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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#9501 Embers

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 04:21

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This is the Webster Two-Liter by William A. Moore from the November 1964 Sports Car Graphic. Why did this relatively obscure one-off car receive a cutaway treatment and a glowing article? There may be several reasons: First, the car was very carefully engineered and constructed, using the best contemporary practices and materials. Marvin Webster Sr., who had the car built, was the owner of Webster Gear Company in Mill Valley, California, and had made money in the marine electronics field. Thus, he had the means and the machinery to produce what was described, at the time, as a “cost is no object” car. The motivation was to continue the success Marvin Jr. achieved in becoming the 1958 quarter-midget National Champion. Marvin Sr. successively acquired a BMC Formula Jr., a Lotus 23, and a Lotus 22. The 23 was modified and, apparently, thinking he could do even better in the D-modified racing class, built his own car using the 23 model and a highly-modified Coventry Climax FPF, enlarged to two liters. The extensive engine modifications described in the SCG article resulted in a 9000 rpm, 200 horsepower output, which shows you what 30-years’s progress will do (re. Honda S2000).

For a possible second motivation for this feature, I’ll mention these facts. The article mentions two then-prominent drivers for Webster and Tony Settember’s testing of the car. Marvin Webster Jr.’s name is not mentioned. However, history records that the first Sports Car Club of America’s USRRC D-Modified race winner in November 1964 at Riverside Raceway was Jerry Titus, driving a Webster Special. Jerry Titus was a writer and editor of Sports Car Graphic. Titus continued to drive the car during 1965.

At the end of the SCG article, Webster is quoted as disdaining building big-engined cars. Of course the very next thing he did was build a Webster 4-Liter. This sort of half measure didn’t work out, as the car was consistently described as underpowered, although it did finish sixth at the November ’66 Las Vegas Can-Am, driven by Titus. Which may say something about Titus’s driving.

Webster’s modified Lotus 23, the Two-Liter, and one of the two 4-Liters made still exist, all in excellent condition. Here is a picture of the Two-Liter, taken at the 2006 Monterey Historic Auto Races. Other than the wider wheels and lower-aspect-ratio tires, it looks just like it did in the 1964 magazine pictures.
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Thanks to macoran’s research, a set of recent studio photos of the car can be found here;
http://www.flickr.co...57625255028608/



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#9502 PS30-SB

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 10:18

Just to explain, Katekane is a form of Japanese which takes short cuts with European words and names.


"Katekane"? Katakana, shirley?

Katakana is one of the Japanese syllabic alphabets ( the other being Hiragana ) and each of its 40-odd symbols represents a sound. The difficulty for non-native Japanese speakers / users is that you have to go with the vernacular Japanese pronunciation of the 'foreign' word in order to use it properly. Hence you have to spell out 'Brabham' with four Katakana characters thus: ブラバム ( "Bu-ra-ba-mu" ). Can be quite counter-intuitive.

But as for the mag... gents.. it isn't worth the $110 at all, unless you get a kick out of all the Chevy/Ford/Pontiac/Buick/Olds B&W pics.
The set of Allington cutaways in the CG issue was actually very bad, I was glad Car and Driver came along a month later with a better set in their magazine.

edit to say, only 10 pages full glossy print, remainder is with a lot of "shine through", or of old 60's smudgy newspaper quality.

But I grant the guy the fact that he is doing him damdest to sell the mag !!


To be fair, that particular issue is not really a good representative of what 1960s / 70s period 'Car Graphic' magazine was all about. Most issues are usually a lot more balanced. That eBay vendor is asking a very high price for his issues too. I usually pay between 1000 and 3000 JPY for single issues of 60s Car Graphic ( maybe up to 5000 for 'special' issues like the Japan Grand Prix editions ) in the specialist used book shops in Jimbocho, Tokyo.

Whilst on the subject of Japanese magazines, has anybody mentioned publisher San'Ei Shobo's superb 'MOTOR FAN Illustrated' magazine and its spin-offs? Great stuff for fans of technical illustration and cutways. The 'Super Car Chronicle' series in particular is very much worth owning: http://motorfan-i.com/special/

#9503 werks prototype

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 11:35

Whilst on the subject of Japanese magazines, has anybody mentioned publisher San'Ei Shobo's superb 'MOTOR FAN Illustrated' magazine and its spin-offs? Great stuff for fans of technical illustration and cutways. The 'Super Car Chronicle' series in particular is very much worth owning: http://motorfan-i.com/special/


That is really good info.

And I particularly like the look of those special editions.

http://www.sun-a.com...il.php?pid=3593

Thanks :up:

#9504 werks prototype

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 11:38

Posted Image
Type P.3 Alfa Romeo. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#9505 tbolt

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 19:30

Volga M-21 unknown artist, as usual found on the web when looking for something completely different.

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#9506 werks prototype

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 13:19

Cresswell's version of the 4.5-litre Bentley.

Posted Image
4.5-litre Bentley. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#9507 Simon Hadfield

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 13:30

The rear wheels on the modern representation of the Webster Two Litre appear to have had the same surgery as the young lady in Tom's avatar.......

#9508 macoran

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 13:52

That is really good info.

And I particularly like the look of those special editions.

http://www.sun-a.com...il.php?pid=3593

Thanks :up:


Copy on ebay with many pages shown
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item3f02e9aff3

#9509 simplebrother

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 15:46

Copy on ebay with many pages shown
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item3f02e9aff3


If anyone is thinking of purchasing, all three volumes are available through Japanese Amazon for about ¥1,680 each, i.e., under $22 USA compared to the $45 in the eBay listing, plus shipping - (that's for new - less if you want used).
http://www.amazon.co.....IN=477960785X

Peter

#9510 ibsenop

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 16:48

I ordered the volumes two and three (more racing cars) for 1,600 yens each trought HMV Online (japanese bookstore - I bought some books from them before).
The freight is only by EMS (not cheap, but fast and reliable). When you buy outside Japan the tax are excluded.
The Google Chrome translate the pages, so I can read the text of their site.

http://www.hmv.co.jp...t...te=&type=sr

Edited by ibsenop, 16 July 2011 - 16:58.


#9511 werks prototype

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 19:16

Copy on ebay with many pages shown
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item3f02e9aff3


Very interesting to see inside the thing. Looks like the illustration is predominantly by Takashi Jufuku.



#9512 macoran

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 16:13

I was mucking around on the web and found this on www.motor snippets.com

JAMES ALLINGTON COLLECTION ON SALE AT CHRISTIES

11/24/2002

London – Christie’s is to offer for sale the James Allington Collection of Exceptional Cutaway Drawings, Automobilia and Motor Cars in London on 3 December. The collection, which comprises over 100 cutaway drawings, five superb motor cars as well as a selection of automobilia, is expected to fetch up to £500,000 with estimates ranging from £250 to £240,000.

James Allington is undoubtedly one of the motoring world’s most talented and renowned technical artists. He originally started his career as an apprentice engineer in the 1950s but after a period of national service in the RAF, where he began drawing sectioned jet engines, Allington realized his creative potential.
A lifelong passion for vintage racers began with Allington’s first purchase, the beautifully proportioned Type 35 Bugatti in 1958, the car which inspired his first cutaway drawing. Following its publication in Motor Racing magazine, Allington was commissioned to do a cutaway of Peter Collins’ Dino Ferrari 248, which in turn led to working as a freelance artist for Lotus and later Ford.
The technically impeccable drawings to be offered at Christie’s in December essentially reveal the complex inner secrets of some of the finest cars ever built and can take Allington anything from five days to five weeks to complete. He begins by photographing the car inside and out which enables him to decide on the viewpoint that will strike the best compromise between capturing the car’s character and revealing the amount of detail required.
Highlights among the fascinating cutaway drawings coming under the hammer range from a Bugatti Type 35B Grand Prix car, a 1929 Austin Seven Chummy to various Ferraris including a 275 GTB/4 and a 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Not surprisingly there are many Lotus drawings from his many years with the company. There is something to suit all collectors’ pockets with estimates ranging from £250 to £4,000.
James Allington has also made the difficult decision to sell five of his treasured cars. One of his particular favourites is the superb 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta estimated at £200,000-240,000 while a replica 1959 Ferrari Testa Rossa may realize up to £160,000.
A 1936 Frazer Nash Shelsey twin supercharged TT replica will also feature and carries an estimate of £80,000-120,000. Allington’s wonderful 1923 ‘Cloverleaf’ Citroen 5CV is estimated at £2,500-4,500 and finally the sporty 1953 MG TF two-seater may fetch up to £20,000.

This sale will take place at The Jack Barclay Showroom, Nine Elms, London SW8


Makes me wonder.....Allington must have earned a pretty penny somewhere if he could afford a Bugatti as a base for producing his first cutaway.
Does anyone know if there was ever an article in the format of "Cutaway Kings" about Jim Allington ?

Edited by macoran, 17 July 2011 - 16:28.


#9513 Embers

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 19:25

Here is a cutaway of Lance Reventlow’s Scarab Mid-Engine drawn by Temple for the December 1962 issue of Sports Car Graphic. This is the initial Buick-powered version, which transmitted its power to the ground via a five-speed Colotti gearbox. Reventlow had the money to do things right and, supposedly, had the car licensed for street use to perform the shake-down process. I have not seen a picture of this car doing that, although one of his earlier front-engined roadsters was regularly driven on the street.
Posted Image
At the time versions of the 215 cubic inch Buick-Oldsmobile-Pontiac aluminum V8 were considered for several sports racing cars (see earlier posts of the Mirage, Genie Mk.8, and the Webster 4-liter). The Olds version became the engine of choice because it had one more head stud than the Buick. The Buick engine in the Scarab was soon replaced by an Olds, but it soon became apparent that this engine could not provide the power to make the car competitive in “big bore” racing. John Mecom bought the car and had Troutman and Barnes install a Traco 377 cubic inch Chevrolet. This and the no-small-matter of choosing A. J. Foyt as driver let to the car’s first significant victories: Foyt and the Scarab won the Governor’s and Nassau Trophy races at the Nassau Speed Week in December 1963.
Augie Pabst, who drove a Chevrolet-powered Lola GT during that Nassau Speed Week, later bought and campaigned the car. He still has it, as can be seen from this photo, from another Autosport forum:
http://forums.autosp...arab Mid-Engine

Curiously, the Scarab mid-engine was modeled to 1/24 scale by Monogram, but not the Cooper Monaco or Lotus 19. A few years ago, this rather dated model was again available for about $15 US. I bought one figuring I would just throw it together as a quickie build. When I opened it I was disappointed by its lack of detail, but it did have nice treaded rubber Goodyears and I could make a few improvements such as opening up the wheel spokes. Thus began a long downhill slide, aided by the cutaway shown above. I know this isn’t a modeling forum, but I hope you will allow me to post this picture:
Posted Image


#9514 Tony Matthews

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 22:18

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Very nice, Embers.

#9515 macoran

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 22:36

These U.S specials you are posting are very interesting John. Especially since you are giving us a bit of history along with the cutaway.

#9516 werks prototype

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 06:53

Here is a cutaway of Lance Reventlow’s Scarab Mid-Engine drawn by Temple for the December 1962 issue of Sports Car Graphic. This is the initial Buick-powered version, which transmitted its power to the ground via a five-speed Colotti gearbox. Reventlow had the money to do things right and, supposedly, had the car licensed for street use to perform the shake-down process. I have not seen a picture of this car doing that, although one of his earlier front-engined roadsters was regularly driven on the street.
Posted Image
At the time versions of the 215 cubic inch Buick-Oldsmobile-Pontiac aluminum V8 were considered for several sports racing cars (see earlier posts of the Mirage, Genie Mk.8, and the Webster 4-liter). The Olds version became the engine of choice because it had one more head stud than the Buick. The Buick engine in the Scarab was soon replaced by an Olds, but it soon became apparent that this engine could not provide the power to make the car competitive in “big bore” racing. John Mecom bought the car and had Troutman and Barnes install a Traco 377 cubic inch Chevrolet. This and the no-small-matter of choosing A. J. Foyt as driver let to the car’s first significant victories: Foyt and the Scarab won the Governor’s and Nassau Trophy races at the Nassau Speed Week in December 1963.
Augie Pabst, who drove a Chevrolet-powered Lola GT during that Nassau Speed Week, later bought and campaigned the car. He still has it, as can be seen from this photo, from another Autosport forum:
http://forums.autosp...arab Mid-Engine

Curiously, the Scarab mid-engine was modeled to 1/24 scale by Monogram, but not the Cooper Monaco or Lotus 19. A few years ago, this rather dated model was again available for about $15 US. I bought one figuring I would just throw it together as a quickie build. When I opened it I was disappointed by its lack of detail, but it did have nice treaded rubber Goodyears and I could make a few improvements such as opening up the wheel spokes. Thus began a long downhill slide, aided by the cutaway shown above. I know this isn’t a modeling forum, but I hope you will allow me to post this picture:
Posted Image


:up: I agree with the others, top stuff!


#9517 TWest

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 15:53

:up: I agree with the others, top stuff!



Another voice of appreciation from here. I have been trying to come up with all of the cutaways on the US Sports Specials and that sort of thing for a while, and a couple of these have definitely added to my set of illustrations for a project upon which I am working. Thank-you for the nicely done history and background that you have included, as well.
Tom West

#9518 ibsenop

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 00:16

Better copy of the Yamaha OX99-11 cutaway posted on page 81.
Artist? Possibly Makoto Ouchi (the signature seems his signature)
Can someone confirm?
Posted Image

Yamaha OX99-11 front suspension
Posted Image

Yamaha OX99-11 rear suspension
Posted Image

Edited by ibsenop, 21 July 2011 - 00:21.


#9519 Motocar

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:06

Please Aid... Help..... I need information for the new format of the Forum, I am not understand, dont see all the cutaway like before.....
in spanish: Tengo dificultad para comprender el nuevo formato del foro, ahora no accedo a todos los cutaways como lo hacia antes, mi dificultad es de idioma, Thank you. Motocar

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#9520 Embers

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 05:30

Another voice of appreciation from here. I have been trying to come up with all of the cutaways on the US Sports Specials and that sort of thing for a while, and a couple of these have definitely added to my set of illustrations for a project upon which I am working. Thank-you for the nicely done history and background that you have included, as well.
Tom West

Thank you, all, for the words of encouragement and appreciation. As I mentioned when I first started posting, I want to give back for all the amazing work posted here that has enabled me to add to my stock of information on sports racing and Formula cars. Many in my saved collection of cutaways have already been posted, so I tried to fill in with those that haven't, hopefully adding to the recognition of the artists who created them.

I would make one request. If any of you happen to have in your collection the cutaway of the original Corvette Sting Ray race car that appeared in the March 1961 issue of Sports Cars Illustrated, would you post it? This may have been done by Clarence LaTourette, but deserves posting for its design influence, if not for its racing success.

#9521 Tim Murray

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 07:25

Please Aid... Help..... I need information for the new format of the Forum, I am not understand, dont see all the cutaway like before.....
in spanish: Tengo dificultad para comprender el nuevo formato del foro, ahora no accedo a todos los cutaways como lo hacia antes, mi dificultad es de idioma, Thank you. Motocar

Hi Motocar. Is this the same problem you were having back in May? You didn't explain exactly what the problem was then, and until you do there's not a lot we can do to help. I suggest you explain the problem in Spanish - it will be easier for you and we can probably work out what you are saying. Here's what was said back in May. :) :wave:

I dont understanding the new format, is very dificult my access to the forum.......
to excuse my poor english. Please help me......... Thanks Motocar

Hi Motocar, please could you try to explain why you are having difficulty. If we know what the problem is, we can try to help. I'm not aware of any new format here since the software was upgraded two years ago. :)



#9522 tbolt

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 07:29

Please Aid... Help..... I need information for the new format of the Forum, I am not understand, dont see all the cutaway like before.....

I don't think it is the forum , more likely a recent update to your security settings or browser. I had something similar with a site I use, after an update to Internet Explorer I could not see any images, but with Firefox it was OK.

#9523 macoran

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:25

Better copy of the Yamaha OX99-11 cutaway posted on page 81.
Artist? Possibly Makoto Ouchi (the signature seems his signature)Can someone confirm?

I think so Ibsen !
Those suspension drawings are great !

#9524 werks prototype

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:44

I think so Ibsen !
Those suspension drawings are great !

I was just about to make the exact same comment.

Better copy of the Yamaha OX99-11 cutaway posted on page 81.
Artist? Possibly Makoto Ouchi (the signature seems his signature)
Can someone confirm?
Posted Image

Yamaha OX99-11 front suspension
Posted Image

Yamaha OX99-11 rear suspension
Posted Image

Brilliant!

#9525 bradbury west

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:44

[quote name='macoran' date='Jul 21 2011, 17:25' post='5180395']
I think so Ibsen !
Those suspension drawings are great ! macoran. quote

Superb stuff. On the rear suspension does something locate through the hole in the bell crank or is it all free standing, and presumably the short rod alongside the spring bears on a torsion/antiroll bar?. Which? You will have deduced that I am not an engineer.
Roger Lund

#9526 werks prototype

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:48

Posted Image
Mercedes-Benz W25.B. Artist L.C.Cresswell.

#9527 werks prototype

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:49

Posted Image
Study for the Type P.3. Alfa, L.C.Cresswell.

#9528 werks prototype

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 16:54

Posted Image
1.5-litre Arsenal C.T.A V.8 and sliding block suspension unit. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

Not a cutaway in the proper sense, neverthelesss, posted in the hope that one day a complete, Arsenal C.T.A. cutaway may well appear.

#9529 TWest

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 17:45

Wow, thought it was some international holiday that I had missed ... glad to have everyone back on the board and active again.
Thought I would throw a couple of more of the Terry Davey illustrations for Haynes out there again.
This one is the Mercedes-Benz 280 from 1980. Rather undistinguished in the M-B lineup, but one of those cars that one still sees around, as they were built pretty well.
Tom West


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#9530 TWest

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 17:48

My next Terry Davey cover for today is the Mercury Marquis of 1980. Twin to the much more popular Galaxie under the Ford nameplate, this car just says retirement, as they used to move a bunch of them at sale prices around all the retirement centers in Florida and Arizona as the modelyear came to an end. They were certainly never that great handling, but they were heavy and would stay on the road. They were also large enough to be a bit protective in a crash, to which they were subject at the hands of their generally aged drivers. Not sure how good they are when you get run over at a bus stop, as has happened ...
Tom West

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#9531 TWest

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 17:54

Only related to the other two by the Alphabetic proximity in my files, this Terry Davey cover for Haynes takes things in a different direction with the MG Midget from 1980. Not sure anyone really took this seriously, but it was a pretty cool little fun car for buzzing around. Remember a friend of mine wrapping one around a phone pole when he took off after we could not get his keys from him. We followed and finally caught up after seeing the spinning headlights shooting beams through the trees that we were driving through. We got there, and my friend and his passenger were sitting there laughing like complete loons and completely unscratched after the car went sideways into a tree that had crushed the passenger seat between the door and the console. Not quite sure how he ever made it out, but he did. Something about god protecting small animals and drunks ... something like that ...
Time for a new Avatar, too, I think.
Tom West


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#9532 macoran

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 18:00

Superb stuff. On the rear suspension does something locate through the hole in the bell crank or is it all free standing, and presumably the short rod alongside the spring bears on a torsion/antiroll bar?. Which? You will have deduced that I am not an engineer.
Roger Lund

Roger,
A bell crank as you name it cannot work free-standing, it has to "hinge" around something, in order to produce a cranking motion.
See pin or whatever it exactly is at end of my yellow arrow.
The short bar alongside the spring unit operates the transverse "anti-roll bar"
Posted Image
Posted Image


Edited by macoran, 21 July 2011 - 18:14.


#9533 bradbury west

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 19:21

Many thanks, Marc, it is as I thought. I was intrigued to consider whether the lever operated a torsion bar as a supplementary spring medium, akin to a compound torsion bar but using a spring and a bar separately. Presumably the damper lies within the coil spring as usual. My question is not as daft as it might seem, IMHO, as the artist has drawn in the wishbone mounting points.
RL

#9534 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 23:53

Forgive me for this, fellas, but I can't resist. In seeing Marc's most excellent annotation arrows on the suspension artwork, this is what immediately came to mind:

I blow thru here
The music goes 'round and around
Whoa-ho-ho-ho-ho-ho
And it comes out here

I push the first valve down
The music goes down and around
Whoa-ho-ho-ho-ho-ho
And it comes out here

I push the middle valve down
The music goes down around below
Below, below, deedle-dee-ho-ho-ho
Listen to the jazz come out

I push the other valve down
The music goes 'round and around
Whoa-ho-ho-ho-ho-ho
And it comes out here

THE MUSIC GOES ROUND AND ROUND
Featured in the film "The Music Goes Round" (1936)
(Mike Riley / Eddie Farley)

MC runs for cover...



#9535 ibsenop

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 00:14

Chinon Camera by Yasuhiro Kawakami

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Nikon F3 AF by Jun Mihashi and Tetsuo Otake

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#9536 Embers

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 05:01

Better copy of the Yamaha OX99-11 cutaway posted on page 81.
Posted Image


This is why I like to include a little description and history with my posts. When I first scanned by the thumbnail shown in this post and saw “Yamaha”, it registered as some sort of motorcycle related drawing. Later I noticed that it looked like a four-wheeler, and I thought, “ I’ve never heard of a Yamaha car, I’d better take a look.” Lo and behold what a strange car. Was Yamaha proposing some sort of low-cost, motorbike-engined sports car for the masses? Wait, how many exhaust pipes are showing? Six! Is it a car powered by one of its Formula 1 engines? And it looks like it only has a single seat! What’s going on here?

Ibsen gave a few descriptors with his original post, but the rest of the Autosport forums were devoid of much information other than a top speed of 217 mph. A further search of the Internet produced the rest of the story of this car, which, assuming I’m not in the minority in my ignorance of its history, I’ll summarize for the other readers of this forum, with my own comments.

I enjoy the cutaways shown here for the technical lessons they reveal. The Yamaha OW99-11 is also an object lesson in marketing and economics. From what I gather, back in 1992 the sporting goods division of Yamaha wanted to leverage the company’s investment in making Formula 1 engines for several teams, by producing a “supercar” to impress the automotive world. Not having a lot of four-wheel design experience, they hired a German firm to work up some concepts. They were not satisfied with the result, as it, apparently, was too conventional in concept and materials. Although Yamaha had it own designer, Takuya Yura, they then turned to a British firm called IAD to engineer the car. Originally proposed as a single seater, at Yamaha’s request, a second seat was added, aft and to the left of the driver. This can be partially seen in the cutaway, if not immediately recognizable as a seat. A carbonfiber tub with a de-tuned, 3.5 liter V12 F1 engine bolted directly to it, served as the chassis, the rear suspension attaching to the gearbox in standard F1 fashion. Three vehicles were produced, one of which didn’t have the aluminum body panels, which emphasized it single-seat formula-car look. According to Wikipedia the estimated 1994 cost of the car would be in the region of $800,000.

Now what could go wrong here: A firm with no automotive experience proposes to enter the field with a $800K “supercar”. The accommodations are for a driver, any passenger relegated to a seat smaller than that provided in contemporary Group C race cars. It is powered by a notoriously unreliable engine and has a chassis made with an exotic, expensive material in a labor-intensive process. This story requires comparison with that of another famous motorcycle name, Honda, and its product in the same timeframe, the NSX. They made about 18,000 of them and, although it may be said that the company didn’t make a profit on any of them, they served the company well as a flagship.


#9537 Tony Matthews

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 06:36

THE MUSIC GOES ROUND AND ROUND
Featured in the film "The Music Goes Round" (1936)
(Mike Riley / Eddie Farley)

MC runs for cover...

Or:-

Your wishbones connected to your -
Knuckle joint, your knuckle joint's connected to your -
Upright, your upright's connected to your -
Push rod, your push rod's connected to your -

(Change key)

Bellcrank, your bellcrank's connected to your -
Damper, you damper's connected to your -

(Change key)

Coil spring, your coil spring's connected to your -
Chassis - now hear the word of the Lord!

Anon. I thang yew, thang yew Madam, very kind.





#9538 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 10:39

:lol:

Better and better! Good one, Tony!



#9539 Macca

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 11:29

But this is the Nostalgia Forum........... :confused:


'The beam-axle's connected to
the leaf-spring.'

Full stop.


Or, at a pinch:

'The De Dion tube's connected to
the Watts link,

The Watt's link's connected to
the chassis.'


Paul M

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#9540 macoran

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 16:34

Oh my gosh !

What a cutaway drawing can do for you !

My index finger is connected to my mouse
My mouse is connected to my......eeek a MOUSE!!! ( there was one a few days ago, raining cats and whotsits one evening),
so the damn thing popped in foe a place to hide, got him chased out in time and closed the garden door !
and yes !! she was standing on the dining room chair , and yelling !!!

What are we cutaway fans...technicians, engineers, songwriters, poets. ?
We probably just appreciate good work, talent, a pint of beer, a glass of wine, some cheese.

Cutawayland is just great !

Another great post to get us to the 10,000
Anders are you listening ?

#9541 TWest

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 21:15

A bit different from the Davey Haynes cover illustrations, I am pulling this from the latest (July, 2011) issue of Aeroplane magazine. As a bit of a plug, if you have any interest in aircraft history, this is a good monthly publication to pick up .. some very interesting articles and features in here.
The drawing is the Convair CV-880 Model 22 as illustrated by Roy Cross for the Aeroplane February 2, 1959 edition. Cross, as you will remember, was probably best known as the major illustrator for Airfix, doing much of their box art for many years. Sort of the equivalent of the Jack Leynwood or John Steele artwork that was being done in the US at the time.
The CV-880 was the smaller, initial version of the Convair Jetliner competitor, losing out to the Boeing 707/720 series and the DC-8 series. From what I know about it, it sounded like it was more of a marketing problem than a product problem for the craft, as with a lot of products over the years.
Tom West

Posted Image

#9542 TWest

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 21:28

My mouse is connected to my......eeek a MOUSE!!! ( there was one a few days ago, raining cats and whotsits one evening),
so the damn thing popped in foe a place to hide, got him chased out in time and closed the garden door !
and yes !! she was standing on the dining room chair , and yelling !!!



Reminds me of a similar situation when we lived in Michigan. Occasionally, a little field mouse would slide into the place and be buzzing around not bothering anyone. One day, when my son was proably 4 months old, he was set on the floor of the living room and my wife went into the kitchen for something quick. Upon her return, there was our little mouse friend standing there looking into Josh's face. She screamed, grabbed Josh and hustled him into the kitchen, then, still screaming, grabbed the only thing that was sitting out, a white plastic Kool-Whip container. Running back into the living room, with the mouse still sitting there with his eyes spinning, she dropped the container over top of him, and proceeded to stack about 3-feet worth of books on top of this thing.
I was called, at work, of course, and instructed to come home immediately, as we had been invaded by a rodent horde. Upon finding that we were talking about one, and that he was buried under probably 200 pounds of books, I decided that unless this was Mighty Mouse under the library, it would probably hold. I told her that if she was concerned, she should call the exterminator and they would take care of it.
No doubt, to his great amusement, the guy shows up, does his complete trap/bait think around the basement, and all of those other expected places, then comes in to deal with our literary mouse in the living room. Since the mouse's tail was caught outside the Kool-Whip container, is would move around fairly often she would not go into the room. The guy removed all the books from the top of the container, took the container off the deceased rodent, informing my wife that the initial problem was fairly well solved.
He then put the container back, and restacked all of the books on top of the Kool-Whip coffin, which is the way I found it upon returning home that evening.
Turns out that they can remove them if they kill them, but, as professionals they aren't going to carry off any kills that they cannot claim. My wife was highly incensed, while I was trying very hard not to keep laughing as I dragged all of the books back to the shelves ...
Sorry for the strange diversion here ... it won't happen again.
Tom West

That was a lie, it certainly will ...

#9543 ibsenop

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 00:12

Two unidentified engines by Yasuhiro Kawakami

Twin Cam engine

Posted Image

and Turbo engine

Posted Image

#9544 RDV

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 08:04

macoran-....some cheese

[/whispering]-mmm....where do you meet?

#9545 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 10:29

But this is the Nostalgia Forum........... :confused:


'The beam-axle's connected to
the leaf-spring.'

Full stop.


Or, at a pinch:

'The De Dion tube's connected to
the Watts link,

The Watt's link's connected to
the chassis.'


Paul M

I appreciate your point, Paul, but the here in Cutawayland we seem not to be imprisoned in the same time frame as most of TNF. If it is a technical illustration of something mechanical it qualifies, age or youth does not hinder, nor predjudice, it's scrutiny, admiration or whatever else you want to add to this rubbish what I have wrote. Ah, coffee!

#9546 PS30-SB

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 10:42

Two unidentified engines by Yasuhiro Kawakami

Twin Cam engine

Posted Image

and Turbo engine

Posted Image


Both DAIHATSU engines, I believe. Top one ( 4cyl. 16 valve EFi ) possibly K3-VE2 type, and bottom one ( 3cyl. 12 valve EFi Turbo ) possibly CB70/80 type?

But why are they "unidentified"? Are they not identified at source?

#9547 macoran

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 11:02

Now what could go wrong here: A firm with no automotive experience proposes to enter the field with a $800K “supercar”.


IIRC Yamaha were the actual manufacturers of the Toyota 2000GT

Edited by macoran, 23 July 2011 - 11:02.


#9548 werks prototype

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 11:31

Another rendition of the Vauxhall.

Posted Image
1922 Vauxhall engine. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.


#9549 werks prototype

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 11:32

Posted Image
1922 Vauxhall. L.C.Cresswell.

#9550 werks prototype

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 11:32

Posted Image
Iso Isetta. Artist, Cadodali.