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#7251 werks prototype

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 15:39

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Jaguar E-Type. By James Allington.

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#7252 werks prototype

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 15:39

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Vauxhall- Opel, 2-litre, 4 cylinder engine from 1978. By R.J.Way

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:05.


#7253 ibsenop

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 10:19

brazilian Ford Corcel 4-door 1969 by unknown artist

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#7254 Karabas

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 13:11

Replacement for one of my previous Yoshihiro Inomoto posts. Slightly smaller, but much better quality.

Yoshihiro Inomoto
1931 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Corto Spider Zagato

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Edited by Karabas, 10 January 2011 - 09:36.


#7255 MEI

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 17:12

I don't think this one (from 100 Great Cars) has been posted before:
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Bentley R-Type Continental - Paul Bambrick


#7256 macoran

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 20:22

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Jaguar E-Type. By James Allington.

Tops werks :up: I just recently found the issue of Road & Track with the E-type in it, scanned it and was getting ready to stitch it.

Now to find the Allington MGBs

Edited by macoran, 28 December 2010 - 20:23.


#7257 Motocar

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 14:07

From Maracay, Venezuela.... I disire Happy New Year 2011 and Success for All

Desde Maracay, Venezuela..... Yo les deseo un Feliz Ano 2011 y Exitos para todos

Motocar

Edited by Motocar, 29 December 2010 - 14:12.


#7258 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 17:35

Desde Maracay, Venezuela..... Yo les deseo un Feliz Ano 2011 y Exitos para todos

Motocar

Thank you Motocar, best wishes to you and everyone else!

#7259 ibsenop

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 23:58

Honda Life 1971 by unknown artist

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#7260 Duc-Man

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:53

Honda Life 1971 by unknown artist

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I remember that one of those was running in the village I live when I was a little child. I never knew what it was until now...about 35 years later. Wow!

:wave: :wave: :wave: All the best for 2011 to everybody here. :wave: :wave: :wave:

#7261 tbolt

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 14:57

Handley Page HP42, by G H Davis, 1930.

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#7262 ibsenop

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 20:33

BMW 520 1972 by Dick Ellis

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#7263 Flightlinearts

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 15:39

BMW 520 1972 by Dick Ellis

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Happy New Year to all the folks out there. To add to the image by Dick Ellis, thought this might interest a few people. It is the Autocar part of the Central Studio at Dorset House in the 70's. All the artists have their backs to the camera. Dick Ellis is in the foreground, followed by John Hostler then Chris Plant. Vic Berris sat at the desk behind Dick Ellis.

Tim Hall

#7264 werks prototype

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 15:54

Tops werks :up: I just recently found the issue of Road & Track with the E-type in it, scanned it and was getting ready to stitch it.

Now to find the Allington MGBs



Great stuff! :up: Marc. Maybe post it anyway if there are any differences in the layout etc. The E-Type I posted was from a re-print (book form).

#7265 werks prototype

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 15:58

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Happy New Year to all the folks out there. To add to the image by Dick Ellis, thought this might interest a few people. It is the Autocar part of the Central Studio at Dorset House in the 70's. All the artists have their backs to the camera. Dick Ellis is in the foreground, followed by John Hostler then Chris Plant. Vic Berris sat at the desk behind Dick Ellis.

Tim Hall


Brilliant stuff! Chris Plant as well!

#7266 werks prototype

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 16:03

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Packard. Model 645,1929. By James Allington. Slightly larger version than that posted previously.

#7267 werks prototype

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 16:10

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A wonderful John Batchelor drawing of the Me 262A-1a Schwalbe.

Happy New Year to all!

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:06.


#7268 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 16:34

Posted Image
Happy New Year to all the folks out there. To add to the image by Dick Ellis, thought this might interest a few people. It is the Autocar part of the Central Studio at Dorset House in the 70's. All the artists have their backs to the camera. Dick Ellis is in the foreground, followed by John Hostler then Chris Plant. Vic Berris sat at the desk behind Dick Ellis.

Tim Hall

Cow gum and Pelican ink in dropper-bottles! That brings back memories! I may have a tin of Cow and a bottle of Pelican in the attic...

#7269 ibsenop

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 20:17

Happy and healthy New Year to all!

Fiat 124 Abarth Rally by Franco Rosso

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Edited by ibsenop, 01 January 2011 - 12:18.


#7270 MEI

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 21:09

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I hope Jeremy Banks won't mind me posting this larger scan of his splendid Ferrari Boxer from way back on page 13. Happy New Year to all, Malcolm

#7271 macoran

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 21:51

Happy and healthy New Year to all!

Fiat 124 Abarth Rally by Bruno Betti
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Ibsen, I am sure the signature reads Franco Rosso :drunk:

#7272 onelung

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 22:07

Cow gum and Pelican ink in dropper-bottles! That brings back memories! I may have a tin of Cow and a bottle of Pelican in the attic...


And as a very much less than distinguished "drafts(person)" in the 60's - for a few brief years - the Pelican ink reference has jolted my memory too.
Used to work on waxed linen in an Aussie summer ... non airconditioned work space, vainly trying to avoid perspiration spoiling the work.
Saw the introduction of a product called (I think...) Cronaflex which was a major step forward: still recall its characteristic odour, slightly sweet.

Ah, the good old days... and my wishes to all for many good new days in this New Year :up:

#7273 macoran

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 22:40

Cow gum and Pelican ink in dropper-bottles! That brings back memories! I may have a tin of Cow and a bottle of Pelican in the attic...

I don't recall the Cow thingy, but I used a lot of the "alternative" Pelikan ink from Germany when doing workshop assembly drawings.

Off to get the champers ready and I've got the shrimp and crab snacks out with the garlic and whisky dips.

Happy New Year Cutawayland Gang !!

Edited by macoran, 31 December 2010 - 22:44.


#7274 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 23:41

I don't recall the Cow thingy, but I used a lot of the "alternative" Pelikan ink from Germany when doing workshop assembly drawings.

Off to get the champers ready and I've got the shrimp and crab snacks out with the garlic and whisky dips.

Happy New Year Cutawayland Gang !!

Happy New Year Marc and everyone, may all your Pelikans be small ones...

#7275 ibsenop

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 12:33

Ibsen, I am sure the signature reads Franco Rosso :drunk:


Thank you, Macoram. You're right.
Franco Rosso, of course. I wasn't drunk when I posted it.
My mind was at the lastest cutaway I re-scanned from the same magazine (Quattroruote December 1972) - the Lancia Stratos by Bruno Betti.

Peugeot 104 1972 engine by unknown artist.

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Edited by ibsenop, 01 January 2011 - 12:41.


#7276 ibsenop

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 00:45

Jaguar XJ13 engine by unknown artist (Vic Berris?)

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Jaguar XJ13 engine cross section by unknown artist (Not a cutaway)

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#7277 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 01:12

Jaguar XJ13 engine by unknown artist (Vic Berris?)

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That is odd. It definitely looks like a Vic Berris, but as if someone has gone over it with a felt-tip pen. The line wheights are unlike VBs normal work, and the detail looks clumsy. I think it's been fiddled with!

#7278 Flightlinearts

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 09:36

Brilliant stuff! Chris Plant as well!

Posted Image
Another photo of the boys who worked for Illife/Temple. This time it is Frank Munger, I don't know what he was drawing or what date the photo was taken. Typical Frank approach for the day, he would produce pages of sketches on a pad and then go back to the hotel and put it all together. It would be drawn straight onto Bristol board, later CS 10 (Great board) in pencil. Sometimes he would go back next day and add to his preliminary drawing. We always inked straight over the pencil, taking off the grease from the board with Pounce. This was the quickest way to get the drawing finished as there was no intermediary stage of pushing through. Frank up until the early seventies used a Crow Quill pen (similar to a mapping pen). This allowed you to thicken or thin down a line with just hand pressure. This was how the graduated line shading was achieved. Also ellipse templates were unknown until the early seventies!

Tim Hall

#7279 macoran

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 13:22

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Another photo of the boys who worked for Illife/Temple. This time it is Frank Munger,
Tim Hall


Your pics and info add so much to this thread !!
Thanks for the inside info

Edited by macoran, 02 January 2011 - 13:23.


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#7280 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 13:35

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Tim Hall

Porsche 917 by the look of it, and a GT40 in the mid-background! Must have been in my garage...

I think, on a second look, that there is a Lola T70 beyond the GT40, and another Porsche, possibly a 910, beyond that. Although thhe Lola could be another 917...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 02 January 2011 - 16:37.


#7281 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 16:30

Typical Frank approach for the day, he would produce pages of sketches on a pad and then go back to the hotel and put it all together. It would be drawn straight onto Bristol board, later CS 10 (Great board) in pencil. Sometimes he would go back next day and add to his preliminary drawing. We always inked straight over the pencil, taking off the grease from the board with Pounce. This was the quickest way to get the drawing finished as there was no intermediary stage of pushing through. Frank up until the early seventies used a Crow Quill pen (similar to a mapping pen). This allowed you to thicken or thin down a line with just hand pressure. This was how the graduated line shading was achieved. Also ellipse templates were unknown until the early seventies!

Tim Hall

CS10! Wonderful stuff, I don't have any left, and I don't know if it is available anymore. There may be a dusty packet of boards in the back room of an art shop somewhere... When I started work with James Allington the working practice was similar, although there was an additional stage (not always used) when the initial ink lines over the pencil were rubbed out to only just visible using Colonel hard erasers, which had, I believe, a powdered glass component. Blue erasers were the most used, but there was a box of green 'uns, which were like carborundum, and good for cleaning aluminium castings. Jim used a mapping pen, as I did, with small, bronze- or blued finish nibs, and pointy enough to really hurt if you were clumsy with them. Jim liked the way they sometimes snagged on a curve or straight edge and splattered. I was a bit neater, and the introduction of the Rapidograph, plus elipse guides, which I'm sure we had in the mid-'60s, was fine for me! Graduated line shading was done not with pressure, obviously, but by additional lines at a slight angle, creating a tapered, thick-based triangle of ink. It sounds time-consuming, but like stippling, it was surprisingly fast with practice.

We had a tub of pounce, too, but it was not often needed, especially with CS10, as it had a thick china clay top-coat, allowing quite a lot of knifing before the surface roughed up. This was another advantage of the overall rubbing-out, as it prepared the surface beautifully for ink. I seem to remember pounce being used whenever ink was used on tracing paper, which was dreadful stuff to draw on, and no comparison to the drafting film I used years later. The advantage of using film for the working drawing was, as far as I was concerened, that it was possible to produce a B&W line illustration and full colour artwork from one construction drawing. Having had to trace-off an engine cutaway done traditionally, the pencil lines inked over and lost, due to a surprise commision for a colour version, I never went back to constructing on board, and later I had orders for multiple colour originals, so the film method really paid off.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 03 January 2011 - 13:17.


#7282 werks prototype

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 16:55

Posted Image
Another photo of the boys who worked for Illife/Temple. This time it is Frank Munger, I don't know what he was drawing or what date the photo was taken. Typical Frank approach for the day, he would produce pages of sketches on a pad and then go back to the hotel and put it all together. It would be drawn straight onto Bristol board, later CS 10 (Great board) in pencil. Sometimes he would go back next day and add to his preliminary drawing. We always inked straight over the pencil, taking off the grease from the board with Pounce. This was the quickest way to get the drawing finished as there was no intermediary stage of pushing through. Frank up until the early seventies used a Crow Quill pen (similar to a mapping pen). This allowed you to thicken or thin down a line with just hand pressure. This was how the graduated line shading was achieved. Also ellipse templates were unknown until the early seventies!

Tim Hall


That really is a great picture. And also another very welcome insight into the cutaway practice in general. I wonder if even after the ellipse guide was introduced, the illustrator/draughtsman still on occasion found it necessary to construct the odd ellipse by hand. Or if the introduction of the guide killed outright that particular specialism.

Fascinating description also of the working process used by Frank Munger. It does seem a very journalistic approach, the compiling of multiple sketches on the spot, to be worked up later into the single, final work. Very much like a form of reportage, and corresponds very well to that wonderful, older notion of the cutaway as a form of 'pictorial journalism'.

Great photo!

Edited by werks prototype, 02 January 2011 - 17:07.


#7283 werks prototype

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 16:55

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SNECMA Atar 9 turbojet. Artist unknown.

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:09.


#7284 werks prototype

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 16:56

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Mirage F1. By Michael. A. Badrocke.

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:10.


#7285 werks prototype

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 16:56

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Sadler Junior. By Gordon Bruce.

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:09.


#7286 Flightlinearts

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 17:16

CS10! Wonderful stuff, I don't have any left, and I don't know if it is available anymore. There may be a dusty packet of boards in the back room of an art shop somewhere... When I started work with James Allington the working practice was similar, although there was an additional stage (not always used) when the initial ink lines over the pencil were rubbed out to only just visible using Colonel hard erasers, which had, I believe, a powdered glass component. Blue erasers were the most used, but there was a box of green 'uns, which were like carborundum, and good for cleaning aluminium castings. Jim used a mapping pen, as I did, with small, bronze- or blued finish nibs, and pointy enough to really hurt if you were clumsy with them. Jim liked the way they sometimes snagged on a curve or straight edge and splattered. I was a bit neater, and the introduction of the Rapidograph, plus elipse guides, which I'm sure we had in the mid-'60s, was fine for me! Graduated line shading was done not with pressure, obviously, but by additional lines at a slight angle, creating a tapered, thick-based triangle of ink. It sounds time-consuming, but like stippling, it was surprisingly fast with practice.

We had a tub of pounce, too, but it was not often needed, especially with CS10, as it had a thick china clay top-coat, allowing quite a lot of knifing before the surface roughed up. This was another advantage of the overall rubbing-out, as it prepared the surface beautifully for ink. I seem to remember pounce being used whenever ink was used on tracing paper, which was dreadful stuff to draw on, and no comparison to the drafting film I used years later. The advantage of using film for the working drawing was, as far as I was concerened, that it was possible to produce a B&W line illustration and full colour artwork from one construction drawing. Having had to trace-off an engine cutaway done traditionally, the pencil lines inked over and lost, due to a surprise commision for a colour version, I never went back to constructing on board, and later I had orders for multiple clour originals, so the film method really paid off.

The story about CS10 is quite sad, but typical of todays world. Colyer & Southey who produced the board were taken over by Frisk. Some time in the early Nineties John Marsden and I noticed that the CS10 did not scratch as well as it had and in fact became quite rough, even after careful scratching with a scalpel blade or razor blade. As both of us then tried other sheets of the board in the office, we came to the conclusion that something was wrong. We contacted the Frisk marketing director and he came over and admitted that they had a problem. the small German paper company that produced the high rag content paper had been brought out by a large American paper producer, and on seeing the small amount of this highly specialised paper they were making at a small profit decided to stop production. That was the end of CS10. There was another German board but I always found it was too slippery. We then went to Orme and Robinson, but they finished production of good quality lineboard in the mid to late nineties. I don't think anybody makes lineboard of an reasonable quality these days. It was certainly one of the factors that made us on Flight look at using new methods in the nineties.
On the template front it was Mike Badrocke who introduced Flight to templates, they were used for all the cutaways for Flight, Autocar and the Motor et al until the demise of the art dept. Of course you could not always get an ellipse to fit, but that was easy just joggle it and use your eye.
On your point Tony about rubbing down finished linework, we used to do that for the small amount of airbrush we produced. I think we used a Stadtler eraser, it was half red and half blue. It was the blue half that was used and as your said it left a lovely surface to airbrush on. I guess in the days before frisk film you used cow and permatrace. With a cowball to take the excess cowgum off the exposed part of the board.

Happy days!!
Tim Hall

#7287 Flightlinearts

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 17:27

Posted Image
Mirage F1. By Michael. A. Badrocke.

Frank Munger told me the story about this drawing. At the Paris Airshow Dassault on their stand had a fantastic perspex model of the Mirage F1. You could see the main elements of the structure and systems. Frank spend some time making sketches, and on his return drew it up. Mike finished the drawing in ink. A nice drawing and it must have shocked Dassault!
John Marsden did a similar thing of the Saab Viggen, at Paris they showed a rotating slide show of the aircraft in build and John sat there and produced sketches until he was happy he could produce something. He produced a pretty good drawing considering what he has access too. Saab said nothing, but at Farnborough the next year he was invited to lunch at their chalet, and at lunch he had too men seated each side of him asking him where he got the information from!!

#7288 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 17:47

On the template front it was Mike Badrocke who introduced Flight to templates, they were used for all the cutaways for Flight, Autocar and the Motor et al until the demise of the art dept. Of course you could not always get an ellipse to fit, but that was easy just joggle it and use your eye.


When this was discussed briefly in an earlier episode I used the word 'squirming' to describe the way you can adjust a guide to an intermediate shape. Joggle is good.

On your point Tony about rubbing down finished linework, we used to do that for the small amount of airbrush we produced. I think we used a Stadtler eraser, it was half red and half blue. It was the blue half that was used and as your said it left a lovely surface to airbrush on. I guess in the days before frisk film you used cow and permatrace. With a cowball to take the excess cowgum off the exposed part of the board.

Happy days!!
Tim Hall

I remember the two-tone erasers, but they never found favour with Jim, for some reason. We did almost no airbrushing, although Jim had a DeVilbiss compressor - we added a tint to some proposed elevated motorways across London once, otherwise airbrushing was put out to another studio/individual, but all I can remember seeing was a Geo. W. King hoist or two, and we didn't do much for them after I joined Jim. Nothing to do with me... I think we used some form of very high-tack film for the motorways, nothing as good as Frisk film, and even that is not really low-tack enough for most purposes. Bit like the early Letraset, which was a sort of silk-screen process - thankfully that was rapidly replaced with the rub-down stuff, but we didn't use a lot of that, all the parts list numbers were added with stencils, some of which I still have, and the odd little pens, or stiluses for use with them.

Cow-balls were an item of pride with some people at college, but there were those who cheated, and just spread gum over virgin card and rolled it up, producing giant balls or phalluses worthy of the porn industry, but they never looked like the real thing - real as in real cow-ball, not real phalluses - as they were too clean. A proper cow-ball, or cow-bogie, had to be quite dirty and have inclusions like bits of eraser embedded in it. Tasty! Cow did make rather nice translucent plastic spatulas for spreading their gum.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 02 January 2011 - 17:48.


#7289 Nev

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 17:51

Jaguar XJ13 engine by unknown artist (Vic Berris?)


Certainly a prototype quad-cam V12 but an engine of this style (with gear-driven cams) was never fitted to the XJ13 in period. Both engines fitted to the XJ13 (numbers 1 & 7) had all-chain drive and were not assembled to full competition spec. One engine WAS built to this gear-driven "competition" spec in 1966 (engine number 8) but was never installed in a car. After it was run on the test-bed it was dismantled - the block ended up in a copy made by Bryan Wingfield and I own its "competition-spec" heads. It was this engine with these heads that achieved 502bhp @ 7500rpm - although every set of specs you will for the XJ13 claim this performance, the most power achieved by an engine fitted to the XJ13 was 438bhp.

The only time a head with gear-driven cams was fitted to the XJ13 was in 1978 after its existing engine was over-revved. This was LONG after the project had ceased and the car was only wheeled out for demos etc.


#7290 alansart

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 17:55

The story about CS10 is quite sad, but typical of todays world. Colyer & Southey who produced the board were taken over by Frisk. Some time in the early Nineties John Marsden and I noticed that the CS10 did not scratch as well as it had and in fact became quite rough, even after careful scratching with a scalpel blade or razor blade. As both of us then tried other sheets of the board in the office, we came to the conclusion that something was wrong. We contacted the Frisk marketing director and he came over and admitted that they had a problem. the small German paper company that produced the high rag content paper had been brought out by a large American paper producer, and on seeing the small amount of this highly specialised paper they were making at a small profit decided to stop production. That was the end of CS10. There was another German board but I always found it was too slippery. We then went to Orme and Robinson, but they finished production of good quality lineboard in the mid to late nineties. I don't think anybody makes lineboard of an reasonable quality these days. It was certainly one of the factors that made us on Flight look at using new methods in the nineties.
On the template front it was Mike Badrocke who introduced Flight to templates, they were used for all the cutaways for Flight, Autocar and the Motor et al until the demise of the art dept. Of course you could not always get an ellipse to fit, but that was easy just joggle it and use your eye.
On your point Tony about rubbing down finished linework, we used to do that for the small amount of airbrush we produced. I think we used a Stadtler eraser, it was half red and half blue. It was the blue half that was used and as your said it left a lovely surface to airbrush on. I guess in the days before frisk film you used cow and permatrace. With a cowball to take the excess cowgum off the exposed part of the board.

Happy days!!
Tim Hall


CS10 was certainly the best board I ever used but I did notice it had gone off a bit the last time I used it in the early 90's. In Germany we used a product which I think was called Schollhammer. Reasonable, but not as good as the surface was much thinner, although you could buy it in very big sheets.


#7291 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 18:04

That really is a great picture. And also another very welcome insight into the cutaway practice in general. I wonder if even after the ellipse guide was introduced, the illustrator/draughtsman still on occasion found it necessary to construct the odd ellipse by hand. Or if the introduction of the guide killed outright that particular specialism.


There were often times when you had to construct an ellipse, even with a full set of guides. Usually you eye-balled an ellipse, then constructed one that fitted your sketch. I don't know if that was frequently done with cutaways of turbo-fans, as I imagine the biggest ellipses were quite large - no doubt Tim will tell. It was also quite easy to enlarge a 10" ellipse (the biggest guide) to the size you wanted. but it helps to know the old method of a piece of paper with the major and minor axes marked on it, and suitable French curves.

Fascinating description also of the working process used by Frank Munger. It does seem a very journalistic approach, the compiling of multiple sketches on the spot, to be worked up later into the single, final work. Very much like a form of reportage, and corresponds very well to that wonderful, older notion of the cutaway as a form of 'pictorial journalism'.


From Tim's description I get the impression that much more on-site sketching was done by the 'Flight' illustrators than by Jim, who used a camera for most jobs, and something I continued. However, sketching was important, and we used to take board with us to Lotus and Ford and sketch bits and pieces.


#7292 Nev

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 18:05

Jaguar XJ13 engine cross section by unknown artist (Not a cutaway)

Posted Image


This is a well-known cutaway that appeared in a technical paper written by Walter Hassan on the development of the V12 engine.

If you look closely, you will see that the inlet angles are different left to right. The left side shows an entry at a much greater angle than the right side. The latter angle was found to develop the most power and was a later development of the quad-cam engine.

Interestingly (or, rather, "interesting if you are sad as I am ...") the cutaway shows one of two 6-cylinder distributors. The XJ13 was never fitted with a single 12-cylinder distributor in period. This was added during its rebuild in 1972/73. The original 1966 car was different in many respects from the rebuilt car that now graces the JDHT collection. There is a bit more about it on my personal blog V12 Engine - Development and The 1966 Jaguar XJ13

#7293 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 18:20

CS10 was certainly the best board I ever used but I did notice it had gone off a bit the last time I used it in the early 90's. In Germany we used a product which I think was called Schollhammer. Reasonable, but not as good as the surface was much thinner, although you could buy it in very big sheets.

Hi Alan, happy New Year! I checked Schollhammer (spl?) at the time that CS10, CS2NOT and CS2HP were getting difficult to find, but never actually bought any. I'm not sure if that is even available now, a quick Google didn't turn up anything. The larger size was interesting, all I posess now is two 30"x40" CS2 sheets, one HP, one NOT. Can't think what to do with them...

#7294 byrkus

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 19:29

I believe you're talking about Schoellershammer.


#7295 werks prototype

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 19:36

, all I posess now is two 30"x40" CS2 sheets, one HP, one NOT. Can't think what to do with them...


I wish I could afford to commission you!

#7296 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 21:27

I believe you're talking about Schoellershammer.

Correct, how embarrassing! However, the British and foreign words... The website isn't very informative.

Edited to say that it is more informative that I first thought!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 02 January 2011 - 21:53.


#7297 Dutchy4C

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 03:07

Happy New Year to you all!

Since this is such a passionate crowd, I am hoping you are the right people to help me on my quest. I have been in awe of a couple of F1 race cars for well over 30 years now, and thanks to the Internet have been trying to get a vast collection of high res images together of each of them. Sadly I may like the wrong cars, since it is rather difficult to find any good images. I wonder if any of you can help?

In particular I am interested in the:

1974 Lotus 76/JPS1. It was of course JPS sponsored, featured prominent Duckhams Q, and was replaced mid season by the old faithful Lotus 72D. The original design was from Giugiar's Ital Design (I have an original scan to that extend), but since it was not a race winner it became rather obscure. It is simply a gorgeous design nevetheless.

The white Martini Brabham Alfa Romeo BT 46 as introduced in late 1975 to be used as a red car in the 1976 and 77 season. Of the white one I have found 3 pictures through the years, and that was it.

Lastly the Martini Brabham BT48 with surface coolers as introduced at the end of 1977. It was raced in 1978 as Parmalat sponsored car, without the surface coolers, and in the Swedish Grand Prix in the "Staubsauger" fan car version, but of course, somehow, the original Martini version with Surface coolers was the one stuck in my mind. I have 4 pictures all from the same shoot, but there must be more.. I hope..

If anyone can help out, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks!

#7298 werks prototype

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 14:42

Frank Munger told me the story about this drawing. At the Paris Airshow Dassault on their stand had a fantastic perspex model of the Mirage F1. You could see the main elements of the structure and systems. Frank spend some time making sketches, and on his return drew it up. Mike finished the drawing in ink. A nice drawing and it must have shocked Dassault!
John Marsden did a similar thing of the Saab Viggen, at Paris they showed a rotating slide show of the aircraft in build and John sat there and produced sketches until he was happy he could produce something. He produced a pretty good drawing considering what he has access too. Saab said nothing, but at Farnborough the next year he was invited to lunch at their chalet, and at lunch he had too men seated each side of him asking him where he got the information from!!


Those certainly are an interesting couple of examples of 'information gathering'. The levels of ingenuity and even 'heroic' opportunism employed, particularly by the wartime aero-space cutaway artists, never ceases to amaze me.

A quite extreme example that I remember reading about, I'm sure many are familiar with this, involves James Clark and his depiction of the Bf 109F?

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Of this work, Bill Gunston writes;

"Clark drew the Bf 109F in June-July 1941, entirely from inspection of one shot-down specimen."

"He called it the 'Me 109F series I'. Clark knew perfectly well that Luftwaffe machine guns were of 7.92mm calibre"




#7299 werks prototype

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 14:43

Posted Image
Porsche 911. By James Allington. (Slightly larger).

Edited by werks prototype, 05 May 2012 - 13:19.


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#7300 alansart

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 15:26

I believe you're talking about Schoellershammer.


I think you may be right although the stuff we used in the 80's had a different logo which was embossed into the corner of every sheet.