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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#751 eglf

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 14:41

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Group 2 Fiesta

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#752 IrishMariner

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 04:28

...Soneone's started a thread on motorcycle cutaways. Perhaps it should be merged with this one. After all, we've had everything from Fiestas to Ferraris, Marches to Motorhomes, Pitts Specials and Powerboats.

Oh, and I second Mr Elleray's call for any interesting car build photos to be posted. They'll never have the same appeal of the art work, but are quite interesting nonetheless.

As a CAD-driver myself (just boring stuff, though), I do like seeing how it was done pre-CATIA, 5-AXIS, CMM, FEA, etc. I like seeing the craftsmanship in an old technical drawing. When I was at a large aircraft manufacturer back in the day I used to unroll Mylars and still smell the cigarettes of the drawing! the penmanship was varied but never less than impressive to an ignoramous like me.

#753 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:57

Originally posted by IrishMariner
...Soneone's started a thread on motorcycle cutaways. Perhaps it should be merged with this one. After all, we've had everything from Fiestas to Ferraris, Marches to Motorhomes, Pitts Specials and Powerboats.

Oh, and I second Mr Elleray's call for any interesting car build photos to be posted. They'll never have the same appeal of the art work, but are quite interesting nonetheless.

As a CAD-driver myself (just boring stuff, though), I do like seeing how it was done pre-CATIA, 5-AXIS, CMM, FEA, etc. I like seeing the craftsmanship in an old technical drawing. When I was at a large aircraft manufacturer back in the day I used to unroll Mylars and still smell the cigarettes of the drawing! the penmanship was varied but never less than impressive to an ignoramous like me.


Hi IM, yes Snr. Baro started that, but is having problems, like so many of us initially, in posting his pix, and I have contacted him - to me it is logical that he joins this thread, but he may not want to!

As to build photos, I don't know, I removed most of my M26 photos as I felt they were out of place. I obviously have loads, but I'm not sure they belong here - but if anyone wants specific images, and I can help, I will.

I have a load of engineering drawings from various sources, and they are wonderful - yes, the penmanship varies, but that is the joy of them, once you learn the 'handwriting' you can tell who did the drafting without looking for the initials! Recent CAD drawings are fascinating and much improved from the early days, but personally I like to see the human touch.

#754 IrishMariner

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 17:11

Originally posted by Tony Matthews

I have a load of engineering drawings from various sources, and they are wonderful - yes, the penmanship varies, but that is the joy of them, once you learn the 'handwriting' you can tell who did the drafting without looking for the initials! Recent CAD drawings are fascinating and much improved from the early days, but personally I like to see the human touch.


Recently I was working in the old design office of a large Bristol-based aircraft company. Typical of an older UK drawing office - built when Spitfire's were being drawn and still going strong despite over the years losing drafting tables and asbestos but gaining photocopiers and CAD screens. Anyways, one night in a cupboard we found a pile of cast iron things that one of the older guys informed us were 'Ducks' used to hold splines in shape for lofting large skin panels. None of us knew what 'splines' or 'lofting' was. He became quite nostalgic and from his briefcase he took out a black & white photo taken in the same office sometime long ago. There were large flat drawing tables on which gents (I assume they were gents because each was tweed-suited and wearing a tie with nary a top button undone) were kneeling and lofting skin panels for old BAe aircraft with the self-same ducks clearly visible on the tables. He apprenticed with the guys and named them all - including a guy they called 'half-thou' because of his lofting accuracy.

You could tell he wasn't impressed by progress by the way he nodded at the current scene before him - instead of suits were an assortment of jeans and t-shirts and rather than being engrossed in the work, the current generation (of which I am one) were fiddling with their iPods and mobile phones - just hitting the mouse on their computer frequently enough to prevent the screensaver kicking in.

'Nostalgia' is it?

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
...I removed most of my M26 photos as I felt they were out of place.


Proper order, too, Tony - this thread is about the cutaways and the preparation for them _ I kind tuned out for a few days when converstaion turned to M23/M26 minutae.

#755 Tony Kingston

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 18:39

Ducks? We used to call them Pigs in the motor industry.

#756 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 20:24

Originally posted by Tony Kingston
Ducks? We used to call them Pigs in the motor industry.


IM, Tony, this is fascinating! Before my introduction to technical illustration my interest was technical drawing, and as is obvious by my comments about the engineering drawings in my possesion, I still love them. Do you mean that the 'splines' were flexible 'battens' that were held in place by 'ducks' or 'pigs' to achieve sections of very large-radius curves? I remember being envious of a draftsman for Husband & Co., consulting engineers, because of his set of 'railway curves', even though I had not much use of them! I had a set of French curves, as did Jim Allington, and they tended to get modified over time with a file, the standard curves always left something to be desired! The railway curves biggest drawback was, of course, that they were circular sections and we wanted parabolic sections.

I do worry that these skills and knowledge of practice are being/are already lost, I maintain that however sophisticated the software that is available it must be an advantage to understand basic principles. The wisdom of a pensioner!

#757 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 21:19

And now for something completely different...the Benetton wind tunnel, latterly Renault. Designed to be capable of running at 1 bar pressure... I was told that if it let go at full pressure the blast would be the equivalent of 1 tonne of TNT!

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Very publicly edited after DCN's comment....capable of running at 1 bar over atmospheric pressure.

#758 Bonde

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 22:26

...and all that just to get a couple of freakish vehicles to run in circles every fortnight. Your excellent cutaway of the Benntton 'tunnel is a very graphic illustration of one of the many things wrong with F1 these days as a result of too much money...but that's just an Old Farte's opinion, of course. Is that a mostly airbrushed work, Tony?

Re hand-made engineering drawings: I'm all with IM and Tony x 2: They can be so pleasing to look at for a nerd such as myself that I can actually spend hours looking at them just for the sheer enjoyment. How sick is that?

Although I definitely enjoy the advantages CAD has brought, I sometimes do miss working on the board with a pencil on Mylar. In my early career I was the last one to do that, yet I'm so young that I had the advantage of access to a spline which was made of soft plastic with a lead or copper core so that you could shape it and it would keep its shape - didn't need many ducs to use.

Tony M, is there basis for an engineering drawing thread? Or would there be too many copyright issues and simple scanning challenges for it to work? I'm afraid most of the hand-drawn engineering drawings I could get access to are of aircraft structure and not to be divulged, but I may have a (very) few racing car engineering drawings that might be of interest, but almost impossible to scan. Perhaps just taking digital photos might be good enough. Thoughts?

#759 PeterElleray

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 23:06

Originally posted by Bonde
[B

Tony M, is there basis for an engineering drawing thread? Or would there be too many copyright issues and simple scanning challenges for it to work? I'm afraid most of the hand-drawn engineering drawings I could get access to are of aircraft structure and not to be divulged, but I may have a (very) few racing car engineering drawings that might be of interest, but almost impossible to scan. Perhaps just taking digital photos might be good enough. Thoughts? [/B]


Anders - i have lots of material - but i havent had much success with posting at a high enough resolution to give any pleasure when viewed - i tried the digi camera route, with my Canon on max everything which meant that an A1 was about 5mb - result pretty hopeless when expaned to viewing size - any ideas?

peter

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#760 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 23:30

Originally posted by Bonde
Is that a mostly airbrushed work, Tony? ....is there basis for an engineering drawing thread?


No Anders, mostly brush, a bit of airbrush as I had problems getting a smooth blend on the large-diameter tunnel sections. It wasn't helped by everything being white!

I think there could be serious copyright issues with engineering drawings, I certainly would hesitate before posting any Ilmor or Ferrari drawings even though they are some years old. Pity.

#761 IrishMariner

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 23:44

IIRC, that Benetton Wind-Tunnel was the brainchild of Wonder-Boy Nick Wirth. Increasing the pressure of the air is one of the few ways to increase the Reynolds No. of the tunnel to make it simulate real-life better. Another way is to increase the density of the fluid used which is why some manufacturers have played with tunnels using waterrathert than air.

If anyone wants to see some real nice engineering drawings, the Auto-Union/Mercedes book 'Quicksilver' by Cameron Earl/HMSO has some fold-out beauties at the end.

My own opinion of 2D drawings is that while it is nice to see an old one, their time is coming to an end. So much time is expended ensuring linetypes are right and that the drawingis laid out properly, etc. At my current employer, we've started using Model-based definition for almost everything and for details and simple-assemblies, the time required isa fraction of that for the drawing. On th'other hand, it can be a problem transitioning over to this method as people need to be trained..

#762 Doug Nye

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 23:51

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
And now for something completely different...the Benetton wind tunnel, latterly Renault. Designed to be capable of running at 1 bar pressure...


:confused: Don't we all run at 1 bar pressure?

DCN

#763 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 23:55

Originally posted by Doug Nye


:confused: Don't we all run at 1 bar pressure?DCN


Clever clogs! One bar over atmospheric!

#764 Rancethebus

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 08:29

[the 721, which I didn't do, was a very 'normal-looking' car! ]
Where Tony was that published and where can I see a copy of it?

#765 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 09:07

Originally posted by Lee Nicolle
Tony, that wheel nut is very interesting but I do not understand the sprocket like outside circumfrence. Suggestions?


A brief explanation (I know people get irritated about the discussion of technical details on this thread). The rules require a locking device for the wheelnut. The wheel has a number of sprung pegs arranged on the same PCD as those notches. These sprung pins are compressed by the wheel nut socket as the nut is installed or removed. If the nut were to start to back off due to insufficient tightening then one of the pins can spring up in to one of the cutouts and stop it turning further, assuming that one had not already aligned with a cutout during the original tightening process.

Thanks, Nigel

#766 markpde

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 15:14

Originally posted by macoran

There is a Matthews cutaway of the 711-Alfa on Marchives, as well as a Bennett 711-DFV

Here's the Bennett cutaway first - Frank Costin's original, beautiful vision.

Posted Image

http://www.marchives.com/ - which also has photos of the prototype 721X.

Also an excellent March history thread on Autodiva.

#767 markpde

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 15:22

And here's Tony's cutaway of a slightly later (I think) 711-Alfa, without cowling for the engine and radiators, also from the marchives site - evidently old Frank had miscalculated on engine breathing and cooling? The marchives (clever name, that) site also has photos of the early 721, still with the elliptical front wing but fully cowled, so these issues were eventually resolved, although IIRC it was only used for the South American races in '72. The 721X used the same cowling and bodywork, but with, of course, a different (uglier IMHO), full width nose.

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#768 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 16:56

Originally posted by markpde
- evidently old Frank had miscalculated on engine breathing

Or Robin

#769 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 17:08

Originally posted by Nigel Beresford


A brief explanation (I know people get irritated about the discussion of technical details on this thread).


I don't think that's true, Nigel, after all, Technical Illustration is all about technical details! I gave an even briefer explanation earlier - in fact the cutaway shows a locking pin in the rear wheel section but is too small to see reproduced on screen. This is why I could never see the point in cutting away an engine in a car, the detail can only properly be appreciated in large format prints.

#770 markpde

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 18:28

Originally posted by Tony Matthews

Or Robin

Frank Costin wasn't often wrong, right enough - I believe virtually every line he drew was a mathematical calculation, and the same would apply to everything else. When you think about it, was the prototype 711 the first 3-litre Formula 1 car with a fully enclosed engine (including the injection trumpets)?

(Tony, I know it's just a page scanned out of Motoring News, and it was one of your early ones, so if you want I'll delete it, especially if you or anyone else comes up with a clearer copy, but I think it's excellent, and it has character - the cutaway equivalent of patina! :) )

Q: Fahnd this in a drawah, guv - woss it worf?

A: A damn sight more than anybody's going to give you for it...

:rolleyes: ;)

#771 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 20:42

Originally posted by markpde
...and it has character - the cutaway equivalent of patina!


I'll go with the patina, Mark! I thought the original 711 with the fully enclosed rear end looked fantastic, it's hard now to appreciate the impact of that bright red STP March with it's Spitfire front wing, if only one could look forward to an F1 launch nowadays, not knowing what to expect!

Fascinating to see Bill Bennet's cutaway too, I had not seen it before. I have, as I'm sure I've said before, a collection of his work and am keen to find him if possible, and either return his illustrations or scan them and post them on this thread.

#772 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:20

Originally posted by Nigel Beresford


A brief explanation (I know people get irritated about the discussion of technical details on this thread).

Thanks, Nigel


Tony,

fair enough. I had just sensed a degree of ennui earlier regarding the M23 / M26 construction discussion on this thread, hence the establishment of the separate thread. As a newcomer I don't want to offend...

Thanks

Nigel

#773 Tim Murray

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:33

Originally posted by Nigel Beresford

fair enough. I had just sensed a degree of ennui earlier regarding the M23 / M26 construction discussion on this thread, hence the establishment of the separate thread.

Not from me - these technical details are all grist to my mill, and I'm sure I'm not alone. This is a most excellent thread, and I regard it a privilege to get the inside details from such eminent contributors as Nigel, Peter, Anders et al, and of course the great Tony. Please don't stop, chaps.

#774 PeterElleray

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 12:16

Originally posted by Tim Murray
Not from me - these technical details are all grist to my mill, and I'm sure I'm not alone. This is a most excellent thread, and I regard it a privilege to get the inside details from such eminent contributors as Nigel, Peter, Anders et al, and of course the great Tony. Please don't stop, chaps.


i guess we fall into different categories - those of us who like to appreciate the cutaway as a piece of 'technical art', and those who look upon it as an aid to unlocking a technical/construction puzzle - from which the technical minutae naturally follow. ofcourse some of us (self included) are highly appreciative of both the art and the engineering! Some, like Anders have both skill sets , which should get everyone's respect!

i will kick start the m23/26 thread and start one on the 711-721 (after checking to see what else id here first) - maybe Tony can treat us on there aswell!

Peter

#775 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 17:48

Originally posted by Nigel Beresford


Tony,

fair enough. I had just sensed a degree of ennui earlier regarding the M23 / M26 construction discussion on this thread, hence the establishment of the separate thread. As a newcomer I don't want to offend...

Thanks

Nigel


Nigel, I'm a newcomer too, and have the same concerns as you. I think the M23/M26 just got a bit too specific, and I was worried that my multiple photographic post looked a bit like 'shouting'!

Peter, the sole purpose of Technical Illustration is to illustrate, to make it obvious how a piece of machinery works or is assembled. Looking good is secondary. The slickest painting that fails to show what you want to know, or is technically innacurate, is a waste of space. When Jim Allington and I were doing Workshop Manual illustrations for FMC we had it drummed into us that as long as the drawings were reasonably accurate the 'artistic' aspect was totally irrelevant, what mattered most was the annotation - the part numbers HAD to be right, and the arrows had to go to the right part!

#776 Stephen Miller

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 02:49

I'm with Tim

I can't image that there can possibly be such a thing as too much detail!! :stoned:

And With Peter

The Cutaway is indeed a key to unlocking a technical/construction puzzle!

Both Art and Engineering!

Stephen

#777 Tony Matthews

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 19:47

Just found a small selection of A4 prints of working drawings...Williams FW14B, one of my favourites.


Posted Image

#778 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 20:03

Stop being so blooming interesting Tony!!
You might have missed my post earlier; what did/do you think of Theo Page??

#779 Tony Matthews

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 21:33

Originally posted by werks prototype
I hope you are able to post something of the unfinished FW 14B at some point. Mark.


There you are Mark!

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#780 Tony Matthews

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 22:02

Originally posted by antonvrs
This is a fascinating thread. I've always thought that the best part of the original two volumes of "The "Grand Prix Car" were not the finished cutaways but the sketches in the back of the book.
Mr. Matthews, I love your BRM piece- do you know who did the translucent cutaway/overlays of the V16 in the 1954 V16 BRM engine book? That book has been one of my treasures for nearly 50 years now. I too would be a buyer of a book of working drawings, especially of the earlier cars like the D50 etc.
Anton


Anton, sorry to have taken so long to respond - I feel the same about Lawrence Cresswell's illustrations, lovely sketches that somehow lost a little in the finishing. Jim Allington and I talked about the way the more you did to an illustration the less 'busy' or complicated it looked, maybe that is what happened.

As to the BRM layered cutaway - I managed to find a copy of the book about ten years ago in very good condition, ever since I saw Jim's copy in about 1960 I was determined to have one. The illustration - artist unknown, at least to me - is a tour de force, my only quibble is the lack of perspective, but it would be immpossible to add perspective without the 'underneath' views looking completely wrong. Some years later Jaguar commisioned a similar illustration of the Jag V12, possibly by the same person.

#781 Tony Matthews

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 22:16

Originally posted by Gregor Marshall
Slightly OT but I've spent all day today at Silverstone (was great seeing & hearing the Brawn Mercedes run on the South circuit!!) going through bound copies of Autosport from the 1960s and '63 and '64 are packed full of simple black and white cutaways by Theo Page - some of them are brilliant (I loved the simplicity of them) and I wish I'd had a scanner with me!!
In the'64 editions of Autosport they advertised booklets of all of Theo's cutaways for sale - has anyone got one? I've not checked the internet yet - my ears (and eyes for that matter) are still ringing from 19,000 revs!!


Hi Gregor, I envy you being at Silverstone. I've been to test sessions there in the past, both private and public, and the best way to appreciate the astonishing sound of an F1 car is when there is just one circulating, the sound rising and falling, sometimes - at least on the full circuit - almost disappearing, and then the full, shattering sound as it passes at unbelievable speed! Cor, got a bit carried away there!

I always think of the Ford Press Release cutaway of the DFV when Theo Page is mentioned, but I have not seen much of his work, If you come across the book let me know and I willl try to get a copy too. I know very little about him, I used, many years ago, to occasionally meet Gregor Grant's daughter Simone, and she mentioned Theo, but not in detail.

#782 IrishMariner

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:29

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
Just found a small selection of A4 prints of working drawings...


Two words - 'goody' and 'gumdrops'.

Tell Imageshack to hold the door, Tony's coming....

#783 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 17:42

'Goody goody gumdrops'! Blimey, where did you dredge that up from. Up from? From! Ferrari F2000

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#784 Nigel Beresford

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 19:42

Tony, I love the original pencil drawings. When I became Tech Director at Penske Cars the office I inherited from Nigel Bennett and John Travis had two framed originals (or very good prints from them) of the pencil drawings of the PC18 and 19. It was an amusing distraction to try to decipher your small notes of song titles or phone messages around the borders of the drawings during long transatlantic conference calls.

Thanks

Nigel

#785 Tony Matthews

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 19:59

Originally posted by Nigel Beresford
Tony, I love the original pencil drawings. When I became Tech Director at Penske Cars the office I inherited from Nigel Bennett and John Travis had two framed originals (or very good prints from them) of the pencil drawings of the PC18 and 19.


Nigel, I am very pleased that you like them. Nigel Bennet was, as are most designers, more interested in the working drawings, but the ones I supplied were copies on film, so they looked even more like the originals. The notes and doodles were obviously done in the heat of the moment, it was only after I had delivered the prints that I would have a mild panic attack in case I had written something I might regret in a corner of the print!

#786 PeterElleray

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 23:38

Originally posted by Tony Matthews


Nigel, I am very pleased that you like them. Nigel Bennet was, as are most designers, more interested in the working drawings, but the ones I supplied were copies on film, so they looked even more like the originals. The notes and doodles were obviously done in the heat of the moment, it was only after I had delivered the prints that I would have a mild panic attack in case I had written something I might regret in a corner of the print!


i keep meaning to ring the mobile numbers that are scribbled on some of the one's that John Tipler used in his Lotus books to see if Colin Chapman answers...

thread may now return to sensible posts.

cheers

Peter

#787 markpde

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 00:49

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
I always think of the Ford Press Release cutaway of the DFV when Theo Page is mentioned, but I have not seen much of his work, If you come across the book let me know and I willl try to get a copy too. I know very little about him, I used, many years ago, to occasionally meet Gregor Grant's daughter Simone, and she mentioned Theo, but not in detail.

Don't know if you'll have seen this, Tony, but it features a couple of anecdotes about Theo Page, a cutaway of the Formula One Cooper-Climax, which you could post if there are no issues with copyright, and a photo.

#788 Gregor Marshall

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:33

Brilliant, thanks guys. I keep in regular touch with Simone (and irregularly with Don!!) so I'll ask them for some more info on Theo Page.

#789 Tony Matthews

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:04

Originally posted by PeterElleray
i keep meaning to ring the mobile numbers that are scribbled on some of the one's that John Tipler used in his Lotus books to see if Colin Chapman answers...


Peter, you may get Clive, but the hot-line to ACBC was carefully removed before printing!

Answering this sooner than I expected as I had a fall this morning, fortunately not from a great height, but I landed heavily on my knees and bent both my hands back further than they are designed to go, but I can't even pick up a Hilti, let alone use it, so I'm home early. The Child Bride has helped me out of my boots and overalls and Aspirin is courseing through my body. C'est la geurre, as we say in Hertfordshire, c'est un pain dans la derriere as much as les mains et les knees. Herreusement, il est Vendredi pas Lundi, si j'ai le 'weekend' pour fait un recovery complet!

Gregor, Simone may not remember me but if you mention Walberswick and Chloe Jeans it may jog her memory. We are talking about a long time ago! I never met Don although he was probably doing cartoons for GBM and later CSS while I was cuting away and producing circuit maps etc.

#790 Tony Matthews

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:05

Originally posted by markpde

Don't know if you'll have seen this, Tony, but it features a couple of anecdotes about Theo Page, a cutaway of the Formula One Cooper-Climax, which you could post if there are no issues with copyright, and a photo.


Thanks Mark, that looks really interesting!

#791 werks prototype

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:13

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
Just found a small selection of A4 prints of working drawings...Williams FW14B, one of my favourites.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by werks prototype
I hope you are able to post something of the unfinished FW 14B at some point. Mark.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There you are Mark!


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Absolute perfection Tony, absolute perfection.

Mark.

#792 PeterElleray

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:16

Originally posted by Tony Matthews


Peter, you may get Clive, but the hot-line to ACBC was carefully removed before printing!


indeed - i checked the country code and it didnt match with Bolivia or Paraguay.

And....

Living in Norfolk and intending to continue doing so, i think thats quite enough of that..

Get well soon Tony - check your private email for my reply to Anders recent 'parcel'

rgds

Peter

#793 Victor_RO

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:28

Originally posted by Tony Matthews
Just found a small selection of A4 prints of working drawings...Williams FW14B, one of my favourites.


Posted Image


Holy Mother of God... that is a superb drawing! One of the most advanced F1 cars in history, in all its glory. :up: :up: :up: Big thumbs-up for these.

#794 Tony Matthews

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:41

Originally posted by Victor_RO
Holy Mother of God...


Thank you very much Victor - but I prefer to be called Tony...

#795 werks prototype

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 18:29

I may be wrong (I have checked the board search function) but there is another artist that I don't think has been mentioned here yet. S.E. Porter? Hopefully some may actually possess a few examples of his work, it featured mostly in 'Motor' I believe.

I happened upon his work fleetingly and by pure chance whilst browsing a book on the history of Jaguar. Each illustration was published with the 'Motor' stamp as well as the artists signature, though the book was apparently unrelated to 'motor' it included a number of Porters cut-aways.

An interesting, either simplistic or simplified, I'm not sure, rendition of a Jaguar engine. And from an unusual rear angle a nice cut-away of a Jaguar mk1 or 2, I believe.

#796 Tony Matthews

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 08:17

Mark, I have seen the name S.E.Porter under several cutaways, but some years ago. I remember the Jaguar engine and some saloons, possibly a Jaguar 'S' Type. He may have been on the staff of Motor, I have a friend who was a Graphic Designer for the publishers, I must contact him, see if he can tell me anything.

#797 Tony Matthews

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 10:52

Posted Image

Ferrari F2000 gearbox - housing fabricated from many CNC titanium components and bolted to a large carbon fibre structure that took all the suspension loads.

#798 macoran

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 12:49

Originally posted by Tony Matthews

Ferrari F2000 gearbox - housing fabricated from many CNC titanium components and bolted to a large carbon fibre structure that took all the suspension loads.


Absolutely fantabulous !!!......for want of a more suitable word.

#799 Pat Clarke

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 13:22

Quote Tony Matthews "I had a fall this morning,"

Tony, with none of us getting younger but with bones getting more brittle, I hope you are okay. I slipped in the shower a couple of years ago (I WAS alone =]) broke my scaphoid and was in plaster for an age! I hope nothing like that has happened you.

Cheers
Pat

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#800 macoran

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 13:45

Originally posted by Tony Matthews

............. as I had a fall this morning, fortunately not from a great height, but I landed heavily on my knees and bent both my hands back further than they are designed to go,


I haven't been reading much these past few days as I broke my specs, picked up my new ones and am catching up.

Hope you are well now Tony.