Jump to content


Photo

John 'Spider' Webb


  • Please log in to reply
61 replies to this topic

#1 Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence
  • Member

  • 288 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 20 October 2005 - 02:08

I have come across a thread introduced by Stefan Ornerdal (Hi, Stefan) which mentioned F5000. This was a great formula for a time, Mario Andretti was a runner, so was David Hobbs, Trevor Taylor, Peter Gethin, Mike Hailwood and many others.

John Webb, supremo at Brands Hatch, was the main driving force behind F5000, and he was the man who first promoted Formula Ford, and 'celebrity' races including House of Lords versus House of Commons.

In an earlier time, Webb would have run a circus. He was a showman.

Most of John Webb's ideas came off. There were failures like Formula Talbot, which used methanol instead of petrol. It came about in the wake of an energy crisis and though Formula Talbot did not attract many entrants, and did not last long. nobody said it was a bad idea when it was announced.

I think that motor racing owes an enormous debt to John Webb.

In 1977 I arrived at Brands Hatch one night for a session with Tony Brooks and Innes Ireland. Back then you were lucky to get 60 or 70 people for an evening like that. The person putting out the chairs was Mrs Webb, a very pleasant lady.

I may be wrong, but I think that John may have been the first person in the UK to run trips to motor races abroad.

Let's share some John Webb memories. We could start with Goggomobil.

Advertisement

#2 fausto

fausto
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 04

Posted 20 October 2005 - 06:05

Was also Thundersports one of his "products"?

#3 Cirrus

Cirrus
  • Member

  • 1,533 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 20 October 2005 - 06:27

Nick Brittain used to indulge in some gentle John Webb mickey-taking in his "Private Ear" column in Autosport. On one occaision he claimed that JW was complaining that times were hard, and he was having to make economies. Apparently, he got so emotional that he had to dry his eyes on a £10 note. However, with economy very much in mind, he used the same £10 note to light his cigar!

#4 ian senior

ian senior
  • Member

  • 2,138 posts
  • Joined: September 02

Posted 20 October 2005 - 07:43

I think it's fair to say yes, most of his ideas were good. But he sometimes had bad ones too. He had a blind spot about Clubman's Formula cars, deeming them to be scruffy and old fashioned. So he came up with Formula F100 (the only racing formula to have been named after a tyre?), which he thought would offer an alternative form of cheap sports car racing. It was a dead loss. Nice looking cars, but essentially two-seater Formula Fords and with only a 1300cc Escort GT engine. Dead slow, no spectacle at all and not that cheap.

#5 Rob29

Rob29
  • Member

  • 3,103 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 20 October 2005 - 08:58

Originally posted by fausto
Was also Thundersports one of his "products"?

May have been one of his last.Started in 1983,just before Brands,Oulton &Snett.were sold to John Foulston.JW soon fell out with Nicola F.
Re.air tours to races you may be right.I seem to remember 'Webbair' when I was still at school and could not afford such things. First I recall was 1956.By flying boat Southampton to Genoa for the Italian GP.

#6 Mallory Dan

Mallory Dan
  • Member

  • 2,671 posts
  • Joined: September 03

Posted 20 October 2005 - 11:01

Great idea Mike for a John Webb thread. This could go on for ages !

As for his great ideas, was FF2000 one of his ? On the other hand how about Formula First, Formula Forward, and MultiSports. And Formula Ford Turbo. All of these seemed to me to duplicate formulae that were already in situ, and hence diluted existing successful series. I guess there was some money changing hands tho' that may have encouraged him to develop and try to promote these...They were of course all single spec series, so pretty awful as far as I'm concerned.

Did he also have something against F2 for some reason ? Ironic then that the final ever F2 race was held at Brands.

And finally, he was a great supporter of F Atlantic as I recall, and didn't seem to favour F3 much. That was good enough for me at the time !!

Is there enough for a book Mike ?? Or if not, perhaps one detailing the 'Brands-mafia' thru' the 60s/70s/80s, with JW, Gerry, Lanfranchi, Whizzo, Whiting etc etc.

#7 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 8,017 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 20 October 2005 - 15:30

I've never really understood the significance or appeal of F Atlantic. What did it offer over and above F3 and F2?

Surely it was one of the first of the 'alternative routes' that led to some talented drivers ending up in blind alleys and never making it to F1? But on this I may be mistaken.

#8 Rob29

Rob29
  • Member

  • 3,103 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 20 October 2005 - 15:49

Originally posted by D-Type
I've never really ynderstood the significance or appeal of F Atlantic. What did it offer over and above F3 and F2?

Surely it was one of the first of the 'alternative routes' that led to some talented drivers ending up in blind alleys and never making it to F1? But on this I may be mistaken.

The concept was that F2 was too expensive for a british series,as it did not attract spectators. The new for 1971,FIA F3 was underpowered.Webb wanted a cheaper F2 whereas what he created was a more expensive F3?

#9 SEdward

SEdward
  • Member

  • 833 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 20 October 2005 - 16:49

I always thought that F5000 and Formula Atlantic were pointless exercises that simply got in the way of Formula 2 and provided an obstacle to its development in the UK.

I also resent the way he butchered all of his circuits when the fuel crisis hit in the early seventies.

Having said that, I fondly remember standing next to him on many a cold and wet October or November Sunday afternoon on the top row of Startline Grandstand at Brands (is it still there?). He was always in a fur coat with a huge cigar and a brandy. I was bloody freezing and penniless. He probably drove home in two Jags and I rode home through the pissing rain on my bike...

Edward

#10 Bonde

Bonde
  • Member

  • 959 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 20 October 2005 - 20:31

wasn't Formula Atlantic essentially 'Europeanized' SCCA Formula B?

#11 Mac Lark

Mac Lark
  • Member

  • 744 posts
  • Joined: April 02

Posted 20 October 2005 - 21:34

Originally posted by ian senior
So he came up with Formula F100 (the only racing formula to have been named after a tyre?)


The (inter) Continental Formula??

#12 RobertC

RobertC
  • Member

  • 60 posts
  • Joined: October 05

Posted 20 October 2005 - 21:54

I mentioned this thread about John Webb to my wife just now and she reminded me...

We like most folk would camp at Brands Hatch for the Grand Prix. On the first evening of the meeting the toilets were already overflowing in the campsite. We seem to remember a promises of better conditions for those camping.

My wife walked past several security guards to enter the clubhouse and found Mrs Webb amusing guests in a cocktail party. My wife, whose voice has never been quiet, informed Mrs Webb of the parlous state of the toilets causing silence amongst the guests. Unphased Mrs Webb offered my wife the use of the clubhouse toilets!

They were cleaned out and stopped overflowing..but as always there were never enough.

#13 Vicuna

Vicuna
  • Member

  • 1,588 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 21 October 2005 - 22:06

Originally posted by SEdward
I always thought that F5000 and Formula Atlantic were pointless exercises that simply got in the way of Formula 2 and provided an obstacle to its development in the UK.
Edward


:rolleyes:

You can't really mean that Edward!

#14 Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence
  • Member

  • 288 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 22 October 2005 - 20:28

One of the best ideas that John Webb came up with was the 1972 Rothmans 50,000, a Formula Libre race at Brands Hatch with a large prize fund (£50,000). It was wonderful in conception because it made us wonder whether a Can-Am McLaren could beat an F1 Lotus. BRM made a 3.3-litre V12 engine specially for the race.

It was a great idea, but it was not a great event. It may have become one but the following year came, among other things, the OPEC Oil Crisis.

The Rothmans 50,000 did not live up to expectation, but everyone was enthusiastic beforehand.

I would say that John Webb had a 65/35 success rate and that is pretty good especially given the fertility of his mind. I think the Aurora British F1 Championship was a Webb idea. I remember MAWP's headline after one of the early races, won by Tiff Needel in the Chevron F1 car, it was: 'Formula One, With Overtaking'.

Formula Turbo Ford was backed by Ford, to judge from the official launch. There was a snag, however, which was that the FTF car, based on a Reynard chassis, was slower than a regular Reynard FF2000 car.

You can't win them all, but John Webb perhaps did more than any other individual to change the face the face of motor racing. The first recognisable FF1600 car was created by Geoff Clarke of Motor Racing Stables, but MRS was based at Brands Hatch. Webb took up the idea and worked it and you cannot complain about FF1600 which spawned all other international 'one engine' formulae. I have not forgotten the DB 'Monomill' series, but that was only local and did not last long. though Jo Schlesser competed in it. FF1600 gave us Formula Vee and many a category since.

#15 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 8,306 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 22 October 2005 - 20:59

Mike's absolutely right about Webby. When I started work in 'Motor Racing' magazine's portakabin office beside the old cafeteria at Brands Hatch in 1963 it was made clear to me that John Webb was The Boss - if effectively then by proxy. When this small, slender fellow with the gammy leg and pronounced limp appeared I was taken aback but the moment he spoke I - as the teenage office boy - really snapped to attention. He seemed to radiate power and a degree of malevolence which I subsequently discovered was largely imagined, but part real. Mrs Webb was quite a strikingly attractive lady who seemed to have a considerable input into what went on at Brands and the other Grovewood-owned circuits, such as Mallory Park. I subsequently discovered he had been quite a committed racer just a few years previously, in a Jensen as well as a Goggomobil, and was apparently regarded as not being a driver to trifle with on track...

His previous exploits with the Webbair charter flights had really made his name - 'WebbScare' flights on all manner of oil-oozing piston-engined silver birds having proved an effective enema for many of my acquaintance. One famous WebbScare charter to Syracuse included most of the UK-based team and driver contingent, and it was during that flight that Innes Ireland took the controls whereupon a large proportion of the (mildly lubricated) passengers formed up in a large scrum who then ran up and down the main cabin aisle as a group - sending Innes into a paroxysm of trim and pitch corrections which greatly alarmed the professional crew before they managed to drag him out of the seat and regain formal control. Photos were also captured on that flight of a pretty talented hostie being held hostage across their laps by Ireland and (a later suitably embarrassed but rather proud) Jim Clark.

DCN

#16 fausto

fausto
  • Member

  • 519 posts
  • Joined: November 04

Posted 23 October 2005 - 00:13

Originally posted by Mike Lawrence
.............
I think the Aurora British F1 Championship was a Webb idea. I remember MAWP's headline after one of the early races, won by Tiff Needel in the Chevron F1 car, it was: 'Formula One, With Overtaking'.
......................


Tiff Needell didn't won that race, he was second, no win for the Chevron F.1....

#17 Rob29

Rob29
  • Member

  • 3,103 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 23 October 2005 - 11:12

Originally posted by fausto


Tiff Needell didn't won that race, he was second, no win for the Chevron F.1....

Correct,I was there,my first visit to Zolder,best ever result by that rubbish F1 car.Good tyre choice in damp track conditions credited by Tiff for that drive.
Anther thing organised by Webb was a trip to a Belgian F5000 race at Coxyde in 1969 for £5. I did not make that one as coach started from Brands at a very early hour!

#18 scheivlak

scheivlak
  • Member

  • 11,160 posts
  • Joined: August 01

Posted 23 October 2005 - 11:51

Originally posted by Rob29
Anther thing organised by Webb was a trip to a Belgian F5000 race at Coxyde

That's a funny way to write Koksijde! :D

#19 Sharman

Sharman
  • Member

  • 2,315 posts
  • Joined: September 05

Posted 23 October 2005 - 15:26

Remember JW flying off the track in his Aztec at Oulton, he took off towards Knickerbrook.
A commercial pilot friend who was with me at the time described as effing dodgy and conjectured that the landing must have been effing dodgier

Advertisement

#20 Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence
  • Member

  • 288 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 25 October 2005 - 11:29

DCN seems to be soft on Mrs Webb. That makes who of us who like big, confident , women who are excellent company. She was an important part of Brands Hatch.

John Webb would never be interviewed on tape, for radio, he claimed that he froze in front of a microphone and I can believe that. I freeze in front of a printed form. I cannot even read what is written, I freeze. I know, it's pathetic, especially from someone who has learned how to read obscure texts.

It doesn't matter that I go through agony when filling out an official form, but it is a real shame that John Webb did not commit his thoughts to tape.

Anyone remember the saloon car championship which was based on price? Tony Lanfranchi cleaned up the Castrol and Britax series in 1972 (29 races: 28 firsts, one second) by running a (Russian) Moskvich 412 in the £600 class. It remain Russia's finest hour in motor racing.

I started this thread to celebrate Webby (I never heard him called 'Spider', only 'Webby') and it has been suggested that there is a book there. I think there is, if John was the hook on which to hang other stories. A lot of heavy-duty villains lacked to relax at Brands Hatch. they were the south London mob made good who had bought big houses in Kent.

Someone mentioned Nick Witing, who was found dead in the boot of a car having upset his business associates - one version has Nick tied to two Range Rovers driving in opposite directions. My understand is that it was due to his taking more than his agreed share from the sale and distribution of nasal highballs and that people involved in the Brinks-Mat bullion robbery were among his business associates.

The geographical location of Brands Hatch has always meant that it has attracted some interesting people and I have no doubt that Webby has many an interesting tale to tell. I don't thik much escaped his attention and it was his attention to detail which made Brands Hatch such a great experience.

#21 Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence
  • Member

  • 288 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 17 November 2005 - 18:52

In the December issue of Motor Sport, Simon Taylor has an interview with John Webb. It's pretty good for a piece only one page long. I think Webbie (I never heard him called 'Spider') deserves more, but one page is better than none.

#22 Allen Brown

Allen Brown
  • Member

  • 4,859 posts
  • Joined: December 00

Posted 17 November 2005 - 19:27

Originally posted by scheivlak

That's a funny way to write Koksijde! :D

Not if you're French it isn't.

#23 Twin Window

Twin Window
  • Nostalgia Host

  • 6,609 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 17 November 2005 - 20:36

Originally posted by Mike Lawrence

DCN seems to be soft on Mrs Webb... She was an important part of Brands Hatch.

Yes she was. And I liked her too; she was (and I'm sure still is) great company.

Pity she found herself on the receiving end of the back of a certain person's hand the way she did.

#24 Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence
  • Member

  • 288 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 18 November 2005 - 16:13

John and Angela Webb did an amazing job, particularly at a time when motor racing was not a major sport.

I'll concede that about half of John's ideas did not work out, but he had more original ideas than anyone else in motor racing. The half which did catch one makes impressive reading.

#25 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,881 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 18 November 2005 - 16:39

I'm told this is John Webb's Bentley...at Snetterton in 1959. Does that figure: what was he doing then?
(part of a Ferret Foto...hope that's alright , Ted)

Posted Image

#26 Gary C

Gary C
  • Member

  • 4,524 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 18 November 2005 - 16:43

OK, I'm going to HAVE to ask..................who are the two guys in the Loti??

#27 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,881 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 18 November 2005 - 16:48

Originally posted by Gary C
OK, I'm going to HAVE to ask..................who are the two guys in the Loti??


Stan Elsworth and Jim Endruweit, I think.

#28 Gary C

Gary C
  • Member

  • 4,524 posts
  • Joined: January 01

Posted 18 November 2005 - 16:54

funnily enough, I THOUGHT it could well be Mr.Endruweit in the nearest car, but wasn't sure.

#29 RWB

RWB
  • Member

  • 116 posts
  • Joined: February 05

Posted 18 November 2005 - 19:32

I can't recall whether it came before WebbAir, but does anyone else remember the Connaught Grand Prix Car Club? John Webb started the club as a last ditch effort to save Connaughts. He also edited the club magazine "Grand Prix" which ran to just four editions, the first of which was dated April 1957. The club ran its own charter flights to GPs and I think perhaps these were the inspiration for WebbAir. I struggled to find 10/6 (53p) to join the club but despite my help the last "Grand Prix" in August 1957 confirmed Connaught's demise.

#30 David Beard

David Beard
  • Member

  • 4,881 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 18 November 2005 - 20:02

Originally posted by RWB
I can't recall whether it came before WebbAir, but does anyone else remember the Connaught Grand Prix Car Club? John Webb started the club as a last ditch effort to save Connaughts. He also edited the club magazine "Grand Prix" which ran to just four editions, the first of which was dated April 1957. The club ran its own charter flights to GPs and I think perhaps these were the inspiration for WebbAir. I struggled to find 10/6 (53p) to join the club but despite my help the last "Grand Prix" in August 1957 confirmed Connaught's demise.


Robert.....Interesting. I know nothing of the Connaught Grand Prix Car Club...but welcome to TNF. You must start a "Goodwood History" thread?

#31 Roger Clark

Roger Clark
  • Member

  • 5,993 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 18 November 2005 - 22:20

In January 1957, Autosport reported that there had been 2,350 requests for membership forms. In the first week of the campaign, some 150 subscription had been received, totalling £250. This was said to be at least one extra car on the starting grid. The Club had also produced some picture stamps featuring 12 past and present Connaughts, available for 2s 6d.

By the middle of February 2,500 membership forms had been requested and 500 had been returned, with some £500.

In April the first issue of the journal was published. It featured the Syracuse Grand Prix and Q and A with Rodney Clarke.

In June, following Connaught's withdrawal from racing, john Webb issued a statement saying that the club would continue as before with the exception that new members would not be enrolled.

#32 RWB

RWB
  • Member

  • 116 posts
  • Joined: February 05

Posted 19 November 2005 - 19:39

David - Thank you for your welcome. I'm sure Goodwood will come up soon enough.

Roger - I'd forgotten the stamps but I do remember the pin badge with the Connaught emblem. I'm still sad that mine disappeared when we moved house decades ago.

#33 Mallory Dan

Mallory Dan
  • Member

  • 2,671 posts
  • Joined: September 03

Posted 25 November 2005 - 13:52

I've only just read the MS Webb article, and agree with Mike. It raises more issues than it answers as regards JW. I like the part where he describes how he started FF, and compares that with how the 'modern' single seater series are far more heavily controlled by Renault and BMW now. While I don't doubt he was a businessman in every sense of the word, his enthusiasm for Club/National racing generally does come through.

#34 arttidesco

arttidesco
  • Member

  • 5,621 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 02 December 2010 - 14:33

I have been scouring the Intelweb and TNF for a couple of hours trying to find a photograph of John Webb, all I found was a photo of his aeroplane taking off at Oulton, for a man who was so influential it would appear there are none, can anyone help out ?

Should there be a choice early 70's would be good ?

Thanking you in anticipation :-)

#35 llmaurice

llmaurice
  • Member

  • 418 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted 02 December 2010 - 16:41

Stan Elsworth and Jim Endruweit, I think.


It certainly is Stan and Jim . Could also be a young Dick Scammell behind "Stans" car.
I found the monst Ominous thing about John Webb was his long drab overcoats and raincoats .

#36 d j fox

d j fox
  • Member

  • 92 posts
  • Joined: November 05

Posted 02 December 2010 - 18:50

Hmm..John Webb
Yes he brought us FFord, F5000, a bold attempt at "Indianapolis" style qualifying at the 1969 Race of Champions..but then there was Sports2000, the attempts to turn female sports persons into racers and other stunts like Radio 1 Fun days. Also, whilst he may not have been totally responsible, who can ever forget the taste of a Minter's "ham"burger?

#37 alansart

alansart
  • Member

  • 4,004 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 02 December 2010 - 18:54

I have been scouring the Intelweb and TNF for a couple of hours trying to find a photograph of John Webb, all I found was a photo of his aeroplane taking off at Oulton, for a man who was so influential it would appear there are none, can anyone help out ?

Should there be a choice early 70's would be good ?

Thanking you in anticipation :-)



There was an article on John Webb in Motorsport a few years ago. If I can find some time I'll try and dig it out.

#38 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 11,659 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 03 December 2010 - 09:40

Hmm..John Webb
Yes he brought us FFord, F5000, a bold attempt at "Indianapolis" style qualifying at the 1969 Race of Champions..but then there was Sports2000, the attempts to turn female sports persons into racers and other stunts like Radio 1 Fun days. Also, whilst he may not have been totally responsible, who can ever forget the taste of a Minter's "ham"burger?


Don't forget FF2000, Formula Talbot and Formula F100 as well as the Ford pick-up races!

:wave:

#39 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 7,616 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 03 December 2010 - 10:00

There was an article on John Webb in Motorsport a few years ago. If I can find some time I'll try and dig it out.


In the December issue of Motor Sport, Simon Taylor has an interview with John Webb. It's pretty good for a piece only one page long. I think Webbie (I never heard him called 'Spider') deserves more, but one page is better than none.

December 2005, Alan, according to Dr Lawrence :)


Advertisement

#40 ErleMin

ErleMin
  • Member

  • 85 posts
  • Joined: January 07

Posted 03 December 2010 - 10:31

I agree with Mike Lawrence's original entry that John Webb was a major, if not the greatest contributor to motorsport in the latter part of the last century at least in the UK, if not the world. His sharpest move I thought was to grab hold of the UK tracks. Although at the time I wasn't happy with this and we blamed everything on him - toilets, weather, our car, looking back I say thanks to John or as we used to call him, Mr. Webb 'cos he owned the place.
For completenes Mike, FF1600 did not actually give us Formula Vee.

#41 arttidesco

arttidesco
  • Member

  • 5,621 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 03 December 2010 - 16:42

Thanks Alan's Art & Cox and Dr Lawrence I was wondering if any TNFer's had actually taken a photograph of Mr Webb, if not I'll try LAT :-)

Cheers



#42 DavidH

DavidH
  • New Member

  • 12 posts
  • Joined: November 06

Posted 03 December 2010 - 17:03

This book is a good (and nostalgic) summary of Brands Hatch over the years and not just the racing - there is quite much about how it was run as a business by Messrs Webb, Foulston, Palmer etc. Actually found it in our local library!

Brands Hatch: The Definitive History of Britain's Best-loved Motor Racing Circuit by Chas Parker, J H Haynes & Co Ltd (24 Jan 2008)

#43 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,530 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 03 December 2010 - 18:26

I have been scouring the Intelweb and TNF for a couple of hours trying to find a photograph of John Webb, all I found was a photo of his aeroplane taking off at Oulton, for a man who was so influential it would appear there are none, can anyone help out ?

Should there be a choice early 70's would be good ?

Thanking you in anticipation :-)


Here's all I found... http://forix.autospo.../8w/bsp-86.html

Edited by MCS, 03 December 2010 - 18:27.


#44 Phil Rainford

Phil Rainford
  • Member

  • 5,289 posts
  • Joined: March 07

Posted 03 December 2010 - 20:05

[quote]name='Simon Taylor' date='Nov 17 2010, 12:10' post='4725475']
Here's a nostalgic query for anyone who grew up in the UK in the 1960s listening to those gloriously irreverent and life-affirming offshore pirate radio stations:

Last week I spent a fascinating day in Spain with former circuit supremo John Webb, who has lived there with his wife Angela in retirement for over 20 years since the Foulston debacle. At the age of nearly 80 he is a mine of stories and controversial views, which will be the subject of an upcoming "Lunch With..." in Motor Sport.


Simon Taylor[/quote]

New article on the horizon :)

PAR


#45 Gatmo

Gatmo
  • Member

  • 270 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 03 December 2010 - 21:37

I'd imagine that will be a great read. :)

#46 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,117 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 03 December 2010 - 23:01

I nods my head appreciatively in the general direction of John Webb, whose spin-off airline (Webbair) gave me my first commercial fight aboard a DC3 during the mid-1960s, from Gatwick to a NATO base somewhere near the Nurburgring for the GP (we cruised there at about 9000 ft, which was fun, but even more so were the intrepid Starfighter pilots who turned out to stare as the Dak waddled in to its berth on their apron. Different times).

#47 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 7,616 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 04 December 2010 - 12:38

I was wondering if any TNFer's had actually taken a photograph of Mr Webb, if not I'll try LAT :-)

There are three photos of him in Chas Parker's book referred to above, two being from his own collection and one (on page 10) credited to LAT.

Edited by Alan Cox, 04 December 2010 - 13:35.


#48 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 3,530 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 04 December 2010 - 12:46

Amazingly, the internet seems to be remarkably devoid of photos of John Webb. Having done a Google image search, only one appears and that is a poor-quality newspaper scan http://forix.autospo.../8w/bsp-86.html
There are, however, three photos of him in Chas Parker's book referred to above, two being from his own collection and one (on page 10) credited to LAT.


Am I still on your "Ignore" list?!!

(See post #43)


#49 Alan Cox

Alan Cox
  • Member

  • 7,616 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 04 December 2010 - 13:35

Sorry, Mark. Never opened the link!

#50 ReWind

ReWind
  • Member

  • 2,345 posts
  • Joined: October 03

Posted 04 December 2010 - 14:39

From Mike Kettlewell's "The Pace Motor Racing Directory" [p. 258]:
Posted Image(No photo credit given. I enlarged a fairly small image.)
In that book (published in 1981) John Webb is described as "50-year-old managing director of Motor Circuit Developments and the four MCD circuits" who "is based at Brands Hatch. One of the most influential men in motor racing, he has been largely responsible for the commercialisation of British motor racing from the 1960s. He was partly behind the introduction of Formula Ford and other categories such as Formula 5000, Formula Atlantic and Sports 2000."