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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#5651 MEI

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 19:03

James Allington's Ferrari 275 GTB4 as shown in Inside 100 Great Cars and volume 57 of the Car magazine
Posted Image

Incidentally, I noticed recently that the above picture was printed back-to-front in the book. Witness the name on the engine, the Prancing Horse on the side of the engine-bay, and the remains of the date superimposed on the rear tyre.

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#5652 macoran

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 20:11

MEI......... I believe Tony Matthews' English is quite good and clear actually !

Printed, for some reason, flopped-over. Should be going Right to Left... How do I know? Aha...


Plus the lettering on the two orange fuel filters, and the chassis plate in the engine compartment - the 'Prancing Horse' is facing the wrong way! I won't say anything about the spokes being crossed over wrongly...;)


yeah I know, the last itsi bit of the signature in the rear tyre is the tell tale
I just didn't want to come across as the "Ow my God Marc is the know it all "


Edited by macoran, 30 July 2010 - 20:27.


#5653 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 20:19

MEI......... I believe Tony Matthews' English is quite good and clear actually !

Thank you Marc - and welcome back, I'm delighted everything has worked out - my Engliish is reasonable. Jim bought the 275GTB shortly after I left his employ, it was imported from, I think, South Africa, and was white! What I didn't mention when it was first posted was that I was fairly certain that it was RH drive...

#5654 MEI

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 20:50

MEI......... I believe Tony Matthews' English is quite good and clear actually !

That's what comes of only joining the Forum recently - but it does show at least that I have been half-concentrating! So far I have been paying more attention to the images than the words. I was, however, on the point of writing to acknowledge that I should have read Tony's post 3751 before "launching into print"- as well as your own 5649. Regards, Malcolm Inglis.

Edited by MEI, 30 July 2010 - 21:28.


#5655 macoran

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 21:17

That's what comes of only joining the Forum recently

There is a lot of material and detail to go through, and ......I admit to being caught out myself sometimes,
and I am what is called "an old pharte" ( to quote a certain TNFer)

#5656 alansart

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 21:22

Talking about two engines...never heard or seen anything about this one:

Posted Image
Drawing by Bruno Betti!
And here is an Autocar article about it.

Volkswagen had appearently also a Jetta and two RallyGolf with two engines. One of the Golfs ran at Pike's Peak in '87.
Seat had a Ibiza bimotor that was (IIRC) for group b/s.

And then there was the brasilian 'Over-Bug':
Posted Image



I think VW did this alongside the Audi Quattro programme. I used to have to go into R&D at VW Wolfsburg and these cars were there and painted a bright fluorescent red! I counted a Jetta, Scirocco and a Passat amongst the various bits and pieces hanging around in the workshops.

Kim Mather raced and rallied his own built Scirocco in the UK :)

#5657 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 21:23

Tony's post 3751 ...

3751! What a normous number - and to think we are now on - something bigger still, I can't tell, as when you write a post, all previous numbers disappear.

5670, I've just found out. How much more is there?

5669!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 30 July 2010 - 21:24.


#5658 MEI

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 21:54

I am what is called "an old pharte" ( to quote a certain TNFer)

I'm sure I qualify for the same description. I still have fond memories of Jim Clark three-wheeling his Lotus-Cortina round Bottom Bend at Brands!

#5659 ibsenop

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 23:56

And then there was the brasilian 'Over-Bug':
Posted Image


a little off-topic
'Over-Bug' - never heard this designation.

Fitti-Volks bimotor - raced by the Fittipaldi brothers 1969-1970 - 8 cylinder 3,2 litre two VW engines

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 140 - post 5566


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#5660 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:16

Guys,
I have been pulling all of the images out of the board, but haven't done much to contribute lately. Thought I would put a few up there, all 50s-60s Formula cars, just to keep a theme going. I still have a few pieces scanned that need to be reworked, and I also think that I have posted some of these ... but am not going back to check. Look at these as a review for our academic pursuit of the artform. I know a few of them haven't been up ...

This is possibly one that I had posted earlier, the Gordon Bruce BRM Formula 1 car out of 1963. The illustration was published in Sports Car Graphic in February of 1963 ... amazing to think that is almost 50 years ago ... wow.

Posted Image


#5661 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:20

Another Gordon Bruce illustration out of the November, 1963 issue of Sports Car Graphic. The evolution of the BRM Formula 1 car.

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#5662 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:24

Here is another Gordon Bruce BRM, the V8 Formula 1 car for 1962, as seen in the September, 1962 issue of Car and Driver.

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#5663 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:28

And ... another Gordon Bruce illustration out of those defunct British builders. This is the BRP Formula One car of 1963. As seen in the October, 1963 issue of Sports Car Graphic.


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#5664 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:31

We have another Gordon Bruce Formula One car out of 1963, the Cooper Formula One car out of the January issue of Sports Car Grahic.

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#5665 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:34

And another contribution to the artform from Gordon Bruce as presented by Sports Car Graphic. The centerspread from the October, 1962 issue featuring the Lola Formula One car.

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#5666 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:38

Going a little earlier with a Clarence LaTourette illustration of the front-engined Aston-Martin DBR4-250, this was featured in the February, 1960 issue of Sports Car Illustrated.

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#5667 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:44

Ok, and a coupe of mine just for grins ...
This was a thing I did on a car out of Denver, running at the 1970 Winternationals. This was the year before Don Garlits premiered his version of this car ... which he had actually taken a tape to a year earlier. His car was pretty close to this one, but he was making more power so his won, and this car became a bit of a footnote. There was talk at the time about the name "Rear-engined" being a misnomer for these cars, as they really should have been called mid-engined. I did a couple of simpler drawings just to illustrate the appropriate terminology as it should apply to dragster design, all of which fell on deaf ears and they are still called, incorrectly, rear-engined dragsters.

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#5668 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 03:49

Will make this the last for the evening, one of my own drawings that meant a bit at the time. Since I was doing only drag racing, I was able to pretty much photograph everything on the cars to make the drawings fairly easy. This Pro Stock car of Richard Maskin and Andy Mannarino was the first that I illustrated where all the body panels could not be removed. I had also completed a drawing in early 1973, and this was 1979, so my eye was the only thing that I had practiced this stuff with.
The drawing was one of my favorites at the time because of that.

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#5669 theglenster

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:03

http://a.imageshack....3/n805dfweb.jpg
Here's a cutaway of a Pitts Model 12 I just did using the client's particular paint scheme and graphics. It was entirely created in Photoshop using mostly the Airbrush tool.


Hi Tom,

excelent work.
you say it was entirely created in PS, even the construction?

cheers
glen


#5670 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:36

Will make this the last for the evening, one of my own drawings that meant a bit at the time. Since I was doing only drag racing, I was able to pretty much photograph everything on the cars to make the drawings fairly easy. This Pro Stock car of Richard Maskin and Andy Mannarino was the first that I illustrated where all the body panels could not be removed. I had also completed a drawing in early 1973, and this was 1979, so my eye was the only thing that I had practiced this stuff with.
The drawing was one of my favorites at the time because of that.

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Thanks Tom W, some really nice stuff. You very quickly established yourself with macaron, ibsenop and wp as a major contributor - thanks to all. I can only wait and watch.

#5671 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:38

http://a.imageshack....3/n805dfweb.jpg
Here's a cutaway of a Pitts Model 12 I just did using the client's particular paint scheme and graphics. It was entirely created in Photoshop using mostly the Airbrush tool.

Another superb job, Tom J, mind-boggling...

#5672 theglenster

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 10:24

Thanks Tom W, some really nice stuff. You very quickly established yourself with macaron, ibsenop and wp as a major contributor - thanks to all. I can only wait and watch.



i can only agree :)

#5673 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 11:50

Guys,
I have been pulling all of the images out of the board, but haven't done much to contribute lately. Thought I would put a few up there, all 50s-60s Formula cars, just to keep a theme going. I still have a few pieces scanned that need to be reworked, and I also think that I have posted some of these ... but am not going back to check. Look at these as a review for our academic pursuit of the artform. I know a few of them haven't been up ...

This is possibly one that I had posted earlier, the Gordon Bruce BRM Formula 1 car out of 1963. The illustration was published in Sports Car Graphic in February of 1963 ... amazing to think that is almost 50 years ago ... wow.

Posted Image


Stunning contribution Tom! What a surprise on logging in! :up:

#5674 macoran

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 11:58

Guys,
I have been pulling all of the images out of the board, but haven't done much to contribute lately. Thought I would put a few up there, all 50s-60s Formula cars, just to keep a theme going. I still have a few pieces scanned that need to be reworked, and I also think that I have posted some of these ... but am not going back to check. Look at these as a review for our academic pursuit of the artform. I know a few of them haven't been up ...

This is possibly one that I had posted earlier, the Gordon Bruce BRM Formula 1 car out of 1963. The illustration was published in Sports Car Graphic in February of 1963 ... amazing to think that is almost 50 years ago ... wow.

Tom, thanks for posting these.
I have them all, somewhere..........and have, I think posted the Lola and one of the BRMs.

Can you imagine a 17 year me having to go (as driver for me mum) to the Chatuchak market in Bangkok, bored to death while mother
enjoyed visiting all the clothing/food and handicraft stalls .
Until,
I came across a stall selling second hand magazines!

The first one I picked up was a Sports Car graphic!....with a Gordon Bruce cutaway!
Mother wanted to be home on time, so I couldn't spend more than half an hour thumbing through the piles of magazines.
I came away with at least fifteen.
I calculated that the market would still be open for an hour if I brought mother home asap, and wouldn't be able to get back in time
to continue my search. So I got the stall guys home address and agreed with him to come over and get more magazines off him.
Needless to say that visit was a very fruitful one !

I never minded having to drive mum to the market ever after that ! :D

#5675 Duc-Man

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 12:45

a little off-topic
'Over-Bug' - never heard this designation.

Fitti-Volks bimotor - raced by the Fittipaldi brothers 1969-1970 - 8 cylinder 3,2 litre two VW engines

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 140 - post 5566


I made up 'Over-Bug' because I had no idea what that was. I just came across that cutaway and one photo of the car.
Thanks for the photos.

#5676 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 15:42

Hi Tom,

excelent work.
you say it was entirely created in PS, even the construction?

cheers
glen


Thanks, Glen. To answer your question, yes....., uh - no....well,.....sort of. This illustration is an odd duck. 10 years ago I did a Pitts model 12 cutaway entirely by hand. The subject was only the 3rd aircraft of this type in existence. Pencil on drafting mylar, followed by a tight ink tracing on a fresh piece of mylar. Then a litho film pos was produced which became the canvas for the airbrush rendering using gouche.

Then, when people started building these planes, they spied the cutaway and liked it but wanted their specfic components and paint schemes. I could have done this by hand using overlays, but no one wanted to pay me for all the hours it took to produce one. That's when I got lured into the digital world.

Sorry, what was your question?

So now, for flexibility, the 'custom' modified illustrations are created in Photoshop using a scanned and digitized file form of the original painting as a base. If the client's plane has significant technical differences from the 'original' illustration, those items are drawn in Illustrator as 'vector art'. Then that vector is exported into the base image in Photoshop and the rendering is done.

The image recently posted was not too much different from the original completely hand-done painting, so a little portion of it was done in Illustrator (line work) and the painting in PS.

Soon, I will do a cutaway of the 1931 Gee Bee Model Z. The 'line' portion of the art will be done entirely in Illustrator, followed by the rendering which will be done entirely in Photoshop.

Cheers

Edited by Tom Johnson, 31 July 2010 - 15:45.


#5677 ibsenop

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 15:51

Fitti-Volks 3200cc 8 Cylinder

To see more => http://www.obvio.ind.....s motores.htm
only in portuguese, up to now. Text, photos and this same cutaway.

#5678 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:06

So now, for flexibility, the 'custom' modified illustrations are created in Photoshop using a scanned and digitized file form of the original painting as a base. If the client's plane has significant technical differences from the 'original' illustration, those items are drawn in Illustrator as 'vector art'. Then that vector is exported into the base image in Photoshop and the rendering is done.

The image recently posted was not too much different from the original completely hand-done painting, so a little portion of it was done in Illustrator (line work) and the painting in PS.

Soon, I will do a cutaway of the 1931 Gee Bee Model Z. The 'line' portion of the art will be done entirely in Illustrator, followed by the rendering which will be done entirely in Photoshop.

Cheers


I must admit I was quite taken aback when reading your initial description of your technique. Quite simply I assumed you were producing textured 3d models. So it really is quite an impressive technique (to my amateur eye I'm afraid). Are you literally using a graphics tablet? It would be good to see some more of the aero engine detail on its own if that is possible.

Edited by werks prototype, 31 July 2010 - 16:07.


#5679 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:11

Posted Image
Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII By James. H. Clark

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#5680 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:13

Posted Image
The 1939 Mini-Motor. Transverse 600cc . Drawn by S. E. Porter.

#5681 ibsenop

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:29

Alpine M64 1964 by unknown artist. Cavara?

Posted Image

#5682 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:33

I must admit I was quite taken aback when reading your initial description of your technique. Quite simply I assumed you were producing textured 3d models. So it really is quite an impressive technique (to my amateur eye I'm afraid). Are you literally using a graphics tablet? It would be good to see some more of the aero engine detail on its own if that is possible.


I only use a mouse. A wacom tablet is really the way to go, but I started with just the mouse and am used to it. Here's an in-progress work of an IO-360 Lycoming aircraft engine being rendered (all 2-D) in PS.

http://a.imageshack....v8progress1.gif


#5683 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:39

I only use a mouse. A wacom tablet is really the way to go, but I started with just the mouse and am used to it. Here's an in-progress work of an IO-360 Lycoming aircraft engine being rendered (all 2-D) in PS.

http://a.imageshack....v8progress1.gif


:eek: Magnificent! :up:

#5684 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 16:46

:eek: Magnificent! :up:


Here's some more aero engine stuff.

http://a.imageshack....01jul310941.jpg




#5685 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 17:05

Dunno how you work with a mouse, Tom - I find it a pain re-touching scans! Terrific work, very impressive.

#5686 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 17:22

Dunno how you work with a mouse, Tom - I find it a pain re-touching scans! Terrific work, very impressive.


Actually, I dunno either. The demand for cutaways has been shrinking by the month and I now am pursueing different avenues to provide beer on the table. If interest in the Gee Bee Model Z gathers momentum, I shall purchase a Wacom tablet......once I get used to it I'm sure that reflecting back to the 'mouse' generated images will result in the response: DOH!!!


#5687 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 17:38

I'm really sorry to hear that. I assumed the demand must be OK, as you are still producing such good work. If cutting out the time-consuming hand drawing and rendering, and niche-marketing, still doesn't generate a reasonable living, I despair. Perhaps we really are seeing the end of technical illustration in all but Ikea build sheets.

The UK Sunday Times did a feature recently on some graphic designer that they use, lauding to the skies his ability to convey statistics in graphic form, and he seems to get a double-page spread every week, but the results are grim and tedious. When you compare what he produces compared with so much of the work posted on this thread it is depressing beyond words. Real skills are ignored, mediocrity is prasied.

#5688 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 18:00

I'm really sorry to hear that. I assumed the demand must be OK, as you are still producing such good work. If cutting out the time-consuming hand drawing and rendering, and niche-marketing, still doesn't generate a reasonable living, I despair. Perhaps we really are seeing the end of technical illustration in all but Ikea build sheets.

The UK Sunday Times did a feature recently on some graphic designer that they use, lauding to the skies his ability to convey statistics in graphic form, and he seems to get a double-page spread every week, but the results are grim and tedious. When you compare what he produces compared with so much of the work posted on this thread it is depressing beyond words. Real skills are ignored, mediocrity is prasied.


Ughhhh!..(as my shoulders droop to the floor). Fortunately, I have found a cure for this form of depression. Dear, could you please pour me another beer?

Actually, the demand seems to be there, although it is ever fading as time goes by. What I've noticed more is that few people want to pay the the price I've set for a high-quality laser print (both giclee and standards). I've thought about making less costly prints (poorer quality) and giving a go at making a decent profit through volume. Will have to see what the market will bear.

Edited by Tom Johnson, 31 July 2010 - 18:08.


#5689 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 18:50

As I was going through my files, came accross this. Don't know if it will be of much interest, but now that am slightly depressed, it helps sharing tidbits with technoids that appreciate cutaway stuff.

This also will show that even though this draft drawing was done in PS, I still construct the drawing as if it were on paper. One thing you can't see on this is the super advantage of drawing 2pt and 3pt perspective in PS. On a another layer (turned off or 'hidden' in this screen shot) are the vanishing pts way off in the distance. As I construct the drawing, I simply grab the appropriate line connecting to the VP, pull it into position then trim it off to build the part. It goes very fast. No more eye-balling parallel lines with the VP's to give the drawing accurate and tasty perpective.

Cheers

http://a.imageshack....0/rv7slider.jpg


#5690 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 19:53

As I was going through my files, came accross this. Don't know if it will be of much interest, but now that am slightly depressed, it helps sharing tidbits with technoids that appreciate cutaway stuff.

This also will show that even though this draft drawing was done in PS, I still construct the drawing as if it were on paper. One thing you can't see on this is the super advantage of drawing 2pt and 3pt perspective in PS. On a another layer (turned off or 'hidden' in this screen shot) are the vanishing pts way off in the distance. As I construct the drawing, I simply grab the appropriate line connecting to the VP, pull it into position then trim it off to build the part. It goes very fast. No more eye-balling parallel lines with the VP's to give the drawing accurate and tasty perpective.

Cheers

http://a.imageshack....0/rv7slider.jpg


That's exactly what I was going to ask you next. How does the way you work now relate to your previous method of actually constructing the underlying drawing. I was going to speculate that presumably you can now just switch off/on individual layers over and above the underlying construction drawing. As if you are using a transparency The link you provided above has illustrated that exact thing nicely. I still can't believe they are not constructed as bits of a 3d model, but actually illustrated in the traditional sense. Incredible.


#5691 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 19:55

Alpine M64 1964 by unknown artist. Cavara?

Posted Image


I reckon. :up: But I have no way of confirming it. :down:

#5692 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 20:01

Thanks Tom W, some really nice stuff. You very quickly established yourself with macaron, ibsenop and wp as a major contributor - thanks to all. I can only wait and watch.


Tony, Thanks for the kind thoughts. I have some books of photocopies of a huge number of cutaways, some of which will scan reasonably and others ... not so much. I want to complete some of these magazine scans, as with a few of these, and will make sure they get out there somehow. Just thought I needed to step it up again, even knowing that some of those have gone out previously.
Since you were in this group so much earlier with all of your own work, I can check all of that out any time. Just out of curiosity, did you post everything you ever did to the group? Always like to know if I have a complete collection or not ... although it is always exciting to know there is still more out there to be added. I also ned to update my own index of illustrations so I have all of this new Board material included.
Thanks for the great stuff, guys.
Tom West

#5693 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 20:03

Stunning contribution Tom! What a surprise on logging in! :up:


Werks,
Since I have been enjoying all of your recent additions, I just consider it a small compensation back. Will be sending out more, although it may have to be a little more of my own material instead of the new scans.
Thanks, again.
Tom West

#5694 ibsenop

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 14:36

Alpine A220 1968 by Editechnic

Posted Image

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 140 - post 5566

Edited by ibsenop, 01 August 2010 - 14:40.


#5695 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 15:28

No more eye-balling parallel lines with the VP's to give the drawing accurate and tasty perpective.

I always enjoyed that bit!

#5696 MEI

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 06:38

Vauxhall 30/98, credited to Roy Haynes. (I have read the discussion on page 122 about being cautious over posting too many images from "Inside 100 Great Cars")
Posted Image



#5697 alansart

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 07:06

As I was going through my files, came accross this. Don't know if it will be of much interest, but now that am slightly depressed, it helps sharing tidbits with technoids that appreciate cutaway stuff.

This also will show that even though this draft drawing was done in PS, I still construct the drawing as if it were on paper. One thing you can't see on this is the super advantage of drawing 2pt and 3pt perspective in PS. On a another layer (turned off or 'hidden' in this screen shot) are the vanishing pts way off in the distance. As I construct the drawing, I simply grab the appropriate line connecting to the VP, pull it into position then trim it off to build the part. It goes very fast. No more eye-balling parallel lines with the VP's to give the drawing accurate and tasty perpective.

Cheers

http://a.imageshack....0/rv7slider.jpg


I'm glad someone else does it the same way. I use the technique for even simple illustrations....

Posted Image

....the only problem I find is occasionally I select the whole line instead of the end point which moves the line away from the vanishing point. Frustrating if you don't notice the error quickly.

Edited by alansart, 02 August 2010 - 07:06.


#5698 werks prototype

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 10:13

Here is something a little different. I am a bit biased here, because it is something I am reading about at the moment.
Posted Image
1932 Brough Superior BS Four. Drawn by Max Millar.



#5699 Tom Johnson

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 14:29

I'm glad someone else does it the same way. I use the technique for even simple illustrations....

Posted Image

....the only problem I find is occasionally I select the whole line instead of the end point which moves the line away from the vanishing point. Frustrating if you don't notice the error quickly.


I noticed the same exact problem. I remedied the situation by creating a separate layer of a different color of a grid perspective and turning the opacity down to 50%. That way, as I was pulling the end point of the perspective line into position each time, I could constantly monitor its position relative to the grid perspective. If I mistakenly selected the entire line instead of its end point, the error would be fairly evident when compared to the grid.

Edited by Tom Johnson, 02 August 2010 - 14:59.


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#5700 alansart

alansart
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Posted 02 August 2010 - 15:17

I noticed the same exact problem. I remedied the situation by creating a separate layer of a different color of a grid perspective and turning the opacity down to 50%. That way, as I was pulling the end point of the perspective line into position each time, I could constantly monitor its position relative to the grid perspective. If I mistakenly selected the entire line instead of its end point, the error would be fairly evident when compared to the grid.


Now why didn't I think of that :rolleyes: