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#8501 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 12:31

Giorgio Piola cutaway of the BRM P153
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#8502 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 13:41

Jochi Kleint European RallyCross VW Golf
by Bruno Betti
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#8503 theglenster

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 13:57

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that has to be the coolest cutaway ever :)


#8504 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 15:24

...I assume it would be possible to incorporate a 'hand-drawn' feel to the software. However, no drawing office manager would be interested...


The drawing office, if such a place exists today as traditionally thought of, is only interested in speed today. I can guarantee you that there IS no interest in bringing an aesthetic appeal back into CAD line drawings. And perhaps this is as it should be as a CAD prints only function is to convey information. That said, I still find certain CAD generated prints are better than others. Some designers/draftsmen have a better sense of balance and layout which still comes across in their CAD work. I suspect, but have no proof that these designers have some manual drawing background where they learned how to layout a sheet.

If you look back historically through many 'blueprints' at first line weight and the suggestion of form using that line weight to suggest shadows was used extensively in trying to convey the intent of the drawing. Then came the standardization of line weights with copious use of notes (lots of hand lettering). Draftsmen could still be differentiated by his style in the use of line weight and lettering 'flair'. Then came the use of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) where most notes were replaced with symbols. This was supposed to promote a better understanding of the drawings intent, whether it has can be debated. The system works but I do not find many designers/engineers who truly understand the entire system. Being old, I still preferred the older system of notes where the designers intent (if he had a mechanics/machinists background) was more clear. DRILL LTR 'C' REAM .250 means a lot to a toolmaker as it not only spells out the intended process, but also it 'implies' the intended accuracy. GD&T specifies hole size and accuracy but infers nothing of the process used to produce said feature and offers little insight into the designers intent. And in most cases the design feature is over specified due to the lack of the designers knowledge of how 'holes' are even made. Yes, I have had to lead many a designer/engineer out into the shop and 'introduce' them to a drill bit and drill press. More than a little scary in my opinion. And I can't even recall the number of times that I have had to explain why toolmakers have a temper tantrum every time they see a square flat bottomed hole on a print. :mad:

It is interesting as you study say, Leo Goosens prints, that you can even get a sense of the time pressure he was under by the amount of 'looseness' of his penmanship in his notes drawing to drawing.

I love your color work Tony, but what really grabs me are the cutaways (yours and others) done in black and white line work, line and stipple shading. I just love that style.

What is more artistic manual or computer, I will leave for artists to debate. And I will cop out with the above mentioned cliche, I have no idea what art 'is' but I do know what 'I' like. It is like the debate in America about whether Norman Rockwell was an artist or a 'cover art' illustrator. Interestingly in a book I have on Rockwell he defines himself as an illustrator who had classical art training. Also interesting is that his later methods of producing his illustration were almost identical with Tony's. A lot of photography developed in his own dark room, followed by hand drawing an overlay and finished by using transfer paper to 'press through' the drawing onto canvas. Then the painting would commence. The big difference was he almost always hired a photographer to take the shots but did the developing himself.

As a side note I am still, as time permits working at my perspective and will upload some of my crude attempts for grading by my instructors when I have something reasonable.

Ralph

Edited by rwstevens59, 26 March 2011 - 16:20.


#8505 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 15:40

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That's about 3x life-size, and looks like I wanted my work to look, all those years ago when my first attempt at colour was dismissed as 'just a photograph!' Trouble is, unless it is enlarged, rather than reduced, it looses this effect...


I have no idea how any human being made any deadline with craftsmanship of this caliber. Simply unbelievable...

To an untrained eye if this is loose what in the world is tight! :eek:

Edited by rwstevens59, 26 March 2011 - 16:14.


#8506 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 16:53

Seems I have strayed a long way off topic with my post on CAD drawing.

I will blame it on having two teeth extracted yesterday and the ensuing pain and use of drugs. :blush:

#8507 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 17:21

The drawing office, if such a place exists today as traditionally thought of, is only interested in speed today. I can guarantee you that there IS no interest in bringing an aesthetic appeal back into CAD line drawings. And perhaps this is as it should be as a CAD prints only function is to convey information.


Exactly, and just as it is difficult to completely eliminate personality from drawings done by humans, so is it impossible - to all intents and purposes - to introduce personality into CAD drawings. The input from the design engineer or draftsperson is the same. I think the point is that a computer 'looking' at a drawing would not perceive personality if it was there, whereas a human, mostly (there are some that are easthetically blind) will see it, even subconsciously.

If you look back historically through many 'blueprints' at first line weight and the suggestion of form using that line weight to suggest shadows was used extensively in trying to convey the intent of the drawing. Then came the standardization of line weights with copious use of notes (lots of hand lettering). Draftsmen could still be differentiated by his style in the use of line weight and lettering 'flair'. Then came the use of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) where most notes were replaced with symbols. This was supposed to promote a better understanding of the drawings intent, whether it has can be debated. The system works but I do not find many designers/engineers who truly understand the entire system. Being old, I still preferred the older system of notes where the designers intent (if he had a mechanics/machinists background) was more clear. DRILL LTR 'C' REAM .250 means a lot to a toolmaker as it not only spells out the intended process, but also it 'implies' the intended accuracy. GD&T specifies hole size and accuracy but infers nothing of the process used to produce said feature and offers little insight into the designers intent. And in most cases the design feature is over specified due to the lack of the designers knowledge of how 'holes' are even made. Yes, I have had to lead many a designer/engineer out into the shop and 'introduce' them to a drill bit and drill press. More than a little scary in my opinion. And I can't even recall the number of times that I have had to explain why toolmakers have a temper tantrum every time they see a square flat bottomed hole on a print. :mad:


It worries me that in so many disciplines, stages are being left out. Like werk's grinding of pigments! I understand why these steps are abandoned, and some probably really could go for ever, but it doesn't take long, you don't have to learn how to do things, but the reason why things were done can sometimes be important. My personal view is that it should be of interest to any student, if you have any enthusiasm for what you are doing, surely you want to know more than just enough to qualify. I'm not suggesting that in all disciplines all knowledge should be sought or tested, but I was talking to a young photographer the other day, on a low-key but professional shoot, who knew nothing about photography pre digital. It might not ever matter to him, but I think it might.

It is interesting as you study say, Leo Goosens prints, that you can even get a sense of the time pressure he was under by the amount of 'looseness' of his penmanship in his notes drawing to drawing.


And quite probably, the loosness made the drawings more interesting!

I love your color work Tony, but what really grabs me are the cutaways (yours and others) done in black and white line work, line and stipple shading. I just love that style.


The number of James Allington cutaways that Tom West posted has been of great interest to me, as much for a trip down Memory Lane as anything, but that is what I learned to do, what I enjoyed doing, and still think looks great. As a method of conveying information - as you mentioned at the top - it is hard to beat. I started working in colour simply because I was asked to, the market for B&W declined and I enjoyed a new challenge. I certainly would not have been so busy, and would have earned a lot less, if I had stuck to B&W. Jim would have had much more cutaway work from FMC if he had been prepared to change his style, but he was not so inclined.

What is more artistic manual or computer, I will leave for artists to debate. And I will cop out with the above mentioned cliche, I have no idea what art 'is' but I do know what 'I' like. It is like the debate in America about whether Norman Rockwell was an artist or a 'cover art' illustrator. Interestingly in a book I have on Rockwell he defines himself as an illustrator who had classical art training. Also interesting is that his later methods of producing his illustration were almost identical with Tony's. A lot of photography developed in his own dark room, followed by hand drawing an overlay and finished by using transfer paper to 'press through' the drawing onto canvas. Then the painting would commence. The big difference was he almost always hired a photographer to take the shots but did the developing himself.


As I have said before, Jim called himself a Technical Artist, and I fell in line for a couple of years - impressionable years! - buit then felt a little uncomfortable with it and became a Technical Illustrator. Not uncomfortable because I didn't think I was worthy, or my work didn't qualify me, and I do not have a sense of illustration being inferior. I'm just pedantic! Drawing on paper and transfering the outline to a ground is ancient, this was a technique often used in mural painting, charcoal dust being rubbed through pinpricks in the drawn outlines. What a pity that light-sensitive material and lenses weren't discovered earlier, we could have photographs of sabre-toothed tigers, or herds of mammoths roaming the lush Russian grasslands! Mind you, there are some pretty amazing illustrations...



#8508 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 17:28

I have no idea how any human being made any deadline with craftsmanship of this caliber.

I still have people assume that I fiddled about for months on an illustration - I did as good a job as I could in the available time, like everyone. The deadline rules over all. Unfortunately it has followed me into building work, when possible clients who are aware of my past comment that they don't really want a lot of time on perfection, they just want it done quickly and on budget! Too right, that's what I want! As I have said on numerous occasions, there are very few activities that I enjoy so much that I deliberately prolong them...

Edited to ask if :blush: is a self portrait...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 26 March 2011 - 17:28.


#8509 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 17:36

Edited to ask if :blush: is a self portrait...

haha..you'd even be a great stand-up comedian !!!

#8510 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 17:40

One of the things I prefer doing sitting down, Marc, preferably holding a glass...

#8511 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 17:51

Edited to ask if :blush: is a self portrait...


Considering my current capabilities as an illustrator, that would be a yes. We will pay for what we neglect sooner or later.

Edited to say: And computer generated no less. Blasphemy!

Getting the job done by deadline, on budget and to a suitable level of quality is the definition of good business. However I suspect, like all craftsmen, if we were to look back into your work diaries we would find that on an hourly scale you were grossly under payed for what you delivered.

Edited by rwstevens59, 26 March 2011 - 18:01.


#8512 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 18:04

I think this came from Autosport. The little Maserati transverse V12 1.5litre for the 1961 formula 1 regs with integral gearbox, the concept showing shades of the Bugatti T251 and anticipating the Honda 2 or 3 years later.
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Roger Lund

I think it is from a book, the title or writer I cannot come up with.
Id actually like the ISBN number to see if I can track it down

#8513 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 18:08

As per Tony Matthews:

"The number of James Allington cutaways that Tom West posted has been of great interest to me, as much for a trip down Memory Lane as anything, but that is what I learned to do, what I enjoyed doing, and still think looks great. As a method of conveying information - as you mentioned at the top - it is hard to beat. I started working in colour simply because I was asked to, the market for B&W declined and I enjoyed a new challenge. I certainly would not have been so busy, and would have earned a lot less, if I had stuck to B&W. Jim would have had much more cutaway work from FMC if he had been prepared to change his style, but he was not so inclined."

My comment was in no way meant to disparage your color work which I also enjoy immensely. And you have explained previously in detail that the customer wants color, the customer gets color. Just as a draftsman the B&W line work appeals to something inside me. It does not mean that any style, type or technique is better or worse than any other to 'me'.

#8514 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 18:16

My comment was in no way meant to disparage your color work which I also enjoy immensely.

No problemo, Ralph, I knew exactly where you were coming from. B&W and colour both have their uses, and I have even toyed with the idea of having another go at ink line, but I only seem to have this faint urge when I'm too busy to actually do it! Odd...

#8515 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 20:12

OFF TOPIC QUESTION:

I am a collector of certain antique tools and devices (figures, right). Toolmakers tools, drafting instruments, templates etc. and of all things, slide rules (yes my math education started before the introduction of the calculator).

I have been searching for quite some time for two drafting aids with no success for quite some time.

Both were manufactured by The Lietz Company:

#1958 Lietz Ellipse Wheel (sort of a slide rule for ellipse selection)

#3911-46 Lietz Isometric Ellipse Protractor

Do I need these, no, I just covet them.

Any help in locating them would be appreciated as they seem to have dropped off the face of the planet.

(Do you really need that wooden box of funny plastic shaped things dear? (a box of beautiful ships curves) No dear, I just WANT them!)

Thank You,

Ralph Stevens

Edited by rwstevens59, 26 March 2011 - 20:16.


#8516 bradbury west

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 20:27

I think it is from a book, the title or writer I cannot come up with.
Id actually like the ISBN number to see if I can track it down

Marc, I think you are right. I have looked through the usual suspects on the shelves here, but cannot trace it yet. Roger

#8517 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 21:19

Marc, I think you are right.

I am sure you even mailed me some scans out of that book years ago, I recognize the typesize
of the text and the OSCA heading !

#8518 rwstevens59

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 21:47

I don't know if this Miller 91 from the Packard Cable Special is up on the site yet or not. Scanned from the book 'Offy, America's Greatest Racing Engine' by Kenneth E. Walton. Illustration is credited to David Kimble.




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Edited by rwstevens59, 26 March 2011 - 21:54.


#8519 marlondylan

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 22:31

275 GTB by Vic Berris.

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#8520 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 23:44

Here is a surprise. It is in an article about eight speed autos so it is very much up to date.

http://www.freep.com.....ext|Auto News

What is surprising is that a real artist has his name on the drawing and ( to my unskilled eye) it looks as if a person drew it.

The more I look at this the less it looks like a Dave Kimble - it is a bit 'softer', although that could be due to the reproduction. To me it has a hint of our own Tom Johnson about it, and the fact that it is credited, rather than signed, seems odd...

#8521 macoran

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 23:58

The more I look at this the less it looks like a Dave Kimble - it is a bit 'softer', although that could be due to the reproduction. To me it has a hint of our own Tom Johnson about it, and the fact that it is credited, rather than signed, seems odd...

It's Kimble enough for me Tony,

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#8522 TWest

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:18

It's Kimble enough for me Tony,

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There is a series of those transmission and engine illustrations out with David Kimble's signature. Assuming they are his, or his group's work, as he was doing the GM illustrations until recently, it seems.
Tom West

#8523 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:50

It was just a thought...

#8524 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 10:21

OFF TOPIC QUESTION:
I have been searching for quite some time for two drafting aids with no success for quite some time.

#1958 Lietz Ellipse Wheel (sort of a slide rule for ellipse selection), #3911-46 Lietz Isometric Ellipse Protractor

eBay, Ralph. I found a Lietz Vintage Ellipse Wheel, #3227 - not the number you quoted, I know - straight away, for about $20, lots of other ellipse guide stuff, from vintage to new. How is that off-topic? Compared with some of my ramblings...

#8525 rwstevens59

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 15:25

eBay, Ralph. I found a Lietz Vintage Ellipse Wheel, #3227 - not the number you quoted, I know - straight away, for about $20, lots of other ellipse guide stuff, from vintage to new. How is that off-topic? Compared with some of my ramblings...


Thanks Tony,

I have been checking eBay on and off for a while with no luck. What was your search criteria?

As far as being off topic I felt I was putting up something akin to a want ad and didn't want to offend anyone. I'm new here and as was discussed before about forums you have to kind of feel your way as to what's acceptable to the group.

Ralph

#8526 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 18:06

I have been checking eBay on and off for a while with no luck. What was your search criteria?

Well, that's a mystery! It was there last night - I just typed 'ellipse guides' and then 'isometric protractor' and it came up, as I said, not the exact one you mentioned, but it was shown as having a card sleeve with a drawing of a cube in isometric, an ellipse on three faces! Now - nothing! I can only assume it has sold. I'm not that familiar with eBay, but I bought a tap for a customer recently, and after the transaction, tried to find the tap and/or vendor again, and it was as if they'd never existed! Got the tap in the post, though...



#8527 rwstevens59

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 18:20

Well, that's a mystery! It was there last night - I just typed 'ellipse guides' and then 'isometric protractor' and it came up, as I said, not the exact one you mentioned, but it was shown as having a card sleeve with a drawing of a cube in isometric, an ellipse on three faces! Now - nothing! I can only assume it has sold. I'm not that familiar with eBay, but I bought a tap for a customer recently, and after the transaction, tried to find the tap and/or vendor again, and it was as if they'd never existed! Got the tap in the post, though...


Thanks. I find that a lot with eBay. Very frustrating. I don't use eBay that much either, but when I'm on the trail of some obscure item it has yielded good to fair results. I'll just keep hunting. I've have pretty much cleaned out the old drafting and blueprint supply houses we used to have in my local area. Most are gone now. I miss rummaging through the old dusty inventory finding items the sales staff would have to guess at a price for because they had no idea what the item was or how much to charge. Got some great deals.  ;)


#8528 macoran

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 19:37

A colour version of the MGB from the latest Haynes Manual
Tom West posted the B & W line drawing on page 203.
Surprise is that effort was made to change the license plate
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Edited by macoran, 27 March 2011 - 19:40.


#8529 IrishMariner

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 04:19

Handley-Page Victor. Artist Unknown (found on the web)

Take from June 1959 issue of RAF's 'Flying Review' magazine)

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#8530 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:52

Handley-Page Victor. Artist Unknown (found on the web)

Take from June 1959 issue of RAF's 'Flying Review' magazine)

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Ooh, I've got a bit of a thing about the Victor! Thanks, IM, the cutaway doesn't look quite like any of the regular illustrators work...

#8531 IrishMariner

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 06:40

Ooh, I've got a bit of a thing about the Victor! Thanks, IM, the cutaway doesn't look quite like any of the regular illustrators work...


Me, too. I've always considered to be one of the most sinister-looking machines.


#8532 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 17:33

Posted Image

That really is nice! I take it that a lovely little articulated armature is inside all the figures. It looks very well made.

#8533 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:08

I have a few of the aircraft scans out of fairly recent Aeroplane magazines, so will just start with them as they come up ... which is alphabetically. This is the Blackburn Skua by James H. Clark, who was the chief illustrator for the Flight International group back in the 40s. This illustration was first published in 1939, and came out of the December, 2007 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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#8534 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:11

This is another James Clark illustration, this one out of 1942 of the RAF version of the Consolidated Catalina Flying Boat. This is the non-Amphibious version, so water only ... well, and air, of course. Out of the January, 2008 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West

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#8535 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:13

This is the rather interesting deHavilland Vampire Night Fighter. It is another James H. Clark illustration out of 1952, and published in the November, 2007 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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#8536 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:27

I could so easily have been an aircraft illustrator - if Jim had been... Thanks Tom, a great selection.

I just Googled Vampire as I had a little tale to tell, but wanted to be sure of the marque, and lo! A cutaway of the Vampire by Mr Bowbeer came up!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 28 March 2011 - 20:30.


#8537 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:30

This is another illustration out of Aeroplane, the big Do.X-1B. Built by Dornier in 1929, this was used for international travel, but do not think it was overly successful.
This is a drawing by John Weal that I first saw back around 1972 in the early issues of Air Enthusiast.
Tom West

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#8538 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:35

This selection seems to be fairly Anglocentric, well, except for the Dornier, but this is an interesting one, as there tended to be few cutaways done back this early. The Vickers Vimy bomber was used for almost everything else as it came along too late for WWI and too early for the next hostilities. It was introduced in 1919, and was published here in the June, 2009 issue of Aeroplane. This is another of the Mike Badrocke pieces.

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#8539 TWest

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:40

The last piece for today is a rather interesting turboprop aircraft for the Royal Navy, the Westland Wyvern S.4. This illustration by Roy Cross was first published in 1956, and more recently in the September, 2008 issue of Aeroplane. Always thought this was an interesting plane with the contra-rotating props and the rather differently shaped fuselage.
I do enjoy pulling these aircraft illustrations, especially the ones in Aeroplane, as they dip back into the archives for unique features, so they are always very different. I have a few more of those to do and will be into various other air subjects, including some of the items out of the RAF annuals and various other things. Still have all that car stuff here to clean up, too. Damn, this could be a full time gig here.
Tom West

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#8540 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 20:46

The last piece for today is a rather interesting turboprop aircraft for the Royal Navy, the Westland Wyvern S.4.
Posted Image

Another favourite of mine - I always intended to make a model, but never quite got round to it... I think there is one in the Fleet Airarm Museum in Yeovil - knowing me, that is probably complete nonsense, but I try. Should have Googled, but it sometimes seems like cheating.

And I meant to add that the very high cockpit was to aid visibility on a carrier deck.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 28 March 2011 - 20:48.


#8541 macoran

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 21:54

Westland Wyvern S.4.

Being and an Anglophile and a Francophile, I became intriqued by the "name" Wyvern
as used for this plane as well as some Vauxhall cars.
Wiki enriched history for me !
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyvern

#8542 TWest

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 04:53

Another favourite of mine - I always intended to make a model, but never quite got round to it... I think there is one in the Fleet Airarm Museum in Yeovil - knowing me, that is probably complete nonsense, but I try. Should have Googled, but it sometimes seems like cheating.

And I meant to add that the very high cockpit was to aid visibility on a carrier deck.


Always thought that this was a pretty cool aircraft, but just a bit behind the time by the time it went into service Nicely thought out, it appeared.
I am now here with boxes of these magazines with the cutaways included, and will still run in streaks getting them completed for everyone. Thanks for sticking with this aircraft stuff instead of cars .. but I guess we are talking about cutaways in general anyway, not just car cutaways.
Tom West

#8543 TWest

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 04:58

Being and an Anglophile and a Francophile, I became intriqued by the "name" Wyvern
as used for this plane as well as some Vauxhall cars.
Wiki enriched history for me !
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyvern


Marc,
It sounds a bit unusual a character to be used for so many family-friendly commercial purposes, doesn't it? Very interesting concept; the Wyvern.
Tom West

#8544 onelung

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 06:15

This is the rather interesting deHavilland Vampire Night Fighter. It is another James H. Clark illustration out of 1952, and published in the November, 2007 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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I'm tickled by the note which points out that the ply/balsa/ply sandwich cockpit construction "conserves cockpit warmth"... sure.

#8545 TWest

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 06:55

I'm tickled by the note which points out that the ply/balsa/ply sandwich cockpit construction "conserves cockpit warmth"... sure.



Guess I never considered a barn door to be a high-efficiency thermodynamic device before ...
Probably won't again ...
Tom West

#8546 Tim Murray

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 08:16

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I've just realised that DK and I do have something in common (apart from similar ages and height, only I'm older and taller)
- at about the same time (this was 1990) we both had oversize spectacles! How fashions change, now all you can get is little slitty
frames that, to my mind, make everyone look slightly untrustworthy. I look in the mirror and my immediate reaction is - I don't
trust you, TM.

Edited to add:- Photo Copyright 'Classic and Sports Car.'

While going through my back issues of Classic and Sportscar magazine looking for something else, I came across a very nice profile of Tony in the April 1991 issue which includes this photo (but it’s only B & W in the mag, though). The article mentions Tony’s full-size projects, including a Vincent Comet motorbike, a Trojan bubble car and ‘a mystery GN sprint car which matches Basil Davenport’s Akela team trio. [Tony] is determined one day to prove to historians that his is the fourth.’ How did these projects all pan out, Tony, and have you still got them?

#8547 smarjoram

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 09:06

That really is nice! I take it that a lovely little articulated armature is inside all the figures. It looks very well made.

Most of them do - but not Morph. You need to be a good sculptor to animate with plasticine as you're constantly trying to keep it 'on model'. Without an armature inside it's easy to end up with something that has completely different proportions to what you had at the beginning of the shot.

The armatures are beautifully made (and cost quite a bit) - but it's worth paying for as a well made armature with just the right amount of friction in the joints makes the animation a lot easier. They also make good mounting points for rigs to hold them steady, rare earth magnets can be used under the set to stick their feet to the ground and often the neck will end with a piece of square section brass tubing - which makes a handy socket for replacement heads.



#8548 macoran

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 18:44

Managed to get a hold of Autosport issue May 19th 1961,
which cost all of 1/6... on the day ( Shilling an six / One an six / Shilling an a arf / 18 pee )

James Allington's cutaway of the 1961 Lotus 21 F1 challenger as the centrespread.
Posted Image

Edited by macoran, 29 March 2011 - 19:38.


#8549 TWest

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 19:02

Managed to get a hold of Autosport issue May 19th 1961, which cost all of 1/6
James Allington's cutaway of the 1961 Lotus 21 F1 challenger as the centrespread.
Posted Image


Marc,
Amazing to be seeing a new James Allington piece ... almost as cool as new Tony Matthews work. i am going to be doing some more of those pieces, by the way, when I find some of those older mags that are in my storage unit. Have to dig a bit, I think.
Thanks for another wonderful piece of history.
Tom West

#8550 cpbell

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 19:21

Many of these drawings are simply stunning - many thanks to those who are posting them.