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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#9351 Embers

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 17:02

With macoran’s help the work of Gordon Bruce in illustrating the brief history of Brabham sports racing cars has been recovered from the pages of the September 1963 and June 1964 issues of Sports Car Graphic.
The name Brabham is largely associated in motor racing history with single-seat cars. Here are two cars from the early days of Motor Racing Developments ( the correct name for the design and car manufacturing firm started by Jack Brabham and Ron Tauranac ) that attempted to take advantage of the interest in sports car racing at that time.
The first is the BT5. This was an attempt to build upon the success of their BT2 Formula Junior car, as happened with several other small sports racers. As can be seen from Gordon Bruce’s cutaway, it was powered by the Twin-Cam Lotus engine. However, the Lotus 23B had a year’s head start on the BT5 and only two were built. Its smooth body suffered from rear end lift, leading to excessive oversteer in high-speed corners.
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With the clear rearward vision of history, the solution seems obvious, and so it was applied to the second sports racer to carry the Brabham name the BT8. This is shown in another Gordon Bruce cutaway, this time viewed from the front quarter:
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The solution hinted at was a small spoiler on the rear lip of the body, so small in this case that it doesn’t project above the fender line in the drawing. This car was designed to use up the supply of Coventry Climax FPF engines which Brabham had bought up after Jaguar had bought Climax and decided to terminate four-cylinder production. Twelve examples of the production BT8A, with 13-inch wheels, were made and did well in British and Continental races during 1964-65. Ron Tauranac did not like doing sports cars, so these two remain the only sports car progeny to carry the Brabham name.

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#9352 Tim Murray

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 17:21

... so these two remain the only sports car progeny to carry the Brabham name.

... not forgetting the BT17.

#9353 ibsenop

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 18:48

TNF Index Update. page 233

?? Cutaways - Now made into 3 parts, Marine, Steam & Rail and Miscellaneous, in alphabetical order, by Tbolt. Thank you again!

#9354 Embers

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 19:03

... not forgetting the BT17.

Yes, I'm afraid I did. It was a one-off stretched BT8A fitted with a 4.3-liter version of the Repco V8. I've actually found a record of a "Brabham-Olds" starting and retiring from the Las Vegas Can-Am race of November 1966. Could it have been that BT17?

#9355 Tim Murray

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 19:47

I think that must have been Dr Tom Tobin's BT8, as listed in these results:

http://www.wspr-raci.../canam1966.html

More details about that car on the excellent Old Racing Cars site:

http://www.oldracing...am/bt8/sc-7-64/

#9356 CVA

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 07:52

marauder a100 1950 by Porter
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#9357 macoran

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:32

I'll add this Michael Stirm Dream Sidecar for the Motorcycle section
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#9358 macoran

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:43

Something different

The "Ben Johnson" Grumman-Piccard PX-15. Artist signature not legible
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http://en.wikipedia....ranklin_(PX-15)

#9359 macoran

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 15:07

Good job by Stanley Ku here
http://www.stanleyku...t-away-drawing/

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#9360 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:01

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1952 Royal Enfield Bullet. Artist unknown.

#9361 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:01

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1953 Triumph Tiger Cub. Artist R.J.Way.

#9362 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:02

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1957 Greeves-Villiers Mark 2T. Artist John Marsden.

#9363 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:02

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1958 Norton Dominator 99. Artist Brian Hatton.

#9364 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:03

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Ariel Leader, crankcase and gearbox. Artist John Ferguson.

#9365 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:03

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Ariel Square Four 'two-pipe'. Artist John Ferguson.

#9366 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:04

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B.S.A. 'B' and 'M' range four speed gearbox component parts. By L. Walton.

#9367 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:04

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B.S.A. 'B' range. Component parts. By L. Walton.

#9368 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:05

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B.S.A. Golden Flash. Artiste unknown.

#9369 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 17:06

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Douglas Mark III. Artist Charles Hurford.

#9370 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 18:09

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B.S.A. 'B' and 'M' range four speed gearbox component parts. By L. Walton.



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B.S.A. 'B' range. Component parts. By L. Walton.

I used to enjoy doing exploded drawings, a different discipline from cutaways. In fact, most of my apprenticeship and beyond was exploded drawings, by the truckload. Obviously they have to be correct and accurate (although FoMoCo and others, quite rightly, were only really concerned that the part numbers be correct) but you end up with a rather abstract piece of artwork. These were done at a time when you had the luxury of being able to add shading and texture. Later drawings are fairly grim, with standard line thicknesses and no shading, but they are quicker and therefore cheaper to produce and there is less chance of misinterpretation on a microfiche.

#9371 werks prototype

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 18:51

I used to enjoy doing exploded drawings, a different discipline from cutaways. In fact, most of my apprenticeship and beyond was exploded drawings, by the truckload. Obviously they have to be correct and accurate (although FoMoCo and others, quite rightly, were only really concerned that the part numbers be correct) but you end up with a rather abstract piece of artwork. These were done at a time when you had the luxury of being able to add shading and texture. Later drawings are fairly grim, with standard line thicknesses and no shading, but they are quicker and therefore cheaper to produce and there is less chance of misinterpretation on a microfiche.


There is definitely something very abstract about each component being located in its own space, especially if it is within a very large work.

Some exploded drawings I find visually overwhelming, in the positive sense of the word, stunned, by the prospect of taking in, all at once, how it works, as well as how it all goes together.

In this sense, I'm a definite admirer of the way Watts sometimes used to go about the task, in an extremely practical manner. Beautiful stuff.


#9372 macoran

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 18:59

This blog is all about cutaways
If you are into the Trade Federation, The Republic and a fan of General Kenobi's forces
Just keep scrolling past the car cutaways and be amazed!
I've just spent the afternoon there feeling like a Jedi

http://www.flickrive...ys/interesting/

#9373 fnqvmuch

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 22:04

This blog is all about cutaways ...


this one;
http://momentdinspir...n.blogspot.com/
- is currently about aviation cutaways, and has touched on the topic at least twice before, too -

(Posted on: Apr 10 2011,
have just found some aviation cutaways that afaik we haven't had here on
http://momentdinspir...n.blogspot.com/
under today's date, and the linked
http://momentdinspir...aeroplanes.html
lots needing splicing and or clean-up though .... )

merely linking the site again now as a 'heads-up' on some nice Max Millers, etc., ...
steven

Edited by fnqvmuch, 27 June 2011 - 00:19.


#9374 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:42

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Royal Enfield 346cc Bullet. Albion four speed gearbox. Artist John Ferguson.

#9375 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:42

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Royal Enfield 500 Twin. Artist, Charles Hurford.

#9376 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:43

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Royal Enfield Twin. Artist, F.W.Beak.

#9377 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:44

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Royal Enfield, series 2 Interceptor. Artist, B.S.Smith.

#9378 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:44

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Excelsior Talisman two-stroke twin. Artist unknown.

#9379 werks prototype

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 20:45

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ISO Split-single, two-stroke. Artist unknown. (Possibly Schlenzig)

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#9380 simplebrother

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 04:50

If your interests extend into the fictional realm you may enjoy this album of Star War's cutaways. I have included just one thumbnail to give a hint of what you may find. There are 40 drawings, most of them 4 to 5 MBs in size, so set aside some time to browse.
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The album is found at http://www.phombo.co...ections/page-1/

enjoy...

Peter


#9381 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 05:30

Got the book - bought it years ago - very interesting, and nicely drawn!

#9382 IrishMariner

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 18:36

Hi,
Forgive me if this has been posted before, but I am on limited internet time at the moment, so didn't have time to research the prodigious index....

From the website of Ptak Science Books can be found some postings about technical illustrations, in particular the work of G.H. Davis in The Illustrated London News:-

Link (Scrolling down produces work from other artists covering ships, shading, etc...)

Sample Images: Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image



#9383 macoran

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 20:34

The album is found at http://www.phombo.co...ections/page-1/

Peter

Seems like the blog I was looking at is missing about six of them Jedi fangled machines !!

Just am still wondering why there are two pages numbered "3" as Introduction ?
Have you got the book to hand Tony ? you might be able to explain....misprint? ?

Edited by macoran, 28 June 2011 - 20:37.


#9384 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 22:20

Have you got the book to hand Tony ?

I'll have a look tomorrow, Marc.

#9385 macoran

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 22:25

I'll have a look tomorrow, Marc.

have a good sleep Tony !

#9386 TWest

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 23:59

Well, here are three cars that might help put you to sleep, all Fords out of the 80s.
The Mustang series was downgraded to the Mustang II instead of the stompin' original Pony car, which never would have been named after this uninspired piece of crap. It did make a decent funny car body, however, which was the best thing I could say for it ... personal opinion, of course.
This is Terry Davey's cover for Haynes Manuals on the car ... which I show as the 1978 version of the car.
Tom West


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#9387 TWest

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 00:03

Among the most average of road cars, the Ford Taurus was one of the best selling namebrands over here, this being the 1988 version of the car for the Haynes Manual by Terry Davey.
Tom West


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#9388 TWest

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 00:15

Another of the rather average Fords of the era, this is the Tempo, another car that made a great funny car body in my opinion. This could not be more uninspired, and average ... one of the advantages for this Haynes series as we get to see these cars for a change. Terry Davey's version of the 1987 car for Haynes Manuals.
Tom West

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#9389 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 03:10

have a good sleep Tony !

Good morning!

#9390 Embers

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 05:07

Here is an image of the initial GT 40 concept. As this vehicle never existed, I guess that this isn't really a cutaway, but more of a proposed configuration of components. It was done by a group from the Ford Product Research and Styling areas, the same that produced the Mustang I, shown in post #9162. Comparing with the third image posted there, one can see the carryover of ideas such as the pop-up headlights, integral rollover hoop, and the radiator location at the sides of the body. Roy Lunn, in a 1967 paper, used this to show a lineage from the Mustang I to the eventual GT 40, but neglected to give any credit to the Lola Mk 6, which in its use of the Ford pushrod engine and forward radiator, was a closer progenitor.
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The object of the GT 40 was to win LeMans. It is somewhat curious that a concept from a Ford styling group would show right-hand drive. Was this due to the belief that this driver position would confer an advantge in a race run on a clockwise circuit? Lunn ackowledged the importance that aerodynamics would have to play in any winning effort, but, clearly, this initial concept was drawn before any aero work was done.

#9391 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 05:14

It is somewhat curious that a concept from a Ford styling group would show right-hand drive. Was this due to the belief that this driver position would confer an advantge in a race run on a clockwise circuit?

More likely that cars designed in the UK are all RH drive.

#9392 simplebrother

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 15:27

The B-17 below is by the same artist as most (perhaps all) of the recently cited Star Wars cutaways... Hans Jenssen.
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To see more of his work (aviation and other genres as well as Star Wars) go to http://hji-portfolio.blogspot.com. The other work tends to be a combination of cutaway and exploded view like this B-17 instead of simple cutaways.
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Peter

#9393 Embers

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 15:51

More likely that cars designed in the UK are all RH drive.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the Mustang I, with LHD, was designed in the U.S., although it used a Ford of Germany drive train. As people from that group proposed the GT 40 concept, I assumed that they were U.S. based.

#9394 tbolt

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 18:57

I'm trying to find a copy of "Modern World" magazine that I have that has a strange cutaway of Goldie Gardner's EX135.

This post has been edited by f1steveuk: Apr 26 2010, 15:23


Here it is, with the inside page story. MG EX135 by L. Ashwell Wood
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Edited by tbolt, 29 June 2011 - 19:22.


#9395 macoran

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 20:21

Here it is, with the inside page story. MG EX135 by L. Ashwell Wood
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Absolute history ! fantastic !

#9396 macoran

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 20:24

The B-17 below is by the same artist as most (perhaps all) of the recently cited Star Wars cutaways... Hans Jenssen.

Thanks for putting a name to the drawings !!!!


The other work tends to be a combination of cutaway and exploded view like this B-17 instead of simple cutaways. Touchy !!!! choice of word !!!!


Peter

Great blog for us thanks !!!!!!!
brilliant stuff
This thread is getting better by the day !!

Edited by macoran, 29 June 2011 - 20:25.


#9397 werks prototype

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 20:50

Here it is, with the inside page story. MG EX135 by L. Ashwell Wood
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die Autobahnen!

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#9398 werks prototype

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 22:17

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Coventry Climax, FWMW. James A. Allington. Slightly different context.

#9399 werks prototype

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 22:18

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Ariel Square Four, 1931 design. Artist, Max Millar.


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Ariel Square Four, 1931 design. Artist, Max Millar. Part II

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#9400 werks prototype

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 22:18

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Bristol Hercules, rotating assembly. Artist, Max Millar.