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#10101 werks prototype

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 19:29

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Hillman Minx. 1956. Artist, John Ferguson.

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Froude dynamometer. Artist, John Ferguson.

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#10102 werks prototype

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 19:32

Lancia Fulvia, artist unknown
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Dick Ellis ? John Marsden ?


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Lancia Fulvia. Artist, Dick Ellis. (Better late than never, as they say.)

#10103 werks prototype

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 19:33

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Ford RS200. Artist, Rob Allerston. Slightly different context/version of that posted previously.

#10104 werks prototype

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 19:34

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Williams FW07, weight distribution. Artist, Giorgio Piola.

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Williams FW07, ground effect. Artist, G Piola.

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'Ground effect' front suspension layout. Artist, Giorgio Piola.

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Ferrari T3 rear suspension layout. Artist, Giorgio Piola.

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Williams FW07. Artist, Giorgio Piola.

#10105 TWest

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 23:44

Good Citizens of Cutawayland,
I have been enjoying the contributions here, as have we all, and feel it is time to make some compensation for everyone else's efforts. Small tribute, more like it, but I will try to add more shortly. I still have 31 car cutaways scanned, but not cleaned up, sitting in my computer, with quite a few more to be assembled from pieces sitting in another file on my harddrive. And that is the scanned cars, but there are also 23 aircraft, in pieces sitting in the same file. I also have four rather large boxes that I just dragged over from my storage (paid enough that they let me in there again ...). These boxes contain much of my collection of Air Enthusiast and Air International .. which means a massive collection of aircraft cutaways to build from. Still have maybe 200 or so of the Haynes covers left to do. And that doesn't count all of the other stuff, so expect to see much more, maybe slowly, but it will happen .. Think post 20000 ...
The first of the two illustrations for today's celebration of Cutawayland is a Terry Davey cover for Haynes. A Peugeot 504 from 1980, so not exactly a majorly interesting subject, but it is French (thus my point), and one of those you aren't going to see very often in this form.
Enjoy.
Tom West


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#10106 TWest

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 23:59

Good Citizens,
I am adding another P-car, if I can use that expression ... the Plymouth Arrow of 1980. This was one of those import presentations out of Japan, not sure which manufacturer built this for Chrysler Corp. My best memory of this car was from its use as a Funny Car body during the '80s, as it made a pretty decent race car. At least they still looked a bit like the real car back then, which they don't currently ... of course, they are running about 80 miles per hour faster now, too, so the Aero is a much bigger factor. This was the Haynes Cover art by Terry Davey.
Please accept this humble tribute to the Cutawayland information base.
Tom West

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#10107 Embers

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 05:27

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This is the Corvette Sting Ray racecar of 1959-1960 as illustrated by Clarence LaTourette for the March 1961 issue of Sports Cars Illustrated. This car was built upon the second Corvette SS chassis, produced by Chevrolet expressly for racing under the direction of Zora Arkus-Duntov. The chassis and suspension of the Sting Ray are more visible in the SS cutaway of Robert Roux found in Post 5201, page 131.

The Sting Ray was the creation of Bill Mitchell, at that time head of General Motors Styling. Mitchell had the idea of a new shape for the Corvette, based loosely on the sting ray fish. A contest within the GM styling department resulted in the eventual choice of Peter Brock’s sketch with a coupe body as the basis for the eventual roadster. Although the Automobile Manufacturer’s Association ban against corporate participation in racing was in effect, Mitchell had enough influence and personal finances to have his own sports car built. GM was receptive to this as a styling exercise, but the car was raced under Mitchell’s sponsorship with the help of moonlighting GM employees who had experience with the Corvette SS. This one-off race car was driven by Dr. Dick Thompson during 1959 and 1960. While not a dominant competitor, it was progressively improved to the point where Thompson and the Sting Ray were national champions in the C-Modified class in 1960. It was, however, a crowd pleaser wherever it appeared. Even after all these years, some of that impact can be appreciated from this shot of the car at the 2008 Pebble Beach Concours (The car was rebodied to GM show standards after its racing career according to John Lamm in a 2001 Road & Track salon article):
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It was inevitable that the Sting Ray’s shape would be reflected in the production Corvette. The aft end of the Sting Ray appeared on the 1961 model, and Chuck Poehlmann and Larry Shinoda further refined the shape for the production 1963 roadster and coupe models, respectively. Under the skin the entire car was re-engineered. Some of that work that went into creating a producible vehicle can be seen by comparing this cutaway with LaTourette’s cutaway of the ’63 Corvette coupe, shown in post 8955, page 224. A ladder-type frame replaced the tubular spaceframe; a realigned double A-arm front suspension saved enough money by using existing components that a unique independent rear suspension could be designed to replace the De Dion-tube racing suspension; and hidden headlights were incorporated in the body’s leading edge.



#10108 CVA

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 12:22

thank's embert for the stingray racing,you can find herewith a worked version.
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On the other hand i have a Yoshihiro Inomoto version but a small part is missing ; if somebody have this part ,he can send it
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#10109 Duc-Man

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 13:07

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Sometimes you should check wikipedia. It was what I expected: a Mitsubishi (Celeste).
Chrysler and Mitsubishi worked together for quite some time. I can't remember the Celeste/Arrow twins but we had some Dodge Stealth/Mitsubishi GTO (3000GT) around.
There were also a couple Eagle Talon/Mitsubishi Eclipse.

#10110 TWest

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 17:13

Sometimes you should check wikipedia. It was what I expected: a Mitsubishi (Celeste).
Chrysler and Mitsubishi worked together for quite some time. I can't remember the Celeste/Arrow twins but we had some Dodge Stealth/Mitsubishi GTO (3000GT) around.
There were also a couple Eagle Talon/Mitsubishi Eclipse.



Duc,
You are absolutely correct, I could do that. I had assumed that it had been a Mitsubishi, but, to be honest, I spent about 3X as long cleaning the crap out of the background and figured I would get it close. If anyone was really interested, they could research it ... and you did. There is usually absolutely dead silence when anyone posts a new piece on here, so it is tough to tell whether anyone really cares at times. Thanks for showing an interest.
Tom West

#10111 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 18:02

There is usually absolutely dead silence when anyone posts a new piece on here, so it is tough to tell whether anyone really cares at times. Thanks for showing an interest.
Tom West

I understand how you feel, Tom. I care, for one, but often there is a landslide of new stuff, and it is difficult to indicate an interest in everything! Sometimes I think that the sheer success of this thread is its own worst enemy. Believe me, I open up every thumbnail, enlarge that image and usually have a good nose around, but a) some images, with the best will in the world, do not merit a comment, and b) it takes time and energy that I am short of at the moment to add more than a sentence to those that do merit comment! You, werks and macaron, plus others, are the powerhhouse of the thread, and if you sometimes feel ignored, it is simply the volume of cutaways that sometimes slows response. Thank you.

#10112 TWest

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 18:11

I understand how you feel, Tom. I care, for one, but often there is a landslide of new stuff, and it is difficult to indicate an interest in everything! Sometimes I think that the sheer success of this thread is its own worst enemy. Believe me, I open up every thumbnail, enlarge that image and usually have a good nose around, but a) some images, with the best will in the world, do not merit a comment, and b) it takes time and energy that I am short of at the moment to add more than a sentence to those that do merit comment! You, werks and macaron, plus others, are the powerhhouse of the thread, and if you sometimes feel ignored, it is simply the volume of cutaways that sometimes slows response. Thank you.



Tony,
Thanks for that comment, but I like to think that adding new material is a recognition of my attitude for everyone's addition to my collection. I try to do a lot of cleanup on all of these things before I post, and I won't do a lot of research besides. I will leave that to others, and appreciate that. If you want archival material, I am not the one to look for ... but you should get a fairly decent visual.
I treat it like my photography. My memory is on the negative (in that file). Any peripheral information is from memory; I am not going to research things beyond what I can do to give a hopefully decent rendition of the photo. I will also say that I really appreciate Embers and his histories that is added. in the case of much of my original material, I have the magazine or a scan of the magazine, so could actually add a bit to the information if the illustration is not too trashed from the original form. On those Haynes Covers, all I have is what you see. I wrote the name of the book on the bottom of the page, and that is it. i know that this stuff is easy to find, so will let that part to someone with the interest. i am doing all of this for the artwork, not the automotive history, which is a bit deeper than I chose to dig.
Actually, I have been feeling bad about going for stretches between posts, and I certainly have a backlog of base material to build from here.
Tom West

#10113 werks prototype

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 20:05

If anyone was really interested, they could research it ... and you did. There is usually absolutely dead silence when anyone posts a new piece on here, so it is tough to tell whether anyone really cares at times. Thanks for showing an interest.
Tom West


I definitely think that you can take it for granted, Tom, that all your efforts are appreciated. Scrutinized, and still turning up surprises, after all this time. :up:

Since we are doing introspection, I confess, I am actually getting more than a little self-conscious about posting too much at once. And for two reasons. 1. It is just starting to feel rude to swamp the thread, especially after someone has just posted something new. And 2. As, Tony, touched on, the numbing effect that too much 'stuff' can have.

(Having said that, it can then be a real joy to trawl back, and upon discovering a gem, think to yourself, how on earth did I miss that).

Anyway, whatever the best approach is. At least this material is 'all in one place', has been documented thoroughly (By Ibsen) and is operating as an encyclopedic resource, complemented and to a certain extent made authentic by the participation of the main protagonists, the artists, of which you are one, Tom.


#10114 werks prototype

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 20:14

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Porsche 'Super' 90 engine. 1960. Artist, unknown. (Possibly Max Millar.)

#10115 TWest

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 23:28

I definitely think that you can take it for granted, Tom, that all your efforts are appreciated. Scrutinized, and still turning up surprises, after all this time. :up:

Since we are doing introspection, I confess, I am actually getting more than a little self-conscious about posting too much at once. And for two reasons. 1. It is just starting to feel rude to swamp the thread, especially after someone has just posted something new. And 2. As, Tony, touched on, the numbing effect that too much 'stuff' can have.

(Having said that, it can then be a real joy to trawl back, and upon discovering a gem, think to yourself, how on earth did I miss that).

Anyway, whatever the best approach is. At least this material is 'all in one place', has been documented thoroughly (By Ibsen) and is operating as an encyclopedic resource, complemented and to a certain extent made authentic by the participation of the main protagonists, the artists, of which you are one, Tom.


Well, to be honest with you, you were one of the guys who I was trying to at least recognize by adding things on occasion. I love seeing the selection of your work, and have hoped to allude to my appreciation in my earlier posts. I don't need a bunch of pats of the head for each time I scan a piece and send it out. Not quite that needy here. But, it does seem like there is no feedback on any of this stuff after a while. Just have to presume that a bit of recognition from those who have really gotten into this work should be enough. To be considered along with some of you guys is an honor, so I will hang with that for my "reward."
That, and the wild expansion of my collection of cutaways. I am not even sure how many new pieces I could claim to have from this group .. which has also lead me to many new areas for the Aircraft collection, as well.
I would never say that too much is too much ...
As one might say of sex and pizza, Even if it is not the best on occasion, there is no such thing as bad sex/pizza. Could pretty much add cutways in there, too.
Keep it coming ... going to send out a couple of more this evening myself ...
Thanks for the response.
Tom West

#10116 fnqvmuch

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 23:43

Posted Image
Porsche 'Super' 90 engine. 1960. Artist, unknown. (Possibly Max Millar.)

thank you again werks, and while at it - thank ibsen always and of course thanks to every contributor for all of this.
having said that - one more thing that makes this my favourite part of the internets is the comparative rarity of that ... anticlimax ... one experiences when a thread one follows has a new post; but then upon opening it- it's just another pro-forma two word response and signature/avatar space-wasting on a page of same already.
that silence might just be an audience listening
steven


#10117 simplebrother

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 01:27

thank you again werks, and while at it - thank ibsen always and of course thanks to every contributor for all of this.
having said that - one more thing that makes this my favourite part of the internets is the comparative rarity of that ... anticlimax ... one experiences when a thread one follows has a new post; but then upon opening it- it's just another pro-forma two word response and signature/avatar space-wasting on a page of same already.
that silence might just be an audience listening
steven


It is good to see all the various thank yous expressed, and I obviously concur. I also understand that a consistent lack of response may raise questions about value, appreciation, etc., but the other side of the coin is that it is hard to say anything when you are drinking from a fire hose. This site is absolutely fantastic because of all the material presented, both visual and verbal. Having a functional index makes all of the data accessible for those who haven't yet delved into its depths. Gentlemen, please don't slow down posts because we are so impolite as to seem unappreciative, and don't slow down posts because you feel you are posting too much, or because the subject matter is different, or ??? High resolution is wonderful when available, but everything is greatly appreciated.

one last artist/illustrator who works in different arenas is Tim Hall (not that he is the last of that group, just the last I will mention)...
His works are mostly of aviation, like the monochromatic LearAvia Lear Fan 2100
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or the color Piaggio Aero P180 Avanti II
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or the color Gulfstream G450
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this low resolution Audi 90 Quatro IMSA was originally believed to a Tim Hall drawing because that is what the signature appears to say, but Tim has clarified that he has not worked in the automobile arena - thus the artist/illustrator of this item is unknown - thanks for correcting a misconception, Tim
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Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 10 October 2011 - 19:28.


#10118 TWest

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 03:47

OK, here are the illustrations that I promised earlier. We start with a trio of Terry Davey illustrations from the covers of Haynes manuals, and then a piece from Air International ... aircraft, of course.
The first will be the economy Plymouth Champ of 1980. This would be a Mitsubishi product that was basically a more Plain Jane version of the Dodge Colt. This was actually a pretty zippy little car at the time, was considering a Colt, as it was probably the best handling car available in the class here in the US.


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#10119 TWest

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 03:52

Our second piece is another Plymouth economy car our of the Chrysler move to FWD cars in all classes. This one is the 1979 Plymouth Horizon, sister car to the Dodge Omni. Dodge had another car that was based on the same platform that was a little sportier, known as the Omni 024, later as the Charger. Not quite the base for a Dukes of Hazzard, but the Charger ended up being one of the best Funny Car bodies available in its time. The Horizon illustration is by Terry Davey from the cover of the Haynes Manual on the car ... just for the record.
These things tonight are based on either really bad copies that I have, and also pretty weak stats that would have been used on the covers themselves. I have punched up a bit, just to give the cars some shapes, but there could be a hell of a lot more put in.
Tom West

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#10120 TWest

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 03:55

Our last car for the evening is the 1980 Pontiac Trans Am. Sister to the Chevrolet Camaro, this was one of the better of the Pony Cars, although they were all burdened with a huge list of emission controls at the time, so power was rather image-based rather than real performance based on these cars. Again, this Trans Am is a Terry Davey cover for Haynes Manuals.
Also, it is a pretty weak copy that I am building on here.
Tom West

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#10121 TWest

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 04:00

My last submission for the evening is moving to our winged category, with the Embraer Phenom 100 Executive aircraft by Mike Badrocke. This was published in the January 2008 issue of Air International magazine. I just picked the first in the sequence of the aircraft in the file, in this case being a two page set of scans that needed to be assembled. These Badrocke pieces are really cool, in my opinion.
Enjoy, and have a great rest of your weekend.
Tom West

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#10122 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 08:41

My memory is on the negative (in that file). Any peripheral information is from memory; I am not going to research things beyond what I can do to give a hopefully decent rendition of the photo. ...I am doing all of this for the artwork, not the automotive history, which is a bit deeper than I chose to dig.

Exactly how I feel, Tom. My memories of a car that I illustrated 35 years ago tend to be of the human-interest type, or dramas going to, or returning from, the workshop/circuit/museum! I have the reference photos, but not necessarily all the technical details in my head, and I didn't take notes! I drew what I saw, and I might remember some stuff, but not with much confidence, and for me it is the illustration that is paramount.

I confess, I am actually getting more than a little self-conscious about posting too much at once. And for two reasons. 1. It is just starting to feel rude to swamp the thread...

Well, me too, werks - and it's probably worse when it is your own work! This is not a me,me,me thread, it is us... Don't stop.

#10123 CVA

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:19

Goliath 1955 by Thierry,a new artist in the forum
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#10124 werks prototype

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:16

My memories of a car that I illustrated 35 years ago tend to be of the human-interest type, or dramas going to, or returning from, the workshop/circuit/museum! I have the reference photos, but not necessarily all the technical details in my head, and I didn't take notes! I drew what I saw, and I might remember some stuff, but not with much confidence, and for me it is the illustration that is paramount.


That refers, again, to the 'adventure' aspect, that I think fans of the art find so intriguing. The notion of there having been a 'mission' (for want of a better term) behind many of the works that we see.



#10125 werks prototype

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:17

Posted Image
Ariel Sports Arrow. Artist, Lawrence Watts.

#10126 werks prototype

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:17

Posted Image
Léon Bollée tricar. 1896. Artist, Max Millar.

#10127 werks prototype

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:23

Posted Image
Crossley. 1933. Artist, Max Millar.
There is potential for this version having a different engine/gearbox to that originally posted on page 124. Either that, or it is 'optical aberration' by scanner.

#10128 Manfred Cubenoggin

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:28

A note principally for...but not strictly limited to...the following:

werks prototype
CVA
simplebrother
Tony Matthews
ibsenop
Tom West
macoran

Gents: I can assure that your efforts in sussing out and posting cutaway images is greatly appreciated by this TNFer. In checking just now, my 'Tony Matthews et al' folder holds fully 2679 images commanding 2.00 Gb's worth of HD space. Please do not interpret little or no responsive posts as apathy. I look forward to each and every image. Indeed, I've felt like posting some myself but have been hesitant as they are of a military/weapons variety and feel that they may not be well received or even panned.

Please do keep up the great work! :up:

#10129 Tim Murray

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:37

Please do not interpret little or no responsive posts as apathy.

Hear hear.

#10130 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:54

Indeed, I've felt like posting some myself but have been hesitant as they are of a military/weapons variety and feel that they may not be well received or even panned.

Definitely not panned by me, but well received, Manfred! In the context of Technical Illustration the end use, it seems to me, of the subject, doesn't really matter. After all, most of the aircraft, and generally the most interesting, are fighters or bombers. Don't forget, my very earliest 'practice' cutaways were of artillary shells!

#10131 TWest

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 18:07

Definitely not panned by me, but well received, Manfred! In the context of Technical Illustration the end use, it seems to me, of the subject, doesn't really matter. After all, most of the aircraft, and generally the most interesting, are fighters or bombers. Don't forget, my very earliest 'practice' cutaways were of artillary shells!


Manfred, I would agree with Tony here. We are generally on this board to see and improve our knowledge of the art, not just specifically about cars. I think that you will notice a shift to widen the subject matter in Cutawayland (not AutoCutawayland), so all are welcomed. I tend to put that sort of thing in with the Aviation work, just because of the military nature, but it all works for me. Thanks for whatever one might include here in the form of a cutaway.
I was not aware of Tony's work on Artillery shells before he exploded on the Automotive world and became such a booming success. Certainly not a Flash in the pan, although more targeted in his later efforts, and certainly had his subjects well within range of his artillery.

Sorry, that started out to be much funnier, but I ran out of suitable terminology too quickly. Must keep the powder dry next time 'round.
Tom West

#10132 simplebrother

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 05:02

The first drawing is one that I thought had already been posted, but I cannot find it...
1931 Daimler Double Six by Paul Shakespeare
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the second I also thought had been posted but I cannot find it either...
1934 Packard Twin Six, by Inkwell Studios
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the last drawing is from the comic Eagle Times, May 8, 1953 - A Royal Car, by L Ashwell Wood
Posted Image

Peter

#10133 Flightlinearts

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 06:24

It is good to see all the various thank yous expressed, and I obviously concur. I also understand that a consistent lack of response may raise questions about value, appreciation, etc., but the other side of the coin is that it is hard to say anything when you are drinking from a fire hose. This site is absolutely fantastic because of all the material presented, both visual and verbal. Having a functional index makes all of the data accessible for those who haven't yet delved into its depths. Gentlemen, please don't slow down posts because we are so impolite as to seem unappreciative, and don't slow down posts because you feel you are posting too much, or because the subject matter is different, or ??? High resolution is wonderful when available, but everything is greatly appreciated.

one last artist/illustrator who works in different arenas is Tim Hall (not that he is the last of that group, just the last I will mention)...
His works are mostly of aviation, like the monochromatic LearAvia Lear Fan 2100
Posted Image

or the color Piaggio Aero P180 Avanti II
Posted Image

or the color Gulfstream G450
Posted Image

but he also works in the automotive industry, as shown by this Audi 90 Quatro IMSA (sorry - this is the best resolution I have)
Posted Image
Thanks for the comments, however I have never produced any automotive drawings. I have worked on different subject matter to aircraft and engines. Including Nuclear Power Stations for Nuclear Engineering and Railway locomotives and rolling stock for Railway Gazette.
One of the blokes who should be mentioned is Vic Berris. He also produced cutaways of aircraft for Flight and Cruise ships and Maritime Diesel Engines for Motorship. You don't get much bigger than a ship's diesel engine.

Tim
Peter



#10134 CVA

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:10

Allard k1,artist unknown
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#10135 NPP

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:56

... A Peugeot 504 from 1980, so not exactly a majorly interesting subject, but it is French (thus my point), and one of those you aren't going to see very often in this form.
Enjoy.
Tom West
Posted Image


thanks for this, Tom. Coincidentally, I cycled past a well-preserved, golden, specimen of these this very morning. I always wanted one like that when I was a student but couldn't find one and got an old Audi 100 Diesel instead, which was (another French connection) shortly afterwards stolen in Aix-en-Provence. Nowadays, I cannot quite comprehend why I once believed large rusty diesel barges were somehow 'cool'

#10136 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 10:31

Nowadays, I cannot quite comprehend why I once believed large rusty diesel barges were somehow 'cool'

Walking around with your arse hanging over your trouser waistband is seen as cool at the moment, I await this trend becoming incomprehensible ASAP.

#10137 Duc-Man

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 10:48

Walking around with your arse hanging over your trouser waistband is seen as cool at the moment, I await this trend becoming incomprehensible ASAP.


This trend could be worn out realy fast.
Every pub should put up a sign at the door:
NO PANTS OVER
THE ARSE
- NO SERVICE !!


#10138 trauts

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 14:20

Our second piece is another Plymouth economy car our of the Chrysler move to FWD cars in all classes. This one is the 1979 Plymouth Horizon, sister car to the Dodge Omni. Dodge had another car that was based on the same platform that was a little sportier, known as the Omni 024, later as the Charger. Not quite the base for a Dukes of Hazzard, but the Charger ended up being one of the best Funny Car bodies available in its time. The Horizon illustration is by Terry Davey from the cover of the Haynes Manual on the car ... just for the record.
These things tonight are based on either really bad copies that I have, and also pretty weak stats that would have been used on the covers themselves. I have punched up a bit, just to give the cars some shapes, but there could be a hell of a lot more put in.
Tom West

Posted Image

Hi Tom,
The Plymouth Horizon started life as a joint design exercise between Chrysler France(Simca) and Chrysler UK (Talbot). If I remember correctly it was based on a short Chrysler/Simca - Alpine/Solara.
Re your thoughts on complacency to this website, I thoroughly enjoy the website and have total admiration for the artwork posted and the research and effort taken to make the postings, also of course Ibsens index.
I started to take an interest in cutaway artwork when a very young reader of the Eagle comic. I have completed some twenty cutaway illustrations but with the luxury of 90% being carried out in my own time as an exercise from the day to day work. any pressures being self imposed, non of the serious pressure most of you guys had to endure from publishers.
I am a member of the Guild of Motoring Artists and one of the members has recently discovered this website and is very excited/impressed by the content. Basically Tom your time along with others is well appreciated.
Regards,
Stuart

#10139 alansart

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 14:37

The Plymouth Horizon started life as a joint design exercise between Chrysler France(Simca) and Chrysler UK (Talbot). If I remember correctly it was based on a short Chrysler/Simca - Alpine/Solara.


It looks very similar to the Talbot Horizon that was sold in the UK in the early 80's. I had one as a Hertz rental car for a few days and it was possibly the worst piece of junk I've ever driven. I had to go to Peterborough to renew more passport and drove up the A1 in in ice and snow. As soon as it hit anything slippery it would crab up the road and it was almost impossible to keep the backend in line. Every time it went over a bump, the hatchback would pop open so I ended up taping the bloody thing down. I went to take it back and as I started it the timing chain/belt? broke. The last straw was when Hertz sent a truck to pick it up the winch flattened the battery on the truck and my neighbour had to jump start it from his car....


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#10140 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 16:01

Renting cars is a good way of finding out what they are like before making an expensive mistake! I used to think that all cars were probably OK, that there were no absolute dogs anymore, and that motoring magazines were probably just going through the motions, so to speak, with 0-60, MPG and boot space. Then I went to Europe a few times and rented a variety of small hatchbacks...

#10141 alansart

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 16:18

Then I went to Europe a few times and rented a variety of small hatchbacks...


...reminds me of a Nissan Micra in Tenerife. We were at the top of one of the developments built in the hillside. It had a road running up the side which required a good 100ft run up and flat out in first to get to the top. It wouldn't make it with the wife and kids onboard, not that they wanted to join in after the first attempt. The clutch was pretty knackered by the time it was returned to El Garage :)

Anyway back to cutaways. I've been catching up with this thread and read the comments regarding military stuff. Bring it on as far as I'm concerned. I did quite a bit when I was at Hunting Engineering but as most of it was Classified and covered by the Official Secrets Act it's all still in my head :rolleyes:

Edited by alansart, 10 October 2011 - 16:18.


#10142 TWest

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 16:54

Hi Tom,
The Plymouth Horizon started life as a joint design exercise between Chrysler France(Simca) and Chrysler UK (Talbot). If I remember correctly it was based on a short Chrysler/Simca - Alpine/Solara.
Re your thoughts on complacency to this website, I thoroughly enjoy the website and have total admiration for the artwork posted and the research and effort taken to make the postings, also of course Ibsens index.
I started to take an interest in cutaway artwork when a very young reader of the Eagle comic. I have completed some twenty cutaway illustrations but with the luxury of 90% being carried out in my own time as an exercise from the day to day work. any pressures being self imposed, non of the serious pressure most of you guys had to endure from publishers.
I am a member of the Guild of Motoring Artists and one of the members has recently discovered this website and is very excited/impressed by the content. Basically Tom your time along with others is well appreciated.
Regards,
Stuart



Stuart,
You are completely correct about the Simca-Talbot roots for this car. I have the cover of one of those in here somewhere, so it will show up at some point. Appreciate the correction .. which may be needed on occasion, as you indicate.
Appreciate the thoughts, speaking for myself and, I am sure, the others who tend to be fanatic enough to pull this stuff out of the weeds on occasion. Somehow, sharing this stuff makes it seem like more of a social activity, rather than just making one a recluse in the corner of the basement ...
Thanks to all of you for making this a socially acceptable behavior.
How about posting a few of your works here, Stuart? There is such a variety of material that any cutaway effort is going to be welcomed, especially from a "new" artist.
Will look forward to seeing your work.
Thank-you.
Tom West

#10143 TWest

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 17:03

It looks very similar to the Talbot Horizon that was sold in the UK in the early 80's. I had one as a Hertz rental car for a few days and it was possibly the worst piece of junk I've ever driven. I had to go to Peterborough to renew more passport and drove up the A1 in in ice and snow. As soon as it hit anything slippery it would crab up the road and it was almost impossible to keep the backend in line. Every time it went over a bump, the hatchback would pop open so I ended up taping the bloody thing down. I went to take it back and as I started it the timing chain/belt? broke. The last straw was when Hertz sent a truck to pick it up the winch flattened the battery on the truck and my neighbour had to jump start it from his car....



Alan,
I am not sure whether this is a worse advert for Talbot or for Hertz. I have had a couple of experiences with Hertz, which is why I now regularly use National ...
One of my favorites was involving my first trip to the Lionel collector's convention in Pennsylvania. We flew to Lancaster, picked up our Mustang rental, and headed up the road, with this thing throwing a faint touch of smoke, and having a fairly regular knock coming from under the hood. We drove up there, with both increasing in intensity and felt lucky to have arrived. Stayed somewhere in the area, and came back the next evening. I was watching the rearview mirror the whole way, as the smoke was really getting thick, and it sounded like we were strafing oncoming traffic after a while. The car started to slow, wheezing into the Hertz return center in a cloud of black smoke, and a final wheeze as I shut it off.
Mind you, this was not one of those drag racing trips where there used to be regular burnout and donut contests in the parking lots with the press rental cars ... we just drove up and back very tamely, if with great smell and noise. That was one of my last ventures with Hertz.
I don't think the Horizon was exactly known as one of the premier cars of its time here, either, by the way.
I think that sidebars like this is what makes some of these Haynes subjects interesting. This isn't exactly a Formula 1 or a Supercar, but the normal production car that most folks had for their choices in automotive art. Sad that such vehicles became part of the disposable automotive world.
Tom West

#10144 TWest

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 17:06

I've been catching up with this thread and read the comments regarding military stuff. Bring it on as far as I'm concerned. I did quite a bit when I was at Hunting Engineering but as most of it was Classified and covered by the Official Secrets Act it's all still in my head :rolleyes:



Maybe hypnotism or alcohol might help bring those back ... or make you forget them completely ... not quite sure which. Am sure someone here might be willing to help with the second, but you are on your own with your therapist on the first.
Tom West

#10145 werks prototype

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 17:17

I am a member of the Guild of Motoring Artists and one of the members has recently discovered this website and is very excited/impressed by the content.
Regards,
Stuart


That wouldn't be Barry Rowe, by any chance?

#10146 alansart

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 17:29

Maybe hypnotism or alcohol might help bring those back ... or make you forget them completely ... not quite sure which. Am sure someone here might be willing to help with the second, but you are on your own with your therapist on the first.
Tom West


I've not been to a Hypnotist but me and alcohol are good friends, although that tends to make me forget.

I hazard a guess a lot of the things I worked on are no longer classified and have either been stored in some vault somewhere or have been destroyed. It's a pity really as there were some nice drawings even though the product was at times a bit nasty.


#10147 simplebrother

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 19:21

Thanks for the comments, however I have never produced any automotive drawings. I have worked on different subject matter to aircraft and engines. Including Nuclear Power Stations for Nuclear Engineering and Railway locomotives and rolling stock for Railway Gazette.
One of the blokes who should be mentioned is Vic Berris. He also produced cutaways of aircraft for Flight and Cruise ships and Maritime Diesel Engines for Motorship. You don't get much bigger than a ship's diesel engine.

Tim
-----------------------------------

My apologies - thanks for the clarification. The Audi has a signature that looked like "Tim Hall" but the resolution isn't good and I obviously jumped to an erroneous conclusion (I will correct the posting). Thanks for the reminder about the works of Vic Berris - we have seen many of his automotive drawings, but I have only seen two of his aviation drawings (one being very small scale) and none of his other works. I will post the aviation ones that I have shortly, but if you would like to share any maritime images that would be great.

I did neglect to include your nuclear drawings (oops) - the two of which I am aware are below, as is one of the jet engines you have done. We would love to see your railway drawings or anything else that you would care to share. Thanks again for your comments and clarification.

#85 of the World Reactor series -DWR-PWR-1300-Isar2 near Landshut, Germany by Tim Hall
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#90 of the World Reactor series - Vandellos2 near Tarragona, Spain by Tim Hall
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Rolls Royce Trent 500 turbofan by Tim Hall
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Peter


#10148 simplebrother

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 20:13

Tim suggested we remember the extra-automotive works by Vic Berris... while I have nearly 100 of his drawings, I do not have any of the maritime ones that he mentioned and only two aviation ones, one of which is small. Any other examples of his works outside the automotive industry would be a welcome addition to the database (hint, hint - no, actually I think it is more of a blatant request).

Here is Northrup's F5a Freedom Fighter by Vic Berris - sorry about the small size - it is all that I have
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And this is Lockheed's L2000, a SST prototype from about 1966 - also by Vic Berris
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Peter

#10149 TWest

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 21:03

Since we are varying our work bit here, this is a color piece by Mike Badrocke that was published in an Air International Special supplement on the Eurofighter Typhoon in 2009. These advertising supplements might be a bit skewed toward how magnificent a particular product might be, but it did give history and detail that was quite detailed. Amazing how much cleanup I had to do to get this illustration in this shape, as it looked like a lot of the edges of the illustration had been chipped in the production, so edges were very ratty in places for some reason. Does not work that way for the regular publication, I have found.
Tom West


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#10150 TWest

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 21:18

This is another aircraft illustration of one of England's illustrious V-Bombers out of the 50s and 60s. These were a manned approach to the US deterrent of ICBMs, and were a major part of the West's holding of the Iron Curtain at the time. The Handley Page Victor B1 illustration was first used in Flight's October 30, 1959 issue. I have taken it from the July, 2009 issue of Aeroplane. There is no signature or attribution for the illustration, in the new or the original usage, which was the first illustration done on the Production version of the HP80. It appears that the original illustration actually appeared as a three-page gatefold layout, which had to be pretty impressive to see this piece when it was published.
Tom West



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