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Bluebird - which party is missing the point?


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#101 Don Speekingleesh

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Posted 17 March 2006 - 22:39

This could be it. (well it's the big lake in the area of the coords from Wiki. Hopefully someone who knows the area can confirm.)

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#102 Terry Walker

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 02:26

Yes, right on target: that's Lake Dumbleyung.

#103 Catalina Park

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 08:34

Donald Campbell had just been to hell and back to get the Bluebird car to beat the record. For him to jump into the boat at Lake Dumbleyung and take the water record in the same year was a great feat that has been overlooked. After what he had been through at Lake Ayre I would imagine that the last thing on his mind would have been another session of waiting for the right weather to go for a record run.

#104 275 GTB-4

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 09:34

Originally posted by Catalina Park
Donald Campbell had just been to hell and back to get the Bluebird car to beat the record. For him to jump into the boat at Lake Dumbleyung and take the water record in the same year was a great feat that has been overlooked. After what he had been through at Lake Ayre I would imagine that the last thing on his mind would have been another session of waiting for the right weather to go for a record run.


Stolen from Mad Magazine....Scenes we'd like to see.....

Donald Campbell collaborates with Ken Warby at Blowering Dam on highly successful WSR attempt ;) :D

#105 MPea3

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 16:00

Originally posted by 275 GTB-4


Stolen from Mad Magazine....Scenes we'd like to see.....

Donald Campbell collaborates with Ken Warby at Blowering Dam on highly successful WSR attempt ;) :D


Warby's at it again you know.... I don't know if he plans on driving the new boat himself or will have his son drive.

#106 f1steveuk

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 16:39

Originally posted by MPea3


Warby's at it again you know.... I don't know if he plans on driving the new boat himself or will have his son drive.


Ken's new boat has run a couple of times, with him at the helm, but the record attempt is to be piloted by his son. It's a four pointer now, which should make it more stable that Spirit of Australia, which was scary to watch!!

#107 MPea3

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 18:49

Originally posted by f1steveuk


Ken's new boat has run a couple of times, with him at the helm, but the record attempt is to be piloted by his son. It's a four pointer now, which should make it more stable that Spirit of Australia, which was scary to watch!!


Yeah, he has a video on his website of the boat running. I didn;t realize it was a 4 pointer.

Isn't the Quicksilver a reverse 3 pointer? At the rate it's going, it might end up in the expensive flops thread.

#108 f1steveuk

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Posted 18 March 2006 - 18:59

Some wag has christened it "Quicksinker". Ken Norris designed a four version of K7, which MacKnight's team decided against using, and went for a reverse three pointer, which in the tank has shown an alarming tendency to be a very fast submarine. I know a frame has been built, but Nigel has done years (and I mean years of talking) and is really no closer to actually driving anything. Ken Norris always said to me, "it is right if it looks right" Quicksilver just doesn't look RIGHT

#109 Warren Matthews

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 05:14

Originally posted by 275 GTB-4


Warren....thanks for that...mind giving us some directions to Lake Dumbleyung? I would like to check it out on Google Map/Earth. Cheers, Mick :up:



Sorry for delay in reply but have been away for few days- the ref quoted looks like it as Terry said.
Off local RAC map Lat 33º 30'S Long 117º 40'E

#110 Warren Matthews

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 06:24

Noticed on other articles elsewhere and on other Forums that a K7 Club had been formed after the recovery of Bluebird and DC.

The original K7 Club was for members of the timing crew and one or two members of the press who were inducted only if Water Speed Record was broken.

The members inducted after 31st. December were Don Reimann (deceased) Rod Style Sr.,
Don Noack and myself. Frank Platell was only press member inducted from memory.
Received a formal letter, which I can't find of course, and at that time HRH The Duke of Edinburgh was Patron.

Also received an invite to Annual Dinner, which was to be held in Manchester, and we thought it was a long way to go for dinner. :

#111 Terry Walker

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 13:09

Lake Dumbleyung nearer 33 degrees 20 seconds south rather than 33 degrees 30 seconds I think you'll find. If I could find my tatty old rally 1;250,000 map of the area I could be more accurate. But I packed all my old Oz ordnance survey maps away in a box in no order, and I have hundreds of them.

I'll have a rummage in the morning.

#112 f1steveuk

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 13:10

Well much of the discussion over the previous three pages seems academic now. A visit to www.bluebirdproject.com will show, K7 has been stripped down, and flipped over. All of the damaged area has been cut away, although Bill Smith tells me that the restoration should retain over 70% of the original. I am still of the opinion, it should still be at the bottom of Coniston, but it isn't, and at the memorial service for Ken Norris, it became fairly clear that Ken had let it be known, that if it's up, it had to look "the business" not a scrap yard. Having given it a lot of thought, K7 looking as she did will be a tribute to a brave man, and to the deign genius of Ken, so grudgingly I find myself objecting far less.

#113 BarryD

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 10:19

Hmmm.....What a shame.

As an aside, a visit to Brooklands to have a look at the "part restored/part conserved" Wellington which was raised from Loch Ness shows just how well and how effectively and sensitively a project like this can be carried out.
The restored areas and the original ones are not at all in conflict.
There was just the one fatality in that particular incident and it has been neither glorified nor ignored.
I found a quiet hour there to be memorable and not a little humbling.

Barry D

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#114 LB

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 11:19

Originally posted by bill moffat
Ah yes, the top photo on the BBC website reflects the true spirit of respect and solemnity which accompanied the raising of K7...


from the bluebirdproject website

"Apology

It was suggested that by standing on the rear deck of Bluebird as she was winched out of the water and looking jubilant, I was being somewhat irreverent. Although this was in no way the intention, I do accept that it may have upset some people and I apologise unreservedly for any distress that I may have caused. On the other hand, I did receive the blessing of Tonia to stand there. She was at the time the only person available whom I could ask and I would have abided by her wishes whatever they may have been. The truth is that I was simply very relieved that we had got the boat out of there without injury to anyone or damage to the boat. Ironically, it was the press who were shouting for a gesture of some kind.

I have also been asked about my somewhat unusual hat. I’ve worn it whilst on the water for almost ten years and my "searching hat" is to me what Mr Whoppit was to Donald. The idea of leaving it off my head on such an important occasion was unthinkable! I was later told by Tonia that Donald loved silly hats and there are several pictures of him in his "Noddy" hat that she bought for him shortly before his accident. "

#115 RTH

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 10:43

The JCB DieselMax has just cruised through 200 MPH at RAF Wittering next stop Bonneville !

http://www.pistonhea...p?storyId=14660

The diesel wheel driven LSR is 235mph Andy Green and the JCB team are looking for 300 plus !.......with 2 excavator engines ! It was at the motor show, it is incredibly narrow ... not much wider than a wheelbarrow !

#116 cosworth bdg

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 12:05

Originally posted by ensign14
One is reminded of the fallout in Yes Prime Minister when a full army team was sent out to rescue a lost dog on Salisbury Plain.

PM Jim Hacker was pleased with the ratings boost until presented with a bill for £330,000.

When asked what he should do, Private Secretary Bernard Woolley suggested putting the dog back.

This is the bit that annoys me the most:



There's me thinking that breaking the World Water Speed Record was the most important aspect.

Of course, it would be wrong to suggest that the Heritage Fund wants to save a few bob to donate to Dorking Lesbian Experimental Dance and a Make Your Own Macrame Activist course, but I cannot think of another way to finish this sentence.

It sounds all very BRITISH to myself......................

#117 jo-briggs

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 12:19

The HLF want to emphasise the "Heroic Failure" aspect......

It should never have been brought up.

#118 cosworth bdg

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 12:44

Originally posted by jo-briggs
The HLF want to emphasise the "Heroic Failure" aspect......

It should never have been brought up.

I agree.................... :up: :up: :up:

#119 Tom Thomas

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 20:42

Originally posted by James Page
Personally, I think they should have left Bluebird at the bottom of Coniston, in the same way as I think it was quite sad that Babs was retrieved from Pendine.

If it was to be rebuilt, it wouldn't be Bluebird - it would be a new boat that just looked the same. And if you were to do that, why not just build a replica?


It's a real tough call, but I think I agree with you. I'm sure everyone envolved has good intentions. I'm a Yank, have never been to the area and, sorry to say, will probably never have a chance to, so I might be talking out of my backside. A replica on display somewhere near the area of the crash site (sort of a monument) could have shown visitors what she looked like, tell of the records, Donald Campbell and explain what happened that day. It's a little late now, but she should have not be raised in the first place.
Sorry if I sound like a smartass, but it's an important part of history (even to many of us in the States) and shouldn't be screwed around with.

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#120 rbm

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 08:52

As I said earlier on, I sit and type this less than a mile from crash site, my in-laws and some of the people I work with were involved with the original attempt.

I still believe that Bluebird should have been left where it was, especially when no one seams to have thought through what they were going to do after it hit the surface, every one involved seamed to be so wrapped up in how great they were to recover it know one thought whether they should recover it.

If left would it have been scavenged? Well it took the treasure hunters 10 years to find and then it was a difficult dive due to depth and conditions - so who knows - and it’s a bit late now.

What about the HLF? wasn’t the original submission to the HLF to rebuild the boat to full working condition, replacing all damaged and structurally unsound components, this included the engine stressed skin and frames (about 99% perhaps :rolleyes: so when is a replica not a replica? ) this submission was rejected, leading to the comments about selling it on eBay or sinking it in concrete.
I'm fairly sure at NO time have they (HLF) said it should be left as a monument to a historic failure, what they did say is they would be very happy to fund the restoration of any of the original Bluebird, BUT they would not fund new bits and if a bid was submitted along those lines they would look favorably at it.

So it's out of the water - now what, well for my books you have to conserve and restore, (make it look complete and un damaged) does it have to fly again? well if put back to full working order, who the hell would use it as it meant to be used? it's not like you can drive it up Lord March's drive is it?

#121 Franklin Ratliff

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 19:56

Originally posted by RTH
I remember watching the wreck emerging from the lake in the TV documentary and feeling very uneasy about the whole process.

It is so terribly badly damaged, it would not be a sympathetic restoration , it would be a completely new vehicle. It's a bit like saying the "Mary Rose " should be rebuilt and sailed down to Spain and back !

Rather as we discussed the 35B untouched for 55 years, recently, I think also it would be preferable and much more dignified if the remains of the Bluebird speed boat stayed untouched.

There is already a GRP full size film 'prop' of the boat used in another TV reconstruction of that fateful day in 1967. Enough.


Everything aft of where the cockpit was is completely intact. Reconstruction would involve building a new cockpit, sponsons and spars while grafting those on to the original construction.

#122 Franklin Ratliff

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 21:25

Originally posted by SEdward
Sorry to spoil the party folks, but IMHO the Campbells were everything but heroes. They were spoilt brats. I think that they were no more than indolent aristocrats who lived a life of luxury by exploiting hard working people. To portray their exploits as heroic is simply sad.

There are countless examples of true heroism in our beloved sport without having to mention monied wasters like the Campbells.

They belong in Père Lachaise with the rest of them.

Illych Edward.


Sir Malcolm made his money in the insurance industry, not from inherited wealth.

Sir Malcolm's money went to the grandkids, not to Donald.

#123 Tom Thomas

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 22:23

Originally posted by SEdward
Sorry to spoil the party folks, but IMHO the Campbells were everything but heroes. They were spoilt brats. I think that they were no more than indolent aristocrats who lived a life of luxury by exploiting hard working people. To portray their exploits as heroic is simply sad.

There are countless examples of true heroism in our beloved sport without having to mention monied wasters like the Campbells.

They belong in Père Lachaise with the rest of them.

Illych Edward.



I'm not asking you this question to be confrontational. In what way did the Campbells exploit hard working people?

#124 Tom Thomas

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 22:48

Originally posted by Franklin Ratliff


Sir Malcolm made his money in the insurance industry, not from inherited wealth.

Sir Malcolm's money went to the grandkids, not to Donald.



Thanks for clearing that up.

One other thing Franklin. You seem to have a very broad knowledge of all things motorsports. If I may ask, in what country do you live.

#125 D-Type

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 23:25

Well, if you look at Franklin's profile he says he lives in Florida.

back on topic: If we face reality and accept that now Bluebird has been raised, it can't be put back so we now have to ask ourselves 'What to do with it?'

To restore it to running order is pointless. This is a machine created with just one purpose - to go as fast as possible. To parade it at slow speeds way below its potential, if you think about it, is simply an animated freak show. Displaying it 'as-found' is definitely in the same class as 'Marie Antoinette's death mask', 'Locks of Napoleon's hair', etc.

Having visited the Bluebird restorers' site and seen what they are doing, I feel that under the circumstances, that is the only thing to do, now. That is to conserve what they can and re-create the remainder. I can see the restorers' frustration coming through in the diary, but I feel it is good that they can articulate and express their views. Their practicality and pragmatism will offer a foil to the, possibly too, academic views of the historians and 'museum-ologists'. The result will be a fitting tribute to Donald Campbell and all his fellow record breakers.

I have long realised that record breakers are driven by a compulsion; like racing drivers they have to have a strong streak of egoism in their make-up. This often makes them unsympathetic characters when judged by the standards we ask of our friends and family. So what! Their greatness lies in their achievements not in whether they are likeable or sympathetic characters who would win Big Brother .

#126 Tom Thomas

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 23:54

Originally posted by D-Type
Well, if you look at Franklin's profile he says he lives in Florida.

back on topic: If we face reality and accept that now Bluebird has been raised, it can't be put back so we now have to ask ourselves 'What to do with it?'

To restore it to running order is pointless. This is a machine created with just one purpose - to go as fast as possible. To parade it at slow speeds way below its potential, if you think about it, is simply an animated freak show. Displaying it 'as-found' is definitely in the same class as 'marie Antoinette's death mask', 'Locks of Napoleon's hair', etc.

Having visited the Bluebird restorers' site and seen what they are doing, I feel that under the circumstances, that is the only thing to do, now. That is to conserve what they can and re-create the remainder. I can see the restorers' frustration coming through in the diary, but I feel it is good that they can articulate and express their views. Their practicality and pragmatism will offer a foil to the, possibly too, academic views of the historians and 'museum-ologists'. The result will be a fitting tribute to Donald Campbell and all his fellow record breakers.

I have long realised that record breakers are driven by a compulsion; like racing drivers they have to have a strong streak of egoism in their make-up. This often makes them unsympathetic characters when judged by the standards we ask of our friends and family. So what! Their greatness lies in their achievements not in whether they a re likeable or sympathetic characters who would win Big Brother .


I've not been on this forum long enough to know how it works. If I had used my head, I would have clicked the profile button and found that he lives in Florida. I agree with your last paragraph completely. Very well put.

#127 BarryD

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 06:24

I also agree and am reminded of the phrase :-

"Nobody ever put up a statue of a critic"

As far as the vessel is concerned, I refer to my earlier post (113) about the Loch Ness Wellington at Brooklands.

Barry D

#128 Franklin Ratliff

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 01:22

Originally posted by Tom Thomas



Thanks for clearing that up.

One other thing Franklin. You seem to have a very broad knowledge of all things motorsports. If I may ask, in what country do you live.


I saw most of the runs, including the last ones, of Craig Arfons tragic but highly innovative water speed record attempt.

It remains to date the last attempt on the World Water Speed Record.

#129 Franklin Ratliff

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 01:25

Originally posted by f1steveuk


Sorry, having made a very very very deep study of the WHOLE family background, that is utter drivel! (no offence). Aristocrats??? How? The first "English" Campbell became one by walking from Scotland with nothing, and set about building up a business that every succeeding Campbell added to, nothing was gifted, it was all worked for, apart form Sir Malcolm (who I actually have no time for) who set up an insurance scheme from sctratch, and succeeded. I admit he did also marry some money which brought him a car or two, but aristocrat, no. Donald was left very very little, had little, and died leaving little, all he had went into the Bluebirds. I don't see anywone having a go at Sir Henry O'Neal de Hane Segrave, now there's an aristocrats name!!!!!!

As for exploiting the workers, Leo Villa was given several cars, three houses (bigger each time) and some huge bonuses for his efforts, and Leo was full of praise for Malcolm, and he also refered to him as "the old bugger".


Leo Villa was one hell of a guy.

#130 Franklin Ratliff

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 01:29

Originally posted by Warren Matthews
While not wanting to comment on Donald Campbell's back ground it takes a lot of guts to get in a boat like Bluebird-.
I was a timekeeper at Dumbleyung and to see both runs , especially the return, was unbelievable.

He may have upset a lot of people, but those in South Australia and WA who did not get paid still like to tell stories of how they were involved .

Lake Dumbleyung is now full of water again for the first time in many years and looks similar to when the runs were made in December 1964.


Any updates about the current status of Ken Warby's project?

#131 LB

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 04:20

Originally posted by BarryD
I also agree and am reminded of the phrase :-

"Nobody ever put up a statue of a critic"

As far as the vessel is concerned, I refer to my earlier post (113) about the Lock Ness Wellington at Brooklands.

Barry D


Loch :evil:;)

#132 BarryD

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 06:15

"Nobody ever put up a statue to a critic"


Or a pedant. :o

#133 jo-briggs

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 21:27

George Bernard Shaw has a statue, and he was a great music critic.

#134 jo-briggs

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 21:33

It always struck me that Malcolm Campbell did everything he could to belittle his son to ensure that Donald didn't better his achievements, which of course he did. As far as I am concerned, Donald was the better man.

#135 MPea3

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 10:24

A couple of things. First, I was under the impression that Malcolm, like his father, was a diamond merchant, and that it was Donald who owned an insurance business.

Second, while there's little doubt that the old man was a hardass, I'm not sure it's fair to say he "did everything he could to belittle his son to ensure that Donald didn't better his achievements". As far as record breaking is concerned, that's something Donald came to only after his father's death, and with their having followed different career paths, I just don't see how that applies. While I'm a big Donald Campbell fan, he seemed to have had his own personal baggage, and the two eras in which they set their records cannot be compared.

#136 RTH

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 11:45

Andy Green and the JCB Dieselmax LSR car set a new world record at Bonneville Yesterday at over 308 MPH ..............and they are not finished yet !!

#137 f1steveuk

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 15:44

Originally posted by MPea3
A couple of things. First, I was under the impression that Malcolm, like his father, was a diamond merchant, and that it was Donald who owned an insurance business.

Second, while there's little doubt that the old man was a hardass, I'm not sure it's fair to say he "did everything he could to belittle his son to ensure that Donald didn't better his achievements". As far as record breaking is concerned, that's something Donald came to only after his father's death, and with their having followed different career paths, I just don't see how that applies. While I'm a big Donald Campbell fan, he seemed to have had his own personal baggage, and the two eras in which they set their records cannot be compared.


Well I have answered all that, and it took a book to do it.

Malcolm never dealt in Diamonds, his first marriage supplied some money, but Malcolm created an insurance against libel actions for newspapers. Donald's insurance company (well he was a director) was Steven Smith Assc.

Malcolm did nothing to prevent his son going into record breaking, he did not belittle his son, he made it difficult for him to go record breaking while he was alive. Donald decided to "have a go" because the means was sitting in the workshop.

It's a more complex subject, hence why I had to write a book!!!

#138 jo-briggs

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 18:05

Originally posted by MPea3
While I'm a big Donald Campbell fan, he seemed to have had his own personal baggage, and the two eras in which they set their records cannot be compared.


The baggage he carried was his father's constant denigration of anything he attempted. Donald was not the sharpest knife in the box, but he had enough guts to run an army.

It was far harder for DC to break records as the advances in technology got smaller and smaller as time passed.

#139 f1steveuk

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 19:23

Originally posted by jo-briggs


The baggage he carried was his father's constant denigration of anything he attempted. Donald was not the sharpest knife in the box, but he had enough guts to run an army.

It was far harder for DC to break records as the advances in technology got smaller and smaller as time passed.


With due respect, "twaddle"! I have known Donald's sister for years, Malcom DID NOT denigrate anything his son did, although did expect things to be done to a high standard!!

Some of Donald's problems came from an early failed marriage, some from two severe accidents (both resulting in fractures to the skull) and some from trying to raise money, when there was none. Donald was very sharpe, KINE Engineering prospered under him, as did ALL his various business projects.

Malcolm was comended by Kitchener after his work in the first world war.

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#140 Stoatspeed

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 20:32

Originally posted by RTH
Andy Green and the JCB Dieselmax LSR car set a new world record at Bonneville Yesterday at over 308 MPH ..............and they are not finished yet !!

Looks like they're neck and neck with the other diesel car there ... but today it looks like the JCB ran at 317 ... Steve had better start writing another LSR book ;) ... and maybe we need a new "flag-waving" thread if the JCB lads keep going towards 400 ...

While we're at it, will you guys please acknowledge Steve's in-depth research for the Campbell book and stop with the "but I thought ..." posts ... he's getting the same treatment about FOCA/F1CA and so on on another thread, and we don't want him to pack up his invaluable knowledge and leave us, now do we? :cry:

Thank you all!

Dave

#141 f1steveuk

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 08:52

Originally posted by Stoatspeed

Looks like they're neck and neck with the other diesel car there ... but today it looks like the JCB ran at 317 ... Steve had better start writing another LSR book ;) ... and maybe we need a new "flag-waving" thread if the JCB lads keep going towards 400 ...

While we're at it, will you guys please acknowledge Steve's in-depth research for the Campbell book and stop with the "but I thought ..." posts ... he's getting the same treatment about FOCA/F1CA and so on on another thread, and we don't want him to pack up his invaluable knowledge and leave us, now do we? :cry:

Thank you all!

Dave


Dave, I'm touched!! All part and parcl of TNF isn't though? but thanks for your words.

#142 MPea3

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 09:20

Originally posted by Stoatspeed

Looks like they're neck and neck with the other diesel car there ... but today it looks like the JCB ran at 317 ... Steve had better start writing another LSR book ;) ... and maybe we need a new "flag-waving" thread if the JCB lads keep going towards 400 ...

While we're at it, will you guys please acknowledge Steve's in-depth research for the Campbell book and stop with the "but I thought ..." posts ... he's getting the same treatment about FOCA/F1CA and so on on another thread, and we don't want him to pack up his invaluable knowledge and leave us, now do we? :cry:

Thank you all!

Dave


Agreed. I'm quite happy to be corrected and learn, and Steve's contributions are invaluable to me. I'm a big fan of the Campbells and enjoy learning more. :)

#143 jo-briggs

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 12:54

f1steveuk,

Sorry, I must have been grieviously misled by the BBC "Docudrama" which seemed to imply that that was the case. But I still firmly believe that he had courage in spades.

As for sisters; I always take their memories with a hefty pinch of salt. Mine remembers things I never did, things I apparently did when I was in fact 100 miles away; not to mention how nasty I was to her on her teenage birthdays - a bit difficult as I was away at boarding school........

#144 f1steveuk

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 18:34

Originally posted by jo-briggs
f1steveuk,

Sorry, I must have been grieviously misled by the BBC "Docudrama" which seemed to imply that that was the case. But I still firmly believe that he had courage in spades.

As for sisters; I always take their memories with a hefty pinch of salt. Mine remembers things I never did, things I apparently did when I was in fact 100 miles away; not to mention how nasty I was to her on her teenage birthdays - a bit difficult as I was away at boarding school........


If that was "days that shook the earth" totally agree, and Across the Lake wasn't much better, and as for The Speed King, pure fiction. Donald did indeed have courage in spades, because to all intents and purposes he hated doing it, but still did, but I'd be the first to say neither man was anywhere near perfect, far from it!!

#145 RTH

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 17:36

The JCB Dieselmax having passed 328MPH is now being fitted with its 2 'Record' engines ready for its fully official runs !

#146 f1steveuk

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 18:07

Originally posted by RTH
The JCB Dieselmax having passed 328MPH is now being fitted with its 2 'Record' engines ready for its fully official runs !


Looks like Andy may have "got the bug" now!!!

#147 Stoatspeed

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 18:29

Originally posted by f1steveuk
Looks like Andy may have "got the bug" now!!!


Sounds like they still have a few challenges ... look at the video on the Dieselmax web site ... Andy said the front engine was overheating and went to reduced power on the record runs .. they are now installing more powerful engines and have to turn the car round in one hour, not one day as they did for the Bonneville record ...oh, and the parachute fell off .... I'd be more concerned than he seems to be!
Whatever the challenges, I'm rooting for them ... another demonstration of Anthony Bamford's belief in the British Spirit and ahievement in motorsports.
If you'll pardon the pun ... "Smoke 'em, Andy!" :D (with apologies to my old friends at Ricardo, who I'm sure are running the engines to strict low smoke emissions .. :smoking:

Dave

#148 MrAerodynamicist

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 12:00

It's now set an offficial record of 328.767mph

#149 RTH

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 16:05

The Dieselmax has just set 350 MPH.

#150 RTH

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 16:40

I see there is to be a further attempt on the Furniture World Land Speed Record currently held by a road legal Sofa at 87 MPH.

Protagonists will be looking to crack 100MPH around the Rockingham oval 9/10 September

http://www.pistonhea...p?storyId=14892