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#10301 Embers

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 19:58

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Here is the 1470 cc Renault 16 engine and gearbox as used in the Lotus Europa S1. It makes an interesting comparison with the drawing of Post 8693, Page 218, also by Editechnic. The same basic drawing was used, but the aircleaner and inlet manifold changed and the gear selector mechanism added on that drawing.


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#10302 Embers

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 20:20

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Here is another example of a modification to a drawing that has been posted earlier. This is the Jensen Healey by Attrill of Post 4497, page 113. Another example is supposed to be on page 185, but I can't find it. This version, which adds a few lines to define the left half of the car, also removed the attribution to the illustrator. It is from the April 1972 issue of Road & Track.

#10303 Embers

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 20:34

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Finally, for today, this is the Caterham Seven, Super Sprint version with a 1700 BDR engine. This is factory illustration by Peter Baker which appeared in the July 1990 issue of Airfix Magazine(!) The magazine, which appeals to model kit builders, was doing a story on the kit-built version of the car as a 1:1 scale kit.

#10304 Tony Matthews

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 21:39

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I reckon the LH driveshaft is a bit short...

#10305 Duc-Man

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 09:55

I reckon the LH driveshaft is a bit short...

And I'm very tempted to say that the differential is under/behind the passanger seat...

#10306 TWest

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 02:43

I missed sending any new scans out over the weekend, so figured that I would do so tonight. They are all Haynes covers again, and we start with the 1979 Rover 2600 by Terry Davey.

Tom West



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#10307 TWest

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 02:46

My second piece of three tonight is a rather simple illustration over the David Kimble signature. This is a 1980 Chrysler Sedan, the big one of the day, from the Haynes cover. Can't believe that one would see very many of these in Kimble retrospectives.
Tom West



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#10308 TWest

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 02:51

The last one for this evening is the sporty little Ford Probe out of 1990, it appears. Again, one of that period's David Kimble pieces for Haynes.
Personally, I always thought they looked fairly cool, but would not perform the way they ever looked ... promised more than they delivered, which was very typical of a lot of "performance" cars of the time. We bought an older one for my daughter as her first car, and had it run into by an Ice Cream truck in the rain the first week she had it. Mexican guy driving this thing that should never have been on a freeway on bald tires and with no insurance of any kind. Wonderful first experience with this stuff for her.
Tom West


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#10309 Duc-Man

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 09:42

My second piece of three tonight is a rather simple illustration over the David Kimble signature. This is a 1980 Chrysler Sedan, the big one of the day, from the Haynes cover. Can't believe that one would see very many of these in Kimble retrospectives.
Tom West



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Wasn't it also a rather simple car?

#10310 TWest

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 17:33

Wasn't it also a rather simple car?


Most of those types of cars here were pretty simple. Throw a bunch of metal at it and make it big ... seemed to be the general rules of creation. This thing was probably not the most contemporary of cars, but they were treated as if they were sort of rolling living rooms for generally the older crowd. Handling wasn't all that important, but velour seats would probably have been. Not exactly keepsake cars generally. This was also before Mercedes came in and got involved with them, I believe. That really helped improve what Chrysler was turning out. I can remember some of those much older cars from Chrysler back in the 60s when they had some of the most hideous cars around, I thought at the time. Now, they are so strange that they would be cool to have for a custom. I see them all the time, and those cars never though of looking as good as they currently do when guys go back and clean up the fit and finish on these things. Not to mention cleaning up all the rust.
I currently have a Dodge Caliber R/T, which had only had one thing (burned out taillight bulb) go wrong until two door windows fell out of it within about 2 hours while I was at Bonneville. Never had that happen ever in the past, so twice in a couple of hours sort of struck me as unusual.
I can't imagine that reliability happening prior to that M-B influence in the Chrysler system.
Will be interesting to see if it reverts back after another 20 years ...
But, to your question, yes, these were pretty straight forward car designs around that time. Not cars that you would look to for inspiration for another maker to study, that's for sure.
Tom West

#10311 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 17:39

these were pretty straight forward car designs around that time.

Simple, yes, but they got you from A to B, probably without much drama, and if they went wrong you could probably fix it yourself, unlike today. Thanks Tom, the archive swells...

#10312 TWest

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 17:43

Simple, yes, but they got you from A to B, probably without much drama, and if they went wrong you could probably fix it yourself, unlike today. Thanks Tom, the archive swells...


Yes, they did function, and their market was not overly demanding except for the stable "roadholding" feel that they grew up with .. think '50s Buick Roadmaster style handling on the Freeways, slow waddling about town. Yes, you could actually fix them until the computer boxes came into being. That took a lot of the fun out of things, but at least I don't have to carry a 6-pack of points around as backups to replace the dual-points in my Accel distributor on my old GTO.
And, if that archive is swelling, maybe someone has a salve that will help ...
Tom West

#10313 Embers

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 19:18

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Here is Brian Hatton’s drawing of the Lotus 30, or rather my reconstruction of a scan of an old Xerox copy of his drawing from the April 1964 issue of Road & Track. The index lists a James Allington version of the car, but it appears to be no longer available. I thought some image would be better than none. If someone should have a copy of the Allington version, it would be nice to have it reposted.

History does not look favorably upon this particular Lotus. The decision to base its structure upon the Elan’s backbone arrangement, and windtunnel testing aimed at producing a low-drag body, produced a racecar with poor handling qualities due to insufficient stiffness to cope with the torque of the Ford V8 engine and front-end lift at the resulting high speed. It was, apparently, a handful for even so talented a driver as Jim Clark. Despite this a surprising number of cars were produced: Twenty one of the initial version and nine of the “30B” version with an 18 SWG steel chassis in place of the earlier 20 SWG in an attempt to improve torsional rigidity. Three further Lotus 40’s were produced and we’ve probably all read Ritchie Ginther’s succinct description of that version.

The article containing Hatton’s cutaway also included this side elevation.
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The racing experience of the 1960’s would subsequently allow one to look at this section and predict the aerodynamic problems. Lotus 30’s soon acquired undernose chin spoilers and rear-deck spoilers which spoiled the clean looks of the car in addition to the lift-inducing flowfields. Some minor controversy has arisen when examples of the car appear at historic races with larger appendages to improve their stability. The car won a share of local races, but did not challenge the supremacy of its contemporary rival, the Lola T70.

#10314 simplebrother

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 19:34

The index lists a James Allington version of the car, but it appears to be no longer available. I thought some image would be better than none. If someone should have a copy of the Allington version, it would be nice to have it reposted.


Thanks for Hatton's Lotus 30. Here is Allington's version, as well as one from the Russian site that I don't believe we have yet seen - turn-about should be fair play - the Bugatti, unfortunately, is unattributed.
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Bugatti EB110 GT prototype from 1991
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[removed redundantly posted Alfa Romeo 33TT3]

Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 09 November 2011 - 15:01.


#10315 helioseism

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:22

I recently acquired a copy of the September 1937 reprint of the paper "Racing Motor Car Design" that was presented by R. A. Railton to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers on 19th March 1937. It contains a number of cutaways that seem to be variations of items we have seen before.

First is a cutaway of a "German Auto Union Car". This version has a rather different rear suspension than most, with a big leaf spring mounted across the differential. It also has a different exhaust system. After consulting Ian Bamsey's book "Auto Union V16 Supercharged - A Technical Appraisal", I think that this is a Type A. The cutaway, while unsigned, looks to me like the style of Gedo, due to the detached front wheel.

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#10316 helioseism

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:27

Next is the "Italian Alfa-Romeo Car". This is very similar to the Alfa-Romeo P3 cutaway of Gedo on page 216, but with rather different front and rear suspensions.

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#10317 helioseism

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:29

The next image is the chassis of the Napier-Railton. Not much of a cutaway, but a nice image nonetheless. No clue as to the artist. By the way, has anyone ever seen a full cutaway of this car?

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#10318 helioseism

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:32

The final one for now is the 1933 version of Bluebird. This looks very much like the version by Pratt on page 228, but with different annotation and a simpler treatment of the tail.

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#10319 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:34

I think that this is a Type A.

Yes indeed - the other significant difference is the use of exhaust manifolding, not the individual exhaust pipes pointing upward as on the Type B and later models.

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#10320 helioseism

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:35

Yes indeed - the other significant difference is the use of exhaust manifolding, not the individual exhaust pipes pointing upward as on the Type B and later models.


Ah good, thanks for the confirmation.

#10321 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 20:50

Next is the "Italian Alfa-Romeo Car". This is very similar to the Alfa-Romeo P3 cutaway of Gedo on page 216, but with rather different front and rear suspensions.

This is still a P3, but with the independent Dubonnet front suspension and reversed quarter-elliptic springs at the rear, introduced in 1935. This was the configuration used by Nuvolari in his famous victory over the German teams in the 1935 German GP.

Edited by Tim Murray, 08 November 2011 - 20:56.


#10322 fnqvmuch

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 21:29

... two door windows fell out of it within about 2 hours while I was at Bonneville. Never had that happen ever in the past, so twice in a couple of hours sort of struck me as unusual.
Tom West


i wonder ...

#10323 Tony Matthews

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 21:29

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I certainly stippled a lot of tyres! Nice to see that again - I went to Lotus with Jim, and while he took photographs for the cutaway I was given the task of producing a sketch of the finished car. I was totally unprepared for this, having only CS10 board and a 3H clutch pencil, so the finished article was a bit grey and spidery. Thankfully I have never seen it since...

#10324 tbolt

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 22:09

The final one for now is the 1933 version of Bluebird. This looks very much like the version by Pratt on page 228, but with different annotation and a simpler treatment of the tail.


Another reason it looks different to the car on page 228 is because I got my dates mixed up, it's the 1932 car.
Your 1933 drawing is different to others I have seen as they normally show the short exhaust pipes.

#10325 onelung

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 22:19

Yes indeed - the other significant difference is the use of exhaust manifolding, not the individual exhaust pipes pointing upward as on the Type B and later models.

At the D'Ieteren museum collection in Brussells towards the end of September I was able to take a close up look at their Type A.
I understand it to be almost 100% fully reproduced. If so, it is a truly amazing work.
I could not believe the seat position: no rake at all on the seat back - absolutely bolt upright.

#10326 ibsenop

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 00:08

The second is an Alfa Romeo 33 TT3 spider from 1971-72
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Peter,
posted at page 256 - post 10224 - artist: Giorgio Piola - from Autosprint 32/1971 - with signature.



#10327 simplebrother

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 04:06

Peter,
posted at page 256 - post 10224 - artist: Giorgio Piola - from Autosprint 32/1971 - with signature.


Oops... I missed that post completely - was very surprised that the Russian site had two of interest that we hadn't yet seen. Thanks.

____Re: QUOTE
____The final one for now is the 1933 version of Bluebird. This looks very much like the version by Pratt on page 228, but with different annotation and
____a simpler treatment of the tail.

____Another reason it looks different to the car on page 228 is because I got my dates mixed up, it's the 1932 car.
____Your 1933 drawing is different to others I have seen as they normally show the short exhaust pipes.

I'm not sure I understand what is being said above, but I'm pretty sure Pratt's version is the 1933 car (since it has Rolls-Royce power) - the '31 car that reset the record in '32 was Napier Lion powered. Sorry if I misunderstood what was being said and this makes no sense.

Peter

#10328 tbolt

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 06:33

I'm not sure I understand what is being said above, but I'm pretty sure Pratt's version is the 1933 car (since it has Rolls-Royce power) - the '31 car that reset the record in '32 was Napier Lion powered. Sorry if I misunderstood what was being said and this makes no sense

.
The 31,32 and 33 cars are Here things to look for, changes to air scoop at front of car, exhausts, and wind screen/shield, 32 and 33 Rolls Royce powered.

#10329 alansart

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 14:55

Just spotted this on the Watkins Glen thread.

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Looks like a bit of Matthews stippling in the background :)

#10330 bradbury west

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 15:30

... , and windtunnel testing aimed at producing a low-drag body, produced a racecar ....and front-end lift at the resulting high speed.... version with an 18 SWG steel chassis in place of the earlier 20 SWG in an attempt to improve torsional rigidity. .....
...predict the aerodynamic problems. Lotus 30’s soon acquired undernose chin spoilers and rear-deck spoilers which spoiled the clean looks of the car in addition to the lift-inducing flowfields. Some minor controversy has arisen when examples of the car appear at historic races with larger appendages to improve their stability. The car won a share of local races, but did not challenge the supremacy of its contemporary rival, the Lola T70.


Not wishing to go off thread too much, but anxious to observe TNFs function of providing factually and historically acurate information, I must comment on your remarks. I recommend Ludvigsen's "Colin Chapman; Inside the Innovator" and Dr Lawrence's "Chapman; Wayward Genius".

If you know where and when and by whom any wind tunnel testing took place, Len Terry will be delighted to hear, as it was news to him in conversation this morning. The body was designed by a Jim Clark, a Kiwi ex Ford design stylist at Lotus, who failed to allow for wheel and suspension movement, so Len had to re-draw the bodylines. Later chassis were built in 16swg like the original Elan.

Ignoring the later lives, say post '65 and group 7, of 30s which degenerated into unloved club racing hotrods, very few 30s in their heyday had spoilers at all, and then very small ones, period photos prove this, with the exception of the radically and deliberately re-engineered, by JCB comp manager Michael Newton-Hugnall, JCB car, the eponymous JCB Lotus, quod vide period Blunsden article in Motor Racing. Ludvigsen points out that the 30, again in its frontline heyday with the likes of Clark etc, set several track records.

A close look at any of the period cutaways for the 30 reveals the position of the mandatory spare wheel and the location and hot-air exits via the front wheel arches.

The Lola T70 arrived on the scene a good year after the 30, and was, apparently, the car which Broadley had wanted to build for Ford during their overtures. It also benefitted from the Chev engine in the main, in 5.9 or 6 litre variants.

Chapman had also courted , been courted by, Ford and when they went with Broadley for the mk6>GT40, ACBC rushed into the 30 in a fit of pique to show he was the real designer. After 2 days studying the design Len gave ACBC a 2 page briefing on why the 30 would not work, especially as a road going coupe for Ford, as part of a 5 model family using the backbone chassis design for all or them. So, as similarly with the 17 and the A frame Cortina rear end, ACBC called the tune and the car was built thus.
Roger Lund

#10331 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 15:38

Looks like a bit of Matthews stippling in the background :)

Not mine Alan, the Tyrrell I'm sure is a Bill Bennett, and the other one too, by the look of it. I can't quite make it out - Lotus 49?

#10332 B Squared

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 16:16

Just spotted this on the Watkins Glen thread.


The International Motor Racing Research Center had extra copies of these cutaways, plus 5-6 others by the same artist, when I was there in early October. They were available for $1.00 each during their annual sale. I bought a copy of each available at the time. To those who might want copies, you can contact the IMRRC at http://racingarchives.org/

I trust that they still have some in inventory. I can provide the list of cars in the set when I get home later today.

#10333 David M. Kane

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 16:17

Tony you are right those are pieces I donated to the Research Center. I was the U.S. Distributor of Bill Bennett's artwork.

#10334 alansart

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 17:00

Not mine Alan, the Tyrrell I'm sure is a Bill Bennett, and the other one too, by the look of it. I can't quite make it out - Lotus 49?


I stand corrected :blush:

Looking at it again I think you may use a bit more perspective.


#10335 alansart

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 17:03

The International Motor Racing Research Center had extra copies of these cutaways, plus 5-6 others by the same artist, when I was there in early October. They were available for $1.00 each during their annual sale.


Now that's value for money :up:

#10336 macoran

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 18:12

Not mine Alan, the Tyrrell I'm sure is a Bill Bennett, and the other one too, by the look of it. I can't quite make it out - Lotus 49?



Coincidence that I was just busy with this ?
BT33 by Bill Bennett, previously posted on page 52, but now with some additional sketching around it by another artist ?
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#10337 macoran

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 18:45

I must apologize for just jumping in with the response above, but thought I would explain afterwards.

Have been away for a spell.. not at all well... the COPD...very bad cough fit recently which hospitalised me with a
bunch of bruised ribs. The doctors and nurses did me good with the Pretnison boosters and the oxygen support.

Am on the mend now, and can happily say "I have kicked smoking !!!!!!!!" eat your heart out Marlboro !!

#10338 simplebrother

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 19:15

QUOTE (helioseism - post 10323)
The final one for now is the 1933 version of Bluebird. This looks very much like the version by Pratt on page 228, but with different annotation and a simpler treatment of the tail.

QUOTE (tbolt - post 10329)
Another reason it looks different to the car on page 228 is because I got my dates mixed up, it's the 1932 car.
Your 1933 drawing is different to others I have seen as they normally show the short exhaust pipes.

QUOTE (tbolt post=10333]
The 31,32 and 33 cars are Here things to look for, changes to air scoop at front of car, exhausts, and wind screen/shield, 32 and 33 Rolls Royce powered.
_____________________________________________

The above Here site is a great collection of Bluebird drawings... however, my point was that post 9103 on page 228 is correctly captioned as the 1933 Bluebird, as is helioseism's post 10323. Both show the Campbell-Railton Bluebird with the Rolls Royce v12, which was built in 1933, first running on 2/22/33 and setting a 272 mph record.
reference - http://en.wikipedia....ilton_Blue_Bird

The 1931 Campbell-Napier-Railton car used the Napier Lion w12 engine and set records in 1931 (246mph) and 1932 (251mph).
reference - http://en.wikipedia....ilton_Blue_Bird

The Here site's picture in the first column, second row is incorrectly labeled 1932, but the picture itself is positioned as if it was a 1933 and is correctly named Blue Bird 1933 unk.jpg.

If interested, I have larger versions of several of the illustrations on the site.

Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 09 November 2011 - 19:34.


#10339 Tony Matthews

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 20:38

Have been away for a spell.. not at all well... the COPD...very bad cough fit recently which hospitalised me with a
bunch of bruised ribs. The doctors and nurses did me good with the Pretnison boosters and the oxygen support.

Am on the mend now, and can happily say "I have kicked smoking !!!!!!!!" eat your heart out Marlboro !!

The person who least needs to apologise! Well done with the ciggies - it has to be done at some stage, I gave up about seven years ago, and although the benefits are not immediately noticeable, long term it helps.

I've had a week in hospital, emergency surgery and pints of antibiotics into me veins just from an ingrowing toenail, now I'm wasting weeks at home waiting for everything to heal. Gwendolyn said she'd call and pamper me, but so far there's no sign of her. She means well, but has such a busy social life... Onwards and upwards, to Cutawayland!

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#10340 Tim Murray

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 20:45

Marc and Tony: sorry to hear about both your sufferings, but it's good to know that you're both on the road to recovery. :clap:

#10341 Embers

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 20:47

If you know where and when and by whom any wind tunnel testing took place, Len Terry will be delighted to hear, as it was news to him in conversation this morning. The body was designed by a Jim Clark, a Kiwi ex Ford design stylist at Lotus, who failed to allow for wheel and suspension movement, so Len had to re-draw the bodylines. Later chassis were built in 16swg like the original Elan.

Chapman had also courted , been courted by, Ford and when they went with Broadley for the mk6>GT40, ACBC rushed into the 30 in a fit of pique to show he was the real designer. After 2 days studying the design Len gave ACBC a 2 page briefing on why the 30 would not work, especially as a road going coupe for Ford, as part of a 5 model family using the backbone chassis design for all or them. So, as similarly with the 17 and the A frame Cortina rear end, ACBC called the tune and the car was built thus.


Roger, thank you for adding to the information on the history of the Lotus 30. I do not always aim to be a provocateur with my comments, but, lacking my research materials on Lotus due to a recent move, I relied on Internet articles and comments found in a search of TNF. I am grateful that you have been able to go to primary sources.
Just to make the history clear, can we say that:
- The Lotus 30 was designed without aerodynamic testing
- The structural material changed from 20 SWG steel in the first run of cars to 16 SWG steel in the second?

I had encountered Len Terry's name in connection with the 30, but since he made no mention of it in his Racing Car Design and Development I did not bring it up. It was reported that he advised Chapman to construct a closed body to torsionally stiffen the chassis. Your comment debunks this assertion. I sure would like to have seen that two-page briefing.

#10342 NPP

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 07:36

Marc and Tony: sorry to hear about both your sufferings, but it's good to know that you're both on the road to recovery. :clap:


:up:

#10343 tbolt

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 08:09

QUOTE (helioseism - post 10323)
The final one for now is the 1933 version of Bluebird. This looks very much like the version by Pratt on page 228, but with different annotation and a simpler treatment of the tail.

QUOTE (tbolt - post 10329)
Another reason it looks different to the car on page 228 is because I got my dates mixed up, it's the 1932 car.
Your 1933 drawing is different to others I have seen as they normally show the short exhaust pipes.


Hi Peter, I will scan and PM you some stuff when I get home tonight.


#10344 TWest

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 08:56

The person who least needs to apologise! Well done with the ciggies - it has to be done at some stage, I gave up about seven years ago, and although the benefits are not immediately noticeable, long term it helps.

I've had a week in hospital, emergency surgery and pints of antibiotics into me veins just from an ingrowing toenail, now I'm wasting weeks at home waiting for everything to heal. Gwendolyn said she'd call and pamper me, but so far there's no sign of her. She means well, but has such a busy social life... Onwards and upwards, to Cutawayland!


Well, you two are on the mend. Wish that I could say that with my missing right hip joint ... was seemingly working and there to a degree a year ago, and is now to a point where I can hardly walk. Going to pretty much hang back from the NHRA World Finals this weekend because of it. Enjoy your newly found health, you two.
Tom West

#10345 Repco22

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 09:10

Marc and Tony: sorry to hear about both your sufferings, but it's good to know that you're both on the road to recovery. :clap:

Hear Hear! :wave:

#10346 B Squared

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 11:15

Marc and Tony: sorry to hear about both your sufferings, but it's good to know that you're both on the road to recovery. :clap:

Agreed :up:

Wish that I could say that with my missing right hip joint ... was seemingly working and there to a degree a year ago, and is now to a point where I can hardly walk.
Tom West


Tom - My 76 year old Mom had her right hip replaced six weeks ago and is doing fantastic. Less than two weeks with a walker, two weeks after that the cane was put away, now working in the gardens, going up and down stairs, driving, and will be able to cut the yard again in the Spring. This operation has truly given her a new life, free of pain. My closest friend, who is 57, had the same anterior operation done about a year and a half ago. His rapid recovery and positive attitude is what inspired my Mom to have the same operation done by the same doctor. He was even able to walk the distances needed to attend his first Indy 500 with us in over a decade, now totally free of the pain associated with his bad hip.

I wish you well and hope you can find a positive solution to your immobility.

#10347 Tony Matthews

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 11:37

Many thanks for the good wishes, at least I'm on the mend, although a week in hospital and ten days lying with my foot raised at home have meant I now have a disc problem - but I'm getting better! Tom's predicament is worse than mine, and Brian is correct, the surgical treatment can be astonishingly effective. Of course, it's free in the UK...

The only down-side of my 'house arrest' is that you get more silly posts from me on various threads...

Edited by Tony Matthews, 10 November 2011 - 11:37.


#10348 Tim Murray

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 12:02

Well, you two are on the mend. Wish that I could say that with my missing right hip joint ... was seemingly working and there to a degree a year ago, and is now to a point where I can hardly walk. Going to pretty much hang back from the NHRA World Finals this weekend because of it. Enjoy your newly found health, you two.
Tom West

To endorse the previous comments, my aunt had both her hips done and it revolutionised her life. Very best wishes for a good outcome, Tom.

#10349 simplebrother

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 18:23


Marc and Tony: sorry to hear about both your sufferings, but it's good to know that you're both on the road to recovery.


Agreed :up:

Tom - My 76 year old Mom had her right hip replaced six weeks ago and is doing fantastic. Less than two weeks with a walker, two weeks after that the cane was put away, now working in the gardens, going up and down stairs, driving, and will be able to cut the yard again in the Spring. This operation has truly given her a new life, free of pain. My closest friend, who is 57, had the same anterior operation done about a year and a half ago. His rapid recovery and positive attitude is what inspired my Mom to have the same operation done by the same doctor. He was even able to walk the distances needed to attend his first Indy 500 with us in over a decade, now totally free of the pain associated with his bad hip.

I wish you well and hope you can find a positive solution to your immobility.


Mark & Tony...
Hope recovery is quick and complete - I also have several relatives who have had hip replacements with wonderful results - the last sounds like a carbon copy of Brian's mom - he is driving again in just over a month (limited, and automatic transmission only, but driving none the less).

Tom...
Here in the states it probably isn't free, but the results are absolutely astonishing. Hope you find relief soon - by whatever means. Pain and lack of movement can take much of the fun out of life.
Peter


#10350 TWest

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 22:35

Thanks to all of you for your support with this hip thing. I have heard the same about the surgery, and it is supposed to be the most reliable and the safest of all of those relatively new orthopedic procedures.
I have done some research and find that I can get it done by Medical Tourism going to India. I have talked with some people and this is a pretty sane concept, and the total cost, no frills, is going to be a tick under $8000, which is damned good, and I could get it scheduled fairly quickly, where her I am going to have to wait for them to decide whether I am really disabled .. and that is a governmental decision .. and we all realize how that can turn out. Considering that my last coverage in a lifetime of having complete medical insurance was with Kaiser, I would have had an Indian doctor anyway, more than likely.
Thank-you for the confirmation of the stories of the success. I know quite a few of the old racers who were gimping around with this for many years, who are walking like nothing was ever wrong, so this just confirms the potential of this stuff.
It is interesting sharing this kind of stuff ... but Cutaways are not a youngsters' game anymore, are they? I had an aunt who passed a couple of years ago at 108. People would ask her how she lived so long, as if she was the medical person dealing with her aging ... and her response would be, "Well, getting old isn't for sissies, you know."
Could not agree with her more.
I have to quit whining around and giving into this thing, as I have four cutaways on the fire that need to get done, too. This is really knocking me off of my game here.
Thanks, again, for the support from all of you guys. At least I get to do a few scans for you guys once in a while while I try to keep from turning around and actually doing those illustrations ...
Seem, some good comes from everything ...
Take care of yourself .. nobody else will, it seems ...
Tom West