Jump to content


Photo

The cutaway drawing and its artists


  • Please log in to reply
13378 replies to this topic

#8851 PS30-SB

PS30-SB
  • Member

  • 219 posts
  • Joined: October 07

Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:57

[quote name='JoeKane' post='4885174' date='Mar 10 2011, 04:09'][quote name='TWest' date='Mar 9 2011, 19:26' post='4885153'
This is the continuation with the Japanese version of one of the more popular sporty cars in the US, which was known here as the Datsun 240Z, and as the Nissan Fairlady in Japan.
Tom West


This car is the Datsun 240Z G nose variant. It is without a doubt the end-all, be-all of 240Z body development cars. I don't think it ever entered series production. I am certain it did not ever show up at dealers in the USofA, the market it was designed for. The father of the 240Z Mr. K (Yutaka Katayama) had a yellow G nose 240Z as his person driver when he was president of Datsun USA. He recently turned 100 years old. The guy still supports the 240Z as the quintessential sporstcar, and he's still right. If Nissan leaders were smart they would bring him back as a consultant and pay attention to his advice. Hint: He does not like the 350/370Z Nissan cars. He says they are cold and dead to drive, and just to follow through he owns a 350Z. Hard to imagine that the 240Z could be made more beautiful, but the G nose accomplished it with a lengthened hood with faired in headlights. The faired in headlights killed it for the US market in the 1970's. It's looks rank right there with the Ferrari 275GTB for me. And hey, I can afford one of them. Which one do you think that might be? In my stable is a Datsun 280Z and I am considering a G nose modification.

Alright, I'm climbing down from the soapbox now. :)[/quote]

May I borrow that sopabox for a few minutes?

That car is actually a Nissan Fairlady 240ZG ( factory code 'HS30-H' variant - the 'H' suffix is very important ) and the word 'Datsun' didn't appear on it anywhere, as it was a Japanese home market model and was not produced for export. The Fairlady 240ZG was a true 'homologation special', sold to the general public in numbers that allowed the 240ZG-specific aerodynamic parts to be used on Group 4 and 5 race cars, so it DID enter series production. I own two genuine factory-built 'HS30-H' models here in the UK, which were both privately imported from Japan.

I'm afraid that people like me will not agree with you about "....the market it was designed for", let alone the stylists, designers and engineers who actually designed it. In fact, we shouldn't say 'it', we should say 'them'. Nissan conceived, designed, engineered and built a family of variants in the S30-series Z range seen at launch in late 1969. They most certainly did not have any single market in mind as regards to the design of the range, and the ergonomic layout of the car was naturally biased to the RHD models simply because a lot of the componentry used had that bias built into into it. It would be true to say that the single largest potential market was north America ( and that potential was indeed realised ) but that was the case with many cars of the sixties and seventies ( from the likes of Porsche, Ferrari, Alfa Romeo and Jaguar for example ) and I doubt we would say that an E type Jaguar was "designed for" the USA in the same way that people are happy to say that the 'Datsun 240Z' was. Most of that "made for the USA" stuff comes from USA-centric advertising spiel anyway, and goes hand in hand with the over emphasis of Yutaka Katayama's role in the story. Katayama was - still is - a great man, but he was a salesman with a background in advertising. He was not an engineer, a stylist or a designer, and his ideas for models suitable for the north American market were expressed in very broad terms. Much of the time, what he thought the USA 'wanted' was really not all that different to what the rest of the world - including Nissan's biggest single market, Japan - 'wanted'.

Talking about the 'Datsun 240Z' as though it was the prime model is fraught with problems. First of all, the 'Datsun 240Z' moniker gets used where 'Nissan S30-series Z' would often be more appropriate ( recognising that models such as the Fairlady Z and Fairlady Z-L, as well as the twin cam Fairlady Z432 and Fairlady Z432-R all lined up alongside the Export variants at launch ) and secondly the 'Datsun 240Z' moniker covered several different market versions which had quite different equipment levels and characters. Katayama might well cite the '240Z' as the "quintessential sportscar", but the north American market HLS30-U models he sold were arguably softened up and dumbed down in comparison to what other markets received. The north American market 'HLS30-U' model 240Z had softer spring and damper rates, a skinny front anti roll bar on the front and none at all on the rear, a 'slower' steering rack ratio, a wide ratio four speed transmission and a tall 3.364 diff ratio. Contrast this with the Japanese domestic models and the UK, European, Australian and NZ market models, all of which could be chosen with more 'sporting' spring and damper rates, stiffer ARBs, 'faster' steering racks, close ratio five speed transmissions with overdrive, and 3.9 ratio diffs as standard equipment. I'd argue that the 'PS30' model 'Fairlady Z432' ( or the super-lightweight 'PS30-SB' model 'Fairlady Z432-R' ) was the top of the range as a sports / GT car: A 24 valve DOHC two litre straight six ( with some pretty good DNA ), electronic ignition, close ratio 5-spd O/D 'box mated to a 4.44 ratio LSD and suitable springing / damping made a pretty good package for 1969. It certainly makes a stock USA market '240Z' seem rather anaesthetised in comparison...  ;)

Sorry for getting off topic, but in my opinion it's always worth pointing out that there are alternative views about these Japanese industrial products other than the 'USA Version'.

Advertisement

#8852 fnqvmuch

fnqvmuch
  • Member

  • 115 posts
  • Joined: April 09

Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:05

...
Sorry for getting off topic, but in my opinion it's always worth pointing out that there are alternative views about these Japanese industrial products other than the 'USA Version'.


well you needn't apologise to me - i have learnt - a lot - and will be following up on them ... images would be nice though ...

#8853 Robbie693

Robbie693
  • Member

  • 44 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 27 April 2011 - 12:00

Robbie,
Sounds pretty understandable. I think that anyone who is really an expert at a particular car will find something amiss, especially in a road car. Most of these covers would have been done with the completed road car, and I can't imagine a lot of panels being removed to assure that all the underpinnings were done accurately. A photo set, as I try to work, makes that much better, I assure you. I would rather have to create 20% that might be hidden rather than try to build 90% of the car as would have been done in the case of that Yoshikawa Elan. I have found myself mismatching springs on a drawing and just not being able to make it look right.

Part of the reason that I like the hot rods is that I can pretty much access everything most of the time. My goal is always to have the guys on a racing team, or the builder of the car come back and say that he can't believe that I even got "that" (whatever that might have been) correct. When I can have those guys doing that, I feel like most folks will be fairly satisfied.

All of this stuff about constructing ellipses seems way overblown to me. The guides, at 5° increments, are pretty close. A little massaging with moving them a bit is enough to make this stuff work unless one really wants to be overly anal about this stuff. Considering that one pretty much has to have Anal as their middle name (just occurred to me that Alan is about as close as one gets ... foreshadowing there???), I think we all want close, but don't make work for yourself.

Use the guides and go down the road. You guys are starting to tire me with this ellipse construction stuff. Besides, what happens when you have a tire and you have to do a series of concentric ellipses? That is really going to be a project.

Stop ... I am getting a headache ...
Tom West


Sorry for the Headache Tom, it's really just a general urge for for complete knowledge than any practical use, as I said to Ralph earlier - there isn't usually the time on a job to mess about with constructing ellipses I find. I shall desist.

A little massaging with moving them a bit is enough to make this stuff work


It's good to know someone else does it the same as me.

The car I cutaway was my own so I could shoot as many pics as I needed and was familiar with the parts from taking it apart to fix it so many times! FIAT stands for Fix It Again Tony I believe.. I can't imagine how I'd begin to cutaway a car I didn't have access to or knowledge of. I'm considering doing one of my current car and maybe, just maybe I'll try doing on the computer by way of a training exercise. I'm feeling like I'm becoming an anachronism not having any computer experience. Apparently the new version of Adobe CS has a perspective drawing tool - something else to put me out of a job!

And no objection here - the new avatar is splendid and certainly catches the eye.


Robbie



#8854 Robbie693

Robbie693
  • Member

  • 44 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 27 April 2011 - 12:03

That car is actually a Nissan Fairlady 240ZG


I believe Tamiya did, or maybe still do, a 1/12th scale model of the ZG


#8855 PS30-SB

PS30-SB
  • Member

  • 219 posts
  • Joined: October 07

Posted 27 April 2011 - 12:17

well you needn't apologise to me - i have learnt - a lot - and will be following up on them ... images would be nice though ...


S30-series Fairlady Z cutaways? I have some from period Japanese magazines, as well as recent stuff ( Takashi Jufuku's work for the Motor Fan Magazine 'Super Car Chronicles' series is particularly nice ) but I'm not really sure how it would sit with the forum's copyright rules to scan them and post them here....? :well:

#8856 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 4,585 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 27 April 2011 - 15:38

For something different, on another thread I came across this,
the Mercury H Bomb Special;
Posted Image
click on image for larger view,
and for the link to the article;
http://sportsracerne...292349181_fbhTL
The larger sizes, L, x2, X3, O, available by clicking on the boxes on the images go from 350kb up to 6mb for original size. The article makes interesting reading.
Roger Lund

Edited by bradbury west, 27 April 2011 - 15:45.


#8857 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 27 April 2011 - 18:11

May I borrow that sopabox for a few minutes?

That car is actually a Nissan Fairlady 240ZG ( factory code 'HS30-H' variant - the 'H' suffix is very important ) and the word 'Datsun' didn't appear on it anywhere, as it was a Japanese home market model and was not produced for export. The Fairlady 240ZG was a true 'homologation special', sold to the general public in numbers that allowed the 240ZG-specific aerodynamic parts to be used on Group 4 and 5 race cars, so it DID enter series production. I own two genuine factory-built 'HS30-H' models here in the UK, which were both privately imported from Japan.
Sorry for getting off topic, but in my opinion it's always worth pointing out that there are alternative views about these Japanese industrial products other than the 'USA Version'.

Thanks for sharing this information and viewpoint. I always learn new things on this forum.

#8858 Karabas

Karabas
  • Member

  • 110 posts
  • Joined: June 10

Posted 28 April 2011 - 11:12

Dear Tony,

The postman has just brought your prints, ordered from Terrific Stuff. :clap:
Thank you very much, they're gorgeous! :up: :up: :up:
Well, finally I can enjoy yours works in the minutest details. It's just a feast for the eyes!

#8859 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 28 April 2011 - 17:51

I have had hunches before, and I have one now.
I have contacted a certain artist.....just because....well I have this hunch


My hunch was Jim Bamber, so I wrote him.

My hunch was wrong

But Jim answered with the following in a next message, when I questioned him on having a look in at TNF....the cutaway thread.

Hello again Marc

No I am not even a member which is shocking as I contribute a cartoon (to Autosport...Marc)
every week but thats a long and boring story.

Well thanks for putting some of my old stuff up on their site. I had
forgotten I had done a Corolla. Have you got my peugeot 205 and Lancia
037 cutaways?

I still have the original of the Lancia at home. I love the drawing
and I remember doing it so long ago and actually crying at one point
as I couldn't get it as good as I wanted. Funny but Tony and I shared
an exhibition once and my Lancia was on display. Different styles but
I wasn't embarassed by the great man.

Stay young

Jim

and

Hi Marc

I'll try and find some stuff for you soon

best

Jim

very kind of him.

Edited by macoran, 28 April 2011 - 17:56.


Advertisement

#8860 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 4,585 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 28 April 2011 - 19:19

Looking for something else connected with the Lear Vapordyne car, I came across this. Image scanned from Motor Sport article a while ago, otherwise copyright unknown. I will remove it if it gives offence.
Posted Image
Roger Lund

#8861 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,579 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 28 April 2011 - 19:30

Looking for something else connected with the Lear Vapordyne car, I came across this. Image scanned from Motor Sport article a while ago, otherwise copyright unknown. I will remove it if it gives offence.
Posted Image
Roger Lund


Roger,
I have a print of that Vapordyne illustration as a Handout from Lear from a long-ago car show. No idea which, but probably one of the LA Auto Shows. The illustration was done by William A. Moore, who had just moved there as the hear of Engineering for them, I believe. He had done a monthly series for Car Craft for a few years in the late 60s, until he stopped and sort of disappeared, from the publishing perspective. He had gone to the Lear operation, and this was the only illustration that I have found from him since.
Thanks for putting it up here.
Tom West

#8862 werks prototype

werks prototype
  • Member

  • 5,563 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 28 April 2011 - 21:11

the Mercury H Bomb Special;
Posted Image


Posted Image


As impeccably obscure as a Sbarro Tiger. :up: :up: :up:

(Which is neither a 'stripy' fierce bird, nor a small 'big cat')


#8863 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 28 April 2011 - 22:06

Dear Tony,

The postman has just brought your prints, ordered from Terrific Stuff. :clap:
Thank you very much, they're gorgeous! :up: :up: :up:
Well, finally I can enjoy yours works in the minutest details. It's just a feast for the eyes!

I'm very pleased you like them, Karabas, I didn't know Terrific Stuff were still selling them!

My hunch was Jim Bamber, so I wrote him. My hunch was wrong

It is someone who lived/lives in Hitchin, UK, Marc, but a friend of a friend, I never met him, and I have lost touch with the friend, too, but I am trying to contact him!

As impeccably obscure as a Sbarro Tiger. :up: :up: :up:

(Which is neither a 'stripy' fierce bird, nor a small 'big cat')

Ooh! Werks is back! Hi!

#8864 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,579 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 29 April 2011 - 01:35

Welcome back, Werks.

#8865 asapiro

asapiro
  • Member

  • 53 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 29 April 2011 - 14:16

Looking for something else connected with the Lear Vapordyne car, I came across this. Image scanned from Motor Sport article a while ago, otherwise copyright unknown. I will remove it if it gives offence.
Posted Image
Roger Lund


and the Vapodyne lives and breathes.
It was part of the Indy Car feature at the 2011 Boca Raton Concours
Still looks great. Doubt that it's a runner ...
Has anyone ever seen scale drawings of this thing????

#8866 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 29 April 2011 - 15:37

Looking for something else connected with the Lear Vapordyne car, I came across this. Image scanned from Motor Sport article a while ago, otherwise copyright unknown. [/url]
Roger Lund


Pretty cool car :p
Mr. Lear put quite a bit of work into steam cars for a few years. He had a good sized plant in Tucson in the '60s. I think that plant was for airplane interiors, but I can't remember for sure. McLellan's Auto Literature has an original handout on the Lear Vapordyne for sale. This may be the same item Tom West has in his collection. It shows the artist's signature which was dropped out in the Motor Sport article re-use of the illustration. I would guess the copyright belongs to the Lear Motors Corporation (defunct?).

Here is McLellans description, which includes a small picture:
Year: 1969 (Item #B35153) - Photo 1
LEAR VAPORDYNE (Race Car), "Lear Vapordyne by Lear Motors Corp.": 2 page part-color sheet, 9x11. Front of sheet is white, with blue and black lettering and blue, white and black Lear Motors Corporation emblem, and has cutaway drawing of Lear Vapordyne race car and photograph of Lear Delta Motor, with specifications. Reverse side has three photographs showing Vapordyne car, engine and vapor cycle system, with discussion. William Lear, of Lear Jet Fame, built this car to win the Indy 500 in 1970. Lear spent an estimated $13 million dollars designing and building a steam engine, steam vehicles and this one-off race car. Price:- $45.

Here is a link to the listing:
http://www.mclellans...yne/index.shtml


#8867 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 29 April 2011 - 15:58

Looking for something else connected with the Lear Vapordyne car, I came across this[/url]
Roger Lund

There is actually an Autosport thread on steam cars that mentions and has some photos of the Lear Vapordyne.
It's located here"
http://forums.autosp...showtopic=24998

#8868 asapiro

asapiro
  • Member

  • 53 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 29 April 2011 - 16:21


length: 192 inches
overall width: 80 inches
wheelbase103.4 inches
overall height 27 inches
body width 46.9? inches

that'll do!

Pretty cool car :p
Mr. Lear put quite a bit of work into steam cars for a few years. He had a good sized plant in Tucson in the '60s. I think that plant was for airplane interiors, but I can't remember for sure. McLellan's Auto Literature has an original handout on the Lear Vapordyne for sale. This may be the same item Tom West has in his collection. It shows the artist's signature which was dropped out in the Motor Sport article re-use of the illustration. I would guess the copyright belongs to the Lear Motors Corporation (defunct?).

Here is McLellans description, which includes a small picture:
Year: 1969 (Item #B35153) - Photo 1
LEAR VAPORDYNE (Race Car), "Lear Vapordyne by Lear Motors Corp.": 2 page part-color sheet, 9x11. Front of sheet is white, with blue and black lettering and blue, white and black Lear Motors Corporation emblem, and has cutaway drawing of Lear Vapordyne race car and photograph of Lear Delta Motor, with specifications. Reverse side has three photographs showing Vapordyne car, engine and vapor cycle system, with discussion. William Lear, of Lear Jet Fame, built this car to win the Indy 500 in 1970. Lear spent an estimated $13 million dollars designing and building a steam engine, steam vehicles and this one-off race car. Price:- $45.

Here is a link to the listing:
http://www.mclellans...yne/index.shtml



#8869 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 29 April 2011 - 17:03

length: 192 inches
overall width: 80 inches
wheelbase103.4 inches
overall height 27 inches
body width 46.9? inches

that'll do!

On eBay, there's a more legible picture of the Lear Motors handout than the one on McLellans. It's slightly easier for my old eyes to read. Still not high res but somewhat better, and cheaper too, on sale by Walter Miller.
http://cgi.ebay.com....e-/370458046698
EDIT to add - The car is said to be at NATMUS on the grounds of the Auburn Cord Duesenburg Museum. I have been there twice in the last couple years but don't recall seeing it. I checked by photos from the two trips and did not find anything on it. Could be it is not on display.

Edited by JoeKane, 29 April 2011 - 17:09.


#8870 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 29 April 2011 - 17:20

While messing about looking at Lear Vapordyne info I found that Google Books has a Popular Science article from June 1969 available for view online. The article contains two additional cutaways, apparently both Ray Pioch. One is of the boiler and the other the deltic engine used in the Vapordyne car.
Here is a link to the article:
http://books.google....M...yne&f=false
Cheers.

EDIT - To remove redundant redundant double double words......

Edited by JoeKane, 29 April 2011 - 17:23.


#8871 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 4,585 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 29 April 2011 - 17:39

Is that a torsion bar on the front suspension, to work with the 2 horizontal coils?
Roger Lund

#8872 asapiro

asapiro
  • Member

  • 53 posts
  • Joined: September 09

Posted 29 April 2011 - 17:41

I think Popular Science had another article on the Indy Car ...
$ 595 for a microwave oven
for those of us who miss the "good ol days" ...


While messing about looking at Lear Vapordyne info I found that Google Books has a Popular Science article from June 1969 available for view online. The article contains two additional cutaways, apparently both Ray Pioch. One is of the boiler and the other the deltic engine used in the Vapordyne car.
Here is a link to the article:
http://books.google....M...yne&f=false
Cheers.

EDIT - To remove redundant redundant double double words......



#8873 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 29 April 2011 - 23:21

Ford GT70 by Dick Ellis

Posted Image

#8874 IrishMariner

IrishMariner
  • Member

  • 212 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 30 April 2011 - 04:59

German U-Boat Cutaway:-

Artist and publisher unknown.

Posted Image

#8875 tbolt

tbolt
  • Member

  • 152 posts
  • Joined: May 10

Posted 30 April 2011 - 08:23

Bloodhound SSC have recently added a 3D CAD download on their site http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/ you can remove body panels and components, zoom in and rotate the parts you are interested in.

#8876 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 30 April 2011 - 17:58

a couple of Fiat engines...
first, an automotive in-line four cylinder, 2 liter, 16-valve, dohc - illustrator unknown
Posted Image

second, an aeronautical radial 18-cylinder by Ugo Vincenzi
Posted Image

#8877 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 01 May 2011 - 22:26

Ford Mk IV by Mati Palk - B&W version of the cutaway posted on page 40 by Macoran.
Can't find this B&W version on the forum.

Posted Image

#8878 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 02 May 2011 - 05:53

This evening I have a few March 701 images that I don't believe we have seen...
the first is by Peter Griffin
Posted Image
Peter

#8879 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 02 May 2011 - 05:55

the second is by Bill Bennett (Anglia Art)
Posted Image
Peter

Advertisement

#8880 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 02 May 2011 - 05:57

the last is by John Hostler
Posted Image
Peter

#8881 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 02 May 2011 - 06:00

To close for the evening, here is another John Hostler image - this is the Lotus 72
Posted Image
Peter

#8882 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 02 May 2011 - 19:49

Coloured in version of Vic Berris' BRM V16
B&W already posted by myself on pg 49 and by werks on page 137

Posted Image



#8883 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 02 May 2011 - 22:10

Vic Berris' Coventry Climax FPF
I know the FPF has been posted on pages 123 and 150, but them have Webbahs
This one's got Skinners Union (SU) twin choke carbs.
Posted Image

may sound odd, but hit the quad 8 here !

Edited by macoran, 02 May 2011 - 22:27.


#8884 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 02 May 2011 - 22:25

Vic Berris' 1914 Mercedes 4.5l engine
Coloured version of the one posted by werks on page 163
Posted Image



#8885 JoeKane

JoeKane
  • Member

  • 76 posts
  • Joined: August 10

Posted 03 May 2011 - 15:39

may sound odd, but hit the quad 8 here !

Not only hit it, but bracketed it. Good show.
Thanks for the lovely posts, as well. :clap:

#8886 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 03 May 2011 - 19:00

To all members of Cutaway Drawings Anonymous

I recently got in touch with Jim Bamber.
Those of you who don't take the hard copy of Autosport magazine, will miss his weekly
cartoon,which very often takes a very tongue in cheek look at the weekly motorsport
happenings.

Jimvery kindly promised to send us some stuff after hearing that we had posted some
of his works on the cutaway thread.

I came home after work today to find this present for all of us to enjoy.
Thank you Jim Bamber !

Hi Marc

Attached are jpegs of two of my old cutaways. Sorry the Lancia is not
very good quality. The Lancia was painted the old way. Pencil sketches
transferred to board and then all painted. The Focus was done the new
way. Again pencil sketches to final ink work. But then this was
scanned and traced on my computer and then painted up in Illustrator.
When I have time I will show you all the details of this as all the
components like the engine, transmission are all drawn separately.
What you see here is the finished result.

Best

Jim
Posted Image

Posted Image



#8887 IrishMariner

IrishMariner
  • Member

  • 212 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 03 May 2011 - 19:41

I recently got in touch with Jim Bamber.....


Brilliant! Thank you so much for making the effort.

I used to love his Rallycar cutaways in the much-missed 'Cars & Car Conversions' magazine in the early to mid-90's.

Am really keen to see any of his working drawings.

Edited by IrishMariner, 03 May 2011 - 19:41.


#8888 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 03 May 2011 - 20:01

Brilliant! Thank you so much for making the effort.

I used to love his Rallycar cutaways in the much-missed 'Cars & Car Conversions' magazine in the early to mid-90's.

Am really keen to see any of his working drawings.


I will forward all reactions to Jim.......,apparantly,even though he does do their weekly cartoon he does not have access to the Board ??
Calling Andrew van de Burgt !!!!

#8889 werks prototype

werks prototype
  • Member

  • 5,563 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 03 May 2011 - 20:45

Jim
Posted Image


:up: Beautiful!

Absolutely brilliant. What a treat!

And the somewhat nifty painting of that right rear, makes me wonder whether or not Jim Bamber is also responsible for some of the ESCI cyrstal kit box art?

#8890 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 03 May 2011 - 20:49

:up: Beautiful!

Absolutely brilliant. What a treat!

And the somewhat nifty painting of that right rear, makes me wonder whether or not Jim Bamber is also responsible for some of the ESCI cyrstal kit box art?

We'll have to ask him, I suppose?

edit: capitalize where you can Marc !

Edited by macoran, 03 May 2011 - 20:50.


#8891 trauts

trauts
  • Member

  • 43 posts
  • Joined: July 10

Posted 04 May 2011 - 08:52

To all members of Cutaway Drawings Anonymous

I recently got in touch with Jim Bamber.
Those of you who don't take the hard copy of Autosport magazine, will miss his weekly
cartoon,which very often takes a very tongue in cheek look at the weekly motorsport
happenings.

Jimvery kindly promised to send us some stuff after hearing that we had posted some
of his works on the cutaway thread.

I came home after work today to find this present for all of us to enjoy.
Thank you Jim Bamber !

Hi Marc

Attached are jpegs of two of my old cutaways. Sorry the Lancia is not
very good quality. The Lancia was painted the old way. Pencil sketches
transferred to board and then all painted. The Focus was done the new
way. Again pencil sketches to final ink work. But then this was
scanned and traced on my computer and then painted up in Illustrator.
When I have time I will show you all the details of this as all the
components like the engine, transmission are all drawn separately.
What you see here is the finished result.

Best

Jim
Posted Image

Posted Image

Hi Marc,
I was trawling through my library of rally car books over the weekend and was admiring Jims work in Rallycourse 1983-84 in particular the 037 Lancia Rally, please ask Jim if he could forward the Audi Quottro and Opel Manta featured in the 1982-83 publications

#8892 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 04 May 2011 - 20:45

Have you had a look at page(s) 44 for the Audi and 80/86 for the Manta Stuart?

Not to forget his Rally Corolla on page 159

Edited by macoran, 04 May 2011 - 21:15.


#8893 trauts

trauts
  • Member

  • 43 posts
  • Joined: July 10

Posted 05 May 2011 - 13:51

Hi Marc,
I was trawling through my library of rally car books over the weekend and was admiring Jims work in Rallycourse 1983-84 in particular the 037 Lancia Rally, please ask Jim if he could forward the Audi Quottro and Opel Manta featured in the 1982-83 publications

Thanks Marc,
I was just surprised that the one day I was admiring Jims Lancia in a book I only refer to a couple of times per annum and you post it which is superb. Last time I saw Jim was at Race Retro approx. four years ago.

#8894 macoran

macoran
  • Member

  • 3,989 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 05 May 2011 - 18:42

Latest from Jim Bamber for us to enjoy:

Hi Marc

As promised more on the WRC Focus I drew some years ago. All the
reference came from photos I took at Malcolm Wilson's rally HQ up in
Cumbria. Martin Sharp of CCC Magazine wanted a drawing that showed all
the rally bits that Wilson put into the car. So I drew the basic shell
as one drawing and then all the other bits you see here. Engine,
gearbox and diffs, suspension struts and wheels all were drawn
individually and then brought together on the computer. It is all
mostly flat colour which was my style then and all done on
Illustrator. Now I would transfer the drawings into Photoshop and put
the colour on with that. This is probably done the way that Tony
Mathews would hate as from start to finish it only took a week. But
the magazine paid peanuts so.....needs must.

You must look at this site which shows a Ford GT40 being built from
scratch with a 3D drawing programme. If I was younger and starting
over this is what I hope I would have been doing. The artist is Luis
Neves. Brilliant, quite breathtaking. http://www.lendesign...wipgallery.html


Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I have taken the liberty of cutting up Jim's main drawing into smaller detail clippings.

#8895 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 05 May 2011 - 20:43

This is probably done the way that Tony
Mathews would hate as from start to finish it only took a week. But
the magazine paid peanuts so.....needs must.

I'm not quite sure what Jim means by that, whether he means I hate to see it done that way, or I would hate to do it myself, or I would hate it because it is quick! I understand the time/cost constraints, and I never deliberately prolonged an illustration, I did them as fast as I could. Three weeks for the lotus 97T was about the quickest, four weeks was the norm. "Hello, Norm, all right mate?" I mean 'proper' cutaways, not simplistic jobs that I did quite a few of, they took a few days to a week. I just don't want to sit in front of a screen all day, I loved the feel of pencil on board or film, and seeing the illustration build up with colour was sometimes quite exciting. Finally, there is genuine artwork at the end, a rectangle of material with pencil, ink and paint on it. I would get no satisfaction from a file on a disc, however slick it looked. just my view on illustrating, and not to detract from the work Jim showed, or the work of Luis Neves. If I was younger and starting over, and this was the way to go, I wouldn't bother, as I don't see it as sufficiently challenging or rewarding, I'd do what I'm doing now! Or build cars...

#8896 Repco22

Repco22
  • Member

  • 710 posts
  • Joined: February 11

Posted 05 May 2011 - 23:54

I just don't want to sit in front of a screen all day, I loved the feel of pencil on board or film, and seeing the illustration build up with colour was sometimes quite exciting. Finally, there is genuine artwork at the end, a rectangle of material with pencil, ink and paint on it. I would get no satisfaction from a file on a disc, however slick it looked. just my view on illustrating, and not to detract from the work Jim showed, or the work of Luis Neves. If I was younger and starting over, and this was the way to go, I wouldn't bother, as I don't see it as sufficiently challenging or rewarding, I'd do what I'm doing now! Or build cars...

Tony, a friend gave me a jig-saw of your 250F cutaway. Fortunately his wife had already put it together! It's on my study wall and beautifully done. What sort of cars would you like to build?

#8897 simplebrother

simplebrother
  • Member

  • 313 posts
  • Joined: April 10

Posted 06 May 2011 - 06:27

I ran across a couple of old motorcycle engine cutaways recently...

Posted Image
Velocette 350cc KKT, c.1926

Posted Image
Sunbeam 350cc(?), c.1912

Peter

#8898 ibsenop

ibsenop
  • Member

  • 813 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 07 May 2011 - 01:19

North American Twin Mustang by unknown artist

Posted Image

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 220 - post 8766 => part A - post 8767 => part B

Edited by ibsenop, 07 May 2011 - 01:34.


#8899 TWest

TWest
  • Member

  • 1,579 posts
  • Joined: November 09

Posted 07 May 2011 - 01:43

North American Twin Mustang by unknown artist

Posted Image

TNF Cutaway Index - updated - page 220 - post 8766 => part A - post 8767 => part B



This illustration has the look of something that might have come from the technical manual for the aircraft. Looks like those industrial things that would have been done back then.
Tom West

Advertisement

#8900 Tony Matthews

Tony Matthews
  • Member

  • 17,499 posts
  • Joined: September 08

Posted 07 May 2011 - 14:04

Tony, a friend gave me a jig-saw of your 250F cutaway. Fortunately his wife had already put it together! It's on my study wall and beautifully done. What sort of cars would you like to build?

Well, hello Rod! I'm impressed that anyone finished those jigsaws, they must have been a trial. I think the 250F was the first to have anything other than a completely white background - we added a graph-paper pattern as some form of aid! I really appreciate your cartoons - cartooning seems to fall into at least two camps - one where the drawing takes second place to the words (assuming it is not entirely visual, which is the third group!) and another, where the artwork is of a very high standard and the words take second place. Yours seems to fall into another group, which henceforth shall be knowne as ye fourth groupe, Sire, in which the artwork is superb and the words match it! I have done a few, many years ago for friends, and more recently (but still a long time ago) as commissions, but I have never been happy with the outcome. It takes time, I think, to establish a style, and I needed more practice, but there is no guarantee that I would ever have developed a style that really worked, and my illustrating discipline is a bit of a hindrance when it comes to real 'loosness'.

As to building cars, I dunno, my problem has always been too many interests, so no concentration, apart from the cutaways. Vintage, historic rebuilds, modern stuff (I admire all the small/smallish builders like GN and Frazer Nash, early Lotus Cars, up to and including Radical) and I do occasionally wonder what would have happened if I'd joined March in 1971/2 as I was 'invited' to... no self confidence. Ho hum. Anything that combiness manual skills with a degree of intellectual challenge is up my street, but I'm best at doing what people ask me to do, rather than what I should do for myself - then the decision is made for me.