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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#10251 Duc-Man

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 14:47

Some more as little bitty things.

Opel CIH-engine head explosion:
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Same engine but no idea what the english word is for that assembly:
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And a section of the whole engine:
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PS: does somebody have one of those engines for sale? Looking for the 2.0S version in good condition.

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#10252 simplebrother

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 15:58

Here are a couple of those marine engines, Tim.

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The 'building' like Sulzer R.N.D Marine engine. By John Marsden.

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M.A.N V-12 Configuration Marine engine, four valves per cylinder. By Vic Berris.


Thanks, Werks...
Peter

#10253 simplebrother

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 16:18

Hi Peter and Tony, I deserved my telling off on the perspective. I did realise the Hartlepool power station was in 3 point, and was referring to the three illustrators mentioned previously. I am impressed that you have so many of the illustrations. Max did at least one, It was the first nuclear power station in the country, I think at Calderhall. It was in black and white and typical Max with good strong treatment. The other bloke who did at least two was Peter Baker or 'Crusty' as he was known. Peter did a lot of work for the Motor Transport publications. I am impressed with your statistics on the drawings. A series of drawings which one never sees on this forum are the Motor Ship cutaways. They were of Diesel engined ships and the ships engines. I remember Vic Berris doing them on CS2 board in pencil and Crusty lining them in for him, and then he would wash and brush them in. On this ships he used Letraset pan colour film. John Marsden also did some ships engines. Tony Lofthouse also did a lot of ships. By the way Max also did a cutaway of the Cutty Sark. Beautifully done a subject that matched his style. Another cutaway which was of a building, was the drawing of the circular BBC Televison centre, this done by R.E. Poulton. Another little gem is the Sir Nigel Gresley locomotive cutaways. These were produced by Jimmy Clark, usually linked with aircraft cutaways.

Best regards Tim


Tim...
I have 10 black and white drawings in the World Reactors series that are unsigned - two are a couple of years after Millar theoretically retired, but eight are from 1956-57. If you would like to try and identify his (or Peter Baker's) I am happy to send them to you as PDF-files (JPEGs would be a little large). There are 11 unattributed color ones also, but they begin in 1971. Thanks for the gentle push - two I had previously noted as unattributed had John Way's name discretely tucked away on them. By the way, the Calderhall drawing is this series was done by Cresswell.

I have not seen Sir Nigel Gresley locomotives, nor Poulton's BBC television center, and have only seen a very small copy of Millar's Cutty Sark.

Now to run off for a bite of breakfast (at least for my grand-daughter - lunch for me) - we share a birthday and generally go to dinner together, but there is a big dance she just can't miss, so I've been relegated to breakfast. At least I had my morning constitutional with Petula Clark whispering in my ear (exercise is almost bearable with a good set of headphones - isn't technology wonderful).

Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 30 October 2011 - 05:01.


#10254 werks prototype

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 16:52

Thanks, Werks...
Peter

:up: Peter

There is also a very good book out there, for this sort of thing, and it is by John Day. Engines: The Search For Power. And it deals with quite a broad section of ways of generating power, and most are depicted in cutaway form.

Here is an image of the cover, http://www.cahood.com/BOOK11109.htm

#10255 Tony Matthews

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 16:56

Now to run off for a bite of breakfast (at least for my grand-daughter - lunch for me) - we share a birthday and generally go to dinner together, but there is a big dance she just can't miss, so I've been relegated to breakfast. At least I had my morning constitutional with Petula Clark whispering in my ear (exercise is almost bearable with a good set of headphones - isn't technology wonderful).

Peter

Very many happy returns, Peter, and to your grand daughter!

#10256 simplebrother

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 18:56

:up: Peter

There is also a very good book out there, for this sort of thing, and it is by John Day. Engines: The Search For Power. And it deals with quite a broad section of ways of generating power, and most are depicted in cutaway form.

Here is an image of the cover, http://www.cahood.com/BOOK11109.htm


Great tip, Werks - thanks - (found a copy on-line for $8.12 - sometimes prices are almost unbelievable they are so reasonable)
Thanks also for your kind wishes, Mr. Matthews...

Peter

#10257 TWest

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 02:32

Thought I would put together a couple of the Haynes covers for you this evening, but with a bit of a difference to it.
We start with a Terry Davey illustration on the cover of the Manual of the Toyota MR-2, dated 1987. This was a fairly popular little sporty car that matched up well with quite a few similar offerings from other makers.
Tom West


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#10258 TWest

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 02:36

This is another Haynes cover for another little sporty car, the Mitsubishi Eclipse coupe from 1993. This illustration was one that was part of the David Kimble period, but I don't think he really did the actual illustration, just the airbrushing. Maybe Tom Johnson can comment here, as he was familiar with this series of illustrations above the Kimble signature.
Tom West


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#10259 TWest

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 02:38

We have another Haynes Manual cover, this one from Robin Levey. There were a few of these from Mr. Levey that fit into the later time with Terry Davey doing the illustrations. This particular illustration is the 1979 Mazda RX-7, another sporty car to give a reasonable comparison between similar car types and angles of the illustration.
Tom West


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#10260 TWest

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 02:41

This is a copy that I ended up with out of the Haynes copies, but this would have come out of some other magazine. The illustration is the Aston Martin DBS out of 1967. Not completely sure of the DBS designation, but that is what I wrote down when I was copying this thing. No credit on the illustration, so jump in if you recognize the artist here.
That's all, folks ...
Tom West


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#10261 Flightlinearts

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 08:02

Good Morning Peter, I would be only to happy to see the Cutaways you mention. pdf files would be fine. Have you my email address? If not contact me through flightlinearts.com there is an email address there. Going to try and get some scanning done. Working away from home a lot at the moment, so It will be a few weeks before I get the scanning completed.

Tim

Tim...
I have 10 black and white drawings in the World Reactors series that are unsigned - two are a couple of years after Millar theoretically retired, but eight are from 1956-57. If you would like to try and identify his (or Peter Baker's) I am happy to send them to you as PDF-files (JPEGs would be a little large). There are 11 unattributed color ones also, but they begin in 1971. Thanks for the gentle push - two I had previously noted as unattributed had John Way's name discretely tucked away on them. By the way, the Calderhall drawing is this series was done by Cresswell.

I have not seen Sir Nigel Gresley locomotives, nor Poulton's BBC television center, and have only seen a very small copy of Millar's Cutty Sark.

Now to run off for a bite of breakfast (at least for my grand-daughter - lunch for me) - we share a birthday and generally go to dinner together, but there is a big dance she just can't miss, so I've been relegated to breakfast. At least I had my morning constitutional with Petula Clark whispering in my ear (exercise is almost bearable with a good set of headphones - isn't technology wonderful).

Peter



#10262 ibsenop

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 17:58

Alfa Romeo 179 by Sergio Baratto

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#10263 TWest

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 23:12

Well, folks. Thought I would send out another piece for you out of the scanned files. This is one of the Mike Badrocke aircraft illustrations out of Air International. It has been around before, but this one was out of the January, 2009 issue and shows the super highspeed Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird. Quite a piece of equipment considering the fact that it was actually developed back in the 50s. There are just some amazing machines that seem to be able to go across the years, and this has to be one of them.
Tom West


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#10264 IrishMariner

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 01:38

Here's some cutaways of the Mercedes-Benz DB601 engine that powered the Messerschmitt Bf-109E and others. They are taken from a bad scan of the original German manual.

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Here's another drawing from the same manual - an unusual, colored drawing..probably hand-tinted

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#10265 TWest

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 05:11

OK, another one for you this evening, this being a Mike Badrocke piece out of Air International, September, 2007 issue. This is the Vietnam era McDonnell Douglas A4KU Skyhawk that was a mainstay of ground attack craft during that time.
Tom West


McDonnellDouglasA4KUSkyhawk-Badrocke-1999-AirIntl07-09


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#10266 simplebrother

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 05:57

Here's some cutaways of the Mercedes-Benz DB601 engine that powered the Messerschmitt Bf-109E and others. They are taken from a bad scan of the original German manual.

Posted Image Posted Image

Here's another drawing from the same manual - an unusual, colored drawing..probably hand-tinted

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Max Millar's rendition of this beauty was originally posted by Werks on page 128 (post 5082), but that illustration is no longer in the post - it was captioned Daimler-Benz DB 601. Below is a slightly larger, higher resolution version of Millar's work - the one Werks posted was signed, but this one only has Flight's logo on it.

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Peter


#10267 helioseism

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 13:58

Max Millar's rendition of this beauty was originally posted by Werks on page 128 (post 5082), but that illustration is no longer in the post - it was captioned Daimler-Benz DB 601. Below is a slightly larger, higher resolution version of Millar's work - the one Werks posted was signed, but this one only has Flight's logo on it.

Peter


This is a great one! But, can anyone tell me what a "supercharger cush-drive" is?

#10268 Tony Matthews

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 14:12

It is a device that minimises jarring in the gear train, by the look of that one it has rubber segments between the gear ring and hub of that particular spur gear. A bit like the small coil springs in a traditional clutch plate.

#10269 helioseism

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 14:17

It is a device that minimises jarring in the gear train, by the look of that one it has rubber segments between the gear ring and hub of that particular spur gear. A bit like the small coil springs in a traditional clutch plate.


Thanks, Tony!

#10270 simplebrother

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 18:57

The first for today is the conservative classic Jaguar XJS from 1975 as it appeared in Autocar - though unnamed on the drawing, the artist has been identified as Vic Berris (thanks, Tom).
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Second is the YF-12 Lockheed interceptor prototype from 1963 by Alfonso Rigato.
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Next comes the USSR's WWER(Water-Water Energetic Reactor) nuclear icebreaker Lenin, launched in 1959, drawn by Tony Lofthouse. (#38 in the World's Reactors series)
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Last is a Bleriot Monoplane from 1909, drawn by Denis Fairlie. This drawing appeared in the October 7, 1955 edition of Eagle comics.
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Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 31 October 2011 - 23:26.


#10271 TWest

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 20:03

The first for today is the conservative classic Jaguar XJS from 1975 as it appeared in Autocar - the artist was not identified.
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Peter,
I have this in my files showing Vic Berris as the artist. It was from a couple of other compendium publications, so I think that is where I got the reference.
Tom West

#10272 simplebrother

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 23:18

Peter,
I have this in my files showing Vic Berris as the artist. It was from a couple of other compendium publications, so I think that is where I got the reference.
Tom West


thanks, Tom - I will update my files

#10273 Duc-Man

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 09:29

Last is a Bleriot Monoplane from 1909, drawn by Denis Fairlie. This drawing appeared in the October 7, 1955 edition of Eagle comics.
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Peter

This illustration has propably the least cuting away I've ever seen on here...

#10274 onelung

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:18

This trend could be worn out realy fast.
Every pub should put up a sign at the door:
NO PANTS OVER
THE ARSE
- NO SERVICE !!


Problem solved!

#10275 onelung

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:42

This is a great one! But, can anyone tell me what a "supercharger cush-drive" is?

Not sure if this is the correct explanation to your question, but my understanding of the M-B supercharging system was that it was "automatic" in the sense that it involved a type of "slip drive" coupling (cush?) whose degree of slip was controlled by an (aneroid) barometer coupled device which left the pilot free of responsibility for changing s'charger drive speeds as his aircraft gained or lost altitude. Damned clever, these teutons...!

#10276 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:48

Not sure if this is the correct explanation to your question, but my understanding of the M-B supercharging system was that it was "automatic" in the sense that it involved a type of "slip drive" coupling (cush?) whose degree of slip was controlled by an (aneroid) barometer coupled device which left the pilot free of responsibility for changing s'charger drive speeds as his aircraft gained or lost altitude. Damned clever, these teutons...!

I think you'll find that that is the supercharger fluid coupling. I may be wrong but I still think that the cush drive (short for cushion?) does what I said. I am up for correction if necessary!

#10277 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:51

Problem solved!

Why didn't I think of that?

#10278 onelung

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 12:12

I think you'll find that that is the supercharger fluid coupling. I may be wrong but I still think that the cush drive (short for cushion?) does what I said. I am up for correction if necessary!


Thanks Tony - yes, looking at the illustration full size the cush (spring) coupling is the "cush" part of the story: so I take it that the (auto controlled) fluid coupling was an additional section of the s/charger drive system then ... ?

#10279 Tony Matthews

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 13:03

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I don't know if this was controlled the way you say, but I wouldn't be surprised! However, I think this is the item you are refering to.
Edited to add that those dashed lines and arrows indicate something!

Edited by Tony Matthews, 01 November 2011 - 13:05.


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#10280 ABG

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 15:52

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I don't know if this was controlled the way you say, but I wouldn't be surprised! However, I think this is the item you are refering to.
Edited to add that those dashed lines and arrows indicate something!


If there is any further interest a visit to the Flight Global archives may be worthwhile. The article the drawing is associated with was published in April of 1942. Do a search for db 601n 1942 to 1942. Another article on 2-speed supercharger drives was published in March of 1942 including a description of how the variable speed drive on the db 601 works.

Al

#10281 ibsenop

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 23:25

Lotus 81 by Sergio Baratto

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TNF Index update - page 250 - posts 9973, 9974 and 9975 - up to post 10286

Edited by ibsenop, 02 November 2011 - 01:17.


#10282 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 00:06

If there is any further interest a visit to the Flight Global archives may be worthwhile. The article the drawing is associated with was published in April of 1942. Do a search for db 601n 1942 to 1942. Another article on 2-speed supercharger drives was published in March of 1942 including a description of how the variable speed drive on the db 601 works.

Al

Thanks for that, Al, I'll check it out!

#10283 fnqvmuch

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 02:10

TNF Index update - page 250 - posts 9973, 9974 and 9975 - up to post 10286


thanks again ibby

#10284 ibsenop

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 13:45

Tyrrell 009 by Sergio Baratto

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#10285 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 14:29

thanks again ibby

Ibby! I like that. Yes thanks Ibsen/Ibby, a lot of work much appreciated.

#10286 helioseism

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 18:29

Thanks, ibsenop, werks & twest!!!!! And everyone else.

#10287 ibsenop

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 20:51

Ligier JS11 by Sergio Baratto

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#10288 simplebrother

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 23:44

The first for this evening is Jeremy Gower's 1984 Chevrolet Camaro Z28.
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The second tonight is from a 1951 edition of Eagle comics; captioned Modern Popular Family Car by L Ashwell Wood, it depicts the 1951 Hillman Minx.
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The third is from Armstrong's How Industry Operates series, by Frank Soltesz. Printed in a 1953 edition of the Saturday Evening Post it is titled How an Office Building Operates - it is quite a building - four basement levels, its own subway/tram station, etc.
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The last for the evening is two-fold, color and black & white images by Max Millar of the Bristol Type 167 Brabazon airliner from 1949.
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Peter

#10289 Embers

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 05:36

With more than ten thousand posts on this auto-themed forum, one would think that the body of work of an illustrator such as James A. Allington would have been pretty well covered, but I’ve found a couple of examples that haven’t appeared in the index. Here is Allington’s rendition of the Lotus Elan S1 or Lotus 26 (if you go by the Lotus numbering system) as it appeared in the January 1963 issue of Road & Track.
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Those familiar with the Elan or the Lotus Twincam engine will notice a curious anomaly: The engine oil fill is shown at the aft end of the inlet camshaft cover, whereas every Twincam I’ve ever seen has it on the aft end of the exhaust cam cover. I, at first, thought that this was an error on Allington’s part, but then I looked at Gordon Bruce’s similar drawing of the Elan from the September 1963 issue of Sports Car Graphic, post 5247, page 132. It also appears on the Theo Page cutaway of the Elan.

What may have happened is that these artists were given access to one of the first examples of the Elan in order to meet publishing deadlines and the cam cover casting was, subsequently, changed for some reason before the engine went into production.

The Bruce drawing has its own curious feature: That is the conical spring retracting the left headlight. While the actual springs didn’t look quite like that, it is interesting to note that the headlights on the first couple of series of Elans were not fail-operational. In further explanation: Engine vacuum was required to extend the lights. A vacuum failure or leak would cause the springs to retract the lights.

It is interesting to see how Allington modified this drawing of the original roadster to represent the Elan S3 FHC (Fixed Head Coupe) which has been posted as #3666, page 92.

As long as we are on an Elan theme, here is a four-view of it from the same R&T issue.
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Ibsen,
Many thanks for your dedication and work in compiling and maintaining the index. It is a valuable resource for researchers and those of us compiling collections. One correction, though: the Lotus 17 you list on page 65 is a Lotus 15.


#10290 Tony Matthews

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 08:57

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Tyre shading by yours truly, and I may have done the suspension drawings too, but I'm not certain. The Elan had vacuum-operated widow lifters at some stage, a Heath Robinson-looking system of pulleys and nylon cord, powered by a very light aluminium cylinder and piston. Whether this survived the prototype and early production stage I know not. My abiding memories of the Elan, and later Elan 2, build shops was the all-pervading smell of resin.



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Four-view by Bernard Porter.

#10291 ibsenop

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 16:55

1979 Williams FW07 by Sergio Baratto

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Edited by ibsenop, 05 November 2011 - 17:01.


#10292 Tony Matthews

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 18:13

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Re the Elan four-view...

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This is Bernard Porter working on something that I cannot recognise, in the first 'studio' that Jim Allington had, his late father's converted workshop. Bernard's heart wasn't really in Technical Illustration - he was happy enough doing the line three- and four-views, but they and similar work gradually dried up and he went to work for a local engineering company. He had a smoking habit that was most likely to give you lung problems, in that he used to recycle dog-ends, or buts, or stogies I think they are known in the US of A, so although he didn't smoke a vast number of ciggies per day, the tobacco was pretty rich in tar - and smelt rank! He died quite young of emphysema, but he was a nice guy, and gave me an occasional lift on his big old BSA.



#10293 Tony Matthews

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 21:33

Re the above, I've just noticed that the full frame that I scanned from a contact print is a bit 'stubby'. I have measured it and it is 24mm x 34mm, not 36mm. I know that this was a 'standard' size before 36mm became the universal standard, and there was another too, and that Nikon also used 24mm x 34mm at one time. However, it probably means that a Leica enthusiast can confirm that Jim used an M2, which is what I remember it to be, but it could have been an M3. I'm not familiar with the history of Leica M-series bodies, but I assume it was no earlier than an M2. I do know that he bought it from a friend who had a camera shop in Old Stevenage High Street, one Hans Edwards.

#10294 alansart

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 22:53

I do know that he bought it from a friend who had a camera shop in Old Stevenage High Street, one Hans Edwards.


I remember that shop. I used to pass it on my way to Barclay School. This would be the late 60's. A few years later I was given a 35mm Praktica Camera by a family friend which included the original receipt from Hans Edwards.


#10295 Allan Lupton

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 23:26

I remember that shop. I used to pass it on my way to Barclay School. This would be the late 60's. A few years later I was given a 35mm Praktica Camera by a family friend which included the original receipt from Hans Edwards.

Ah Barclay School - my mother taught there from late 1950s until she retired in 1970-ish so I knew quite a lot of the staff socially! I also remember Hans Edwards' shop as I used to pass through Stevenage en route to work at Hatfield.

#10296 ibsenop

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 13:56

1980 Willians FW07 by Sergio Baratto.

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#10297 alansart

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 14:42

Ah Barclay School - my mother taught there from late 1950s until she retired in 1970-ish so I knew quite a lot of the staff socially!


I left in 1971 :)

#10298 Tony Matthews

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 15:16

Hans Edwards was - and may still be - an interesting guy. His passions were cameras, cars, radio control model aircraft and guns. I went to his house once, with Jim Allington, and when Hans heard that I had the same interests he produced a Luger and some ammunition. He loaded the pistol and handed it to me. "Have a shot at that post!" he said, indicating a pine post, complete with bark, at one end of a rose arbour. I took aim and squeezed one off - if you'll pardon the expression. There was a satisfying bang and a shower of bark from the post, and then one of his children ran out from behind it, apparently oblivious to how near they had been to a 9mm slug.

#10299 ibsenop

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 15:28

Ibsen,
Many thanks for your dedication and work in compiling and maintaining the index. It is a valuable resource for researchers and those of us compiling collections. One correction, though: the Lotus 17 you list on page 65 is a Lotus 15.


Embers,

The information came from "Motor Racing, 1959". Lotus 9-11-15-17-19-23 - by Collin Pitt - Unique Motor Books - page 62

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#10300 Embers

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 19:47

[quote name='ibsenop' date='Nov 6 2011, 08:28' post='5382484']
Embers,

The information came from "Motor Racing, 1959". Lotus 9-11-15-17-19-23 - by Collin Pitt - Unique Motor Books - page 62

My mistake. I had thought that the original Lotus Elite was the Lotus 17, but now realize that it must be numbered 14.