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The cutaway drawing and its artists


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#11251 macoran

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 18:44

Honestly, I thought you people were sharp. :) Lirpa Loof indeed???

You cheated a bit Mark, now if you had called the artist Lirpa Sloof we would've been onto to you right away :p

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#11252 werks prototype

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 19:28

You cheated a bit Mark, now if you had called the artist Lirpa Sloof we would've been onto to you right away :p


:)

I was impressed with you though, Marc. Trying to work out how it would have gone. That is exactly the kind of thing I would have done. :up:


#11253 Tony Matthews

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 20:24

I think it would come down quicker than it would go up. Especially if it went through the Armco and over a cliff...

#11254 werks prototype

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 21:34

Oh dear................. :)

#11255 Motocar

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 23:23

North American TF-86 Cutaway, version of training developed by the signing of a two-seater, for which he took as its starting point two F-86F cells and modified to create this version that was not sustained, the same was achieved by lengthening forward fuselage, both had slight differences from each other, one being armed only with two 12.7 mm machine guns Browning and incorporating a small extension of the fin before drifting, allowing a greater total area and better lateral control, unfortunately North American had created a great plane, easy to fly where everything worked perfectly, with hydraulically assisted controls and where to fly alone from the beginning was not impossible, however was not the case with many other fighters and author Pilot Press, amended by Motocar to make this tentative interpretation of this unique fighter.

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#11256 ibsenop

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 16:43

Volkswagen 411 LE by Siegfried Werner.

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#11257 werks prototype

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 22:22

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Formula 1 Renault Gordini V6 1,500cc engine, twin turbochargers. Artist, E.T.A.I France.


#11258 werks prototype

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 22:22

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VW GOLF. Artist, Terry Davey.

#11259 Tony Matthews

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 14:35

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Not very exciting. I thought I'd posted this before, but apparently I had spared Cutawaylanders the yawn that is a 1984 Astra. Its only claim to fame is that the front half of the illustration was used on the cover of a large hard-back ring binder for a partwork called Car Care. This was briefly advertised on TV, the voice-over having a pronounced Estuary twang, so it was called "Caw Cear". My son was only five at the time, but old enough to join me in shouting "Caw Caer" everytime we saw the ad.

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#11260 Duc-Man

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 15:29

Not very exciting. I thought I'd posted this before, but apparently I had spared Cutawaylanders the yawn that is a 1984 Astra.


I work in the Opel factory in Kaiserslautern about 10 minutes drive from where I live.
What puzzles me about the Kadett E/Astra Mk.II: they build almost 3.8 million of them from '84 to '93 and you barely see one on the street anymore.
Around town were thousands of them on the road. Where are they gone?

#11261 TWest

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 17:12

I work in the Opel factory in Kaiserslautern about 10 minutes drive from where I live.
What puzzles me about the Kadett E/Astra Mk.II: they build almost 3.8 million of them from '84 to '93 and you barely see one on the street anymore.
Around town were thousands of them on the road. Where are they gone?


I find that I have a couple of reactions to this thread ...
The illustration is one of those that one ends up doing that is never going to be the most remembered (without having seen this submission, that would have been very easy), but it certainly shows Tony's work well, in spite of the uninspired subject. Considering the fact that the Matthews name was always more on the top competition cars, it is interesting seeing it on a rather baseline car such as this. Do you have any other work like this buried in the dark corners of your files? They are always welcomed, as you know.
Second, the millions of such cars seem to go the way of locusts .. they are all over when they are around, then they just disappear. One of my favorite examples of that was when Pontiac used a sort of olive color in their line, with the LeMans seeming to be only produced in that color around 1967 ... by ten years later, there seemed to be none of those hideously colored cars around. And, it is very tough to hide a LeMans, believe me.
My third thought has to do with the revelation that you worked at Kaiserslautern. I was not aware of this having any connection to the automotive world, but learned of it from an "adult entertainment" video a few years back. The young lady was interviewed prior to any action, revealing that she was German, and came from the town of Kaiserslautern. Being unfamiliar with the city, I had to watch if a few times just to make sure that I had gotten the name correct; I am all about accurate information, as you know. I will say that the connection was eerie, as the video was shot within a couple of miles of where I had my office ... in Chatsworth, the North San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles.
A stunning coincidence, is it not, Duc-Man? I ask you ...
Tom West

#11262 Tony Matthews

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 21:35

The only other production car that I can remember doing was the Vauxhall Chevette, not a very good illustration! But very red. I live less than 10 miles from the now-defunct Vauxhall plant in Luton, and apart from the Chevette and Astra the only other GM vehicle I did was the Bedford truck posted a long, long time ago, manufactured on the same site.

Odd, Tom, that a staightforward name like Kaiserslautern should be so hard to comprehend whilst watching that type of film. We are lead to believe that a certain activity leads to impaired vision, but seems it affects ones hearing too, if only temporarily. What?

#11263 Duc-Man

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 10:01

"adult entertainment"? You surely talking about a "educational video". :rotfl:
With Ramstein airbase beeing just 10 miles down the road and roughly over 30.000 americans living in the area there should be many German Fräuleins from the area living in the US. Glad to see that at least one made it to stardom... :rotfl:

Sorry for drifting OT.

#11264 Motocar

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 14:56

The new "Giroscopic car" no need cutaway, design by Indian student, of web:
http://www.gizmag.co...2060/pictures#3

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#11265 CVA

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 08:49

porsche 908 1968 by Giorgio Alisi
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#11266 ibsenop

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 00:55

porsche 908 1968 by Giorgio Alisi
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I'd like to see a hi-res scan of this cutaway.


#11267 ibsenop

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 00:57

Lancia Beta 1800 Berlina by Franco Rosso.

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#11268 Motocar

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 15:41

Dassault Mirage G cuitaway, prototype fighter Mirage family with variable geometry wings, equipped with Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine / SNECMA TF-306 of 9300 kg thrust, at the request of the French Ministry of Defence, suitable to operate in unprepared runways and aircraft carriers, for which the firm Dassault designed and built this prototype single-engine two-seater with variable geometry wings with minimum arrow angles of 23 and maximum of 70 degrees, the prototype was evaluated in the decade of the sixties and accumulation 400 hours in 316 flights this device lost the January 13, 1971, but had already planned a new model even more with two SNECMA Atar engine MK50 multirole capable interceptor, attack and reconnaissance far, note that this solo venture Dassault firm as demonstrated at the time I had the great capacity for enterprise and technological level reached by the same author of the original models Dassault Mirage F1 of John Weal and MiG-27 Mike Badrocke, as amended by Motocar to recreate the Dassault Mirage G, represented with different weapons including anti-ship missile AM-39 Exocet, AS-37 Martel, Matra 530 air air missile guidance radar and infra-red next to the Magic 550 infra-red guide (French response to U.S. missile AIM-9 Sidewinder), together with the container / tank 68 mm rocket launchers JL 100 and 250 liters, also the auxiliary tank and carrying four bombs of 250 kg, not to mention the auxiliary tanks under the fuselage and wings, one quite close to the speculation that had been installed in this fabulous game had continued its development and entered service with the French aviation, come up with ImageShack.us

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Edited by Motocar, 07 April 2012 - 15:42.


#11269 Motocar

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 15:47

Caproni Vizzola C-22J cutaway, the primary jet trainer studied and built by the firm to create an airplane Caproni trainer/attack very light, (same solution designed for motor coach Microturbo 200) for which it was based on his vast experience as a builder of sailboats in this if we speak of Calif., which took its fuselage very low aerodynamic drag and also offering additional support was driven by two small jet engines Microturbo TRS-18 thrust of 145 kg, had a modified wing with the same straight section simplicity, with four hard points for arms and airbrakes in extrados, tail stinger tail surfaces metal "T" in the riding position reclining seat retractable tricycle landing gear, unfortunately and despite an aggressive promotion where you paint with camouflage and incorporated a posteriori auxiliary tank on the tips of the planes can not get done in any order being promptly stowed in a warehouse of the company in Italy, Pilot Press author ImageShack.us taken from


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#11270 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:31

OK, folks. I have again left the cutaway contributions for others for a while, so I will give you a selection of things today that will help rectify that a little; a bit of something here for everyone, i would think, unless you are into the Nuclear reactors. Can't help you out much there. So you know, I did dig out another two fairly decent sized cartons of Air International/Aeroplane/miscellaneous magazines. Many years of this stuff in there, so will have to dig through some of that soon.
Our first selection for this Easter weekend is the British Aerospace BAE 146-100. This piece came from the RAF Yearbook from 1983, with Mike Badrocke credited as Aviagraphica. I have flown on one of these, and just remember this thing making turns on its wingtip as it avoided some massive thunderclouds while twisting its way through the MidWest.
Tom West


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#11271 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:35

Cutawayland ...
Seemed like you could not open an aviation magazine during the 70s without an illustration of one form of the Harrier or other. The 1981 RAF Yearbook was no exception, carrying this Aviagraphica/Mike Badrocke illustration of the British Aerospace Harrier GR Mk. 3.
Tom West

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#11272 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:38

BritishAerospaceNimrodAEWMk3-Weal-RAFYearbook1980
Another RAF Yearbook presentation in 1980 and again in 1984, the ungainly British Aerospace Nimrod got a lot of attention in the early 80s as one of the most advanced Electronics Warfare aircraft in the world. This Nimrod was the AEW Mk.3, as illustrated by John Weal.
Tom West



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#11273 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:42

CanadairCL415-Badrocke-AirIntl11-1996
This is a bit of an unusual subject, not your normal executive/fighter/bomber/airliner theme. I have seen the Canadair CL-415 flying around Southern California attacking forest fires that flare up around here during the dry seasons (pretty much every fall, and when the dirtbags remember to start setting them ...). This Mike Badrocke illustration was in the November, 1996 issue of Air International.
Tom West


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#11274 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:47

I had a few of the Cavara pieces sitting in the unprocessed file, so this will clean them out, necessitating more scanning from the pages of the Italian Auto Club collection of Italian sports cars. Here we will see a non-cutaway clip illustration of the front of the chassis under the 1947 Ferrari 125S. These things appear to have really gotten scratched up before being processed into this book. I have tried to clean up a bit of the ratty finish here, and hope that I did not take out too much of the intended look of these illustrations.
Tom West

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#11275 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:49

Cavara-Ferrari166SEngine-1947
This is another of the Cavara Auto Club collection, among the very early Ferrari subjects in the set. This piece is the Ferrari V12 engine from the 1947 166S.
Tom West



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#11276 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:52

This is another early Ferrari subject from Giovanni Cavara and his 60 Sports Cars collection for the Italian Auto Club. This is the Ferrari 375 Formula 1 out of 1951. A bit different style for Cavara, I think you will find.
Tom West



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#11277 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:55

Another Ferrari competition engine illustration out of 1952, this is the Ferrari 500 Formula 2 engine out of the Auto Club collection.
Tom West



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#11278 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 21:59

Bit of a changeup here with a few of the David Kimble pieces out of the Haynes Manual covers collection. Wish that I still had these, but really don't want them either, as the scan from the cover rather than the photocopy (Xerox) is not the clearest copy around. They really don't hurt these all that much. We start with the Chevrolet Sprint of 1990. Not one of the more memorable cars of the time, or any time.
Tom West



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#11279 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 22:01

This Haynes cover by David Kimble was the 1990 Chrysler. Still based on the infamous K-Car chassis, I cannot say this was the most fondly remembered big Chrysler of all time, not exactly one of the high-performing 300 series of cars.
Tom West


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#11280 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 22:03

This is another Haynes cover from the David Kimble group, the 1992 Dodge Spirit. Again, not exactly an earthshaker of a car.
Tom West



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#11281 TWest

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 22:07

This is the last of our little Saturday collection for you folks. This is another David Kimble Haynes cover based on the big Ford Crown Victoria our of 1993. For those of you who don't know, the Crown Vic was one of the larger cars available at the time, and was the basis for many a city's police car fleet. I have to believe that there were many more of these sold for various government service, for big city cabs, and for rental cars than there were for private use.


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#11282 Tony Matthews

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 23:42

A marathon, Tom, well done!

#11283 macoran

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 14:47

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Brian Hatton’s Rumpler Tropfenwagen.
The series of magazines I took this from has many colour renderings by Giorgio Alisi, so the drawing in the corner is by his hand I think.
Interesting info on the Tropfenwagen on wiki
http://en.wikipedia....er_Tropfenwagen


#11284 Jian10

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 14:55

Here is F-15A by Mike Badrocke back in 1975. Somehow I feel that his early works are more lively.

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Edited by Jian10, 08 April 2012 - 14:59.


#11285 macoran

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 18:08

1964 Autobianchi Primula, artist unknown
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#11286 macoran

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 18:14

Paolo d'Alessio Ferrari T4
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#11287 Motocar

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 16:46

The pretty Ferrari 599XX race car cutaway, of the web:
http://www.diecastxc...6-f1-sharknose/


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#11288 simplebrother

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 00:04

I've been away for a while. Here are a few Alpha engines ... all are inline 4 cylinder, dohc.
first is a JTD (diesel), 16v, 1910cc - artist unknown
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next is a TS 75 from 1985 - 16v, 2000cc - author again unknown
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next is from a 1971-76 series-105 2000 GTV - (thanks, Rod - that makes much more sense. I was stuck thinking of the 916-series GTV produced in 2000 which was a twin spark, 4-valve)
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the last is a 1290cc from the 750 series, by Schlenzig
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Hope all had a wonderful Easter...
Peter

Edited by simplebrother, 10 April 2012 - 01:30.


#11289 Repco22

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 01:05

I've been away for a while. Here are a few Alpha engines ... all are inline 4 cylinder, dohc.

next was identified as being from the 2000 GTV - however, with single spark and only two valves per cylinder that must be mistaken; if anybody recognizes it, accurate identification would be nice.
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Hope all had a wonderful Easter...
Peter

Peter, Re the 2 litre GTV; that looks right to me-------it is from the earlier '105' series GTV. Note the wide sump too. The next model, the Alfetta range, had a narrower sump but still only single spark and two valves.

#11290 simplebrother

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 01:21

A while ago we saw an opposed cylinder engine (2 pistons in the same tube, connected to crankshafts at opposing ends) - the aviation-related Junkers Juma 205 (page 177). Tonight we will look at a three other opposed cylinder engines...

First, from the automotive industry, the Commers TS3 - commonly used in Commers trucks (I guess I should say lorries because of origin) in the 50s and 60s. This one is a horizontal three cylinder with 6 pistons - 3261cc - like most of this type, it is 2 stroke diesel. The drawing is signed, but I cannot be certain of the signature - might be Berris?
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The next one is also automotive industry (sort of), the Kharkov (Leyland) L60, for a tank - vertical 6 cylinder with 12 pistons displacing 16.3 liters, but they also made a 5 cylinder / 10 piston version displacing 13.6 liters as well as 10- and 12- cylinder versions for the railroad industry. Artist is Collins.
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The last is a bit more unusual, from the marine industry, the Napier-Deltic, comprised of 3 banks of 6 cylinders arranged in a triangle, 18 cylinders, 88.2 liters. The images are not the best quality, but they give the general idea. Interestingly, since a piston fired every 20 degrees, this engine uses no flywheel. Artists of the two images are not known.
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Peter


#11291 CVA

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:28

I'd like to see a hi-res scan of this cutaway.

Attached better one resolution of the porsche 908, it is the maximum which I can make
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#11292 ibsenop

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:40

Attached better one resolution of the porsche 908, it is the maximum which I can make


:clap: Thank you. I love those "Sport Prototypes" of this Era. :clap: :clap:
From what book / magazine this cutaway come from?

#11293 D-Type

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 16:12

~
The last is a bit more unusual, from the marine industry, the Napier-Deltic, comprised of 3 banks of 6 cylinders arranged in a triangle, 18 cylinders, 88.2 liters. The images are not the best quality, but they give the general idea. Interestingly, since a piston fired every 20 degrees, this engine uses no flywheel. Artists of the two images are not known.
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Peter

Is this the same engine as in the 'Deltic' diesel locomotives?

#11294 macoran

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 17:34

Had a clean out of my lock-up in France a while back.
Came across the magazine set "La Passion Ferrari" by Editions Atlas, part of the de Agostini Group.

Some good Ferrari cutaways by a new signature, though I just cannot make it out exactly.

Roberta Mehhia or Roberta Mehkia, the magazine colofon makes no mention of him / her ?

Suffice to say this cutaway artist is no hobbyist, quality of detail and proportioning is of the
Betti and Franco Rosso level, in some cases maybe even better !

Bear with me while I unstaple a couple of the mags and scan / splice some.


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#11295 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:45

I am going to do another aircraft marathon for you ... having just found two more cartons of Aeroplane and Air International magazines. I just pulled maybe 15% of the carton of Aeroplane (with a few miscellaneous), and these represent the ones that I could get done in a single piece. The two and three part illustrations are going to take a bit longer, as you can imagine.
We start out with the Armstrong-Whitworth Whitley, as illustrated by James H. Clark. Rather simplistic, but typical of the pieces out of the 40s, it seems. This was more recently published in the May, 2012 edition of Aeroplane.
Tom West

ArmstrongWhitworthWhitley-Clark,JamesH-Aeroplane201205
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#11296 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:48

Our second illustration is the Bristol Beaufort Mk1, first flown in 1938. This was the major bomber type that was available to the RAF during World War II. This Mike Badrocke illustration was from the May, 2007 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


BristolBeaufortMk1-1938-Badrocke-Aeroplane200705
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#11297 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:51

Next up is the Handley-Page Halifax B Mk. II heavy bomber. This version first flew and was illustrated in 1942. The James H. Clark illustration of the plane is from that time, and was re-released in the May, 2003 edition of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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#11298 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:53

The Hawker Typhoon Mk. 1B is our next subject. First illustrated by James H. Clark in 1944, it was reprinted in the June, 2004 edition of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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#11299 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:56

And now for something completely different ... the French were doing some interesting experimentation going into the early years of the jet age, and had some of the stranger approaches to the concept. This one was an unusual RamJet design from Claude Leduc. This illustration of the Leduc 021 from 1953 is unsigned, but was reprinted in the July, 2004 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


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#11300 TWest

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 20:59

I always liked this design, as it was among the more interesting approaches of World War II. Max Millar illustrated the last production version of the Lockheed P-38L Lightning in 1944, and it was reprinted in the October, 2004 issue of Aeroplane.
Tom West


LockheedP38LLightning-1944-Millar,Max-Aeroplane200410
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