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#10201 simplebrother

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 01:30

I have four to share this evening...
The first is a 1984 Ferrari 512bbi by Jerry Banks.
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The second is another from Eagle comics - this time The Last of London's Tram and Trolley Buses by L Ashwell Wood from the September 9, 1961 edition.
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The third is another from Armstrong's How Industry Operates series, How a Modern Bakery Operates from the March 3, 1948 edition of The Saturday Evening Post.
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The last is number 14 in the World's Reactor series, RWE-1, a boiling water reactor planned (but not built) for Dettingen, Germany. The drawing is by Tony Lofthouse.
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Peter

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#10202 TWest

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:25

Hello, Folks,
Thought I would take a shot at a scan that I took from the November, 1975 issue of the Italian Aerei magazine. I think that I have only the one issue, and would not mind finding a few of them somewhere to try a few more scans, as these are some fairly cool pieces. The subject for the one that I am going to post to you this evening is by Alfonso Rigato on the Republic RF84F Thunderflash, which was titled Thundeflash in the original copy on the illustration.
I didn't attempt to proof the copy in Italian for the Legend, so you will have to take a shot at that for yourself. The printing looked pretty messy, as if someone had thrown a handful of dirt onto the printing plate, as there was a lot o dust and dirt all over the print. Tried to clean it up a bit, but it is nowhere near perfect ... better, however.
Cool subject, i have to think.
Tom West


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#10203 werks prototype

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 18:00

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BSA Super Rocket. 646cc. 1960. Artist, Tony Lofthouse.

#10204 werks prototype

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 18:01

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Rochdale Olympic. Artist, Tony Lofthouse.

#10205 werks prototype

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 18:01

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Ginetta G15. Prototype. Artist, Bill Bennett.

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Ginetta G15. Production. Artist, APT.

#10206 TWest

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 19:05

I have another fighter aircraft illustration from that single issue of Aerei in my collection, November, 1975. This is also form Alfonso Rigato on the Soviet era Sukhoi Su-9, known under the melodious NATO moniker Fishpot-B. I don't think the Russian sense of humor was probably appreciative of these names, or they would have had their own codes for our aircraft. A Hunter might have been the Armpit-A, a Phantom could have been a Dogbum-C, etc.
Just a thought.
Tom West


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#10207 TWest

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 19:08

Another Sukhoi Fighter, this one from Mike Badrocke in the March, 2008 issue of Air International, this is the swing-wing Sukhoi Su-22M4, codenamed Fitter-K. It appears that this version first flew in 1976.
Tom West


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#10208 werks prototype

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 16:08

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Renault. 1956. Artist, Vic Berris.

#10209 werks prototype

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 16:08

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Lotus Elite Sports Coupe. 1958. Unitary construction diagram. Artist, unknown.

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Lotus Elise Sport. Artist, Richard Burgess.

#10210 werks prototype

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 16:11

It's not good to quote yourself, but in the name of tying up loose ends.

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Aston Martin DB2. Artist as yet unknown!


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Aston Martin DB2 Saloon. Artist, R.E.Poulton.

#10211 ibsenop

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 19:09

Mclaren MP4-2C by Jean-Jacques François.

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#10212 Tony Matthews

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 23:55

Mclaren MP4-2C by Jean-Jacques François.

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The impossible reflections strike again!

#10213 cheapracer

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 06:07

Here's something to get your teeth into, a Dental Unit by Len Huxter


Wow, I drooled over that one ...


#10214 Tony Matthews

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:35

Less of your lip...

#10215 Karabas

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 11:48

Grumman F6F-5 "Hellcat" by R.G. Smith, from FLYING mag.

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#10216 Karabas

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 17:46

DC-10 Cutaway

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Unfortunately, the the signature is very blurred. Maybe someone will be able to identify the author?

Edited by Karabas, 23 October 2011 - 17:57.


#10217 Karabas

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 17:50

Douglas DC-8F Jet Trader. No sign :confused:

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#10218 Karabas

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 17:55

Typhoon cutaway
Signed:"Flight International Artists. Sutton 2002"

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#10219 ibsenop

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 19:06

Alfa Romeo 33TT3 by Giorgio Piola (1971 prototype)
from Auto Sprint 32/1971.

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#10220 werks prototype

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 20:51

E.R.A. Bits 'n' bobs. Artist, unknown.

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#10221 werks prototype

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 20:51

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Citroen .1934. Artist, H.C.Lovell.

#10222 simplebrother

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 07:10

DC-10 Cutaway

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Unfortunately, the the signature is very blurred. Maybe someone will be able to identify the author?


I presume it is David G Beigle - Below is another of his, the Douglas A3D2T-Skywarrior, a carrier-based jet bomber sometimes used as a trainer that first flew in 1949. This drawing has his full name, but not a signature, per se.
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Peter

#10223 simplebrother

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 23:04

This evening I have three to add...
First is How a Steamship Operates from Armstrong's How Industry Operates series by Frank Soltesz. It appeared in the 11/22/1947 edition of the Saturday Evening Post.
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Second is the Caorso Enel IV boiling water reactor from Piacenza, Italy. Drawn by Tony Lofthouse, it is number 61 is the 105 World's Reactors series.
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Third is an Allard J2x, drawn by Hubert Redmill. It appeared in the 6/13/1952 edition of Eagle Comics.
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Peter

#10224 ibsenop

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 22:09

Arrows A3 by Sergio Baratto

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#10225 werks prototype

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 23:15

Arrows A3 by Sergio Baratto
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What a wonderful find, Ibsen. :up:

#10226 werks prototype

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 23:20

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Bantam Super D7. (In later D14-4 form). Artist, L.A.Walton.

#10227 werks prototype

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 23:20

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Rolls-Royce 'Bedstead'. Artist, unknown.

#10228 helioseism

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 01:45

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Rolls-Royce 'Bedstead'. Artist, unknown.


OK, what the heck is the story behind this thing?

#10229 tbolt

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 07:48

OK, what the heck is the story behind this thing?


It looks like the prototype for the Harrier

#10230 Tim Murray

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:25

In the 1950s Rolls-Royce at Derby and the engine division of the Bristol Aeroplane Company were both working on VTOL projects. The RR 'Flying Bedstead' as shown in the cutaway is described here:

http://en.wikipedia....t_Measuring_Rig

The developments at Bristol were entirely separate, and resulted in the Pegasus engine as used in the Harrier:

http://en.wikipedia....s-Royce_Pegasus

The two companies merged in 1966, so the engine was known from then on as the Rolls-Royce Pegasus.

Edited by Tim Murray, 26 October 2011 - 08:26.


#10231 werks prototype

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:29

OK, what the heck is the story behind this thing?

For me, one of the highlights of many a school trip to the London Science Museum. It looked impossible to my eyes then.

http://www.sciencemu...8/10306993.aspx




#10232 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 10:40

This evening I have three to add...
First is How a Steamship Operates from Armstrong's How Industry Operates series by Frank Soltesz. It appeared in the 11/22/1947 edition of the Saturday Evening Post.
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Isn't that nice! I love the kids diving off the quay and the shoals of fish - and it shows you what goes on inside. What more could you ask for?

#10233 helioseism

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 13:38

In the 1950s Rolls-Royce at Derby and the engine division of the Bristol Aeroplane Company were both working on VTOL projects. The RR 'Flying Bedstead' as shown in the cutaway is described here:

http://en.wikipedia....t_Measuring_Rig

The developments at Bristol were entirely separate, and resulted in the Pegasus engine as used in the Harrier:

http://en.wikipedia....s-Royce_Pegasus

The two companies merged in 1966, so the engine was known from then on as the Rolls-Royce Pegasus.


Thanks, Tim and Werks. I'm amazed no one was hurt testing it.

#10234 ibsenop

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 23:16

Lotus 80 by Sergio Baratto

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#10235 Tony Matthews

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 23:29

Lotus 80 by Sergio Baratto

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That has a nice feel about it. I did several exploded Indycars, all B&W line - the only colour exploded illustrations I did were a couple of Aurora AFX slot cars! Still cars, though...

#10236 simplebrother

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 23:43

The first for this evening needs no additional comment - it is Robert Roux's Jaguar XK 120 C from 1951-53.
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The second is the Hartlepool Nuclear Power Station, an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) near the seaside resort of Seaton Carew (Great Britain). This reactor, still in operation, was the first in England to be built near an urban area - it provides power for 1.5 million homes. Scheduled to be operational into 2019, it is also one of 10 sites approved for new reactors (though, of course, there is some opposition to nuclear power in general). This illustration is the 47th in the World Reactor series and was drawn by P.F. Sumpter and T. Trend.
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The third tonight is Jeremy Gower's rendition of the 1973 Datsun 240Z, again needing no additional commentary.
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The last item is from the 08/04/1950 edition of Eagle comics. Captioned A Typical British Flying Boat and drawn by L. Ashwell Wood, it illustrates the Short Bros. Solent Class aircraft, which could carry 38 passengers 2,000 miles at a top speed in excess of 210mph.
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Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 26 October 2011 - 23:47.


#10237 Tony Matthews

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 00:04

The second is the Hartlepool Nuclear Power Station, an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) near the seaside resort of Seaton Carew (Great Britain). This reactor, still in operation, was the first in England to be built near an urban area - it provides power for 1.5 million homes. Scheduled to be operational into 2019, it is also one of 10 sites approved for new reactors (though, of course, there is some opposition to nuclear power in general). This illustration is the 47th in the World Reactor series and was drawn by P.F. Sumpter and T. Trend.
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I suppose the turbines were considered of secondary interest, as this concentrates on the reactor and support system. It took me some time to locate the turbine hall - item 76!

Many thanks Peter, a wide variety of subjects!

#10238 werks prototype

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 16:48

Lotus 80 by Sergio Baratto
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Is it fair to say that this, as a design, ultimately, managed to confuse even the original design team?

(And from the reports that I have read, would probably still give the average marine biologist a run for their money today, at least where an accurate model of coupled oscillation in pitch and heave is required)

Wonderful stuff, Ibsen. :up:

#10239 werks prototype

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 16:49

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Riley. 1932. Artist, Max Millar.

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#10240 werks prototype

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 16:52

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1914 Mercedes. Clutch assembly, differential assembly and rear brake assembly. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

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Mercedes-Benz Type W.25B. Cylinder construction (Braking) and independent rear suspension detail. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

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1937 Mercedes-Benz Type W.125. de Dion tube. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

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Mercedes-Benz Type W.163. Detail, de Dion type rear with combined back axle and gearbox. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

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Mercedes-Benz Type W.163. Front suspension detail. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

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Mercedes-Benz, Type W.196. Rear-axle layout. Artist, L.C.Cresswell.

#10241 harerton

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 22:55

Is it fair to say that this, as a design, ultimately, managed to confuse even the original design team?

(And from the reports that I have read, would probably still give the average marine biologist a run for their money today, at least where an accurate model of coupled oscillation in pitch and heave is required)

Wonderful stuff, Ibsen. :up:


Lotus was trying to maximize the ground effect with this car in 1979 but the project was a failure. So Lotus had to return to the Lotus 79, which wasn't able to repeat its success from 1978.





#10242 Flightlinearts

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 07:17

Hello Peter, I am intrigued that you have so many Nuclear Engineering cutaways. Did you work in the Nuclear Industry? Your images are certainly a good cross section and I enjoy seeing them. I was lucky enough to have know Tony Lofthouse, John Way and Dick Ellis, who worked on the power station drawings at the same time as I did. All the above and I think also Max Millar (have to check on this) produced their cutaways in two point perspective. This kept the verticals parallel so making them parallel with the side of the poster. Most buildings look better in two point. I will try and get the two railway drawings I produced for Railway Gazette scanned.

Tim

The first for this evening needs no additional comment - it is Robert Roux's Jaguar XK 120 C from 1951-53.
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The second is the Hartlepool Nuclear Power Station, an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) near the seaside resort of Seaton Carew (Great Britain). This reactor, still in operation, was the first in England to be built near an urban area - it provides power for 1.5 million homes. Scheduled to be operational into 2019, it is also one of 10 sites approved for new reactors (though, of course, there is some opposition to nuclear power in general). This illustration is the 47th in the World Reactor series and was drawn by P.F. Sumpter and T. Trend.
Posted Image

The third tonight is Jeremy Gower's rendition of the 1973 Datsun 240Z, again needing no additional commentary.
Posted Image

The last item is from the 08/04/1950 edition of Eagle comics. Captioned A Typical British Flying Boat and drawn by L. Ashwell Wood, it illustrates the Short Bros. Solent Class aircraft, which could carry 38 passengers 2,000 miles at a top speed in excess of 210mph.
Posted Image

Peter



#10243 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 10:34

All the above and I think also Max Millar (have to check on this) produced their cutaways in two point perspective. This kept the verticals parallel so making them parallel with the side of the poster. Most buildings look better in two point.

Tim

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That'll be the old 2+1 point perspective then, Tim! :p :)

#10244 simplebrother

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 19:07

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That'll be the old 2+1 point perspective then, Tim! :p :)


Well, Tim - I think Tony got you on the illustration used, but your comments were actually directed, unless I misunderstood, to the artists Lofthouse, Way, and Ellis. Of the 105 drawings currently in the World Reactor series, 25 are by Tony Lofthouse (all 2-point except one), 36 are by John L Way (all 2-point but two - one 3-point and one with the primary being 2-point and details in 3-point), and 4 are by Dick Ellis (half and half 2- and 3-point). Leslie Cresswell also drew 4 of the series, all 2-point (as were yours, but you knew that).

The primary artist in the drawing illustrated was involved in three in the set, interestingly enough all 3-point perspective drawings. In total, 11% of the 105 are or have 3-point perspective used in them - the balance are 2-point. You mentioned Max Millar - I haven't seen any of his nuclear drawings (none in this set, unless unsigned), so I cannot comment, and I haven't paid that kind of attention to his other works.

To your question, I wasn't involved in the nuclear industry, but did stumble on the full series and was intrigued. Originally interested only in the automotive side, I have been vastly broadened, finding the aircraft industry just as intriguing, and really enjoying the works of Leslie Ashwell Wood and Frank Soltesz.

Peter

#10245 simplebrother

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 19:57

For this afternoon we have a Tipo 57 Bugatti from Inkwell Studios - perhaps not the most exotic of the Tipo 57s, but a nice vehicle.
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Next is Frank Soltesz's How a Produce Terminal Operates, from Armstrong's How Industry Operates series, as run in the 11/20/1948 edition of the Saturday Evening Post. My experiences with produce markets is that they are much more hectic than illustrated, but that probably would have appeared too cluttered.
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Following is L Ashwell Wood's perception of Future Gas-Turbocar, as seen in Eagle comics in the '50s. The seating consists of four upholstered captain's chairs, and access for both the luggage and the spare tire is from the vehicle's side, not from front or rear.
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Last is Short Bros. SC7 Sky Van, a favorite of parachutists from the mid-60s through the '80s, as drawn by Arthur Bowbeer. It was also used for short-haul freight runs.
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Peter

#10246 Tony Matthews

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 20:12

Well, Tim - I think Tony got you on the illustration used, but your comments were actually directed, unless I misunderstood, to the artists Lofthouse, Way, and Ellis.

I hope everyone appreciates the tone of my post, it was not malicious, just poking fun at someone making the sort of mistake that I make all the time!

#10247 simplebrother

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 21:19

I hope everyone appreciates the tone of my post, it was not malicious, just poking fun at someone making the sort of mistake that I make all the time!


I can't speak for anyone but myself, but I didn't think that you were being malicious at all - just, as you say, having fun, and you found a wonderful dichotomy to exploit - he was speaking of several artists who, he correctly noted, virtually always drew the nuclear power facilities in two point perspective. However, the illustration depicted in the post to which he specifically responded was by an artist who used three point perspective for all three of the nuclear drawings which he contributed. Touché!

Peter

#10248 Flightlinearts

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 07:49

Hi Peter and Tony, I deserved my telling off on the perspective. I did realise the Hartlepool power station was in 3 point, and was referring to the three illustrators mentioned previously. I am impressed that you have so many of the illustrations. Max did at least one, It was the first nuclear power station in the country, I think at Calderhall. It was in black and white and typical Max with good strong treatment. The other bloke who did at least two was Peter Baker or 'Crusty' as he was known. Peter did a lot of work for the Motor Transport publications. I am impressed with your statistics on the drawings. A series of drawings which one never sees on this forum are the Motor Ship cutaways. They were of Diesel engined ships and the ships engines. I remember Vic Berris doing them on CS2 board in pencil and Crusty lining them in for him, and then he would wash and brush them in. On this ships he used Letraset pan colour film. John Marsden also did some ships engines. Tony Lofthouse also did a lot of ships. By the way Max also did a cutaway of the Cutty Sark. Beautifully done a subject that matched his style. Another cutaway which was of a building, was the drawing of the circular BBC Televison centre, this done by R.E. Poulton. Another little gem is the Sir Nigel Gresley locomotive cutaways. These were produced by Jimmy Clark, usually linked with aircraft cutaways.


Best regards Tim

Well, Tim - I think Tony got you on the illustration used, but your comments were actually directed, unless I misunderstood, to the artists Lofthouse, Way, and Ellis. Of the 105 drawings currently in the World Reactor series, 25 are by Tony Lofthouse (all 2-point except one), 36 are by John L Way (all 2-point but two - one 3-point and one with the primary being 2-point and details in 3-point), and 4 are by Dick Ellis (half and half 2- and 3-point). Leslie Cresswell also drew 4 of the series, all 2-point (as were yours, but you knew that).

The primary artist in the drawing illustrated was involved in three in the set, interestingly enough all 3-point perspective drawings. In total, 11% of the 105 are or have 3-point perspective used in them - the balance are 2-point. You mentioned Max Millar - I haven't seen any of his nuclear drawings (none in this set, unless unsigned), so I cannot comment, and I haven't paid that kind of attention to his other works.

To your question, I wasn't involved in the nuclear industry, but did stumble on the full series and was intrigued. Originally interested only in the automotive side, I have been vastly broadened, finding the aircraft industry just as intriguing, and really enjoying the works of Leslie Ashwell Wood and Frank Soltesz.

Peter



#10249 werks prototype

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 08:46

A series of drawings which one never sees on this forum are the Motor Ship cutaways. They were of Diesel engined ships and the ships engines. I remember Vic Berris doing them on CS2 board in pencil and Crusty lining them in for him, and then he would wash and brush them in. On this ships he used Letraset pan colour film. John Marsden also did some ships engines. Best regards Tim

Here are a couple of those marine engines, Tim.

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The 'building' like Sulzer R.N.D Marine engine. By John Marsden.

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M.A.N V-12 Configuration Marine engine, four valves per cylinder. By Vic Berris.







#10250 werks prototype

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 08:52

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Jowett engine. 1935. Artist, Max Millar.

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Jowett chassis. 1949. Artist, Max Millar.