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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#7351 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 00:09

This forum may very well represent the main repository of the history concerning the hand production of cutaway art during the golden age of the art form.

Thankyou Joe. It is invidious to list names, but there is a powerhouse here, fuelled by macaron and ibsen, and certainly Anders has to be fingered for starting it all. I've certainly enjoyed it, and look forward to its continuation - it does have fits and starts like all threads, but it doesn't take long for a new flowering after a quiet period, and off we go again! I amazes me that there are so many who like and source cutaways, and every now and again a new enthusiast appears - OK, a couple more names, Tom West and werks prototype - who find or have collected illustrations that I have either never seen, or not seen for years. Thanks to all. It intrigues me that, apart from Tom West, those of us who are or were working illustrators have contributed the least number of cutaways. Generally speaking it seems that if you do it, you don't collect - but that does not mean that you are unaware, or do not take notice, or do not learn from others. I struggled with colour untill I saw a small, detail illustration by Bruno Betti, a quick illustration of a suspension unit, that made me realise that I had forgotten what James Allington told me twenty years earlier about reflected colour.

Onwards and upwards...

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#7352 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 00:34

So here is a question for the group in general. Is anyone archiving this thread for posterity? Is it even possible to do so? I am sure individual posts can be copied, but what about multiple pages of this priceless information? I am interested in pursuing the mechanics of how to accomplish this.

If you click on the 'Options' button on the right of the thread title bar, there is one for downloading the thread. However, ISTR that if you try to download very long threads such as this one you only get the first 300 posts.

#7353 ibsenop

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 01:11

I think we didn't have this one of the Jaguar XKSS. Artist?
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Jaguar D-type. By Vic Berris


The artist seems to be Vic Berris to me. Almost the same D Type by Berris.

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 180 - post 7164 => part A - post 7165 => part B

Edited by ibsenop, 08 January 2011 - 01:13.


#7354 JoeKane

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 04:47

If you click on the 'Options' button on the right of the thread title bar, there is one for downloading the thread. However, ISTR that if you try to download very long threads such as this one you only get the first 300 posts.


Tim, Thanks for sharing your expertise. I followed your adivce and I see what you mean about it downloading only a segment of the thread. It certainly is a start.

I have also experimented with copying a section and pasting it into a Word document. Must say the result was better than I expected. It even retained the embedded link URLs, something the download does not. I'll continue to experiment.

Thanks for your help.

#7355 JoeKane

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 05:07

...the Library central to Brautigan's story being where people shelved - where they liked - what they had written - and it was cared for ...
steven


Thanks Steven. That Library sounds alot like the internet. I'm on the Board of a Library so I have a sense of what it takes to retain history, as well as the reasons why... Our Library can only do so involving limited collections of special interest, but we do what we can.

Your story of the lost forum is exactly what I am talking about.

#7356 macoran

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 10:27

Marc, I don't have a problem with people posting artwork that is not theirs - how could I? It's just that no effort has been made to credit an illustrator, or even say "unknown". That's all, I'm not having a rant! Keep on trucking, and happy New Year.

I had another look at the russian site, James Allington's Jaguar E type posted by werks has taken a hitchhike over there. I noticed that most
of the cutaways posted have had signatures removed, but the artist is creditted in the text next to the main thumbnail.

Характеристики изображения:

Разрешение: 2048×1536
Размер: 613 kB
Добавил: M-Powe®, donderdag 6 januari 2011
Автомобиль: Jaguar E-Type Coupe (Series I) '1961–67
Статус изображения: Принято
Все изображения являются собственностью их авторов.

Если вы считаете, что автор сайта ошибся, разместив данную картинку в этом разделе, то было бы здорово, если бы вы написали об этом в комментариях и указали на ошибку.

Поделиться своей радостью, обсудить наболевшее и просто поболтать об автомобилях и не только вы можете на нашем форуме

Примечание для модератора: By James Allington


#7357 275 GTB-4

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 10:35

Mike do you know how many cylinders and what capacity .

Thanks Doug
H.N.Y to you


Lots and Big!! HNY to you Doug...I can never remember...there were three Deltics on each Bird Boat, one to drive the genny I recall....maybe 48 pistons??

Edited by 275 GTB-4, 08 January 2011 - 10:37.


#7358 JoeKane

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 17:48

Lots and Big!! HNY to you Doug...I can never remember...there were three Deltics on each Bird Boat, one to drive the genny I recall....maybe 48 pistons??


I'm straying off topic, but here is a start for those interested in more detail on the Deltic engines.
Pretty fascinating design.

Contains an animation of operation
http://en.wikipedia....i/Napier_Deltic

Lots of info and pictures
http://www.thedps.co....php?page=about

Edited by JoeKane, 08 January 2011 - 17:49.


#7359 JoeKane

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 18:02

... It is invidious to list names, but there is a powerhouse here...
I struggled with colour untill I saw a small, detail illustration by Bruno Betti, a quick illustration of a suspension unit, that made me realise that I had forgotten what James Allington told me twenty years earlier about reflected colour.


Thanks Tony.
Took me awhile to reply as I first had to find my dictionary - not an easy task in itself - as I find that "invidious" is not in common use in my part of Arizona.
Turns out to be a most useful word and I shall henceforth endeavor to use it in my daily conversations. (That's why I'm on this forum - I'm always learning something..)
Returning to serious conversation I could not agree more that there is a powerhouse here.
Your last sentence is but another example of my claim that history is being recorded here that exists nowhere else in printed form...

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#7360 simplebrother

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 18:08

The artist seems to be Vic Berris to me. Almost the same D Type by Berris.

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 180 - post 7164 => part A - post 7165 => part B


Recently ran across another Vic Berris - slightly different genre

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#7361 D-Type

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 18:41

I was in The Works today and saw they have the Haynes book of cutaways at £4.99. If this has already been posted, my apologies - i don't follow this thread.

#7362 Graham Clayton

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 20:21

A nice drawing of an early 1970's Edmunds speedway super-modified by David Kimble:

Posted Image


http://www.khulsey.c...vid_kimble.html

#7363 TWest

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 21:30

Thanks Tony.
Took me awhile to reply as I first had to find my dictionary - not an easy task in itself - as I find that "invidious" is not in common use in my part of Arizona.
Turns out to be a most useful word and I shall henceforth endeavor to use it in my daily conversations. (That's why I'm on this forum - I'm always learning something..)
Returning to serious conversation I could not agree more that there is a powerhouse here.
Your last sentence is but another example of my claim that history is being recorded here that exists nowhere else in printed form...


Joe, Thank-you for pointing out the wonderful use of language that happens on this group. Mr. Matthews and a few of the English and European types seem to have brought that extra precision of language that makes words such a fascinating device at times. I actually used my new Kindle Reader to look it up, so I have brought tech and tradition together to appreciate the use of the very well crafted invidious.
Not quite as appropriate, but there seems to be some invigilation happening with the group that shows much respect for the process that we are sharing. Since this has never been a commercial site, but only a forum for appreciation and sharing, I think that works just fine ... with the afore mentioned invigilation from the other members.
That was the word after invidious, just fyi ... although in verb form, not noun.
That makes all of us joint co-invigilators, by the way.
I mention the wordsmithy process as an appreciation for the more classic education that most of us have. Being here in Los Angeles area, the LAUSD has managed to take a fairly low level education and turn it into a storage facility where students are lauded for their ability to read a STOP sign, but they really feel great about themselves. After all, they should all feel good about themselves, whether there is a reason or not.
This group is about celebrating talent, and effort, which is a unique process it seems.
Tom West

#7364 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 01:34

This group is about celebrating talent, and effort, which is a unique process it seems.
Tom West

Effort mainly, Tom! Effort and panic.

#7365 eldougo

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 01:35

Thanks Joe ,WHAT a complicated motor. :confused:

Contains an animation of operation
http://en.wikipedia....i/Napier_Deltic

Lots of info and pictures
http://www.thedps.co....php?page=about



#7366 NPP

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 09:21

Effort mainly, Tom! Effort and panic.


Effort and panic. I think you are on to something there Tony, this might well be the best way to describe the way to getting things done I have come across so far! I'll right away insert that quote into the notes for my research methods course, telling students that only if they put in some effort in time they'll get through the panic phase and produce something useful.

#7367 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:15

I'll right away insert that quote into the notes for my research methods course, telling students that only if they put in some effort in time they'll get through the panic phase and produce something useful.

:lol: I wonder how many will take that on board! I didn't do much at school, except in Art and English, and later, Technical Drawing, because a) I enjoyed them, and b) I found them relatively easy, despite not being able to spell very well. However, I put a lot of effort into model making, and slept amidst various projects, working on them late into the night and starting again early before school. Apparently I sleep-walked noisily past my mother's bedroom one night, and she confronted me on the landing, asking me where I was going. "I'm going to get some sandpaper!" "Don't be silly, you can't get sandpaper in the middle of the night!" "Oh. Well I'll go for a piss then."

The awakening for me was meeting James Allington, and seeing his illustrations - realising that here was something I really wanted to do, and felt that I might be able to do. At that moment I started to really work, and a year after I left school with four 'O' level GCEs I realised that with the same effort that I was now constantly employing I could have cleaned up in 'O's and got some 'A's. Never mind...

As for panic, I think that was mostly caused by lack of work, but I do like a challenge, so tight deadlines were not so much panic-inducing as a spur, with periods of panic when things went wrong. Even when I discovered that agencies were shortening deadlines to cover their backs, and in fact there was often another week to spare, I always met those 'false' deadlines as a matter of professional and personal pride, and if that meant working ludicrous hours, so be it. The satisfaction of delivering artwork that the client was delighted with, on time, was often greater than being paid. Not always though...

#7368 NPP

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 12:01

As for panic, I think that was mostly caused by lack of work, but I do like a challenge, so tight deadlines were not so much panic-inducing as a spur, with periods of panic when things went wrong. Even when I discovered that agencies were shortening deadlines to cover their backs, and in fact there was often another week to spare, I always met those 'false' deadlines as a matter of professional and personal pride, and if that meant working ludicrous hours, so be it. The satisfaction of delivering artwork that the client was delighted with, on time, was often greater than being paid. Not always though...


Panic caused by lack of work sadly will be something my students will have to face as well (except those who are studying part time). I personally did not find that sort of panic conducive to achievement at all and prefer the milder one caused by an approaching deadline. Of course, in academia, we strictly enforce deadlines for students but have long given up on trying to get academics to adhere to them (do as we say, not as we do ...)

#7369 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 12:33

I personally did not find that sort of panic conducive to achievement at all and prefer the milder one caused by an approaching deadline.

You are absolutely right, and it takes a while to realise, as I now tell my children, that it is a waste of emotion, and doesn't affect the outcome. However, it is hard not to panic when major contracts are suddenly withdrawn, you have a mortgage, a young family and have just bought an expensive car! I read somewhere that the tendency to panic in these situations diminishes with age, 40 being the age when you become sanguine. It seemed to happen to me. Mind you, become too blase' and you don't achieve much... I do all of my worrying before work now, it means, hopefully, that nasty surprises tend not to leap out at me on the job. So to speak.

Edited to add that panic is when you have had the last call to the boarding gate at Chicago Airport, only to realise that you have lost eight rolls of exposed film, and relief is when you remember that you left them in a tray by the metal detector gate two hours earlier, and run back to find them still there!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 09 January 2011 - 12:39.


#7370 Flightlinearts

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 13:18

:lol: I wonder how many will take that on board! I didn't do much at school, except in Art and English, and later, Technical Drawing, because a) I enjoyed them, and b) I found them relatively easy, despite not being able to spell very well. However, I put a lot of effort into model making, and slept amidst various projects, working on them late into the night and starting again early before school. Apparently I sleep-walked noisily past my mother's bedroom one night, and she confronted me on the landing, asking me where I was going. "I'm going to get some sandpaper!" "Don't be silly, you can't get sandpaper in the middle of the night!" "Oh. Well I'll go for a piss then."

The awakening for me was meeting James Allington, and seeing his illustrations - realising that here was something I really wanted to do, and felt that I might be able to do. At that moment I started to really work, and a year after I left school with four 'O' level GCEs I realised that with the same effort that I was now constantly employing I could have cleaned up in 'O's and got some 'A's. Never mind...

As for panic, I think that was mostly caused by lack of work, but I do like a challenge, so tight deadlines were not so much panic-inducing as a spur, with periods of panic when things went wrong. Even when I discovered that agencies were shortening deadlines to cover their backs, and in fact there was often another week to spare, I always met those 'false' deadlines as a matter of professional and personal pride, and if that meant working ludicrous hours, so be it. The satisfaction of delivering artwork that the client was delighted with, on time, was often greater than being paid. Not always though...

Your comments on work and school struck a chord. I hated school and left without any O levels back in 1963. At 15 went into the Army as a Junior Tradesman and found I had to do my O levels then. When I left the Army after 5 yrs, I went to work for the Navy as a civilian and it was during that period that I found out about Technical Illustration. My Sister had a place on the Interior Design course at Portsmouth College of Art and pointed me in the direction of the course. I went to see the course on an open day and that was it. I had no art qualifications but I could draw, and got in on my drawing ability. I went on to take O levels in Art and Engineering drawing, but that was it. Found it difficult for the first term, then went from strength to strength. Portsmouth had a good Technical Illustration course run by Don Spetch. Left the course with the old City and Guilds Finals qualifications. I am sure there are a few people out there who remember them!
There were other good courses in the Country too, at that time. Sadly it has all gone. Tech pubs these days use solids to produce the illustrations - not much fun there. However I have seen solids starting to be used for IPC and maintenance manuals where they are used for animations. They work well and I think that in the near future all manuals will be on a DVD and be animated.
After working for an agency and then Flight for 30+ years, I found myself having to work as a self employed person.
Lack of work and being ill are the only two down sides of being self employed. You are constantly looking for work, you do get used to it, but it took some years. However working for yourself beats having people above you, who in a some cases have'nt got a clue.
The main qualifications needed to produce cutaways are: - 1. Being able to draw from life, 2. Having an intense interest in technical subjects and wanting to find out what goes on under the casing. (Technical knowledge can be acquired if you are really interested) 3. and lastly where most people fall down having the stickablility to work for long hours day after day, with a deadline approaching. The last one is where I have seen most people fail.
The interesting thing is that all the blokes who get there share a common sense of humour. You have to have a laugh or you would go mad!!

Tim Hall




#7371 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:11

It is not my intention to choke the board up here with multiple cutaway 'specimens'. I have been doing a little folder spring cleaning!

Posted Image
BMW M1. Artist unknown.

Scanned up from a postage stamp size I'm afraid, hence the poor quality.



#7372 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:11

Posted Image
B.M.C. A-Series unit. Artist unknown.

#7373 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:12

Posted Image
B.M.C Minicar, automatic transmission. Artist unknown.

#7374 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:12

Posted Image
BMW R24. By Schlenzig.

#7375 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:12

Posted Image
Ferrari Testarossa. By Stephen Seymour.

#7376 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:13

Posted Image
Ferrari flat-12. Testarossa. By Stephen Seymour.

#7377 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:13

Posted Image
Ferrari Testarossa. Braking system and rear suspension. By Stephen Seymour.

#7378 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:13

Posted Image
Nieuport XVII. By John Batchelor.

#7379 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:13

Posted Image
Yak-9 and Yak-9B detail. By John Weal.

Posted Image
Yak-9 key.

Edited by werks prototype, 09 January 2011 - 15:14.


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#7380 werks prototype

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:14

Posted Image
Spad XIII. By John Batchelor


#7381 tbolt

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 15:45

I have just been watching a programme on Quest UK, it was about the revolutionary new idea of submerged floating tunnels.

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Hmm, not that new after all.

#7382 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 16:14

...submerged floating tunnels.

I notice the advocation of "Anchoring cables of unoxidizable steel in non-corrosive casings." Pity they didn't think of that for suspension bridges - as far as I can make out just about every suspension bridge in the World has cables that are losing strand after strand all the time. One of the great lines is "Rust never sleeps!"

#7383 tbolt

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 16:30

For those of you that have a phobia about crossing large suspension bridges I would like to add that these cables rarely snap.... once is usually enough.

#7384 JoeKane

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 18:13

For those of you that have a phobia about crossing large suspension bridges I would like to add that these cables rarely snap.... once is usually enough.


Let's see... time of exposure to a hazard increases the chances of an injury...
So less time exposure would mean lower chances of injury...
Another reason to drive faster.
"But really officer under the circumstances it was the safest thing to do..." voice trailing off the officer continues to write the excessive-speed-on-a-bridge ticket.

#7385 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 18:17

Officer, will that be a fine ...or a suspension?

#7386 JoeKane

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 19:27

Officer, will that be a fine ...or a suspension?


Owwhh... That's so good it actually hurts! :rotfl:

#7387 JoeKane

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 19:31

Seattle Space Needle from 1962

Does anyone know if this Seymour is the same as the Ferrari Testarossa artist just above?

Edit - Hmmm... No thumbnail... I see I have more to learn about linking from Flickr. Double edit - To see if I've got it right yet...

Alraighty, let's try this again...

Posted Image
Space Needle 1962 by joekane17, on Flickr

Edited by JoeKane, 10 January 2011 - 03:30.


#7388 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 22:05

Lack of work and being ill are the only two down sides of being self employed.

Don't you find that you rarely get ill when under pressure of deadlines? My busy periods varied from three weeks to three months at a stretch, and I could be surrounded by plague and pestilence without suffering, but as soon as the workload disappeared, bingo, ill. During 37 years of freelance illustrating I was only too ill to work at a time when I had a major commission on one occasion, and farmed the work out, which was a disaster... My children would come home from school riddled with dengue fever, elephantiasis and rickets but if I was busy I was bullet-proof. I used to quite enjoy having a week in which to be a bit ill, and have no responsibilities. No, please Matron, not more ice-cream - Ooh! Lovely cool hands...

#7389 jondon

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 23:27

Enjoying your flickr page, Joe.
Have PMed you regarding how to post pics here on the bulletin board.


#7390 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 01:45

Don't you find that you rarely get ill when under pressure of deadlines? My busy periods varied from three weeks to three months at a stretch, and I could be surrounded by plague and pestilence without suffering, but as soon as the workload disappeared, bingo, ill. During 37 years of freelance illustrating I was only too ill to work at a time when I had a major commission on one occasion, and farmed the work out, which was a disaster... My children would come home from school riddled with dengue fever, elephantiasis and rickets but if I was busy I was bullet-proof. I used to quite enjoy having a week in which to be a bit ill, and have no responsibilities. No, please Matron, not more ice-cream - Ooh! Lovely cool hands...



Tony, I have been feeling really flat out here for about six weeks, and not getting crap done. At least it keeps my one project in front of me, rather than completing it and moving forward. Maybe there is something to this retirement thing afterall. I will just have to keep doing the photo shoots with the women, I guess, as I can always get ready for those, it seems. Maybe a career change is in order ...
And, who the hell every took care of one as you describe. Can't remember having that since being really small (not that I was ever all that small). But, my mother was such a pain for that kind of thing that I would drag myself out of the house anyway ...
Tom West

#7391 JoeKane

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 02:20

Here is something for those worrying about those suspension bridge cables. Ever notice how many of those cable supported bridges are over salt water to boot?
I'm afraid I don't know anything about this artist.

Okay I'm trying to follow new instructions from my tutor. Thanks John. Let's see if I get it right.

Posted Image
Golden Gate Bridge 1968 by joekane17, on Flickr

Edit - I forgot to note the oil accumulated on the roadways in this cutaway. Pretty normal stuff for 1968, eh.

Edited by JoeKane, 10 January 2011 - 02:22.


#7392 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:40

I have been a bit remiss in my contribution to the group, so thought I would take a shot at correcting things a bit. I pulled a few more of the Haynes Manual covers and thought we would see where the pile takes us first.
That would be the Terry Davey rendition of a 1988 BMW520i. One of those cars that I don't see one generally working on, however.

Tom West

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#7393 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:44

Our next offering out of the Haynes Manual covers for the evening is a US Ford, Galaxie, I believe. One of those rather standard configuration larger cars that we have over here. This one is from 1985.
Tom West


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#7394 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:48

The intermediate modern Thunderbird became pretty common over here, probably a good item for a Haynes Manual. Again, as with all of these this evening, they are Terry Davey pieces. This was also a 1988 version of the car.
Tom West

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#7395 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:49

This is the 1987 Honda Civic by Terry Davey.
Tom West


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#7396 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:52

Here we have the Haynes cover for the 1988 Isuzu Trooper. Simple, fun little vehicle with a penchant for the rollover. Must have been a load of laughs for high performance motoring.
Tom West

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#7397 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:53

Definitely a bit unusual for over here, but this is the 1985 Lada 1600 from Terry Davey.
Tom West

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#7398 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:55

Here is Terry Davey's version of the 1985 Mazda Pickup.
Tom West


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#7399 TWest

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 07:57

The 1986 Pontiac Fiero. This was the baseline car, although I think there may be a GT version here in the stack. There were some interesting features in this car, for the time. Again, by Terry Davey and off the cover of the Haynes Manual.
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#7400 TWest

TWest
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Posted 10 January 2011 - 08:00

The Porsche 911 from 1986 by Terry Davey.
Tom West

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