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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#9601 werks prototype

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 20:33

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Lotus 99T. Artist, G.Piola. One very very light cutaway!

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Tyrrell DG-016, CAD, carbon fibre use schematic. Produced by, Courtaulds.

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Ferrari F187 CAD file. Draughtsman unknown.

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#9602 werks prototype

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 20:33

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1936, 6-litre Auto Union. Frame, suspension links and rear suspension detail. Artist, S.E.Porter.

#9603 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 21:13

I was mucking around on the web and found this on www.motor snippets.com

JAMES ALLINGTON COLLECTION ON SALE AT CHRISTIES


Makes me wonder.....Allington must have earned a pretty penny somewhere if he could afford a Bugatti as a base for producing his first cutaway.

I can't give you much information Marc, as I don't know it all, and if I did I'm not sure that I should. However, he was left money by a couple of people, and cars were cheap in those days! The Type 35 had gone by the time I met him, in 1959, as had a re-built-from-a-wreck MG TF. He had a Fiat Topolino and an MGA - don't know if it was a Twin Cam - and then sold both and had a Downton Mini, a part-finished Shelsley Frazer Nash and a Lotus Elite which was part-payment for work done for Lotus Cars, before a 300 SL appeared overnight and the Lotus went. He added to the list over time, but although there was sufficient funds to buy cars and do them up I would not say he was rich. The only car that I can remember as being bought new was a Rover 2000. Everything else needed work!

I remember thinking, a couple of years into my apprenticeship, that at the rate he was charging for illustrating I was never going to be payed much!

Payed. Payed? Paid.

Edited by Tony Matthews, 27 July 2011 - 06:14.


#9604 ibsenop

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 23:35

Honda HT 3810 Lawn Tractor by Hisashi Saito

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#9605 TWest

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 00:34

I have another of those Kiimble illustrations from that 1997 Chrysler catalog. This was actually a pretty cool sales piece, and the three cutaways were certainly a reason to save it. This is the 1997 Chrysler Concorde.
Tom West

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#9606 TWest

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 00:44

By the way, I just got that publication titled Sectioned Drawings of Piston Aero Engines ... pardon me while I catch my breath. Illustrations by Lyndon Jones, and includes some kind of cutawy on most of the major aircraft that were powered by a particular engine. It is spiral bound, so should be easy to pull the pages for scanning eventually. Pretty decent Lyndon Jones work published by Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust in 1995. Can't believe that there are a ton of these sitting around, and they are worth the money, it would appear. Seems like something to have if you are a cutaway fan, especially an aircraft guy.
Tom West

#9607 werks prototype

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 11:31

By the way, I just got that publication titled Sectioned Drawings of Piston Aero Engines ... pardon me while I catch my breath. Illustrations by Lyndon Jones, and includes some kind of cutawy on most of the major aircraft that were powered by a particular engine. It is spiral bound, so should be easy to pull the pages for scanning eventually. Pretty decent Lyndon Jones work published by Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust in 1995. Can't believe that there are a ton of these sitting around, and they are worth the money, it would appear. Seems like something to have if you are a cutaway fan, especially an aircraft guy.
Tom West


I'd be interested to find out more about his life and his work, if there is any biographical information contained, Tom. I know that he served with the RAF during the second World War, was an engineer and an illustrator, working at Rolls-Royce and then, where Ross Brawn began his career, Harwell (Atomic Energy Research Establishment).

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Rolls-Royce Avon R.A.7. Artist Lyndon Jones.

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Supermarine Swift F.2. Artist Lyndon Jones.

#9608 werks prototype

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 11:39

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Griffon Marks 61-65. Artist, Lyndon Jones.

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Griffon engine installation. Spitfire 24. Artist, Lyndon Jones.

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Spitfire 24 cannon installation. (20mm). Artist, Lyndon Jones.


#9609 TWest

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 17:46

I'd be interested to find out more about his life and his work, if there is any biographical information contained, Tom. I know that he served with the RAF during the second World War, was an engineer and an illustrator, working at Rolls-Royce and then, where Ross Brawn began his career, Harwell (Atomic Energy Research Establishment).


Werks,
I will pull some of the bio material from the Forward of the book for you for reference. Note that, as the title implies, more like directly states, this is all the piston engined Rolls Royce engines, none of the turbines, that show in this book.
From the Forward to the book"
Lyndon Jones was born in South Wales in 1924 and educated at Wellington Grammar School in Shropshire. On leaving school he had the ambition to fly, but was persuaded by his parents to join the post office. (Sounds like the kind of insightful career advice that I tended to get ... TW)
In his spare time, however, he attended night school to learn teh rudiments of navigation with a view to furthering his ambitions.
When, in 1942, he was old enough, he volunteered for the Royal Air Force but was unable to become aircrew as his eyesight did not meet the required standards. He trained as a flight mechanic, working on a wide range of aircraft, seeing service through the UK and overseas. During his service, he did achieve his ambition to fly by riding "shotgun" to ensure the results of his maintenance repair work were successful. He flew in many different types, including Ansons, Lancasters and Mosquitoes.
During his time in the RAF, Lyndon learned, at first hand, the basics of aeronautical engineering and, using his self-developed talent for drawing, started to produce sectioned drawings of both aeroplanes and their engines. This work was to secure him, on demobilisation in August 1947, a job as technical artist with handley Page and Cricklewood, working on Hastings and Hermes illustrations. During this time he came into contact with Rolls-Royce and moved to the company in March 1951 to work on the Merlin, Griffon and the new Dart turbo-prop.
Du to family circumstances, he left Rolls-Royce in June 1952 to move back to be nearer South Wales and joined the Gloster Aircraft Company at Hucclecote. He remained there until January 1955, working on the Javelin aircraft. His final career move was to the illustrations Studio at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell. Although he had left the aircraft industry, he continued to draw aeroplanes and their engines and, upon his retirement in 1989, decided that he need to find good homes for his original drawings: the aeroplanes went to various aircraft heritage societies and he contacted the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust concerning his engine originals. We (They) were delighted to be given custody of these and, to put his work on permanent record, we (they) are publishing this book as a "special" in our (their) Historic Series. Lyndon has not restricted himself to aircraft and engines, but also ventured into steam locomotives, motorcycles and even cathedrals.
This was all supported by Lyndon's wife Daphne, who evidently put a lot of effort into getting all the material ready and documented.
That is the information from the book, so the basic framework for Lyndon Jones is at least there ... and we know that he wasn't Swedish, I suppose.

Hope this helps,
Tom West

#9610 1996900sp

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 18:00

Hello All,

One of my Illustrations was recently used on the cover of a college text book for Engineering Drawing & Design. The funny part is if I had to take this class myself I probably wouldn't make it! http://www.hatchillu...daatv_book.html

Edited by 1996900sp, 27 July 2011 - 18:41.


#9611 werks prototype

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 18:31

Werks,
I will pull some of the bio material from the Forward of the book for you for reference. Note that, as the title implies, more like directly states, this is all the piston engined Rolls Royce engines, none of the turbines, that show in this book.
From the Forward to the book"
Lyndon Jones was born in South Wales in 1924 and educated at Wellington Grammar School in Shropshire. On leaving school he had the ambition to fly, but was persuaded by his parents to join the post office. (Sounds like the kind of insightful career advice that I tended to get ... TW)
In his spare time, however, he attended night school to learn teh rudiments of navigation with a view to furthering his ambitions.
When, in 1942, he was old enough, he volunteered for the Royal Air Force but was unable to become aircrew as his eyesight did not meet the required standards. He trained as a flight mechanic, working on a wide range of aircraft, seeing service through the UK and overseas. During his service, he did achieve his ambition to fly by riding "shotgun" to ensure the results of his maintenance repair work were successful. He flew in many different types, including Ansons, Lancasters and Mosquitoes.
During his time in the RAF, Lyndon learned, at first hand, the basics of aeronautical engineering and, using his self-developed talent for drawing, started to produce sectioned drawings of both aeroplanes and their engines. This work was to secure him, on demobilisation in August 1947, a job as technical artist with handley Page and Cricklewood, working on Hastings and Hermes illustrations. During this time he came into contact with Rolls-Royce and moved to the company in March 1951 to work on the Merlin, Griffon and the new Dart turbo-prop.
Du to family circumstances, he left Rolls-Royce in June 1952 to move back to be nearer South Wales and joined the Gloster Aircraft Company at Hucclecote. He remained there until January 1955, working on the Javelin aircraft. His final career move was to the illustrations Studio at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell. Although he had left the aircraft industry, he continued to draw aeroplanes and their engines and, upon his retirement in 1989, decided that he need to find good homes for his original drawings: the aeroplanes went to various aircraft heritage societies and he contacted the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust concerning his engine originals. We (They) were delighted to be given custody of these and, to put his work on permanent record, we (they) are publishing this book as a "special" in our (their) Historic Series. Lyndon has not restricted himself to aircraft and engines, but also ventured into steam locomotives, motorcycles and even cathedrals.
This was all supported by Lyndon's wife Daphne, who evidently put a lot of effort into getting all the material ready and documented.
That is the information from the book, so the basic framework for Lyndon Jones is at least there ... and we know that he wasn't Swedish, I suppose.

Hope this helps,
Tom West


:up: Thanks, Tom! And quite comprehensive.

And, as you say he definitely wasn't Swedish. :) We now know that.

If he schooled in Shropshire, I'm thinking he may have been exposed to the many goings on at RAF Cosford. (I'm not quite sure when that site was developed).

Interesting that his repertoire includes Motorcycles, Cathedrals and Steam Locomotives. (The only work I have ever seen of his, up to now, is the material Wuzak posted and the Supermarine/R-R material)

#9612 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 19:50

Hello All,

One of my Illustrations was recently used on the cover of a college text book for Engineering Drawing & Design. The funny part is if I had to take this class myself I probably wouldn't make it! http://www.hatchillu...daatv_book.html

Having your illustration on the front cover is better! Sock it to 'em!

#9613 Wuzak

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 02:50

By the way, I just got that publication titled Sectioned Drawings of Piston Aero Engines ... pardon me while I catch my breath. Illustrations by Lyndon Jones, and includes some kind of cutawy on most of the major aircraft that were powered by a particular engine. It is spiral bound, so should be easy to pull the pages for scanning eventually. Pretty decent Lyndon Jones work published by Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust in 1995. Can't believe that there are a ton of these sitting around, and they are worth the money, it would appear. Seems like something to have if you are a cutaway fan, especially an aircraft guy.
Tom West



Interesting that his repertoire includes Motorcycles, Cathedrals and Steam Locomotives. (The only work I have ever seen of his, up to now, is the material Wuzak posted and the Supermarine/R-R material)



I have scanned the main engine cutaways from Sectioned Drawings of Piston Aero Engines, plus a couple of other pages. I sent some reduced size to Marc a while back. I'm not sure about the legailities of uploading them to the web. I could e-mail copies to those interested.

#9614 1996900sp

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 17:13

Having your illustration on the front cover is better! Sock it to 'em!

Thanks Tony! This means a lot coming from you.

Jim

#9615 simplebrother

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 18:10

(TWest @ Jul 27 2011, 10:44) *
By the way, I just got that publication titled Sectioned Drawings of Piston Aero Engines ... pardon me while I catch my breath. Illustrations by Lyndon Jones, and includes some kind of cutawy on most of the major aircraft that were powered by a particular engine. It is spiral bound, so should be easy to pull the pages for scanning eventually. Pretty decent Lyndon Jones work published by Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust in 1995. Can't believe that there are a ton of these sitting around, and they are worth the money, it would appear. Seems like something to have if you are a cutaway fan, especially an aircraft guy.
Tom West


(werks prototype @ Jul 28 2011, 04:31) *
Interesting that his repertoire includes Motorcycles, Cathedrals and Steam Locomotives. (The only work I have ever seen of his, up to now, is the material Wuzak posted and the Supermarine/R-R material)

I have a few other drawings in my files attributed to him...

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MG - 1957 EX181 engine (unsigned)

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Handley Page HP 59 Halifax

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Handley Page HP 61 Halifax VI per the drawing, but other sources say that VI was actually HP 63 - not certain which is correct

Peter


#9616 macoran

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 20:27

I'm not posting much recently, but I am raiding the web.
Werks may have posted many of the cycle engines already but,

here's a link
http://www.motobrit....ch/tech-cut.php

#9617 werks prototype

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 19:05

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60 h.p. Mercedes. Gordon Bennett winner, 1903. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#9618 werks prototype

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 19:05

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Four-cylinder, 2-litre Connaught engine. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#9619 Motocar

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 21:52

The Mach 5 cutaway, Car of movie and anime japanese Tv series, author unknow

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Edited by Motocar, 01 August 2011 - 12:49.


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#9620 ibsenop

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 22:41

Honda Geo engine by Hisashi Saito

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#9621 tbolt

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 08:36

Three engines from the 1930's, mostly exploded drawings with just a hint of cutaway.

Vauxhall 10 by S.E. Porter
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Standard 9 and 10 by S.E. Porter
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Morris 8 unknown
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#9622 Tony Matthews

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 10:10

I like those, tb, as I'm sure I've said before, exploded drawings are 'fun' to do, although these still require a degree of knowledge to work out what goes where. Sometimes a dotted- or chain-dot line is needed to show shared centrelines, etc.

#9623 ibsenop

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 21:42

Porsche 906 Carrera by artist unknown

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TNF Cutaway Index updated - page 240

Edited by ibsenop, 30 July 2011 - 23:20.


#9624 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 00:27

And another one bites the dust...........

Reluctently, I have decided to stop beating the tired old horse and am stepping away from the technical cutaway business. After 21 years, the studio doors will close behind me. It was a good adventure.

And now for something completely different.

#9625 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 01:03

A tough decision, Tom, I sympathise. All the very best for the future - you never know, you may find yourself doing something you really enjoy and pays the bills! Best wishes.

#9626 Embers

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 05:05

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This is the Autoproject GTR V12 by Vic Berris. It is a rare example of an automotive cutaway of a car that didn’t exist. The Mach 5, posted earlier, is another example. This is a design that was truly of its time. Anyone familiar with the history of sports racing cars can, at a glance, estimate to within a couple of years when it appeared. The “Autoproject” series appeared in Autocar magazine and presented ideas for cars that they thought were missing from the market place. The idea for this car was to recapture the pre-WW II notion that there should be a relationship between the fastest road cars and the fastest competition cars, which Autocar thought had disappeared at the time the article was written. The proposed design gets the idea across, as it fairly shouts “Jaguar 917/10 !”. Sure enough, it appeared in the 29 March 1973 issue. If the drawing appears a bit vague in certain areas, this is because it appeared as a two-page spread with a substantial gap across the crease. I have attempted to recreate some of the missing material.

The design was probably a collaboration between the author of the article, Ray Hutton, and Berris. They take pains to point out that, although the drawing shows the car with racing numbers, it is really intended to be a road car in the same way that the Jaguar XKSS was related to the D-Type. It is almost amusing to read the rest of the article, which attempts to gloss over the lack of amenities, relating mostly to weather protection and carrying capacity. Berris indicates the position of the driver in phantom outline (with racing helmet, no less). This allows one to note where the foot pedals are located. Yikes! This is following the 917 model too closely. The guys that drove that car were brave. I’m not sure I and my passenger would be that brave.

Another design oddity is the forward-facing louvers ahead of the front tires. These are actually headlight covers. The reason that they are not fixed transparencies is that they function as variable cooling air inlets for the cockpit. At night you get the full cooling effect, I guess.


#9627 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 08:38

And another one bites the dust...........

Reluctently, I have decided to stop beating the tired old horse and am stepping away from the technical cutaway business. After 21 years, the studio doors will close behind me. It was a good adventure.

And now for something completely different.


That sounds like you are a man with a plan, though!

Best wishes to you. :up:

#9628 PixelOz

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 09:03

Hi I'm new in this forum and I was browsing through most of the pages of this particular thread cause I love technical illustration and I just couldn't resist looking at all the incredible illustrations that I saw here. There are some that are simply amazing and being a car lover too that was just twice the fun!

I downloaded a particular picture that macoran placed in this thread (Zakspeed 861) cause is one of the many that I liked a lot and I decided to clean it up and I fixed it (in Photoshop) for my own pleasure. I removed the seams & white lines and cleaned the excessive yellowing (particularly from the white background), fixed a lot of the color mismatch from the two scanned halves, restored some of the color and contrast, cleaned the dirt of the page and the scanner lens, etc. and I want to place it here cause I though that some of you might enjoy it.

I'm asking permission to macoran to place it, if he doesn't agree with this I will remove the picture. Just remember that it was him and not me that provided the scan, I merely cleaned it up, I just restored it to make it look more like the way it was originally.

I couldn't place it in Imageshack at first cause it told me that it was too big so I was wondering how do you place such big jpegs in Imageshack and I found that the image limit is 5 megs there with a regular account so I loaded the image in Jpeg Optimizer and I reduced it a little without loosing quality whatsoever (to 97 percent) and I got it way below 5 megs so here it is:

Posted Image

Edited by PixelOz, 31 July 2011 - 09:23.


#9629 macoran

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 11:17

I'm asking permission to macoran to place it, if he doesn't agree with this I will remove the picture. Just remember that it was him and not me that provided the scan, I merely cleaned it up, I just restored it to make it look more like the way it was originally.

No permission required from me PixelOz, as it isn't my work but Giulio Betti's.
I thank you for the valetting job.

#9630 tikbalang

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 16:03

Posted Image
Porsche 911 Turbo. Artist, (the relative anonymity that is), Technical Art.



apologies for being off topic. is there a trick to getting the hires photo from imageshack? i keep getting the reduced 640*480 resolution. zooming in tells me to upgrade my free account.


#9631 byrkus

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 16:16

Right click on reduced version --> 'Show picture'.;)


#9632 tikbalang

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 16:29

Right click on reduced version --> 'Show picture'.;)



thank you. it worked on firefox v5.01, failed on opera v11.50, which is my default browser.



#9633 NPP

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 19:12

Posted Image
Lotus 86. Artist G.Piola.


Seeing this makes me wonder how this car would have driven without the bodywork - it looks very neat and finished 'naked'.

#9634 werks prototype

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 19:16

Here again is the Bugatti T-35, as originally posted on page 199. Here it is in its original context (With shadow!) and additional profiles.

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Type 35 Bugatti. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#9635 TWest

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 20:52

And another one bites the dust...........

Reluctently, I have decided to stop beating the tired old horse and am stepping away from the technical cutaway business. After 21 years, the studio doors will close behind me. It was a good adventure.

And now for something completely different.


Tom,
I was wondering how you kept things going as long as you did, and to support a studio for so long, too. Quite something. Are you going to continue to do any of this, like your GeeBee illustrations? Hate to think that will not be completed as I was enjoying seeing the work you had done along the line on that.
Best of luck. Obviously, keep us posted on your new career progress.
Tom West

#9636 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 21:09

Seeing this makes me wonder how this car would have driven without the bodywork - it looks very neat and finished 'naked'.

Probably like any other F1 car without its bodywork and wings! :)

#9637 Tom Johnson

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 21:23

Tom,
I was wondering how you kept things going as long as you did, and to support a studio for so long, too. Quite something. Are you going to continue to do any of this, like your GeeBee illustrations? Hate to think that will not be completed as I was enjoying seeing the work you had done along the line on that.
Best of luck. Obviously, keep us posted on your new career progress.
Tom West


Thanks, Tom - and Tony.

Yes, I will at least finish the Gee Bee Model Z and will most likely continue to produce cutaways as a hobby because I enjoy it so much.

One thing I intend to do when the smoke clears and things settle down is to attempt a style I always had thought of but never had the bravado to try. Which is, make a drawing of a cutaway subject all by hand in pencil, complete with all the tic marks, notes and faint red/blue construction lines as I normally did before converting to digital stuff. Next, I would scan it and load the image into Photoshop and do a transparent color rendering. That way the original draft drawing would still be visible.

My finished air brush paintings were, in my opinion, a bit too tight and lacked the ability to inform the viewer that the work was obviously done by a human and not a machine. Many a time when presenting a finished original piece to a client usually their comment would be: "Pretty cool....What CAD program did you use?" Then I would show them the original hand-done pencil draft and they would reply...."HOLY CRAP!!! YOU MUST BE INSANE!!! Time to boldly back up and try that road me thinks.


#9638 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 21:39

My finished air brush paintings were, in my opinion, a bit too tight and lacked the ability to inform the viewer that the work was obviously done by a human and not a machine.

Without passing judgement on the 'tightness' or otherwise of your finished artwork, Tom, which I like and admire, this is the very lesson that I learned when I was nineteen and had a brush-painted version of Jim Allington's Lotus 25 cutaway on display at college. It was dismissed as a photograph by a visiting teacher, complete with entourage of dis-interested kids. I overheard his comment and realised that if I was to avoid this scenario in the future I had to loosen up! Before I quit I had ideas for different approaches too, and did a bit of experimenting. However, they remain distant whims!

Don't think I've used 'whims' before...

#9639 werks prototype

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 17:10

Two more deposits for the Vic Berris vault

Posted Image
The Thinwall Ferrari. Artist, Vic Berris.

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#9640 werks prototype

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 17:11

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The Thinwall's Lampredi-designed 4.5-litre Ferrari vee-12. Artist, Vic Berris.

#9641 TWest

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 17:43

."HOLY CRAP!!! YOU MUST BE INSANE!!!


Tom,
I hope that you realize that you are not the first to be considered on the road to Commitmentville (was that the old Monkee's song, or the new Plant and Page cut ...). I think that most people cannot envisions how to do some of the basic styling drawings, much less something looking inside the surface as we do. There has to be some sort of tweak north of our ear canals that allows this to happen, but I am not sure that I want it fixed, either.
Best of luck to you. Personally, I am just starting to do some catalog photography for gun auctions (knowing nothing about guns), but it will be enough to well supplement things and at least let me live a bit better ... or to at least waste a bit of money without going over the edge, which is probably more like what will happen. It also legitimizes doing all the automotive and women photography ... well, sort of anyway.
Tom West

#9642 macoran

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 23:15

Posted Image

That ...if only because of the colouring and layout is absolutely fabulous !! thanks Marc

Oeps !! Mark !

Edited by macoran, 01 August 2011 - 23:34.


#9643 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 06:01

That ...if only because of the colouring and layout is absolutely fabulous !!

Yes, it is. Really nice.

#9644 werks prototype

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 08:25

That ...if only because of the colouring and layout is absolutely fabulous !! thanks Marc

Oeps !! Mark !


:up: Marc.

It is subtle. It reminds me a bit of George Stubbs, Whistlejacket.

http://www.britsatth...s/cr_stubbs.htm

Edited by werks prototype, 02 August 2011 - 08:47.


#9645 Repco22

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 09:03

Two more deposits for the Vic Berris vault

Posted Image
The Thinwall Ferrari. Artist, Vic Berris.

Very nicely done and my favourite cutaway genre; front-engined monopostos of the period. :up:

#9646 MEI

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 10:02

:up: Marc.

It is subtle. It reminds me a bit of George Stubbs, Whistlejacket.

http://www.britsatth...s/cr_stubbs.htm

Quite off topic, but if you go to the National Gallery website, you find the facility to zoom right into any picture in their collection.

http://www.nationalg...s-whistlejacket

Brilliant - technology at its best! Malcolm

#9647 werks prototype

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 10:13

Quite off topic, but if you go to the National Gallery website, you find the facility to zoom right into any picture in their collection.

http://www.nationalg...s-whistlejacket

Brilliant - technology at its best! Malcolm


:up: Much better.

#9648 vladP

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 12:55

Very nice, thanks a lot. Yet how come that Thinwall of the early 50-s is equipped with disc brakes?


#9649 werks prototype

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 13:29

Very nice, thanks a lot. Yet how come that Thinwall of the early 50-s is equipped with disc brakes?


According to Edward Eves, it was delivered with the Ferrari large diameter finned brakes, prone to fading, Vandervell knew of disc brakes from the aircraft industry. At that time none were available from any of the component manufacturers, British or otherwise. Consequently, Vandervell obtained drawings from the American Goodyear aircraft disc brake and the services of Lockheed and ended up with the Vandervell-Goodyear disc brake!


#9650 werks prototype

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 13:34

Very nicely done and my favourite cutaway genre; front-engined monopostos of the period.

Another of that ilk, Rod.

Posted Image
The 1951 twelve-cylinder 4.5-litre Ferrari. Artist, Harold Bubb.

Posted Image
Final drive, 1951 twelve-cylinder 4.5-litre Ferrari. Artist unknown.

Posted Image
Front suspension, 1951 twelve-cylinder 4.5-litre Ferrari. Artist unknown.