has the same structural approach as an FAA certified aeroplane. It's about $140. That being said it is the main book i used to learn about designing structures and FEA out of uni, as my manager swore by it. Brown et al looks interesting.






#64 Halfwitt

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 22:59

Has everyone seen this:

http://www.ret-monitor.com/articles/

It's looks like it's associated with Race Engine Technology magazine. The magazine is quite expensive, but this appears to be free (at least it is at the minute).

It might be interesting for some people.

#65 Canuck

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 03:01

Has anyone read / is anyone familiar with Pulkrabek's Engineering Fundamentals of the Internal Combustion Engine? I'm itching to add something to my engine library again.

#66 McGuire

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 16:47

Has anyone read / is anyone familiar with Pulkrabek's Engineering Fundamentals of the Internal Combustion Engine? I'm itching to add something to my engine library again.


I found the characters two-dimensional and the plot development tired and predictable. Also, the sex scenes were gratuitous and in my opinion, implausible.


#67 munks

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 15:46

Any opinions on,

"Theory of Ground Vehicles by Wong"?

I find a lot of professors using this as reference for vehicle dynamics.

OT: Could this be stickied?


A bit late on the reply here, but I recently obtained this book. It's good, readable, and only gets down into equation & derivations when necessary (as opposed to someone like Pacejka who seems to only be capable of communicating with complicated equations). Plenty of useful graphs.

Wong covers a lot of ground, and gets into things you probably won't see anywhere else, like how much soft soil will deflect when run over by a tire at pressure X, plus air cushion vehicles, and other interesting things (many or most of them being off-road applications).


#68 Greg Locock

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 20:53

Incidentally John Dixon has a new book out written from the point of view of writing programs to build suspension models. I haven't read much of it, but if that is your interest it will almost certainly be worth a look. I have access to it via some horrible server based system, check yours (eg Knovel)

#69 Deepak

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 19:01

A bit late on the reply here, but I recently obtained this book. It's good, readable, and only gets down into equation & derivations when necessary (as opposed to someone like Pacejka who seems to only be capable of communicating with complicated equations). Plenty of useful graphs.

Wong covers a lot of ground, and gets into things you probably won't see anywhere else, like how much soft soil will deflect when run over by a tire at pressure X, plus air cushion vehicles, and other interesting things (many or most of them being off-road applications).


Thanks for the reply. :)
I might give it a try after seeing your feedback.

#70 Deepak

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 19:07

Incidentally John Dixon has a new book out written from the point of view of writing programs to build suspension models. I haven't read much of it, but if that is your interest it will almost certainly be worth a look. I have access to it via some horrible server based system, check yours (eg Knovel)


Greg - Is this the one?
Suspension Analysis & Computational Geometry

#71 Grumbles

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 05:18

I've been reading Harold Bettes "Engine Airflow" and I'm greatly impressed. I find a lot of these soft cover magazine-sized books to be big on fluff and product placements but short on substance. Not this one. There is more usable information in here than in nearly all the other "how to port cylinder heads" books put together, though that's not really saying much. Densely packed, and unusually so for this format.
It's refreshing to read something in this style that isn't dumbed down to useless generalities, yet at the same time is readable and understandable for someone like me with my admittedly modest mental capacity.
From this book - and from the Speedtalk interviews - Harold comes across as a really nice guy who know his stuff and knows how to get it across. I don't know him personally but I bet Macguire does. Bill? He has a credibility and directness that I'd compare with the likes of McFarland and Widmer, and incidentally both these guys contribute to the book.
If you're an amateur flowbench jockey like myself - even an experienced one - I'd be surprised if you weren't both delighted and enlightened by this book. I don't think I've enjoyed a book like this since Grumpy Jenkins' racing smallblock book first came out way back when.

/end of gushing review

Edited by Grumbles, 15 October 2010 - 05:38.


#72 Magoo

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 16:06

From this book - and from the Speedtalk interviews - Harold comes across as a really nice guy who know his stuff and knows how to get it across. I don't know him personally but I bet Macguire does. Bill? He has a credibility and directness that I'd compare with the likes of McFarland and Widmer, and incidentally both these guys contribute to the book.
If you're an amateur flowbench jockey like myself - even an experienced one - I'd be surprised if you weren't both delighted and enlightened by this book. I don't think I've enjoyed a book like this since Grumpy Jenkins' racing smallblock book first came out way back when.

/end of gushing review


Sorry for the delay in replying -- didn't look into this thread until just now.

Harold Bettes has been around forever -- he was formerly president of Superflow. I imagine thousands of people have been through his presentations. I must confess I haven't seen the airflow book, but I do have his book on dynos, which I think is a great resource for people digging into the issue.

#73 rachael

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 21:01

Maybe not strictly 'authoritative' but two inspirational autobiographies are;

http://www.bentleypu...ck-edition.html

And

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/1859606660



#74 gruntguru

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 06:38

Maybe not strictly 'authoritative' but two inspirational autobiographies are;
http://www.bentleypu...ck-edition.html

Those who liked Tony Rudd's Autobiography, will love Sir Stanley Hooker's although they have probably read it.
http://www.amazon.co...mp;sr=1-1-spell

#75 Scotracer

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 20:58

Does anyone have any properly useful reference texts for engine combustion chamber/piston design? It's an area I want to get in to.

#76 Wolf

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Posted 14 June 2012 - 13:23

Here are few books I haven't seen mentioned, that I've found interesting (and would welcome comments from more knowledgeable members):

Matschinsky - Radführungen (1998)
Stokes - Manual Gearbox Design (1992)
Trzesniowski - Rennwagentechnik (2010)

And also Pomeroy's "Grand Prix Car" (I must admit to being somewhat in awe when I spotted a copy at my Uni and browsed through it)...


#77 Grumbles

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 04:11

Christmas is approaching, which means it's nearly time for me to buy a couple of books for the wife to wrap up and surprise me with on Christmas morning. I'm thinking of a couple of bios, Colin Chapman and Henry Ford. Anyone got any recommendations for these two or anything else for that matter?

#78 Keith Young

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 15:37

I think this is a very important topic, and it seems like it died. Not sure if this is a party foul, if it is let me know and I'll delete the post. But...

 

It seems books are in the process of dying, so I'll start including Authoritative Videos.

When I was in the process of getting my Aerospace Engineering degree, I used these quite a lot. I still use them when writing articles sometimes:

 

http://www.youtube.c.../VerraStrngNUCF

 

For Math, which is essential, here are a few. I use the Khan Academy videos almost exclusively for my Applied Math Example articles:

 

http://www.youtube.c...ser/khanacademy

http://www.youtube.com/user/nptelhrd

http://www.youtube.com/user/MIT

 

Hope this helps. Again, if posting links to YouTube video channels is a party foul, let me know. Just wanted to help put a pulse back in to this important thread.



#79 Canuck

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 19:41

All knowledge is good knowledge. Thanks for the links.

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#80 Magoo

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 17:34

Christmas is approaching, which means it's nearly time for me to buy a couple of books for the wife to wrap up and surprise me with on Christmas morning. I'm thinking of a couple of bios, Colin Chapman and Henry Ford. Anyone got any recommendations for these two or anything else for that matter?

 

 

I suck for not seeing this until now, but in case you are still looking...

 

On Henry Ford:

 

Ford: The Times, The Man, the Company by Alan Nevins. Really superb, in depth and done with historical rigor, a kind of biography they don't do anymore except about former presidents and literary figures. 

 

On Chapman:

 

I am going to go weird here and recommend that everyone read both the authorized biography by Jabby Crombac and the highly unauthorized bio by Mile Lawrence, Wayward Genius.

 

Taken separately, each book offers an incomplete picture, but the two books together provide a rich, multidimensional study of a talented and complicated man.  



#81 Smiley

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 15:15

Hi everybody,seen this topic about technical books and have a question,I want to subscribe,or buy single issues of Race Engine Technology  https://www.highpowermedia.com/

Do any of you have read this,and is it worthwhile to obtain any of this issues.

I thank you for support and have a Merry Christmas and very prosperous New Year,and may each and every one of your teams and drivers perform well



#82 BrandsFan

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 17:32

This is a bit different.
 
Does anyone believe that it may be possible for one team in F1 to use electronics to interfere with the telemetry of another car and so affect its performance?  The reason I ask is that I was sent an e-book for Christmas which I have just finished reading. It is a novel, but the premise of the book is that an engineer on one of the GP teams discovers that another team is using very high tech, military spec electronic weaponry to zap (that's the name of the book, Zapped, by Alan Wilson), the ECU's of competing cars and so compromise their performance.  I know that it is a novel, but the author seems to have done his research and the technology he bases his book around does seem to be very feasible, if a bit out there at this time.
 
The problem that I see is that if this is the case, then God help racing, because then someone could sit in a grandstand and simply use a remote device to target a car on the track.  I know that this concept was suggested at a hacker's convention in Las Vegas earlier this year, when several hacker groups showed that they could get into the electronics of road cars, using radio I think, and affect their brakes and steering. But that was for road cars with fairly basic electronics compared to F1. Still the idea is pretty scary.  Anyway its a fun book with a lot of insider info and some pretty scathing opinions of some of the people in GP!



#83 Canuck

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 22:53

Hi everybody,seen this topic about technical books and have a question,I want to subscribe,or buy single issues of Race Engine Technology https://www.highpowermedia.com/
Do any of you have read this,and is it worthwhile to obtain any of this issues.
I thank you for support and have a Merry Christmas and very prosperous New Year,and may each and every one of your teams and drivers perform well

I have. I don't any longer. I would happily subscribe at a more reasonable price but for $20/issue it tends to be full of advertiser-stroking with the odd bit of substance thrown in. Once in a while a truly meaty article comes around, but it's not worth the outrageous price in my opinion.

Brandsfan - I'd post your query as it's own thread. A worthy discussion.

Edited by Canuck, 04 January 2014 - 22:55.


#84 Smiley

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 10:27

Thanks Canuck, the exchange rate is not in my favour,and postage is ridicilious in itself,I'll try the digital version,at least you can choose which issues you want.



#85 Canuck

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 18:15

Mine either. The last "quote" I received from them was 38GBP for 3(!) issues.

#86 BrandsFan

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 16:58

Thanks Canuck,

 

I will do as you recommend. In the meantime Fox News here in the USA had a story about the group in the UK who are working with the Government to target cars on the public roads, using radio type technology. just as Wilson describes in ZAPPED., although in a more simple form. They make the comment that, once the electronics have been hit then the driver will have zero control of his car which then has no brakes, no steering and he will have no control of the accelerator. So the car will almost certainly have an accident.    Now that is very scary.  My concern is that while here in the USA the lawyers will most probably find ways to prevent the government form using this technology it will still be able to be used by hackers and some of them are very green and may well use the technology to make a point about racing  contributing to global warming, or something! 

 

The book uses this theme as it's center story but it is also fun novel about GP racing as a whole, and there are not many books like it out there. It certainly shows how technology can easily be subverted by someone who has less than honest goals for racing!



#87 Greg Locock

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 02:53

" It certainly shows how technology can easily be subverted by someone who has less than honest goals for racing!
"

 

ACBC?



#88 Greg Locock

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 01:45

Here's an encyclopedic PhD on tires, done by one of Pacejka's crew.   https://www.tno.nl/d...s_Zegelaar1.pdf   -hat tip  to Damien for the link



#89 Greg Locock

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 22:49

Not technical as such, but the autobiography of Wil Cooksey who was plant manager at Bowling Green for 15 years, and a lifelong corvette junky. http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/1491808926 - the kindle version is about 5 bucks. It is funny and predictable that his concerns with running the plant are paint, paint, paint, panel fit and repair yard. That holds for most car companies I've worked for, except Lotus and Land Rover, oddly. It's not a great book, but it is mostly interesting (interminable details of car clubs excepted)