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#8001 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 12:19

A request has flooded in for news of Gwendolyn - anonymous, but I would be surprised if it wasn't from young Bingo Murray. As it happens I visited her in her Knightsbridge apartment on my way back from darkest Devon - or was it Polynesia? I lead such a busy life... Any road up, she is well, and keeps an eye on the Cutawayland thread, so language, please! We had a few pink gins and a pleasant evening, apart from Angustora, her chihuahua, urinating on my nearly-new Caterpillar work boots that I had left in her immaculate lobby. For some reason the subject of relativity arose, and as usual, Gwendolyn was able to add colour to the conversation, in this case by mentioning that she had met, even knew well, Albert Einstein. "Did you, Gwendolyn? How?" "Tony, dear, there are few people of note that I have not met, one way or another! He and some of his intellectual friends would meet here for gin and a game of rummy. They wanted to play chess, but I soon put a stop to that nonsense!" "What was he like as a person?" "Tony, what strange grammar you use at times! Well, he was sweet, lovely eyes and soft white hair - polite, unassuming, and my first impression was that he was not the type that I could imagine going cross-eyed with pleasure on top of Mrs Einstein! However, he did spend a great deal of time staring at my embonpoint, which, although slightly smaller than before the lap-top fire, has always been called magnificent. Eventually we had a brief liason, and... well, perhaps I shouldn't mention it, but... well, Tony dear, I know you are discreet - he had the odd habit of crying out a strange sort of yodel at the moment of climax! Always, and I never quite knew what to make of it." "What was it like, Gwendolyn, can you imitate it?" She pondered, took a sip of gin, threw back her lovely head and gave a cry... "EEeeeeeeeEEEeekweeelsemmseeeskwaaaareddd!! That's the closest I can get to it, Tony dear - it was a long time ago!" I took one of her 'At Home' cards from the bureau and, borrowing her tortoise-shell and lapis lazuli biro, wrote 'E=mc²' and handed her the card. She pondered for a moment, then snorted "Don't be so silly, Tony dear, that's not even a word!"

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#8002 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 12:26

Tony,

Just noticed the Influx Lancia article with your uncredited D50 illustration - glad you pulled them up on that, did your hear anything back?

Robbie

A very nice e-mail, Robbie, I won't use the word 'grovelling', that would be insulting, but acknowledging that it should not have been used without pernission. They have offered to include the Kevin Hulsey link in their newsletter, so that's sorted, amicably. Unless they don't include it... Grrr!

#8003 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 12:35

I've just noticed that tbolt, of whom it is said..., has put his name to post#8,000! Give that man a cigar, coconut and a pat on the back!

#8004 Tim Murray

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 12:44

A request has flooded in for news of Gwendolyn - anonymous, but I would be surprised if it wasn't from young Bingo Murray.

Not I, Sir. She must have another admirer. If I find out who the bounder is, I shall have no alternative but to call him out. Jet Skis at dawn!!

#8005 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 13:02

Not I, Sir. She must have another admirer. If I find out who the bounder is, I shall have no alternative but to call him out. Jet Skis at dawn!!

In my experience it is not advisable to harbour jealousy when it comes to Gwendolyn's liasons, otherwise one is jealous of many Crowned Heads of Europe, the Near East, the Far East, several New World Presidents and Ambassadors, the Worlds top artists, musicians (from knighted classicists to recent rock gods), politicians and at least one window cleaner. And me...

#8006 scorerr770

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 13:18

just came across these cutaways someone has collected Hotrods and USA race cars

Roy

#8007 Tim Murray

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 13:55

In my experience it is not advisable to harbour jealousy when it comes to Gwendolyn's liasons, otherwise one is jealous of many Crowned Heads of Europe, the Near East, the Far East, several New World Presidents and Ambassadors, the Worlds top artists, musicians (from knighted classicists to recent rock gods), politicians and at least one window cleaner. And me...

I'll fight you all, dammit! :mad:





Wait a minute, I've just remembered that I transferred my affections to Gwendolyn's niece Honoria some while back (I think). How fickle love is. All duels off, sorry. :blush:

#8008 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 15:38

Wait a minute, I've just remembered that I transferred my affections to Gwendolyn's niece Honoria some while back (I think).


News of Honoria later...

#8009 tbolt

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 18:17

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What's this lot then? :)


Err that's them thing's that look like handlebars, they are actually Handel bars, so called because as you pick up speed the air passing over the ends makes a whistling sound.
The Jet Ski I posted is basically for one person who rode standing up or kneeling, hence the Handel bars mounted on the end of the hinged watchamacallit, none of the Jet Ski's that I saw had a watchermacallit, they were the larger two seaters with the handlebars mounted thus.

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#8010 TWest

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 21:39

Can you give us any extra 'teaser' information, Tom? Car type etc?


Werks,
I wasn't aware that any of you guys were all that excited about some of my drag racing and hot rod pieces. Thanks for asking.
The car that is on the board is a commission for a guy who recreated a car out of the mid-60s. He is probably the most accurate drag racing modeler that I know, and after moving from 1/25 to 1/16 because they were easier to see, he moved up to this one as a 1:1 project. This is just a very typical dragster from about 1965, and was close to winning a couple of major events and was one of the strongest runners in Southern California on a weekly basis for a couple of years. Just one of those essential cars ... if it is needed to go faster, it is there; if it doesn't make the car faster, it isn't.
I just completed a layout on one of my other earlier scans that will go up later, I had a digital scan that really trashed the thing so it has taken me a bit of time to clean it up to print. Another dragster from 1969.
Will include a few others, but will have to check which ones I have put up here previously.
Satisfying to have them in this setting, I have to say.
Thanks.
Tom West

#8011 TWest

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 21:46

just came across these cutaways someone has collected Hotrods and USA race cars

Roy



I have been putting together some of this kind of thing for a possible book on that subject, and there are actually a couple of these that I had not seen, of not taken in. Most of them were actually done in cutaway illustrations, not the photo stuff as most of these are done.
Will have to dig out those magazines and do some larger versions of them, I guess.
Tom West

#8012 RDV

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 22:32

Gwendolyn eh! Many fond memories of the gel! Of course we shall be discreet and not reminisce too far, of course. Nowadays ones life is much taken by the country side, of course even if it is a sad fact that one's social duties occasionally force one to that loathsome sink of depravity and sin known as London, where one has been the past fortnight. For those readers who still think of London as a picturesque city of old-world treasures, Bobbies, and quaint photographic opportunities, one hastens to inform them that they are wrong. When one returns from that dank and dismal city, one returns not with happy memories and a Brownie full of snapshots, but a inch-thick layer of grime and grease that takes repeated scrubbings with carbolic soap to remove.

It is also a sad fact that when in London, one is expected by one's companionship-starved wife to attend several so-called 'smart parties.' One's readers may have been to similar affairs. Waiters with canapes and cocktails. A hostess gaily pairing off guests for 'interesting chat.' An hour of two of strained conversation with perfect strangers. The discreet look at the pocket watch. The signal to the wife. The fumbling for coats, and the polite excuse, until finally one is on the streets again, wondering why one ever left one's home.

It was at one of these parties, hosted by Gwendolyn Hampton-Phudle, that one was subjected to the so-called 'dream analysis.' One was trying to ingest the fifth in a series of quick whiskey and sodas when one's hostess cornered one. By her side was a woman in a smart business suit and spectacles who was regarding one with frank interest. (Well, one is rather fit for one's age.) "This is the one we've all told you about," murmured one's hostess to her companion meaningfully, before turning to oneself and saying, "Sir Julius! This is Dr Jean Fitzsimmons. She's a Freudian and is very interested in talking to you! I hope she can do a spot of good for you." Ever thoughtful, Gwendolyn Hampton-Phudle.

Dr Fitzsimmons instantly inquired into the nature of one's dreams. Well, one's readers know one's opinion that what one dreams when the draperies are drawn around one's four-poster are better left undiscussed, but one found that Jean's gentle way of making one comfortable on the leather couch in the Hampton-Phudle smoking room soon elicited one's confidences.

So one told her about the recurring dream in which one is on the Orient Express and one is the only passenger, attended to by a strike series of French maids in uniform, as the train plunges in and out of tunnels while "The Theme to Shaft" plays gently in the background. At the end of the dream one emerges onto a long avenue, at the end of which are the Tivoli fountains, while long rows of women knees on the ground and uncork bottles of bubbling, overflowing, foamy champagne. At that point Dr Fitzsimmons dropped her notebook and had to pick it and her jaw from the floor, but she quickly told one to continue.

One next told her about the dream in which one's ward, young Penelope Windsor-Smythe (with whom Dr Fitzsimmons was wholly unacquainted, despite her preeminent status as she who is eighty-fifth in line for the throne) stands half naked upon a haystack, a giant anaconda twining around her body, while dozens of stripped farmhands toss thorny roses at her from below.

"Oh my g-d!" exclaimed the psychoanalyst. "Do you ever dream of your wife?"

"Why of course," one replied, and proceeded to tell her of the recurring dream in which the Lady Patricia floats on a doughnut shaped glacier down the canals of Venice, swathed in furs, refusing to meet one's glance as one runs along the sidewalks calling her name and waving a large sausage. After a very, very long silence, the good doctor finally asked, "Sir Julius, I really must ask . . . how do you interpret this dream? For the significance seems crystal clear to me."

"It's clear to oneself as well," one said imperiously, for no mere Fraudian gets the goat of Sir Julius Flangg-Tilly. "Everyone knows that the Lady Patricia is fond of Italian ices."

It was at that point that Dr Fitzsimmons volunteered to visit one at Blandsdown for an indefinite series of similar conversations. One always knew that one was a fascinating conversationalist!

Looking forward to more revelations, one remains for yet another week,
Sir Julius
P.S.-Do send one's regards to Gwendolyn, dear Anthony, and do tell her one still chuckles at the though of Canon Frogthorps discomfiture.

#8013 werks prototype

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 22:57

Werks,
I wasn't aware that any of you guys were all that excited about some of my drag racing and hot rod pieces. Thanks for asking.
The car that is on the board is a commission for a guy who recreated a car out of the mid-60s. He is probably the most accurate drag racing modeler that I know, and after moving from 1/25 to 1/16 because they were easier to see, he moved up to this one as a 1:1 project. This is just a very typical dragster from about 1965, and was close to winning a couple of major events and was one of the strongest runners in Southern California on a weekly basis for a couple of years. Just one of those essential cars ... if it is needed to go faster, it is there; if it doesn't make the car faster, it isn't.
I just completed a layout on one of my other earlier scans that will go up later, I had a digital scan that really trashed the thing so it has taken me a bit of time to clean it up to print. Another dragster from 1969.
Will include a few others, but will have to check which ones I have put up here previously.
Satisfying to have them in this setting, I have to say.Thanks.
Tom West


Well, let me put it this way, Tom.

I reckon that, to most of us, it is both fascinating and reassuring that you are producing new material in this way and continue to contribute to the genre.

:up:



#8014 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 23:16

Err that's them thing's that look like handlebars, they are actually Handel bars, so called because as you pick up speed the air passing over the ends makes a whistling sound.
The Jet Ski I posted is basically for one person who rode standing up or kneeling, hence the Handel bars mounted on the end of the hinged watchamacallit, none of the Jet Ski's that I saw had a watchermacallit, they were the larger two seaters with the handlebars mounted thus.

Posted Image

Ah, right! Well, I only remember seeing the tiddlers with the setup as the drawing, hence the misunderstanding! I had Handel bars on a bike once, backed up with lolly sticks on my spokes - sounded like a Pipe 'n' Drum Band at 30 mph.

#8015 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 23:22

Looking forward to more revelations, one remains for yet another week,
Sir Julius
P.S.-Do send one's regards to Gwendolyn, dear Anthony, and do tell her one still chuckles at the though of Canon Frogthorps discomfiture.

Thanks for the bodice-ripper, Sir Julius, but I think the word 'cutaway' ought to feature somewhere, as a gesture to the thread... I have been guilty of omitting it occasionally myself, but it preys on my concience.

#8016 RDV

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 23:25

:up: :rotfl: :rotfl: Ooops, sorry old chap, a definitely manic mode evening....

#8017 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 23:27

Werks,
I wasn't aware that any of you guys were all that excited about some of my drag racing and hot rod pieces. Thanks for asking.

Tom, I'm with werks here, and many others I'm sure. It just didn't occur to pick the subject matter out over other types of vehicle. I particularly like the B&W photos you posted on Facebook, I just wish I'd taken more photos of events I attended when I was younger. You only get one chance.

#8018 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 23:41

...a Brownie full of snapshots,

"A Brownie full of snapshots" sounds like particularly disgusting type of pudding. "I'll have the BFOS, please, with the horseradish custard and peppercorns." "And the honey and blue cheese crust, sir?" "Er, no... no, thankyou." Perhaps I'm thinking of brandysnaps, which I quite like. Funny old world...

#8019 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 00:50

Jim Allington drawing from JWA parts book.1969/70.
Posted Image

Posted Image.... NOTE.....Wire wheels .

These were joint efforts, Jim roughed them out whilst on holiday, and I finalised and inked the chassis drawing, Jim did more of the suspension drawings but there was still a lot of finishing to do, so most of the ink work is mine. It was a system that worked well, as our styles were similar. Jim was very good at visualising the final illustration and positioning things on the page, he could then leave me to get the job done while he roughd out some more. I can't now remember which GT40 illustrations I did from scratch, but there were a few. The fuel system and bag tanks was one, I think, and possibly the dash and instruments. Oh, pedal assembly!

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#8020 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:08

Well, let me put it this way, Tom.

I reckon that, to most of us, it is both fascinating and reassuring that you are producing new material in this way and continue to contribute to the genre.

:up:



Nice comment, thank-you. I know that I ran into quite a few fans of the hot rod cutaways at the NHRA Museum today during the qualifying for the Winternationals this weekend. I was supposed to be a the track, but gave my back a break (no pun or literal comment intended there), and just hung to talk with folks over there. Not sure there is exactly much of a thriving print market, but if I could come up with a few of these to do, it would certainly ease some financial stuff caused by, well, a bunch of things. Seems very possible, as I spoke with three different parties about that today, and have a couple of more coming up anyway. May end up with my one-per-month deal, just as a supplement arranged shortly. Going to shoot research pics on one that I shot earlier, but never completed my base photos for the illustration.
Not sure that would be considered an active market, but it is something, I suppose. All of this stuff is being done for car owners of these cars, so they are very appreciative of the fact that there is something like this possible on their own personal project.
I will post a couple of the drawings that I just cleaned up, starting with this dragster out of 1969. A clutch explosion lead to the death of the driver from this team, one of the most popular Southern California racers of his day, and the car was built as a tribute by another good friend who passed a couple of years ago.
Tom West

Posted Image

#8021 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:12

Just to put up another illustration for the evening, this is the last piece that I completed. It is an amazing Street Rod that is built by a group out of Chicago, with owner Jim Eckford having been introduced to me by a guy that I have known from the Internet for many years. I finally saw the car for myself a few weeks ago, so finished this layout with a photo from a car show so I had something in there other than one in a shop setting.
This kind of thing isn't exactly like working for Jaguar or Lotus, but is does give me a bit of a niche, if a very low budget one. Now, if I could get my back to cooperate a little more, I might be able to do a few more of these things.
See what you think.
Tom West


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#8022 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:22

Tom, I'm with werks here, and many others I'm sure. It just didn't occur to pick the subject matter out over other types of vehicle. I particularly like the B&W photos you posted on Facebook, I just wish I'd taken more photos of events I attended when I was younger. You only get one chance.



Tony, Thanks for the kind words. I have thought about doing more "corporate" things, but got started with this crowd of folks and have just stuck with it. I never felt like i had a real feel for color work, so just did not feel like I could step up to compete for that corporate work, of which there seems to be much less now anyway. This is seeming to have the chance to actually step up if I can get myself on track to do it. As Tony said, maybe a deadline will help.
As to the photos on Facebook, this was how I got started with this stuff. Went out shooting on the starting line at drag races, met guys out there with the cars, and then the magazine folks that got me rolling with people actually seeing my work. Never knew if I could do this stuff, as I had only basic mechanical drawing background .. and they used to mark me down for using too heavy a line weight. That has turned out to be one of my strongest assets in doing these things, as they generally hold up well to reproduction, just short of ink quality. Bless the creators of Photoshop, who have allowed me to correct things to look even more inklike.
Every once in a while, I get an itch to just scan some of those old racing images, even the Formula 1 stuff can be pretty cool, for those 5 or 6 GPs that I was able to shoot.
And, shooting women at car shows can always be rather interesting, especially when I seem to be able to recruit them for full shoots out there. Guys who have jumped into the shooting always come up and thank me for allowing them to join in ... just spreading the joy.
Will probably have that other dragster illustration done next week .. almost have to finish it sometime ... and will try to get my neg and scan at that point.
Appreciate the support, all.
Tom West

#8023 scorerr770

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:58

Tom, I'm with werks here, and many others I'm sure. It just didn't occur to pick the subject matter out over other types of vehicle. I particularly like the B&W photos you posted on Facebook, I just wish I'd taken more photos of events I attended when I was younger. You only get one chance.


I will have to look you guys up on facebook when I get the chance at home this weekend, or if possible can you add me please, Roystern Scorer on facebook.

Many thanks

Roy

#8024 werks prototype

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:54

Just to put up another illustration for the evening, this is the last piece that I completed. It is an amazing Street Rod that is built by a group out of Chicago, with owner Jim Eckford having been introduced to me by a guy that I have known from the Internet for many years. I finally saw the car for myself a few weeks ago, so finished this layout with a photo from a car show so I had something in there other than one in a shop setting.
This kind of thing isn't exactly like working for Jaguar or Lotus, but is does give me a bit of a niche, if a very low budget one. Now, if I could get my back to cooperate a little more, I might be able to do a few more of these things.
See what you think.
Tom West


Posted Image


Good stuff, Tom.

You are fortunate also, I think, in geographical terms, to have so many working, building/customizing shops in the US. And it is good to see that they still appreciate this kind of work enough to commission it post 2010. The legacy of Burnett?

Could we yet see a US lead re-emergence of the cutaway specialism?

Edited by werks prototype, 25 February 2011 - 10:05.


#8025 bradbury west

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 12:10

Just to put up another illustration for the evening, this is the last piece that I completed. It is an See what you think.Tom West
Posted Image

For the benefit of a non-engineer, how does the rear suspension operate onto the angled springs, please?
Roger Lund

#8026 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 13:33

Could we yet see a US lead re-emergence of the cutaway specialism?

As Dave Kimble is still busy I think the USA, which has always appreciated art and illustration in publishing, more so than the UK, I think it is far from dead. However, Toms West and Johnson might not see it that way, and I suppose there is always the chance that a change of management at GM might mean less work for DK.

#8027 Tom Johnson

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 16:33

As Dave Kimble is still busy I think the USA, which has always appreciated art and illustration in publishing, more so than the UK, I think it is far from dead. However, Toms West and Johnson might not see it that way, and I suppose there is always the chance that a change of management at GM might mean less work for DK.


I recently talked with Dave Kimble and he is currently working on a publication showcasing the GM historical engine illustrations he did. Other than that, the GM gig seems pretty much gone.

I haven't had a corporate commission for over 2 years now and am concentrating on the 1931 Gee Bee Z cutaway. It is especially challenging since there isn't a lot of accurate information available about its details - which makes it extremely interesting to me but also very, very, very time consuming. Edit to add one more "very".

Edited by Tom Johnson, 25 February 2011 - 16:34.


#8028 Robbie693

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 16:47

A very nice e-mail, Robbie, I won't use the word 'grovelling', that would be insulting, but acknowledging that it should not have been used without pernission. They have offered to include the Kevin Hulsey link in their newsletter, so that's sorted, amicably. Unless they don't include it... Grrr!


Glad to hear (that should be read I guess) it! I think they should do a piece on you by way of recompense..


#8029 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 18:28

Good stuff, Tom.

You are fortunate also, I think, in geographical terms, to have so many working, building/customizing shops in the US. And it is good to see that they still appreciate this kind of work enough to commission it post 2010. The legacy of Burnett?

Could we yet see a US lead re-emergence of the cutaway specialism?



Werks, The geographic situation in much of the US is not quite so good for any of this kind of thing unless you really know the people first, or live in Southern California. If you are wanting to meet movie people, they are just out there lying about on the streets, figuratively speaking, of course. Same with porno people .. can even tell you where they meet at a Karioke bar on Monday evenings .. also a little Mexican place, although I never really had much luck there ...
For the racing stuff, there are various activities where the major players of the business are around on a fairly regular basis, and they are all within an hour of where I am sitting now. i am not so sure there is a resurgence so much, but there are a couple of people who get occasional work with this kind of thing. Darrell Mayabb, a very talented artist from Denver, has done a few pieces, in the Burnett style, of salt and rod subjects out of that area. I am getting a few from around the country on occasion ... just not overly regular. I did speak with three different people yesterday and those look to be promising.
Now, if the magazines had any editorial money to spend ... I came up with a way where the magazine paid a bit for the initial exclusive on the use, and the owner would pay the bulk of the cost and get the original and rights for his own promotional use. Turned out to be a nice, fairly regular thing when I wanted it a few years ago. The Publisher really liked these things, so I had a rep working for me. Not so much the case now, as it is looked at as an inconvenience, it seems.
Different group out there.
Since all of this is special commission stuff, not sure how much will be seen published, but will keep you posted.
Tom West

#8030 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 18:52

For the benefit of a non-engineer, how does the rear suspension operate onto the angled springs, please?
Roger Lund


Roger,
Overall design is ladder bars and Watts link with coil shocks. While the coil-shocks seem to be a bit angled, they evidently work fine for the type of driving anticipated for a car like this. Everything is a bit angled to my way of thinking, as the ladder bars are a bit short, and mount well off perpendicular to that rear axle. The track bar is pretty short, but would locate the live axle well enough. I agree that the springs are angled, and probably are visually more forward than inward then they really are. I would assume that the spring and damping rates are pretty elevated to create the correct results at that angle.
Remember that this car is not going to be used for visits to grandma, unless she is on the next block, and the sun is shining, but not too much. These cars, with a few notable exceptions, do not get driven much and are intended more as mechanical pieces of art. Like going to the grocery store with your new Veyron. In the case of a one-off piece, practical can sometimes take a back seat, although I am assured that this setup works fairly nicely .. just can't exactly see that it has ever been to the proving grounds to find out.
Tom West

#8031 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 19:03

I recently talked with Dave Kimble and he is currently working on a publication showcasing the GM historical engine illustrations he did. Other than that, the GM gig seems pretty much gone.

I haven't had a corporate commission for over 2 years now and am concentrating on the 1931 Gee Bee Z cutaway. It is especially challenging since there isn't a lot of accurate information available about its details - which makes it extremely interesting to me but also very, very, very time consuming. Edit to add one more "very".



Well, since that has never been something I could do, as I was essentially using the same skillset for my modelkit and diecast development work, as the corporate type of thing would not have allowed for the other things, it is obviously tough to break into a lessening business now. I am not so sure that we have ever appreciated this art form nearly as the British work. When you look back at the origins of this whole thing, it comes greatly out of those early aviation and automotive works that we have seen in this group. All of that was really out of England. We were very much a secondary thing. Even Rex Burnett, who was thought of as doing every hot rod of significance for many years, really only did that Hot Rod of the Month thing with Hot Rod Magazine from 1948 into 1952. There were other pretty regular series going in Sports Car Illustrated and Car & Driver, but that was not necessarily a monthly feature, and those stopped around the early-mid 60s.
Car Craft started a monthly series with Steve Swaja, later William Moore, that ran for about four years in total, and then I picked it up for maybe six pieces. Since I was still in school at the time, and would be gone for alternating 6-week sections, I could not do a monthly thing had they had really wanted to do it.
Kenny Youngblood mixed in about a dozen pieces of various types in the 70s, and Kimble started around that time as well.
Not sure you could say that this has exactly been a fertile garden for this material over the years. Since I have been the only one doing any of this stuff, other than the manufacturer illustrations from David Kimble ... and his being the only that you could consider being done on a regular basis ... not sure there is much life it in overall. Would not be considering it myself if it were not for Social Security ... damn, I am old ...
Tom West

#8032 bradbury west

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 19:08

Tom, many thanks
RL
PS Who told you about me and the Veyron.........?

#8033 TWest

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 19:15

Tom, many thanks
RL
PS Who told you about me and the Veyron.........?



Just an absolutely insightful guess on my part, I assure you. What else would you use for such a mundane task?
Personally, I like to take the Vector down to the mailbox on occasion, just to shake out the cobwebs ...
Tom West

#8034 werks prototype

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 20:25

Just an absolutely insightful guess on my part, I assure you. What else would you use for such a mundane task?
Personally, I like to take the Vector down to the mailbox on occasion, just to shake out the cobwebs ...
Tom West


:) W2 or W8 twin turbo, Tom?



#8035 macoran

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 20:44

Just an absolutely insightful guess on my part, I assure you. What else would you use for such a mundane task?
Personally, I like to take the Vector down to the mailbox on occasion, just to shake out the cobwebs ...
Tom West

You have cobwebs in your mailbox Tom ?

#8036 TWest

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:33

:) W2 or W8 twin turbo, Tom?


Why, the Twin Turbo, of course. I had to upgrade from my daily Stealth R/T, which was a twin turbo.
Actually, I did have a Stealth, R/T, which was my favorite car. Probably had cars that would do each specific thing better, but that was a really nicely balanced car that pretty much did everything I asked of it.
I know that I had cruised to Las Vegas, or up the hill to Bakersfield a few times at about 120 without a hesitation. Had that car for a few years and had to give it up. Considering my back at the moment, that was probably inevitable. Put about 180,000 miles on that sucker and it still pulled without a problem through the whole range.
Cool little car.
Tom West

#8037 TWest

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:35

You have cobwebs in your mailbox Tom ?


I was referring to my own personal cobwebs, Marc.
Tom West

#8038 werks prototype

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:25

Posted Image
Alfa Romeo Alfetta. By Betti.

#8039 werks prototype

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:26

Posted Image
B.R.M. 1962, 1.5-litre. By Brian Hatton.

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#8040 werks prototype

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:34

Why, the Twin Turbo, of course. I had to upgrade from my daily Stealth R/T, which was a twin turbo.
Actually, I did have a Stealth, R/T, which was my favorite car.
Probably had cars that would do each specific thing better, but that was a really nicely balanced car that pretty much did everything I asked of it.
I know that I had cruised to Las Vegas, or up the hill to Bakersfield a few times at about 120 without a hesitation. Had that car for a few years and had to give it up. Considering my back at the moment, that was probably inevitable. Put about 180,000 miles on that sucker and it still pulled without a problem through the whole range.
Cool little car.
Tom West


:eek: I think that car is the very definition of a 'street legal' dragster.

#8041 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 11:12

Small point...

Werks: Your image in post #8044 of the BRM. Is that a monoque chassis? If so, I suspect that it's 1963 rather than '62.



#8042 werks prototype

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 11:19

Small point...

Werks: Your image in post #8044 of the BRM. Is that a monoque chassis? If so, I suspect that it's 1963 rather than '62.


I think it is the 1962 Graham Hill championship 'tubular space frame' car. Which then gave way to the monocoque in 1963.

But, as always, I'm not of the generation and tnf is very much a learning experience for me. So hopefully one of the experts can confirm.

#8043 tbolt

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 12:31

Don't think I would like to sit out a storm in a ship that does not have an engine.

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#8044 Tim Murray

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 12:42

I think it is the 1962 Graham Hill championship 'tubular space frame' car. Which then gave way to the monocoque in 1963.

But, as always, I'm not of the generation and tnf is very much a learning experience for me. So hopefully one of the experts can confirm.

It's the P578 (spacefame) car, as used by the works in 1962 and for most races in 1963. For some reason a lot of the important detail to the left of the cockpit has faded or got lost somehow, but some of the tubes are still vaguely visible. Compare the P578 cutaways here and here with the P61 (monocoque) cutaway here.

#8045 werks prototype

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 12:57

It's the P578 (spacefame) car, as used by the works in 1962 and for most races in 1963. For some reason a lot of the important detail to the left of the cockpit has faded or got lost somehow, but some of the tubes are still vaguely visible. Compare the P578 cutaways here and here with the P61 (monocoque) cutaway here.


Ah! Thanks very much. You have solved that properly, because I did wonder whether or not it was the actual quality of the drawing/reproduction itself that was maybe causing confusion.

Manfred, you have your answer!

#8046 TWest

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 17:50

:eek: I think that car is the very definition of a 'street legal' dragster.



The Vector certainly was. The Stealth was a very comfortable power, not necksnapping. I have had various cars, like my SS454 Chevelle and a WW6 GTO that would feel like they outaccelerated the Stealth, but it would run rings around them. The two small turbos would spool up very nicely and smoothly, so there was no noticeable turbo-lag. That thing had all the bells and whistles, especially for the day. Even the all-wheel drive and steering was pretty cool for a 1991 car.
And, it was that toner red ... very cool to be seen in that thing. Had a lot of people question me about what it was.
Tom West

#8047 IrishMariner

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 06:03

Another chance to play "Decipher The Signature", this time with a Fokke-Wulf FW-190 in gear-down pose. Not the greatest cutaway you'll ever see, but it's extracted from the otherwise great Monografie Lotnicze #018 on the FW-190
Posted Image

#8048 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 08:53

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]

#8049 Karabas

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 10:39

Another chance to play "Decipher The Signature",
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Oh! It's not difficult to recognize the author (slowly lighting a Holmes pipe :smoking: )

Jarosław Wrobel

Drew a large number of illustrations. His prints can be found everywhere: from the collections for paper modeling up to serious military monographs. Very popular among publishers.
Several years ago, the publisher AJ-PRESS has released a book about the artist's work. The publisher has promised to continue the series, but something they have slowed down. :confused:

One of my favorite paintings of this Artist (sorry for offtopic, just as an example of his great art):

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Edited by Karabas, 27 February 2011 - 10:45.


#8050 MEI

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 12:48

One of my favorite paintings of this Artist (sorry for offtopic, just as an example of his great art):

Posted Image

An excellent way to go off topic! Thanks, Malcolm