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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#9051 werks prototype

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 09:27

For those who are interested I have just managed to get all of Frank Mungers cutaways on line. These are the cutaways that he produced outside of Flight/Flight Iternational and include aero engines never seen before. Go to flightlinearts.com and go to the Frank Munger pages.

Tim Hall


Brilliant.

Particularly, the 'Lee Richards' Annular Monoplane and the Manley Balza Engine. (Both, new to me)

(I find the biographies good reading also).

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#9052 Duc-Man

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 12:09

Found this at Autodiva Forum - Le Mans topic today. Reworked front fender and rear wing.

Sauber C9 Mercedes AEG. Who is the cutaway artist? Does anyone have a better scan?

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Ibsen

Just found it in rallye racing #11 1988.
The artist is Antonio Eiras.
Goes in the scanner right now. Usual deal: drop me a note and I mail it to you. Two scans like always.

Edited to say: found this one in the same mag as well.
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No name and needs some cleaning up as well.

Edited by Duc-Man, 28 May 2011 - 12:53.


#9053 ibsenop

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 19:26

Sauber C9 Mercedes AEG by Antonio Eiras.
Spliced cutaway - scanned by Duc-Man. Thank you.

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and without background

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Edited by ibsenop, 28 May 2011 - 19:31.


#9054 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:01

Mike has been unwell, recently but is now recovering. For those who are interested I have just managed to get all of Frank Mungers cutaways on line. These are the cutaways that he produced outside of Flight/Flight Iternational and include aero engines never seen before. Go to flightlinearts.com and go to the Frank Munger pages.

Tim Hall



Tim,
Thanks for the update on Mr. Badrocke. He has been one of my favorite illustrators for many years, and my eye, such as it is, was really trained more by looking at his aviation work than any other single influence. He will have no idea who I am, but please express my sincere respect and best wishes to him.
That Frank Munger work is also some great stuff. A little pricey for me in your format, but may have to do something with them at some point. Hope that those sell for both of you.
Tom West

#9055 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:28

I have a few related illustrations from the Haynes cover collection, all by Terry Davey. These are all under the Chevrolet badge and cover a couple of different types of cars.
We start with an '80s Camaro that became a standard of the popular Pony car type in the US. This one is showing as a 1979 model.
Tom West

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#9056 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:30

My second offering for this holiday Saturday is another Chevrolet Camaro, the next version that was introduced in 1982. Another Terry Davey cover for Haynes, this one is dated 1984 and based on the mid-line Berlinetta model.
Tom West

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#9057 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:33

Our third Chevrolet is the 1981 Chevelle. This was essentially a shared platform with the Buick Regal, the Oldsmobile Cutlass, and the Pontiac LeMans, all of which were highly popular and seemed to exchange sales leadership among the divisions. Terry Davey cover for Haynes, for the record.
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#9058 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:36

Another '80s Chevrolet, this is the front-wheel drive Citation. This was seen as such a unique concept over here that they did commercials with this car having just casters in the back, as if driving the front wheels was some sort of magic. Suppose that, for GM, it tended to be, as the Toronado was its other earlier foray into the technology. As with anything that went against the front-engine/rear drive layout, they didn't quite know what to do with it yet.
Haynes cover from Terry Davey.
Tom West

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#9059 TWest

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 20:44

This is the mid-sized luxury 2+2 Monte Carlo, a long-nosed version of the Chevelle. This one is dated 1975 for the Terry Davey cover for Haynes.
These things were cruisers compared to the Chevelle, which would have a little higher gearing for quicker low-end performance. I had a '70 SS454, which was pretty stout at the time. A business associate in the fraternity that I was in at school brought his '70 Chevelle 454 up there, and four of us went out for a buzz up I75 to see what it would do. At about 110, we found out that it had some pretty heavy uplift characteristics and the front of that thing started to come up and we had to bail on it when that massive hood almost blocked our view of the road ahead; not particularly a good thing at over 110. It is interesting to think that Chevrolet had gone through this same phenomenon with the lightweight factory Corvette Grand Sports, which tended to trap a lot of air and flew the front end running Sebring and those races back in the day, until they vented the hell out of the hood and the side of the fenders, just to let the nose stay in contact with the track. Seems like that same concept should have applied to these things ... but, let's not learn anything from our expensive racing programs.
And folks wonder why General Motors has lost their way.
Anyway, last one for the moment. Enjoy, even if they are those big crap-box cars of that time.
Tom West

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#9060 simplebrother

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 13:36

I've run across some illustrations by several of the well-knowns of a type that I don't believe we've posted before - air cushion vehicles.
Here are a couple by Frank Munger...
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CC5 by Britten-Norman (1966)

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SR-N4 by British Hovercraft Corp (1967)

Peter

#9061 simplebrother

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 13:42

Some air cushion vehicles by John Marsden...
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HM2 by Hovermarine (1967)

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SR-N6 by Westland (1964)

Peter

#9062 simplebrother

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 13:51

Some air cushion vehicles by Mike Badrocke...
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CC7 by Cushioncraft (1968)

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BH7 by Westland Aircraft and British Hovercraft (1969)

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VT1 by Vosper Thornycraft (1969)

Peter

#9063 simplebrother

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 13:58

Some other air cushion vehicles...
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Hovercraft Mark 2 (1969) by Ira Epton

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HD2 from Hovercraft Development (1969) by John Ferguson

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CC2 from Britten-Norman (1966) by an unidentified illustrator

Peter

#9064 werks prototype

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 22:24

If that would have a red/black paint job I'd say it is a 'Leader' out of a Michel Vaillante comic...


I've seen those types of design now and know exactly what you are talking about. :up:

Apparently there is also a Michel Vaillante magazine or graphic novel type thing as well, which I would very much like to own, which contains speculative McLaren, Brabham, Tyrrell's etc.

Edit:

Here we go, http://www.michel-va..._1975_1979.html

It seems 1978 was the year of the subject you mentioned, Leader F1. The Lotus looks good, from 1977/2000!

Edited by werks prototype, 29 May 2011 - 23:04.


#9065 TWest

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 20:02

It is amazing how this place will go completely silent for days at a time on occasion, and I have never figured out a common factor ... Sun Spots ... solar flares ... whatever ...
Hope everyone is doing well out there and just gathering their material for another assault on our senses.
Tom West

#9066 macoran

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 20:21

I have never figured out a common factor ... Sun Spots ... solar flares ... whatever ...

I have this Ground Hog Day feeling,if I can't come up with something worthwhile,
I'd rather stay low and out of sight......... Posted Image

Citroen 2CV ... one of the earliest models,by A.N.Other a.k.a Klaus Unbekannt, alias Pierre Inconnu

Edited by macoran, 31 May 2011 - 20:23.


#9067 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 20:25

tired...

#9068 smarjoram

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 09:42

Was in the Bugatti Trust a few weeks back and thought of you...

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Posted Image

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There's a few others here.

Edited by smarjoram, 01 June 2011 - 09:42.


#9069 Wuzak

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 09:51

I wonder what we would agree on as the greatest ever piston engine design?

I would go for the (somewhat un-tried and tested) Pennine.


Noticed this as I was scanning through the thread.

Lyndon Jones drew a cutaway of the Pennine in his book Sectioned drawings of Piston Aero Engines, which was published by the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust.

The Pennine is an interesting engine. It was an air cooled, sleeve valve X-24 engine with fan cooling. At 2800 cubic inches (45.8l) it was the same capacity as the Rolls-Royce Eagle 22 (some say 24) H24 liquid cooled engine, but was somewhat shorter and some 1000lb/450kg lighter. At the beginning of development its bench tested at 2750hp at 3500rpm and +12psi boost. For comparison the Pratt and Whitney R-2800 required more boost and anti detonation injection (water or water/methanol) to get to a similar power level.

Some other interesting engines in his book include a sleeve valve version of the R-R Kestrel - which was tested as a Diesel as well as a spark ignition engine, the Armstrong-Siddeley Deerhound - a 21 cylinder air cooled radial (3 rows of 7, cylinders not staggered), the proposed R-R H-Merlin - basically two flat 12s side by side using Merlin 61 components (and two complete supercharger systems), and the R-R Crecy.

For mine, the R-R Crecy had the potential to be the ultimate piston aero engine. This was a sleeve valve 2 stroke, developed from a concept of Harry Ricardo's. But due to the war situation not a lot of resources could be spared on that engine, and when they could R-R jets were already taking over. Problems with piston cooling caused most of the problems.

I have scans of all the pages of this book, but not sure it is appropriate to upload them to the web.

#9070 byrkus

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 09:56

Posted Image

Citroen 2CV ... one of the earliest models


This one is from at least 1958. Earlier ones didn't have metal boot lid. :)


#9071 Wuzak

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 10:11

Another interesting aero engine

The Wright R-2160 Tornado.

Not strictly a cutaway, done in 3d, but not very well rendered.

The R-2160 us 6 rows of 7 cylinders for a total of 42 cylinders. In capacity it was slightly smaller than a Sabre or Griffon, and around the same power as the Sabre, but heavier.

The bottom end of the engine is basically three 14 cylinder radial modules, each with its own two throw crankshaft. The cylinder blocks and separate heads were built as 6 cylinder units. Power from the three crankshafts was transferred to the propellor reduction drive via 7 layshafts, shown in green,.

#9072 Wuzak

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 10:36

Just to get this straight, it is not a "more even firing order" but the only natural way of operating a four-stroke radial.
Remember that a four-stroke does everything during two crank turns so a radial is arranged to fire alternate cylinders in rotation so an odd number of cylinders fired alternately gets you back to the beginning in two revs having fired them all (e.g. in the order 1-3-5-7-9-2-4-6-8-1 (for a nine cylinder)). The other thing to remember is that the valves are operated by cam rings, one inlet and one exhaust, which are co-axial with the crankshaft and in order for them to work there has to be a simple and continuous sequence. Of course there's always one to "prove" one is wrong as the Lycoming XR-7755 had its four rows of 9 arranged without stagger and had twin OHC on each of the nine groups of four.
From (rusty) memory I don't think anyone used more than nine cylinders/row but I can offer examples of 3, 5, 7 and 9.


Wright were developing the Cylone 22, or R-4090, in competition with the Pratt and Whitney R-4360. The R-4090 used two rows of 11 cylinders - the same cylinders as used in the R-2600 (14 cylinders) and the R-3350 (18 cylinders). Not sure why development was cancelled - perhaps because of the problems they had with the R-3350, or because of the end of the war.

The problem with adding more cylinders per row is that the diameter of the engine becomes larger, and the R-3350 was already quite enourmous.

The alternative is to add more rows, as per the R-4360, which was 4 rows of 7. This has problems in that it is difficult to cool al the cylinders properly, but P&W solved this issue with baffles to direct the airflow.

The Lycoming XR-7755 didn't need the stagger between banks because it was liquid cooled. Not having stagger simplified the valve train, as a normal gear train to a camshaft (or two) per bank could be used. The XR-7755 also used a variable valve timing system.

The Armstrong-Siddeley Deerhound also had no stagger between rows and overhaed camshafts. But it was aircooled. The cooling issue was overcome by use of a fan positively blowing the air through the engine. The Deerhound was 3 rows of 7, and a 4 row 28 cylinder engine called the Wolfhound was also under development until the air ministry gently persuaded them to take up gas turbine development.

#9073 Wuzak

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 02:54

General Electric turbosupercharger cutaway

From The Turbosupercharger and the Airplane Power Plant

#9074 onelung

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 11:51

Brilliant.

Particularly, the 'Lee Richards' Annular Monoplane and the Manley Balza Engine. (Both, new to me)

(I find the biographies good reading also).

Can recommend "Aircraft Piston Engines" by Herschel Smith. My copy is 1981 print.
From it, a cross-section of the Manly-Baltzer engine. Cheers...
Posted Image


#9075 macoran

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:17

Found a few Eagle cutaways,which must have their rightful place here.They are not very large, but they will have to do.
Also a listing of all the artists who drew for Eagle. We have discussed previously whether or not Roy Cross drew for the
magazine.
According to this listing I found on the web, he did.
In all, around two dozen artists contributed to the feature, the most notable after Leslie Ashwell Wood being: J. Walkden Fisher,
John Batchelor, Geoffrey Wheeler, Laurence Dunn, Hubert Redmill and Roy Cross

1964 Amphicar
Posted Image
Avro Vulcan
Posted Image
BoB Locomotive
Posted Image
Fairey Rotodyne
Posted Image
Fast Pilot Launch
Posted Image
HMS Eagle
Posted Image


#9076 macoran

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:23

While surfing the web,looking for material I came across this quote on another forum.

Quote:
Mejack - You might like this thread, on the Autosport forums. Nearly 7,000 posts of cutaway drawings, if you don't mind ignoring all the old goats waxing poetic about their favorite artists and just have a look at whatever thumbnails seem interesting, it's a good read for bored times. Mainly pre-90s race cars, but some more recent vehicles every now and then as well as road cars, trucks, etc.
Unquote

:p

#9077 macoran

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:25

Thunderbirds are GO !!!!

just love this one !
Posted Image
artist unknown

Edited by macoran, 02 June 2011 - 17:19.


#9078 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:35

While surfing the web,looking for material I came across this quote on another forum.

Quote:
Mejack - You might like this thread, on the Autosport forums. Nearly 7,000 posts of cutaway drawings, if you don't mind ignoring all the old goats waxing poetic about their favorite artists and just have a look at whatever thumbnails seem interesting, it's a good read for bored times. Mainly pre-90s race cars, but some more recent vehicles every now and then as well as road cars, trucks, etc.
Unquote

:p



Well, this guy must have much too high a stimulation requirement for something like this. Personally, while every post isn't going to be a keeper, there is so much of it from over the past that it is tough to go back and see it at one time. This is more for the tech side of the process, not just throwing a bunch of pictures out there for the uninitiated ...
Anyone remember the secret handshake? Adjusted for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, of course ...
Good to be associated with all of you old goats, can't think of a better group.
BAAAAAAH.
Tom West

#9079 alansart

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:39

Thunderbirds are GO !!!!

just love this one !
Posted Image



I bet you had to pull some strings to get hold of that one :)

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#9080 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 17:52

Good to be associated with all of you old goats, can't think of a better group.

What Tom said. Doesn't the author of that post realise that the illustrations he likes were done by either Old Goats, or Young Goats who will age gracefully? Just call me Billy, and take care when bending over... (Inuendo intended, just in case some callow youth thinks otherwise.)

#9081 werks prototype

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:04

Noticed this as I was scanning through the thread.

Lyndon Jones drew a cutaway of the Pennine in his book Sectioned drawings of Piston Aero Engines, which was published by the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust.

The Pennine is an interesting engine. It was an air cooled, sleeve valve X-24 engine with fan cooling. At 2800 cubic inches (45.8l) it was the same capacity as the Rolls-Royce Eagle 22 (some say 24) H24 liquid cooled engine, but was somewhat shorter and some 1000lb/450kg lighter. At the beginning of development its bench tested at 2750hp at 3500rpm and +12psi boost. For comparison the Pratt and Whitney R-2800 required more boost and anti detonation injection (water or water/methanol) to get to a similar power level.

Some other interesting engines in his book include a sleeve valve version of the R-R Kestrel - which was tested as a Diesel as well as a spark ignition engine, the Armstrong-Siddeley Deerhound - a 21 cylinder air cooled radial (3 rows of 7, cylinders not staggered), the proposed R-R H-Merlin - basically two flat 12s side by side using Merlin 61 components (and two complete supercharger systems), and the R-R Crecy.

For mine, the R-R Crecy had the potential to be the ultimate piston aero engine. This was a sleeve valve 2 stroke, developed from a concept of Harry Ricardo's. But due to the war situation not a lot of resources could be spared on that engine, and when they could R-R jets were already taking over. Problems with piston cooling caused most of the problems.

I have scans of all the pages of this book, but not sure it is appropriate to upload them to the web.


Very interesting, and thanks. :up:

So, we now have a case for both the Pennine and the R-R Crecy, as potential 'greatest ever piston engine design'.

We will have to see what the other knowledgeable folks out there feel.

#9082 werks prototype

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:07

Can recommend "Aircraft Piston Engines" by Herschel Smith. My copy is 1981 print.
From it, a cross-section of the Manly-Baltzer engine. Cheers...
Posted Image


Excellent. I will attempt to track that down.

Thanks. :up:

#9083 werks prototype

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:22

While surfing the web,looking for material I came across this quote on another forum.

Quote:
Mejack - You might like this thread, on the Autosport forums. Nearly 7,000 posts of cutaway drawings, if you don't mind ignoring all the old goats waxing poetic about their favorite artists and just have a look at whatever thumbnails seem interesting, it's a good read for bored times. Mainly pre-90s race cars, but some more recent vehicles every now and then as well as road cars, trucks, etc.
Unquote

:p


:lol: Any old Goats round here?




#9084 werks prototype

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:35

Found a few Eagle cutaways,which must have their rightful place here.They are not very large, but they will have to do.
Also a listing of all the artists who drew for Eagle. We have discussed previously whether or not Roy Cross drew for the
magazine.
According to this listing I found on the web, he did.
In all, around two dozen artists contributed to the feature, the most notable after Leslie Ashwell Wood being: J. Walkden Fisher,
John Batchelor, Geoffrey Wheeler, Laurence Dunn, Hubert Redmill and Roy Cross

1964 Amphicar
Posted Image
Avro Vulcan
Posted Image
BoB Locomotive
Posted Image
Fairey Rotodyne
Posted Image
Fast Pilot Launch
Posted Image
HMS Eagle
Posted Image


These are great, Marc. I have loads like these, trains etc, but none of the above.

They also, frustratingly remind me of a Leslie Ashwell Wood work, that I have been searching for, in vain, for an age. (A bit like your Allington, MGB and Page, Starship)

Below, in terrible quality, HMS Brave Swordsman. By Leslie Ashwell Wood.

Posted Image

My motivation? This was one of the first ships that my dad served on, at the end of it's life, just before it was due to be decommissioned. He claims he had to 'stoke' three Proteus Gas Turbines. But I'm not buying that.

Once again, It looks like I will miss the old 'Fathers day' deadline.

Any info at all or Ebay alerts at any time in the future, would be gratefully appreciated!



#9085 JoeKane

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:36

:lol: Any old Goats round here?

Old Arizona mountain goat checking in.....
Sorry for the long absence. :rolleyes:
I actually have a couple things to post, maybe later today...

#9086 werks prototype

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 19:44

Old Arizona mountain goat checking in.....
Sorry for the long absence. :rolleyes:
I actually have a couple things to post, maybe later today...


I am going to try and do the same. But it might take me a couple of days to get it all together.

I do definitely have some new material though. Including some work by one Stan Clinker!

#9087 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 21:45

What Tom said. Doesn't the author of that post realise that the illustrations he likes were done by either Old Goats, or Young Goats who will age gracefully? Just call me Billy, and take care when bending over... (Inuendo intended, just in case some callow youth thinks otherwise.)


I think that one has to be a bit of an old goat in some respects to put in the kind of attention to detail that these works entail, plus, you have to have the patience and determination to get yourself to even try one to see if it is possible. There is a ton of talent that comes to the table with many of the honorees in this group. There is also a lot of work and focus, not usually exactly the type of personality that makes for the most exciting party normally.
There are certainly exceptions to that observation, but, in general, there is a bit of old goatishness involved, don't you think.
Would not have it any other way, as those "fun" guys tend not to be doing anything that anyone else wishes to observe ... again, with exceptions.
Don't remember any Cutaway or Tech Artists who have cut off their ear .. while the fine arts guys have at least one ...
Also, does not seem to be a lot of incentive for younger guys to get involved in this stuff, while, 30 years ago, there seemed to be a market for this kind of thing. Better enjoy goatwork while it can still be retrieved, don't you think?
Tom West

#9088 Tim Murray

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 22:12

... as those "fun" guys tend not to be doing anything that anyone else wishes to observe ...

Absolutely - I'm rather tickled to find that the forum where Marc found the 'old goats' post is for devotees of a computer football (soccer) game. :lol:



#9089 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:01

Ah, yes. Those computer game players are always the life of the party .. their own, of course. Unless they are designers, they seem to contribute nothing but their own amusement to the world. Probably better than the alternative with many of them.
Now that we have all fired shots across each others' bows for a while ...
On to some goatish behavior.
I have a few of the Terry Davey Haynes covers that I have done over the past couple of days, so will add them to the GoatArt archive here. Interesting that our GoatGraphics also seems to have a following with that Russian site, as there was a string of those Davey illustrations, less the signature, that just popped up there. Glad they are enjoying the stuff coming from our GoatGroup ...
The first one for you is the 1976 Chevrolet Nova, the main car in that popular series of intermediate cars from GM. This was the Nova from Chevrolet, the Buick Omega, the Pontiac Ventura and the Oldsmobile Apollo. We built this series of cars when I worked with General Motors in the Assembly Plant in Van Nuys back around 1970. Rather familiar with these things in many ways.
Tom West


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#9090 onelung

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:06

:lol: Any old Goats round here?

Not me - I'm too busy being a senile delinquent: and enjoying it ...:smoking:

#9091 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:14

This is among the more controversial cars produced in the US Auto Industry over the last few decades, the Chevrolet Vega. This is the Haynes cover from Terry Davey. Sorry for the rather bad rendition of this drawing, but it is all that I have to work with.
This was the economy car that GM came up with as a competitor to the European and Japanese entrants to the market and was produced out of a new "super-plant" in Lordstown, Ohio. That plant, because of the union's interference, ended up costing more to actually assemble than the full-sized Cadillac at the time .. one of the more inefficient plants that we had in the entire GM Assembly Division. They tried to run the line so fast that they hit that break point in efficiency where they are walking between succeeding jobs on the line than they were actually putting parts onto the unit. Ended up with duplicate workers "backing up" line operators, especially in the body shop, and it was, overall, a horribly run operation for a variety of reasons.
And, now ... the Vega ...
Tom West

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#9092 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:19

Back in the '80s, when Chrysler got the government loan guarantees to be able to stay in business, they built their entire lineup on the K-Car platform, as it was called. One of the Chrysler FWD cars was the larger Chrysler New Yorker, as represented by this 1987 model drawn by Terry Davey.
Tom West

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#9093 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:23

Among the early Datsun models was the fairly large Datsun Maxima out of Nissan. This is the 1979 model that has grown into a really nice larger sedan model now. Like the later models much better than this one, which never struck me as that great a car.
Terry Davey illustration as a Haynes Cover.
Tom West


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#9094 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:27

One of the original Chrysler K-car offerings was the mid-sized Dodge Aries, this one being a 1981 model. These were never the best of cars on the road, but they certainly transitioned the company into a more modern era. Actually had a couple of Dodge Daytonas over the years, and they worked pretty well.
Terry Davey cover for Haynes Manuals.
Tom West


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#9095 TWest

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 23:29

This is the last of this batch of Terry Davey covers for Haynes, the two-seater Fiat X1/9 of 1980. This is a pretty ratty print, as the original was not all that great as it was printed. Sorry it isn't better.
Tom West


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#9096 Wuzak

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 01:10

Northrop P-61 Engine air intake and intercooling installation


Aircraft Engine Historical Society

#9097 Wuzak

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 01:50

Very interesting, and thanks. :up:

So, we now have a case for both the Pennine and the R-R Crecy, as potential 'greatest ever piston engine design'.

We will have to see what the other knowledgeable folks out there feel.



Your welcome.

The concept behind the Crecy started with Harry Ricardo, and it was to be a compression ignition engine, ie a Diesel. Around 1930 a lot of manufacturers were playing with Diesels because of poor fuel quality causing problems with petrol engines. It was as a Diesel that R-R started work on the Crecy, using one of Harry Ricardo's test engines.

Later in the 1930s the fuels had improved, and the idea was floated that the Crecy be developed as a short endurance high performance petrol engine. The Crecy used direct fuel injection with a chamber designed for a stratified charge. The intake air was pumped in through the ports in the lower part of the sleeve, the exhaust exited through the ports in the top of the cylinder - the sleeve didn't have ports for the exhaust, but the top of the sleeve uncovered the ports. The exhaust ports covered the entire circumference of the cylinder.

8 V2 test engines were made (they chose V2 so they could test the sleeve drive mechanism), and 6 main engines (V12 Crecys). Maximum power extracted was 1800hp at the power take off, or similar to what the Merlin was making on the bench at the time. It was expected that exhaust thrust would be equivalent to 30% of engine power. Fitted with an exhaust turbine to recover exhaust energy the power was around 2500hp. Problems with melting pistons were not overcome before the program's cancellation.

Ricardo continued to devlop his single cylinder engine, and managed to produce the equivalent of 5000hp in a Crecy.


The Rolls-Royce Crecy, from the RRHT (I'm sure I didn't quite pay that much for my copy!).


The Pennine was essentially a larger, more useful, version of the Rolls-Royce Exe that was built before the war. The Exe was an X24 cylinder aircooled sleeve valve engine. The reduction gear on the Exe was a simple spur gear type. The Exe was 22l (1350cid) in capacity, about the same as the V12 Kestrel and Peregrine. And it was more powerful than either, nearly as powerful as the Merlin of the time. It was heavy, however, and the small capacity worked against it. It flew around in RR's test hack for some time, quite reliably.

IIRC, the Exe was designed by AJ Rowledge when he was recuperating from illness.

Other versions of the Pennine were envisioned. One with a larger bore which took capacity out to 75l, an X32 version of the standard bore engine which gave 61l, and an X32 with the larger bore at over 100l.

#9098 tbolt

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 18:52

1933 Blue Bird drawn by Pratt, have looked in the index but don't think he has been mentioned before.
On page 112 Werks posted several MG's the two uncredited MG EX135 drawings are by S.E.Porter 1937/8
and Max Millar 1951.

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#9099 MEI

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 20:23

What Tom said. Doesn't the author of that post realise that the illustrations he likes were done by either Old Goats, or Young Goats who will age gracefully?

Well said! I do hope that the culprit and his chum get to read this page and are prompted to reflect on the arrogance of youth. But what do I know? I'm only a humble old owl!

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#9100 Tony Matthews

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 21:20

Well said, Wol!