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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#451 fines

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:59

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
Cheeky. Anyway , can I have it back, please?

Only if you promise to post a cutaway of, say, a 180° V12 engine!

Hey, did I mention it's about 2° C outside - freezin' cold here, even at 50° of latitude...

Oh, alright then! I've had my fun, I'll return it now... :(

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#452 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:09

Originally posted by fines
Only if you promise to post a cutaway of, say, a 180° V12 engine!


I wish I'd done one, Michael. I'm at about 52 - where IS it? - degrees N and below freezing.

I foolishly decided to drive to the local supermarket yesterday evening to 'stock up', nearly did the splits on the road by the driver's door so decided to walk, got four bottles of wine, a packet of cashews and groin strain. Roll on the blistering grey skies of summer.

Edited to say - I missed the full majesty of your joke, Michael, silly me! A degree of humility is offered.

#453 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:12

Originally posted by alansart


Google Alvin Ellipse Templates and you get various options. Beware they aren't cheap although the never were. The exact same sets I brought in 1982 for about £150 only cost about £200 now. (small, medium & large)



Alan have you checked IrishMariner's link? I haven't scrutinized every available set of guides, maker's names aren't prominent, but the prices look amazingly low!

#454 Engineguy

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:26

Tony,
Thank you so much for sharing your artwork with us. Your works and similar works of your peers always left me awestruck... I'm one of those who assumed they took a year with the the car/engine at your side. Knowing now that you could do several a year, it's really a shame they're not being done... with the amount of money in racing these days you'd think plenty of teams/sponsors would toss you a couple months of generous income for a beautiful illustration they could use in promotions, gifts, etc.

Works like yours had a bit of a dis-inspiration effect on me: I started drawing cars (pencil/pen) very young and was pretty good, but without formal illustration training the quality I saw in magazines seemed an unreachable goal... especially the color illustrations... so I didn't persue it. After years in engineering and programming, I combined that with my old passion of car design/illustration to create software to allow anyone to pretend to be Tony Matthews (well, not quite). After a few years, and a few aborted attempts at making it 3D, I settled on a side view only approach to reach a wider audience and make it quick and fun rather than hard to understand. Maybe it'll inspire a few to take up a car design/illustration career :cool:

Posted Image


Originally posted by Tony Matthews
(where's the degree simbol key?) ...


Hold down the ALT key and type 0176 on the numeric keypad. When you let up on the ALT key the ° will appear.

0177 is plus/minus symbol ±
0178 is squared symbol ²
0179 is cubed symbol ³
0188 is one-quarter ¼
0189 is one-half ½

I have 'em written on my keyboard since I do a lot of technical writing.
.

#455 Pat Clarke

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:41

Quote Tony M.

"I foolishly decided to drive to the local supermarket yesterday evening to 'stock up', nearly did the splits on the road by the driver's door so decided to walk, got four bottles of wine, a packet of cashews and groin strain. Roll on the blistering grey skies of summer".


Well, I foolishly decided to drive to the local service station to fill up my wifes car. I live in the Blue Mountains and the temperature was comfortably hot and uncomfortably humid.

At the bottom of the Mountains it was bloody 42 degrees and still bloody humid.

Trouble is my 42 degrees is not the same as your 42 degrees!

BTW, the heatwave that has spawned the fires in Victoria has now killed 84 people with many more expected.
Spare them a thought.

Pat

#456 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:01

Hi Engineguy, I understand your attitude to professional illustrations, they are daunting if you have made an effort and been left less than happy with the results. It is just this reaction that has prevented me from being able to play the guitar! I think that if you see that you are making progress, you are inspired by other's work - I used to clip artwork in magazines and newspapers to give me something to aim for.

Of course, initially Jim Allington was the major inspiration, particularly as I have always been drawn (!) to B&W in illustration and photography, and as happens in all the best tutor/pupil relationships I ended up influencing and challenging him. The discussions we would have about shading, texture, nib-size and paper meant cold coffee on many occasions.

I find Tom Johnson's work inspirational, but I can't do it - we work in different media, and he has said that he can't/doesn't want to work the way that I do. That's a relief, Tom! Certainly I have no desire to illustrate on a screen, I need the tactile experience of drawing on paper or film and adding colour via brush or airbrush.

I like sideviews, and for artwork that I knew had a chance of being seen 'live' I would add them to help fill in the white card around a cutaway, and they are great for showing gradual change in design model to model.

Many thanks, too, for emphasizing that I miss-spelt 'cymbal'! Look out for a flurry of °'s!

#457 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:10

Originally posted by Pat Clarke
BTW, the heatwave that has spawned the fires in Victoria has now killed 84 people with many more expected. Spare them a thought.
Pat


Absolutely, what we are suffering is, well, the word 'suffering' is not really correct for most of us, it's bloody inconvenient. I'm putting on weight and losing money, but I ain't dying.

I drove over the Blue Mountains a couple of times in 1990, Pat, but in October, so very chilly in the morning and evening and hot enough midday to take the skin off your nose. Ah, Bathurst...

#458 alansart

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:27

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
you are inspired by other's work - I used to clip artwork in magazines and newspapers to give me something to aim for.


I used to stroll into college on a thursday morning with Motoring News and lay the latest Matthews cutaway on my desk. Old Mike Wrigglesworth would wander over for a look, take a puff on his pipe and mutter "keep going Alan there's a long way to go yet" and then stroll off with a smile on his face :)

I kept a lot of Bob Freeman's pictures to hand when I felt my stuff was getting a bit tight and I needed to loosen up.

We're never to young/old to learn from others :)

#459 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:38

[QUOTE]Originally posted by alansart
I used to stroll into college on a thursday morning with Motoring News and lay the latest Matthews cutaway on my desk. Old Mike Wrigglesworth ...[QUOTE]

He's 70 now Alan, pretty fit and didn't look very different, I thought he'd changed less than I have! I called on him about a month ago.

We're never to young/old to learn from others :) [/QUOTE]

Absolutely, and if you run out of inspiration or challenges the whole thing becomes a bit of a chore. Like all jobs.

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#460 alansart

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:54

Originally posted by Tony Matthews

He's 70 now Alan, pretty fit and didn't look very different, I thought he'd changed less than I have! I called on him about a month ago.


Excellent news - He gave me the confidence and direction so that I'm still at it now...even if it is mostly on Apple Macs :)

#461 Anomnader

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 14:45

Some nice pictures

Hi Tony was wondering if you have a website where they are all displayed?

I'm a web developer who also does small hosting, if you don't have a site that can display them without resorting to image shack, please message me and I can see about setting something up.

#462 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 16:10

Originally posted by Anomnader
Hi Tony was wondering if you have a website where they are all displayed?


Thank you , there is a site, set up by Kevin Hulsey, featuring several automotive illustrators, I am still not quite adjusted to seeing it, but I am pleased that Kevin wanted my work on his site. http://khulsey.com/m...y_matthews.html

It's unlikely that I will have a site of my own, but you never know, I will certainly bear your offer in mind.

#463 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 16:35

Originally posted by Manfred Cubenoggin
Asked with greatest respect, have you ever bungled something so badly that it's never seen the light of day? Was there something that despite all efforts, you just couldn't get quite right?


Well :lol: for a start, Manfred! I've had to make a couple of re-starts, but not too far into the job. Drawing the cars from scratch, rather than using a photograph to give the outline, can be a bit nerve-wracking, apart from just not getting it right it's quite possible, when trying to maximise the image on the board, to find out, too late, that some piece of bodywork actually hangs over the edge.

In B&W it's not too bad, you can stick a bit of board on and carry on, but colour is harder. I helps if the drawing is done on film as you are forwarned and can opt to cut down a bigger board, but I hate waste!

I had to restart the colour version of the Ilmor 500I engine as, having spent over a day pressing the working drawing onto watercolour board I screwed up the top two or three inches when painting the plenum chamber, so binned it. Second time round I pressed it through in stages, about four inches at a time, painting as I went.

I took my March 83C cutaway to the factory for a check, and after some minutes Alan Mertens said 'Youv'e only got three LH headers!' And so I had, but the fourth was on the drawing, not much of it showed and I had cheerfully obscured the line of it with rendered heat-resistant quilted mat. Embarassing, but it just makes you check and re-check.

I've just remembered doing some renderings for Jackie Oliver in the Ambrosia days, didn't make any notes, completely forgot what he'd asked for and presented him with a load of painstakingly produced rubbish. Got an earfull for that!

Don't forget your coat!

PS Or did you mean in life in general? If so, yes!

#464 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 18:47

Originally posted by Bonde
Tony, Did you use the "P"-type of leads when drawing on film? I always found them very crisp and firm but rather cumbersome to erase (though a damned sight easier than ink).


I braved the bitter cold of the attic, not to mention the bitter cold of the steps that were brought in from outside, and I can now tell you, Anders, that I used Pentel 'Ultrafine' Hi-Polymer SUPER leads, 0.3mm 4H. in a funny little Steadtler mechanical pencil. Before that, on board, Steadtler clutch pencils and 2.0mm 3H Mars leads. Far too big and soft for film, and all that sharpening was tedious and messy, although the dedicated Steadtler sharpeners helped, unless you had a little accident when emptying them!

Imperial drafting film, 50 micron single matt - I started on 75 micron double matt before I knew what the options were, usual bull-at-a-gate moi. I found the 4H lead was a joy on the film, very sexy, like sheer nylon on...Sorry, where was I? No problem erasing it with (I think) Mars plastic erasers, but the way I worked it was not a problem leaving pencil errors as I inkeed over the ones I wanted.

That's where the Rotring and later Faber-Castell pens came in, 0.2mm and Rotring Chinese Black ink - Zeichentusche, Encre de Chine, Tinta china, it says - I found the 'New!' Rotring MF Film ink rather grey and slow-drying. You can remove the ink quite easily with a moistened cotton bud, which I used to consume at quite a rate. I may have commanded a little suspicion in Boots the Chemists, hanging around the Mother and Baby section, only to buy two 250 packs of cotton buds, but you have to suffer for your art. You have to exercise a little caution moistening them or get some funny glances when you saunter into the pub looking as though you've overdosed on liquorice.

If I was to start again on board I'd do it the way I used to, one problem with pressing through onto softish board is the indented line, no problem with paint, but coloured pencil skates over the top, leaving a line the colour of the board. My B&W line work was drawn in pencil, the chosen lines inked, the whole illustration rubbed out almost to invisibility using hard blue Colonel erasers, which contain an abrasive, we always thought it was powdered glass, but possibly not. This gave a pure white surface with a superb working surface, and all the main lines in very pale grey, shading was done on top of the final inking of those lines, and any mistakes were razor'd off and more blue eraser.

Will someone please stop me, I feel like my late friend Ben Sutton, Ten Men Ben, who, when he was on a jack-hammer, could only be stopped by shutting down the compressor.

#465 macoran

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 19:45

Originally posted by Bonde
Although this doesn't stand up to the light of day, I've posted it for Macoran: There never was a Comprex-supercharged Escort Mk. III Group 5 with rear wheel drive - rules stated that the driving wheels had to be as on the 'donor' car - I just didn't know any better when I was 21...But I did rather fancy the BBC Comprex!

Posted Image


Good job there Anders, I bet if you'd shown it to Martin Schanche at the time, he'd have had you build one !

#466 Bonde

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 22:07

Thanks for the kind words, Tony and Marc.

If Schanche had me build one in those days, his career and mine would have ended right there and then... :eek: I still knew very little about the actual engineering then - I do know a bit (but not a lot) more now...

I suppose I've mellowed with age and have begun to accept that 'my style' is rather loose, and probably will (and should) remain so - it's also a consequence of working primarily in pencil. I also still enjoy Brian Hatton's style immensely, so loose ain't bad in and of itself. Still, Tony's work remains for me the Gold Standard in both linework and colour, with Allington a close second in linework. There are/were many other excellent illustrators out there, fortunately, for it takes many artists to illustrate the huge mass of worthwhile subject matter out there.

The Escort is particularly loose, not only due to lack of experience and lack of knowledge, but also because I made up the design as I went along, it was done in a weekend or two, and I had no ellipse templates. (I still only have way too few - only the brake disks and the inlet trumpets on the Pantera were done using ellipse templates - everything else is a mix of freehand and French curves.) Most (of only a few) of my cutaway drawings back then were loosely sketched in pencil, typically on ivory board, drawn up in felt-tip pen (went through a few as the tips grew blunt) and the pencil lines subsequently erased, colour added in pencil. I later did a couple with Rapidograph pen, but my hand wasn't (isn't) steady enough for freehand work with the very light pressure Rapidographs require. Later on I went 100% pencil, sketching very, very lightly in 4H and the finishing with softer pencils. Now I sketch in pencil and some felt tip pen and then trace the pencil sketch with line and colour on ivory board using a light box.

I use(d) Staedtler or Pentel 0,3, 0,5 and 0,7 mm, and have also used the 2 mm with the sharpener - I always sharpened over a bowl specifically used for the task, rather than risk losing the sharpener in a waste paper basket...

Strangely, when I used to do exploded views for my aerospace employer, I did it all in pencil on isometric paper, then traced it in pencil, using a light box, on either film or paper. Engineering drawings B.C. (Before CAD) were done with the Polymer leads Tony also used on Mylar film, one side matt. I never did use pen in my professional life.

Now, if anyone is interested, I can actually post my very first cutaway, done when I was a pimply lad of 15. It is acutely embarrasing, but may have some relevance to this thread and forum anyway...

#467 macoran

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 22:18

Anders, your first cutaway will be better than mine, as I will still have to start.

All I've ever done in "view" "projection" drawing are exploded views for maintenance and parts manuals.
I wouldn't even have enough photographic material to start one.

So go on Anders, show us.

#468 Bonde

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:00

...ooookayeee...[holds breath]...I'll show me mine, if you'll show me your, Marc:

Posted Image

:blush: :blush: :blush:

#469 macoran

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:13

Originally posted by Bonde
...ooookayeee...[holds breath]...I'll show me mine, if you'll show me your, Marc:

Posted Image

:blush: :blush: :blush:


I have nothing to show yet Anders............... but

for a 15 year old consider that STUNNING !!

The only hint you were 15 when you did that is signing it Anders Bonde "75" and maybe.....
your spelling of the "Matleese" GP :D

#470 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:19

Originally posted by macoran
but for a 15 year old consider that STUNNING !!


I quite agree Marc. Anders, I couldn't better, or equal that when I was 15, terrific stuff.

#471 macoran

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:25

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
I couldn't better, or equal that when I was 15, terrific stuff.


I was wondering just that as I was writing Tony...did you start that early ?

#472 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:34

I was making model aircraft and explosives at 15, but was introduced to Jim Allington when I was 16, that was the turning point! I found my first car cutaway earlier today, but have since re-lost it, and I think it has the date on the back - I would guess I was 18 or 19. A Lotus 7, and Jim helped on some of it, mainly because it was needed for the Workshop and Owners Manuals. I did a body-only cutaway of a Marcos, the little gullwing-door effort, before that, but have no idea when, or what happened to the artwork.

Anders, the more I look at your drawing and the more I think about it the more impressed I am!

#473 Bonde

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 23:45

Thanks, Gents. :blush:

I suppose it just goes to show that Tony's skill improved a lot more and a lot more rapidly than mine!

Marc,

The "Matleese" thingy was actually intentional. You see, I had this imaginary country, called "Matlos", an Island in the North Sea, somewhere north-west of Ireland. The capitol was "Ikantiki", after which the car manufacturer was named (don't ask me why I chose that name, but I think it had something to do with Thor Heyerdahl's Kontiki-expedition). I even drew maps of the country and prospects of the city, and embarked on a rather profusely illustrated book called "The Racing Ikantikis", which, unfortunately, hasn't survived my 11 house moves, a fate shared with several Ikantiki F1 cardboard models. A bit later in my teens I dropped the imaginary country bit (embarassing and silly if you want to start dating members of the opposite sex), but the made-up-as-I-went-along drawings and carboard model cars remained "Ikantikis", with the odd somewhat down-market "ABC" cars (Anders Bonde Cars) up to 1982. All the while, "my" F1 team's major sponsor was NMP, Northsea Motor Petroleum [I had strong opinions then, that fossil fuel should exclusively be used for transportation and chemical industry, not for heating or electric power generation (I still hold that viewpoint)]. As a gag, I put "NMP" logos on my unsponsored Formula Fords when I dabbled with driving myself...

Sorry about that rather off-topic narcissistic display of youthful exuberance and ignorance. You will notice, I'm sure, a lot of 24 carat engineering gaffes in all my earlier works of imagination...

#474 alansart

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 07:50

Originally posted by Bonde
...ooookayeee...[holds breath]...I'll show me mine, if you'll show me your, Marc:

Posted Image

:blush: :blush: :blush:


That's incredible for somebody of 15 :)

#475 fines

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:43

Originally posted by Bonde

Now, if anyone is interested, I can actually post my very first cutaway, done when I was a pimply lad of 15. It is acutely embarrasing, but may have some relevance to this thread and forum anyway...

Embarrassing? I'm lost for words! If I could've done that at 15 I wouldn't have to resort to "collecting facts and figures"! :lol: Man, you have talent!

OT, but it's interesting to see that I'm not the only person in the world to have "invented" a country! :lol: Maps and the lot, too! Of course, racing was #1 sport, and my country had lots of interesting circuits, cars and drivers... but I digress! :D

#476 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 13:10

Tony:

Thank you for responding to my question above. I was fearful that you and other members of TNF might take it the wrong way and be offended. My rational for asking was strictly honest and above board.

#477 alansart

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 15:10

Originally posted by Engineguy
TI settled on a side view only approach to reach a wider audience and make it quick and fun rather than hard to understand. Maybe it'll inspire a few to take up a car design/illustration career :cool:


Side views have their value and given decent information can be very quick.

Not motor sport but underwater testing.

http://www.alanraine...n.co.uk/H47.pdf

#478 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 14:58

Posted Image

My apologies for posting this here, but I've at last managed to get a print small enough to fit my scanner, it should replace the partial scan posted earlier but I'm not sure how to do it.

#479 alansart

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 16:22

A big problem with airbush, paint and ink artwork is spillages. There's nothing worse than knocking over a pot of dirty water, or a cup of tea all over your latest masterpiece and basically screwing it!

Occasionally it helps. One december on a field trip from college I was in a hanger at Old Warden sketching an unrestored Hawker Hurricane. It was freezing and was keeping warm on coffee from a flask, which I managed to knock over my last couple of hours work. I dried it off and carried on regardless and was congratulated on my "rustic" look when I got back :)

There was another episode whenworking in Germany. An English colleague had almost finished a fairly complicated airbrush illustration when he knocked a cup of coffee over it. He just sat there speechless for a while and you could see his frustration building up. He got up, walked out of the office on to the balcony (we were on the first floor overlooking a park) and just screamed "BOL**CKS" at the top his voice (frightening the geese), then quietly walked back in and cleared up the mess. About half an hour later our wonderful, female, German boss crept over and quietly asked "What does bol**cks mean?

She learnt a lot about the Brits that lady :)

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#480 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 17:08

You're not wrong Alan! A major source of fear and panic. Food has a very soporific effect on me, and one early afternoon at Jim Allington's studio, on my own, I fell asleep. I was in the process of inking a drawing of Sutton Bridge village in Lincolnshire, it vies, I think, with Arlesey in Hertfordshire, as the longest village in England. The drawing showed the village sprawling along the main road from left to right, and the river, towards the right, going top to bottom.

Over the river there was to be a new bascule bridge, and the illustration was for the Consulting Engineers to show to the relevant Planning Authority. As the cheese and tomato took hold I slumped on my stool and face down, hit the complex steelwork of the proposed bridge. Thus I remained for probably half an hour, mouth slightly open, saliva trickling, wierdly, down the river. The board had to be dried out and the bridge re-drawn and further progress made, all before Jim came back.

There are other stories... no, it's all right, I've stopped!

#481 fines

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 07:53

Don't! The last two posts have been the highlight of my morning so far! :lol:

#482 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 12:04

Not much to do with illustrating per se, except that is what I was doing, prowling the street around Olympia with a large sheet of board, sketching buildings onto a street map for another civil engineering project for Husbands and Co, the proposed London Inner Ring Road. About mid-afternoon I saw a little lady, probably in her early eighties, immaculately dressed in a fur coat and swaying slightly, approaching. She slowed as she reached me, and stopped when I said hello. "I've had a lovely day!" she said. I made an encouraging noise. "It's my birthday, and we've had a little drinks party and all my friends were there. And a photographer. He took a picture of us all." She paused and formed a circle with her right thumb and forefinger, and moved her hand rhythmically. She continued - "And my friend Bunty said to the photographer, why don't you photograph her doing that, because that's how we all remember her!" With that she gave a little hiccup and wandered off.

#483 Bonde

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 14:07

:drunk: ...alright - back on topic...(almost)

In the late 70s, early 80s used to make a made-up-as-I-went-along racing car cutaway for my cousin every year for X-mas - it was usually done the last weekend up to X-mas (and it shows). Anyway, the first thing he'd always try to find on the drawing was the apparently inevitable coffee stain...

For fear of damaging drawings with perspiration, I've always tried to avoid working on drawings on hot days, as we don't have much indoor air-conditioning around here. So if I had/wanted to make a 'good' drawing in high summer, I'd usually work from dusk till dawn (and then get my kip on the beach or in class).

Okay - on topic - I think?

Cut-away versus ghosting - what's the sentiment here?

Personally I think cut-away works equally well in line, monochrome and in full colour, whereas I feel ghosting tends to work a lot better in line, or line with monochrome wash, than it does in full colour. Of course, the two methods can be combined to good effect, but I think one of the reasons that Tony's full colour paintings work so convincingly is due to strict adherence to the cut-away technique. I love Jim Allington's highly detailed line drawings, which often combined the two methods, but many of his coloured line drawings are to my eye simply too "busy". I think this is in contrast to Tony's, in his own words (almost) pedantic style, which has no distractions - it's clear, concise, and easy on the eye. And simply beautiful! Tony, all your illustrations are Works of Art - and the Tom's Toyota Supra is absolutely remarkable in the way that although the blue tone prevails, it doesn't dominate - every object and edge can still be clearly discerned without confusion of the eye. Fantastic!

#484 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 16:25

-Anders, my mind is still boggling at your youthful artwork!

My studio was a very small room, low ceiling and a flat foof, the window facing South, everything you don't want in a studio! In the summer it was not only baking but the sunlightwas so bright I could hardly see the image, so the blind was down and a daylight tube switched on. Crazy. I always wore long-sleeved shirts or photographs and film would stick to my forearms, and in the worst heat, a cotton glove on my right hand, the thumb and first two fingers cut off, to avoid sweat getting on the board. That, combined with shorts, meant that I was always loth to answer the front door for fear of scaring the postman.

The advantage of linework is that ghosting is so easy to do, and looks right. Jim and I used it all the time, you may have noticed that we never detailed the main part of a nearside wheel, just the outer face, the hub carrier, brake and associated suspension was drawn as though the tyre was transparent, and some tread, where appropriate, ghosted over all. It is a great help to be able to indicate a chassis tube under a mass of bodywork, chassis and other parts. When I started using colour I realised that if I was going to keep to my definition of a cutaway this was going to have to stop, and a new approach decided on.

Jim and I started producing colour cutaways seperately, his first that I know of being the Ferrari 156 Sharknose, done while he was at the factory, and I never saw the original as I believe it went straight from Italy to Switzerland to be reproduced in Automobile Year. After that he did none until some time after we went our seperate ways.

His style was different from mine in that he 'coloured' ink line drawings, rather than ink shading them - in other words, he followed the tried and tested route, stopped short and painted - whereas I worked on water colour board with only graphite lines to guide me, and my style has little bearing on my earlier work.

You are always very kind in your comments, I am gratified that you, as both artist and engineer, think that my approach worked. After all, it was the design engineers that I had in mind as I was slaving away, and if it pleased the sponsors too, I could feel reasonably happy.

Bill Bennet did several cutaways using monochrome washes over ink line, and very successfully, but on the whole I will always prefer cutting to ghosting - it's just a matter of preference.

#485 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 16:42

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Here we have bodywork ghosted over wheel/tyre, over LR suspension/hub and LH turbo intake and catch tank over rear chassis tubes. You have to draw it all anyway, and here you can keep it, whereas in solid colour you have to cut away, and decide what you can afford to lose.

#486 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 20:49

Evening Tony - I hope you're well; still waiting for a single malt night!!
I don't think I asked the question at the TNF meeting but out of interest if I wanted you to draw a picture of one of my Dad's racecars and could provide you loads of external pictures, one or two off-body photos and also give you the spec of everything (well, most) bits underneath, then could you draw it or is it a case of only (and I mean that in an extremely un-educated form of the word!!) being able to draw what you can "see/photo"?
The only reason I ask is that I agree with numerous people on here about seeing you draw again plus I'd love something a bit different of one of Dad's cars!!

#487 Doug Nye

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 23:19

I'm sorry - this thread is proving too much for me. I've been an enormous fan of Tony's work for years - and of Jim Allington's before him - and the illustrations here (many of which I recall when first published) are just causing me sensory overload. Mercy!

DCN

#488 macoran

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 23:22

Originally posted by Doug Nye
I'm sorry - this thread is proving too much for me. I've been an enormous fan of Tony's work for years - and of Jim Allington's before him - and the illustrations here (many of which I recall when first published) are just causing me sensory overload. Mercy!

DCN


I don't mean this disrespectfully Doug as I am a great fan of your written word, but I hope you will have to suffer a while longer.

#489 IrishMariner

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 04:43

Originally posted by macoran


I don't mean this disrespectfully Doug as I am a great fan of your written word, but I hope you will have to suffer a while longer.


I'd like to second that praise of Doug's work. In an earlier post on this thread, I comented on how some of Doug's articles in Autosport (in particular, William's F1 in 1986 F1 Review, McLaren in '88 equivalent and Lotus 72 from a few years later) are amongst my favourite race car articles ever. Before RaceTech, Racecar Engineering and the internet, these articles and Tony's cutaways were the only quality sources of information.

One of your books, too, is in my "never, ever, sell" list. The quality of the McLaren F1 roadcar book is apparent in the prices being commanded by it on the used market (300 quid, FFS).

I'd like to sum-up my opinions of both Matthews' & Nye by paraphrasing your good-self, Doug:-

"Pure, Unmistakable, Incontrovertible, Class"

#490 Doug Nye

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:12

:blush: Well thank you very much.... (As we arranged - the ten shillings will be in the post...)

#491 Bonde

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:26

"Pure, Unmistakable, Incontrovertible, Class"

Seconded!

For me, Doug is the author's equivalent of the illustrator's Tony. Doug's words and Tony's illustrations in the same work is, for me, motor racing literature perfection.

#492 Tony Matthews

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 10:22

Originally posted by Doug Nye
: (As we arranged - the ten shillings will be in the post...)


Is that ALL Doug? I had to give him a pound!

At the risk of this getting out of hand, I echo everyone else in their praise of Doug, a beacon in the world of motoring literature, or so it seems, and I am not at all sure that I deserve to be mentioned in the same breath.

#493 IrishMariner

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 15:35

Originally posted by Tony Matthews


Is that ALL Doug? I had to give him a pound!

At the risk of this getting out of hand, I echo everyone else in their praise of Doug, a beacon in the world of motoring literature, or so it seems, and I am not at all sure that I deserve to be mentioned in the same breath.


To be honest, Tony, when I bought the Wright Ferrari F-2000 book that featured your illustrations, my immediate thought at the time was that it would've been better if Doug Nye had written it. I admire Wright, don't get me wrong, but I find his stuff far less readable that Doug's.

#494 werks prototype

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 15:07

I just wanted to run an outsiders theory by you, Do you think that in part, the spirit and the craft of the hand drawn cutaway rather than having being truly absorbed by the computer workstation has in part survived, through a change of medium and is alive and well in certain contemporary model making specialisms?

From an enthusiasts point of view I feel that some of these models perhaps owe more to your work Tony than traditional model making techniques. In essence they are models of the cutaways.

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#495 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 15:21

Very nice WP, I am a model-maker myself, and as I said early on in my contribution to this thread, I drew as though I was model-making. This is why I avoided ghosting, and cut away so that, in theory, you could cut a car the same way and it would almost hold together. I once made a cutaway model of Niki Lauda's Ferrari 312T, cutting it as I had the illustration. It no longer exists, but I have, I think, one photograph of part of the model.

I have the Tamiya FW14 - 1/12 scale - which I planned to do the same to, but haven't done so yet, and probably won't!

The trouble with models is that you can't print several thousand or put them in a magazine centre-fold, and they take up space! They compliment each other, I think.

By the way, terrific finish on the Mercedes!

#496 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 15:54

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Just found this very poor, heat-damaged slide of the un-finished Penske PC11, I posted it as it looks even more like one of your models!

#497 werks prototype

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 16:41

:) No Tony, its the other way round the models are made to look like 'your' work, especially the modern models or representations. (I dont think that is a coincidence). That's just my theory.

Tony, I did not construct those models myself. They are I’m afraid (rather predictably) constructed en mass by a modern company called Exoto.

It was though, your initial comment regarding the elements of ‘model making’ inherent to your own technique that started me off on that train of thought in the first place. I’m convinced that some of these contemporary models are actually attempts at recapturing the fundamental essence of the type of hand drawn cutaway produced by yourself Tony. A modern attempt at recreating the soul of the practice, or recapturing it from the exclusive domain of the cold and austere computer render.

Sadly I’m not of the generation that was really exposed to the hand drawn works regularly through the mass media. I graduated in Fine art last year. I can confirm though that most of my fellow students still preferred to turn their back on the computer based techniques in favour of the craft and the traditional skill sets, such is the unchallenging and unsatisfying nature of the computer work, infact I would predict even more of a backlash along those lines in the future.

My dad is a design draughtsman, and we talk all the time about the concern for the lost skills and techniques of the old draughtsman that he used to know, even twenty or thirty years ago. We also talk about how those skills will not necessarily be lost, they are alive and well, probably in a non commercial sense and as embodied, in other mediums, i.e. the modern generation of ultra detailed die cast representations (I wont call them models) that feature removable body work and cutaway sections

Anyway,the thing is, like most people I have been slowly working my way through this thread and it really has been a kind of aesthetic information overload when encountering your work Tony. The thread has become something to take in, for me, in cautious doses; such is the strength of the work. I hope I haven’t now ruined that with images of models and a wacky theory.

#498 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 16:53

Sorry they're not your handywork! It's an interesting theory, but I'm sure my illustrations aren't sufficiently well known to have had any influence - but my aim was to make the viewer feel they could pick the subject up or roll it backwards and forwards on the page! I had a good look at a small lathe at the Model Engineering Exibition in January and thought, shall I...? No, too late!

#499 werks prototype

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 20:36

Tony,

You effortlessly achieved your aim of enabling the viewer to feel they could pick the subject up or roll it backwards and forwards on the page, in particular your illustration of the Lancia D50, it looks taut, heavy and quite beautiful, like it just wants to roll off the board. Simply incredible.

Regarding the temptation of the lathe, well, I can imagine that if you went down that road you would soon end up with a workshop full and dedicated to tool making and the machining of various scale parts, a dangerous game.

You know you can now expect somebody to pounce on this and suggest an official line of Tony Matthews’s cutaway ‘models’.

Tony thanks again for sharing some of your work in this way. When viewing it the word ‘Enlightenment’ comes to mind.

Mark.


Originally posted by Tony Matthews
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#500 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 23:30

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The finished cutaway of the Penske PC11, one of two versions, one with blue flashes, the Norton car.
I don't know about 'effortlessly' WP, but it kept me out of mischief for several decades. What am I saying? No it didn't! But it was hard work.