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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#8801 Robbie693

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:47

You guys inspired me to pull out my old Templets. This was my small kit and I threw in a HPC for kicks.

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I take it you don't use them any more then Jim?

I like your website, there's some very nice stuff on there. If you don't mind me asking, what computer programs do you use?


Robbie

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#8802 rwstevens59

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 16:02

Mmmm - desire.

Thanks Ralph. What is Pseudo perspective?


Robbie


It is my understanding that Pseudoperspective drawing is any system that attempts to show depth by using parallel receding lines. Isometric is but one form of pseudoperspective and is of course the one most often taught and utilized by engineering draftsmen.


True perspective requires that the receding lines converge to vanishing points as they recede into the distance, similar to, but not quite the same as a photograph. Pseudoperspective is easier to draw because just like the common form, isometric, when the 'tip and tilt' angle are chosen and the receding lines kept parallel you can create three measuring scales for each axis and then use those scales to directly measures points from your orthographic views. These scales in true perspective must have foreshortening and therefore the scale compresses as you move back along a perspective line. It is the foreshortening that makes measurements difficult, but it is the illusion that foreshortening creates that makes the best looking illustrations.

The camera drawing on the Lietz instruction sheet is a pseudoperspective drawing because the 15 and 40 deg. lines are parallel top and bottom, not converging.

Hope that makes some sense.

Ralph

Edited by rwstevens59, 23 April 2011 - 16:07.


#8803 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 16:38

Hope that makes some sense.

Perfectly, Ralph. There is no point in using anything else for illustrations of small items. If you use a lot of perspective on a drawing of a matchbox you turn it into a factory building.

#8804 paulhooft

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 16:45

Looks like a fantastic device!
Even if I absolutly don't know,
how ever to use it..!
Paul


Mmmm - desire.

Thanks Ralph. What is Pseudo perspective?


Robbie



#8805 1996900sp

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 19:13

I take it you don't use them any more then Jim?

I like your website, there's some very nice stuff on there. If you don't mind me asking, what computer programs do you use?


Robbie


Thanks for the kind words. I switched from Templets, Rapidographs and Airbrush to a Mac and Wacom tablet about a decade or so ago. I primarily use Photoshop for my work and draw in paths and then stroke them using a paint brush.

I was able to emulate my line work pretty well I feel from the old days. This was hand done: http://www.hatchillu...custombike.html And this one using PS and Paths: http://www.hatchillu...l_hondaatv.html

Jim

#8806 Robbie693

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 20:43

Thanks for the kind words. I switched from Templets, Rapidographs and Airbrush to a Mac and Wacom tablet about a decade or so ago. I primarily use Photoshop for my work and draw in paths and then stroke them using a paint brush.

I was able to emulate my line work pretty well I feel from the old days. This was hand done: http://www.hatchillu...custombike.html And this one using PS and Paths: http://www.hatchillu...l_hondaatv.html

Jim



Nice braiding on the hoses.

I have not really investigated using Photoshop for line drawings; is there a way to specify an elipse angle? (not looking for a tutorial - yes or no is fine!) Also, do you find working on computer as opposed to by hand quicker, slower or the same?

Robbie

#8807 Robbie693

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 20:45

It is my understanding that Pseudoperspective drawing is any system that attempts to show depth by using parallel receding lines. Isometric is but one form of pseudoperspective and is of course the one most often taught and utilized by engineering draftsmen.


True perspective requires that the receding lines converge to vanishing points as they recede into the distance, similar to, but not quite the same as a photograph. Pseudoperspective is easier to draw because just like the common form, isometric, when the 'tip and tilt' angle are chosen and the receding lines kept parallel you can create three measuring scales for each axis and then use those scales to directly measures points from your orthographic views. These scales in true perspective must have foreshortening and therefore the scale compresses as you move back along a perspective line. It is the foreshortening that makes measurements difficult, but it is the illusion that foreshortening creates that makes the best looking illustrations.

The camera drawing on the Lietz instruction sheet is a pseudoperspective drawing because the 15 and 40 deg. lines are parallel top and bottom, not converging.

Hope that makes some sense.

Ralph


Thanks Ralph, as Tony says - makes perfect sense.

Cheers

Robbie


#8808 ibsenop

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 21:05

Republic P47D-30 Thunderbolt FAB (Brazilian Air Force) by unknown artist

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#8809 TWest

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 21:28

Thanks for the kind words. I switched from Templets, Rapidographs and Airbrush to a Mac and Wacom tablet about a decade or so ago. I primarily use Photoshop for my work and draw in paths and then stroke them using a paint brush.

I was able to emulate my line work pretty well I feel from the old days. This was hand done: http://www.hatchillu...custombike.html And this one using PS and Paths: http://www.hatchillu...l_hondaatv.html

Jim


Jim,
I would say that your work would indicate that this can be done ... I know that my first attempt has taken much more time than the hand drawing, and I am going to be doing a mix with what I have done digitally, then printed out, and am going to complete it by hand. Will see how this little trick works. At least it will eventually get the job done ... which I am not doing now.
Tom West

#8810 ibsenop

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 17:34

Lockheed P-38 Lightining by Douglas Rolfe

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Tony, I hope you will like the arrows! :D

#8811 IrishMariner

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 20:27

Lockheed P-38 Lightining by Douglas Rolfe

Tony, I hope you will like the arrows! :D


Thanks for posting. What's the point of the arrows I wonder? The numbers are there. Glad it's not a technique copied by many.

#8812 IrishMariner

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 20:27

Lockheed P-38 Lightining by Douglas Rolfe

Tony, I hope you will like the arrows! :D


Thanks for posting. What's the point of the arrows I wonder? The numbers are there. Glad it's not a technique copied by many.

#8813 Tony Matthews

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 20:31

Lockheed P-38 Lightining by Douglas Rolfe

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Tony, I hope you will like the arrows! :D

Magic arrows, made from marijuana-wood! Thanks Ibsen, another of my favourite aeroplanes!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 24 April 2011 - 20:32.


#8814 ibsenop

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 20:49

Supermarine Spitfire MkII from Pallas Magazine.

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I don't like those sky backgrounds.

#8815 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:00

Supermarine Spitfire MkII from Pallas Magazine.


I don't like those sky backgrounds.


Ibsen,
Have to agree with you completely. If you consider that the landing gear is lowered and there is no pilot, showing a sky-cloud background seems a bit new age for this type of publication.
This is why I usually clear out all of the background, plain color, type or any of that stuff when I rework the illustrations that come to hand. Then, if I am so inclined, I can post them on top of fireworks, a clown, a Saturn V launch, or any other silly visual that I feel like ... which I don't.
This is an interest in cutaway illustrations that we have, not in magazine layouts. At least, so I presume ...
Tom West

#8816 fnqvmuch

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:05

This is an interest in cutaway illustrations that we have, not in magazine layouts. At least, so I presume ...
Tom West


so to paraphrase the immortal Bard; ' Ibsens arrows have outraged us '?

Edited by fnqvmuch, 25 April 2011 - 04:06.


#8817 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:10

Fellow CDAs ...
I had a chance to get out to Autobooks yesterday when I was meeting my kids for dinner. Stopped in and ended up finishing up the Shin Yoshikawa prints that I did not have out of the display book at the shop. They are so clean and pretty easy to complete, so I thought I would get them done and out to you guys, as I haven't put much up over the last little while again.
Only six more this time around, and they are not the Ferrari and Porsche subjects from the earlier stuff.
The first will be Shin Yoshikawa's Datsun 240Z. This was the first of the series of cars that became so popular here as a decent sporty car value.
Tom West


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#8818 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:12

This is another Yoshikawa illustration of one of those little Fiat-Abarth adaptations, the 695 EsseEsse, as he titles it. Not sure what class this might fall under.
Tom West

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#8819 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:14

This is a car that seemed to have gotten done more than any other at the time, the Shin Yoshikawa version of the Lancia Statos. This is a really nifty looking little car, I have always thought.
Tom West

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#8820 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:16

This is the Shin Yoskikawa illustration of the Lotus Elan S2.
Tom West

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#8821 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:18

This is another road-going Lotus, the Elite Type 14 S.2 by Shin Yoshikawa.
Tom West


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#8822 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:20

One of the road Mercedes-Benz Sports Roadsters, the 190SL from Shin Yoshikawa.
This is it for tonight. Just thought you guys would get into a few more cars, as we seem to have taken this board into aircraft more than in the past.
Tom West

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#8823 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:09

Just thought you guys would get into a few more cars, as we seem to have taken this board into aircraft more than in the past.

And nose art! :up: Thanks for the cutawys Tom.

#8824 Robbie693

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:03

This is the Shin Yoskikawa illustration of the Lotus Elan S2.
Tom West

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Nice - thanks Tom. Is it me or do some of those ellipses look a bit, err, wonky?

Robbie

#8825 MEI

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:52

Ibsen,
Have to agree with you completely. If you consider that the landing gear is lowered and there is no pilot, showing a sky-cloud background seems a bit new age for this type of publication.
This is why I usually clear out all of the background, plain color, type or any of that stuff when I rework the illustrations that come to hand. Then, if I am so inclined, I can post them on top of fireworks, a clown, a Saturn V launch, or any other silly visual that I feel like ... which I don't.
This is an interest in cutaway illustrations that we have, not in magazine layouts. At least, so I presume ...
Tom West

I also agree - and couldn't resist the challenge (particularly after Ibsen's excellent stitching job). Malcolm

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Edited by MEI, 25 April 2011 - 10:55.


#8826 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 11:29

Nice - thanks Tom. Is it me or do some of those ellipses look a bit, err, wonky?

Robbie

If I was being critical I would suggest that it has a regular LR spring, whilst the RR spring is heavy-duty...

#8827 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 11:31

I also agree - and couldn't resist the challenge (particularly after Ibsen's excellent stitching job). Malcolm

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Well, that, to my mind, is an improvement, but we don't know what the brief was, or if the 'sky' was added later.

#8828 MEI

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 12:06

Well, that, to my mind, is an improvement, but we don't know what the brief was, or if the 'sky' was added later.


Tony, I take the point (and I know we have had this discussion before). Studying Ibsen's post, it did look to me as if the original cutaway had been superimposed on the background. The other John Batchelor cutaways that I have come across tend to be on plain white backgrounds. Also I was surprised that the aerial cable was missing. I have taken the opportunity to replace it. Regards, Malcolm

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Edited by MEI, 25 April 2011 - 12:10.


#8829 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 16:17

Nice - thanks Tom. Is it me or do some of those ellipses look a bit, err, wonky?

Robbie


Robbie,
I know that it is possible that an ellipse is hand-drawn on occasion (not by me ...) and they can look a little off. It can also get thrown off when you build from photographs, especially if you have to use a wide-angle lens. Larger ellipses, like a tire, will really get thrown off and will almost have to be constructed in pieces to match what is really seen. The option is to approximate with a single ellipse angle, but if you go by the guide, you will see that the ellipse will distort greatly from front to back. This one looks like it might have that problem in the front, but I am not going to take a shot at Mr. Yoshikawa's work, as most of it really seems to be pretty decent. If something is a little off, there should be a reason for it.
Tom West

#8830 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 16:21

I also agree - and couldn't resist the challenge (particularly after Ibsen's excellent stitching job). Malcolm

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Malcolm,
That is great. This well represents the illustration without the distractions or the strange visuals. Thanks for saving the effort. Will have to get a few of those done here, too.
Thanks for doing this one.
Tom West

#8831 alansart

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 16:52

It can also get thrown off when you build from photographs, especially if you have to use a wide-angle lens.


When you see the photograph, it looks real. If you turn it into a drawing it can look totally wrong. Oh the joys of being an illustrator.


#8832 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 16:59

Well, that, to my mind, is an improvement, but we don't know what the brief was, or if the 'sky' was added later.



Tony,
I think that this version (with the antenna added) pretty much shows the intended artwork. I have a hard time believing that Mr. Batchelor would have added that sky on his own. Considering that this was early-70s when it was published, I would guess that the overlay of the artwork on a sky background resulted in the loss of the antenna, as it would have been cut out and placed on a physical background. Don't think they were doing this digitally back then, were they? i can still remember actually cutting rubylith for chassis highlighting.
Of course, having a strange request for a background probably was not all that unusual. I know that when I went in to discuss my first piece to go into Car Craft, the Editor said that we should do something different ... illustrate the driver standing behind the car and do a cutaway showing his skeleton inside the firesuit. My suggestion was that, as they had not run a cutaway in about 18 months, just having the series start again was probably fairly different, and that we should hold to be quite that goulish, maybe for an October issue (Halloween). Ended up that the car was destroyed in a fire and that our driver had to do a roll off the deck of the moving car to escape the fire. That would have cut a bit close to home having that "torched" driver standing behind the car.
But, I have no sense of humor evidently ...
Tom West

#8833 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 17:05

When you see the photograph, it looks real. If you turn it into a drawing it can look totally wrong. Oh the joys of being an illustrator.



Alan,
Actually, it is rather joyous to see the results at times. The major problem with the ellipses comes with that very close perspective. Since I build everything inward from a starting base photo of the car, you have to use what you can get sometime. Have had to shoot cars standing in the corner on a workbench because it was the only access. Then you end up with those mixed angle ellipses, and just have to play with them, which can be tough. I think the technical term is "muddling through."
Of course, in no other forum that I have seen will we find ourselves analyzed quite the way one might be here. Everyone else seems to think we are some kind of wizard for being able to "see through" a car to do these drawings.
Wouldn't trade it for anything ...
Tom West

#8834 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 18:11

Tony,
I think that this version (with the antenna added) pretty much shows the intended artwork. I have a hard time believing that Mr. Batchelor would have added that sky on his own. Considering that this was early-70s when it was published, I would guess that the overlay of the artwork on a sky background resulted in the loss of the antenna, as it would have been cut out and placed on a physical background. Don't think they were doing this digitally back then, were they? i can still remember actually cutting rubylith for chassis highlighting.

I'm sure you're right, Tom

I think the technical term is "muddling through."
Of course, in no other forum that I have seen will we find ourselves analyzed quite the way one might be here. Everyone else seems to think we are some kind of wizard for being able to "see through" a car to do these drawings.
Wouldn't trade it for anything ...
Tom West

I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago. Your last post, Tom, was the spark that ignited the rocket...
It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.

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#8835 IrishMariner

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 18:25

I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago....It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.


:clap:


#8836 rwstevens59

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 21:02

I'm sure you're right, Tom


I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago. Your last post, Tom, was the spark that ignited the rocket...
It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.

Posted Image



I've read my way all the way through this forum searching for the holy grail of cutaway art wisdom only to find out you have had it all along. Now, that is funny! Impeccable timing as well.


#8837 macoran

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 21:25

Not reading German does not give me complete confidence, but with the style of the drawings, it does mention John Batchelor down there at the bottom of the listings, so I would think we could make that assumption. Very cool stuff.
Tom West

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It is John Batchelor,

The text reads : The colour(color) drawings which are looked upon as achievements in this genre are the work of the reknowned John Batchelor.

And as you say there is the mention of Artist: John Batchelor

Edited by macoran, 25 April 2011 - 21:26.


#8838 macoran

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 21:29

I'm sure you're right, Tom


I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago. Your last post, Tom, was the spark that ignited the rocket...
It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.

Posted Image


Just for the heck of it Tony, do you remember sitting on a ladder when you did the Alfa ?

The guy who did it is quite an artist in his own right !!!
Interesting enough to ask the friend who gave it you, if he might remember who dunnit !

#8839 TWest

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 22:20

I'm sure you're right, Tom


I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago. Your last post, Tom, was the spark that ignited the rocket...
It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.

Posted Image


This is funny. I think that there must be people who believe this is what is done.
Personally, I deal in more non-destructive methods, and do everything with photos. The killer is when you have to get someone else to do them for you. That can be problematic, but better than nothing.
But, I may use this for my Christmas card ...
Thanks, again.
Tom West

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#8840 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 22:24

Interesting enough to ask the friend who gave it you, if he might remember who dunnit !

Well, it was about 37 years ago, Marc, but I'll see what I can do!

#8841 Tony Matthews

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 22:32

I did a drawing for the friend, shortly after I did the Alfa cutaway for Motor Sport. A few weeks later he gave me this cartoon that a friend of his had done, after seeing the cutaway! It has remained 'lost' untill I was having a clearout of my plan-chest, it is well drawn, although the drawing of me is not exactly flattering! My friend described me to the cartoonist, hence the hair that at that time was curly, the heavy 'Buddy Holly' glasses and the pullover that we all wore in those days, heavy, smelly Norwegian jobs, drenched in natural lanolin and shower-proof!

#8842 macoran

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 22:57

Well, it was about 37 years ago, Marc, but I'll see what I can do!

I have had hunches before, and I have one now.
I have contacted a certain artist.....just because....well I have this hunch

#8843 Robbie693

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 09:46

Robbie,
I know that it is possible that an ellipse is hand-drawn on occasion (not by me ...) and they can look a little off. It can also get thrown off when you build from photographs, especially if you have to use a wide-angle lens. Larger ellipses, like a tire, will really get thrown off and will almost have to be constructed in pieces to match what is really seen. The option is to approximate with a single ellipse angle, but if you go by the guide, you will see that the ellipse will distort greatly from front to back. This one looks like it might have that problem in the front, but I am not going to take a shot at Mr. Yoshikawa's work, as most of it really seems to be pretty decent. If something is a little off, there should be a reason for it.
Tom West



Hi Tom,

To be honest everything looks a bit wonky to me at the moment as I've been burning the midnight oil all week/weekend :stoned:

Really I'd be the last to criticise Mr yoshikawa's work, it was just a couple of things that looked a bit off - the Rad cap and oil filler, along with the springs Tony mentioned. Maybe this is a result of multiple copy generations or perhaps it's just because I know Elans that it stood out to me - there's always an 'expert' to be picky about anything!

I've only done one cutaway, which was from photographs but I know what you mean about distortion and true ellipses. I recently read an article on Kevin Hulsey's site about correcting ellipses after drawing with a guide, I'd never known or realised that what you get with a guide is technically 'incorrect'. Another instance of 'you never stop learning', which seems to happening a lot with me lately. Mostly as a result of finding this forum. 'Tis a great place indeed.

P.S. I tried my first construction using the sphere technique for finding ellipse angles - worked like a charm! Also used the dividing box method for foreshortening which was almost as successful, I just need to figure out how to transpose it into the vertical plane as my first attempts looked a bit off so I had to revert to my usual method of eyeballing it as the deadline is looming. Which reminds me - need to get on with it!

Robbie

Edited by Robbie693, 26 April 2011 - 09:51.


#8844 TWest

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:06

Hi Tom,

To be honest everything looks a bit wonky to me at the moment as I've been burning the midnight oil all week/weekend :stoned:

Really I'd be the last to criticise Mr yoshikawa's work, it was just a couple of things that looked a bit off - the Rad cap and oil filler, along with the springs Tony mentioned. Maybe this is a result of multiple copy generations or perhaps it's just because I know Elans that it stood out to me - there's always an 'expert' to be picky about anything!

I've only done one cutaway, which was from photographs but I know what you mean about distortion and true ellipses. I recently read an article on Kevin Hulsey's site about correcting ellipses after drawing with a guide, I'd never known or realised that what you get with a guide is technically 'incorrect'. Another instance of 'you never stop learning', which seems to happening a lot with me lately. Mostly as a result of finding this forum. 'Tis a great place indeed.

P.S. I tried my first construction using the sphere technique for finding ellipse angles - worked like a charm! Also used the dividing box method for foreshortening which was almost as successful, I just need to figure out how to transpose it into the vertical plane as my first attempts looked a bit off so I had to revert to my usual method of eyeballing it as the deadline is looming. Which reminds me - need to get on with it!

Robbie


Robbie,
Sounds pretty understandable. I think that anyone who is really an expert at a particular car will find something amiss, especially in a road car. Most of these covers would have been done with the completed road car, and I can't imagine a lot of panels being removed to assure that all the underpinnings were done accurately. A photo set, as I try to work, makes that much better, I assure you. I would rather have to create 20% that might be hidden rather than try to build 90% of the car as would have been done in the case of that Yoshikawa Elan. I have found myself mismatching springs on a drawing and just not being able to make it look right.

Part of the reason that I like the hot rods is that I can pretty much access everything most of the time. My goal is always to have the guys on a racing team, or the builder of the car come back and say that he can't believe that I even got "that" (whatever that might have been) correct. When I can have those guys doing that, I feel like most folks will be fairly satisfied.

All of this stuff about constructing ellipses seems way overblown to me. The guides, at 5° increments, are pretty close. A little massaging with moving them a bit is enough to make this stuff work unless one really wants to be overly anal about this stuff. Considering that one pretty much has to have Anal as their middle name (just occurred to me that Alan is about as close as one gets ... foreshadowing there???), I think we all want close, but don't make work for yourself.

Use the guides and go down the road. You guys are starting to tire me with this ellipse construction stuff. Besides, what happens when you have a tire and you have to do a series of concentric ellipses? That is really going to be a project.

Stop ... I am getting a headache ...
Tom West


#8845 theglenster

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:17

I've been saving this image for the right moment, having stumbled upon it a few months ago. Your last post, Tom, was the spark that ignited the rocket...
It was done years ago by an unknown (to me) hand, and given to me by a friend.

Posted Image


Brilliant! :clap:
reminds me of a client that used to send me actual washing machines to draw from because they would not give me detailed drawings or 3d data. at the begining of every project they would ask if the could have it back in a working state. that never happened ;)
exploded washing machine

As the old drawing tools are being dragged out i thought id mention the "proportional dividers". They were maily used to subdivide lines and circles and sometimes for selfdefence! i apologise if they have already been mentioned, must catch up with the thread, and also for the crapy mobile photo.
Proportional dividers


and this is now what i "draw" on these days. i miss my drawing board :cry:
theglensters desk


oh yes, for the first time in my working life im not working as a technical illustrator :eek: but i guess for me im doing the next thing, since 4 weeks i work in the marketing dept of the software company that makes the 3d software i used to make my technical illustrations :)

but im still doing some construction in my spare time, allbeit 3d:
Fokker EIII 1
Fokker EIII 2


#8846 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 19:50

Posted Image

Proportional dividers - there is a third somewhere, my first one, a smaller, brass instrument, but fairly worn, and allowed to retire to a nice dark draw, from whence it has disappeared. It's probably on a pensioners coach trip to the Rotring factory, along with some drawing pins and a cracked eraser shield.

I found the proportional divider to be a really useful instrument, and made life so much easier and quicker. Quicker in that there was less worrying and double-checking to see if a tyre diameter was indeed correct relative to a wheel, for instance. I ended up with two good ones - and they weren't cheap - simply because on a large complex illustration it helped to have each divider set to a different ratio for use in different planes, rather than having to constantly re-set one of them. Very sharp points. Get one of them in a bit of hand loaded with nerve-endings and it took your mind off illustrating for a few minutes!

Beat you to it, but they look the same!

#8847 TWest

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 21:39

Beat you to it, but they look the same!


Damn, have one of those in here, too. Was very handy in my modelkit design days, although I started doing things mathematically rather than visually. Had to make some minor use of that Mechanical Engineering degree, I thought. I also started converting everything to metric, so figured if they could hold tolerances to my 2:1 dimensions down to 0.1MM, that should be close enough.
I do have my old beam compass handy, however, in case anyone ever needs to swing a 48" radius.
Also have my old K&E sliderule that I used through college. For some reason, I got another through a place in Hong Kong that I was using for Camera equipment back in the early '70s. Thought I would get this great new whippy-zippy sliderule, and it turned out to be the K&E in its original form, under the brand HEMMI. Have to dig those out sometime, just to see if I can still use them. Used to be able to made that thing smoke when I was in school .. then got my first calculator about two years after I graduated, in 1973. It was the latest and greatest tech Sharp, with four functions, and two memories. And, you would wait while it did the calculations. Almost wish I had kept it, just to show the technology, but the sliderules will be ancient enough to make the point.
Hope there are no complaints with the new Profiile Pic.
Tom West

#8848 TWest

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 21:43

Brilliant! :clap:



oh yes, for the first time in my working life im not working as a technical illustrator :eek: but i guess for me im doing the next thing, since 4 weeks i work in the marketing dept of the software company that makes the 3d software i used to make my technical illustrations :)

but im still doing some construction in my spare time, allbeit 3d:
Fokker EIII 1
Fokker EIII 2


This is one of the attractions of the new technology, the fact that you can move these things around to any angle ... if you put in the time to construct all components in 3D. I would do one of them, then go back to 2D forever.
It is impressive. Keep us posted on this thing, amazing stuff.

Tom West

#8849 ibsenop

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 01:51

Ford GT40 MkIII by Bohanna (?)

Posted Image

#8850 TWest

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 03:55

Ford GT40 MkIII by Bohanna (?)

Posted Image


Ibsen,
I was positive that I had heard this name before, so I went back and checked ... and this was what I had seen before. It was published in a Gold Brooklands collection of reprints from an earlier magazine ... but it was there as its last stop from my involvement with it. No other listing that I have seen for Bohanna artwork. Possible that it is some internal Ford deal, I would assume.
Tom West